THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JULY 2, 1885.

CHESS, IS IT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Well, Mr. COURIER, I want to say a few words. You say that chess never is found in rye or other grains than wheat. I know that it has grown in rye, and that it was caused by the rye having been fed off extensively by sheep on one side of a field. The sheep got in often and that side was nearly all chess, whereas no chess appeared on the other side. There was only about an acre in the field. This was on new land first crop. I don't know how wheat originated, but I know how chess does, and that it will produce its kind from year to year for I have tested it sown separate from wheat or other grain.

A. H. HYDE.

Mr. Hyde is mistaken about what THE COURIER said. It did not intimate that chess does not grow and reproduce from its own seed, and did not claim that it never grows except in wheat fields. We believe it will grow wherever its seed is put in the ground under favorable circumstances, whether among wheat, rye, oats, grass, or potatoes. What we did mean to intimate was that it is found almost universally among winter wheat and often in large quantities such as would preclude the idea that it all sprang from the few seeds of chess which were sown with the wheat, and that it is not found in such quantities among other cereals. We well know that cases similar to that described by Mr. Hyde have often occurred in wheat fields but did not know that it occurred in rye fields. The fact is, we have never studied chess in relation to rye and therefore it is likely that such facts may be known to others while they have escaped our notice.

We do not see that this case weakens our position that chess is an ancestor of wheat. It only infers that chess is the ancestor of rye also. Rye belongs to the same family or sub-tribe with wheat and barley, the sub-tribe hordeineae, and is more like wheat than anything else, so it is altogether likely that rye and wheat are variations from a common origin. If that common ancestor is chess and if wheat and rye are brethren of the same family, then we would expect rye to revert to chess under circumstances unfavorable to rye and favorable to chess.

What we have to ask is: How can you explain the case stated by Mr. Hyde and the thousands of similar cases in a wheat field, by any other theory. The explanations that sufficient chess was sown with the rye to make all that crop; that the chess seed was lying dominant in the unbroken prairie sod; and that the seed was carried there by the sheep, are all decidedly "too thin to wash."

OFFENSIVE PARTISANSHIP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

We suppose that the suspension of the Republican postmaster of Leavenworth and the appointment of Frank T. Lynch, a young and active Democrat, in his place is one of the best changes that the present administration has made, but one of the two reasons given for making this change is not sound, viz.: that the incumbent was an offensive partisan. The other that he did not run the office in a satisfactory manner. The charge that he has been an offensive partisan is, we are credibly informed, wholly untrue, for he has never spent a dollar or an hour in assisting in a Republican canvass or in electing a Republican ticket, but he has been one of those stoughton bottle Republicans who sit up on a shelf to see others do the work and spend their money while he does nothing to offend a Democrat or anybody else, makes no enemies, cultivated popularity, and rakes in the spoils won by the "offensive partisan." A man so useless to a party is likely to have little interest and energy in the performance of his public duties and it is highly probable that such a man would not run the Leavenworth postoffice satisfactorily, so we suppose the charge to that effect was true and that he ought to have been bounced. Of course a partisan may spend so much of his time, energies, and means in work for his party that he will neglect his business and his official duties. Such a one is not a good officer, but he is incomparably better than the stoughton bottle who is too lazy and stingy to be useful in anything. The man who has ambition, energy, and public spirit enough to make a good postmaster will take a great deal of interest in public affairs and spend time, labor, and money in behalf of the party and principles in which he believes in. One who does not do this is not at all likely to make a good officer and does not deserve the public recognition of an office of trust and profit. If to have done what one could honorably do for the success of ones political party constitutes an offensive partisan, we hope we are considered an offensive partisan, and if our successor is not such an offensive partisan, he will probably be totally unfit to be postmaster.

SOME REMARKS OF GEN. SHERIDAN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

It is sad to think of General Grant dying under such physical torture as is inflicted by his terrible disease, and under such mental anguish as I know he experiences in consequence of the unfortunate business failure that overwhelmed him and his family. I could never comprehend why the old man (all old soldiers call General Grant the old man) went into business, and particularly why he set himself up in Wall street. From the time he entertained this business notion, I have always thought General Grant was off his base and had lost that abundance of caution that has characterized his movements. I have listened to him talk about making money, in perfect amazement. He waged that he had talent for making money, and that his sons possessed this talent to a remarkable degree. He seemed never to tire of talking about this when we were so situated as to be free from interruption, and when we could talk with freedom of by-gone days. Now I knew very well that General Grant did not possess the talent and genius for making money; his nature was too confiding and generous for that. His talent in connection with money was in an opposite direction, and caused him to get clear of money in a very short time. He could never keep money before he set up in Wall street, and you know he is a very bright fellow who can keep money after he gets there. What most surprised me, however, was that the old man should talk so much about this newly discovered talent. He talked persistently (and Grant always talked well when he felt free to talk) about accumulating a large fortune, and I noticed his earnestness of manner and sometimes thought that I underrated him in this particular. Still I could not entirely divest myself of the apprehension I felt on his account, and his very persistency and earnestness added to my fears. Why, I never knew Grant to talk about the great abilities which he did possess, and which the world has recognized. No one ever heard him talk about his great military talent or boast about his splendid achievements in the field, and yet Grant knew not of his extraordinary abilities in this direction before his successful movements and brilliant decisive results that attended them showed him. Indeed, General Grant had greater talent for conducting campaigns and fighting armies than he was really aware of. Nobody, however, ever heard him talk about what he possessed in this direction; and the simple fact that he disserted to me with so much earnestness and frequency on his supposed money making talents brought about a suspicion in my mind that his previously strong mental forces were breaking up, and that he was rapidly passing away from his previously well established line of prudence and safety.

You have seen the statement that the old man laid plans to secure the nomination for the Presidency in 1886. There is no foundation for such a statement, and I know whereof I speak. I know what his feelings and his desires were at that time touching his future. He wanted, above all things, to remain with the army, which he loved and whose idol he was and is still, and had no ambition whatever to become President. He doubted his ability to discharge the duties of President, but above all he had no taste or inclinations for political office.

TO THE OLD HOUSE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

[Lines addressed to the "old house" on the farm of Mr. Allen C. Davis, Tisdale.]

For half a score of years and more

We entered at your well worn door,

Beneath your roof our home has been,

Your four rough walls have shut us in.

You sheltered us from summer's storm,

Through winter's cold you kept us warm.

Many a happy day we passed,

Securely sheltered from the blast.

In sickness and in health, our home

Has been beneath your humble dome.



As pioneer we builded you,

And many trials have passed through.

Yet oftentimes, in sport and mirth,

We gathered 'round your homely hearth.

Our neighbors, too, have gathered here

To share with us our frugal cheer.



The houses then were far between,

Few dwellings here were to be seen.

'Tis true, those days were filled with labor.

But then a neighbor was a neighbor,

Each stood by each through weal or woe,

Response to duty was not slow.



But now in these dogen'rate days,

Men chiefly do that which pays.

Intent on getting rich so fast,

That friendly intercourse has passed

Into a much neglected custom,

And new friends now, we cannot trust 'em.

But you, old house, have stood the test,

Of all our friends, you've been the best.



We've built another house near by,

Compared with you, it's broad and high.

It's comfortable in every way,

We prize it more each passing day,

But for all that, we'll not forget

The plain old house, where first we met

To make a home in this far west.

We still love you, old house, the best.



And now, through fair and stormy weather,

We are growing old, together.

We know that soon the time will come

To leave this world for that far home.

Our journey here will soon be through,

We'll leave the old house for the new.

Our house will be in other hands,

In "a house not made with hands."

Whatever fate may have in store,

For us upon the other shore,

We'll not forget, where'er we roam,

Our dear old house, our early home.

BYRON WILSON GRIFFIN.

Chicago, June, 1885

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds yesterday.

Henry Denning et ux to Ann Denning, w hf of se qr 16-33-5e: $2,000

H W Ide to S H and A H Jennings, lot one blk 108, Winfield: $8,000

Mary Frost to Thomas S Smith, sw qr sw qr sec 20 and se qr se qr 30-33-6e: $600

Mattie De Turk to J L H Darnell, sw qr nw qr 34-33-s-5e: $225

Thomas J Harris et ux to David N Wolf, pt se qr 15-33-1e: quit claim: $1.00

Wm A Van Omer et ux to L E Gray, lot 18 blk 3 Dexter: $600

Samuel H Wells to John H Serviss, lots 1 and 2 blk 6 Dexter: $65

Henry C. McDorman et ux to John H Serviss lot 12 blk 4 Dexter: $40

J C. McMullen et ux to The West Side Town Company, nw qr and n hf sw w of W. R. and s hf ne qr w W. R. and all w W. R. in n hf se qr 20-33-4e: $12,000

R E Wallis et ux to J A Wood and H H Owen 39 ½ in sw qr se qr 32-32-4e: $1,200

James F Saunders et ux to B W Trout s hf ne qr and e hf se qr 35-33-5e: $400

R B Niblich et ux to J H Serviss ½ acre in ne cor 26-33-6e: $5.00

Benj S White to J H Park, lots 3 and 4 blk 52, A C: $200

C M Scott et ux to B W Matlack, lots 5 and 6 blk 122, A C, quit claim: $1.00

Sue S Johnson and husband to E J Sherlock, lot 12 and e hf lot 11 blk 230, Fuller's ad to Winfield: $525

Highland Park Town Co to T R Bryan, lots 3 and 12 blk 6 H P ad to Winfield: $650

Cambridge Town Co to J B Lukens, lot 11 blk 14, Cambridge: $5.00

Cambridge Town Co to J B Lukens, lot 10 blk 4, Cambridge: $8.00

S B Sherman et al to J B Lukens, lot 12 blk 14, Cambridge: $12.00

Cambridge Town Co to J B Lukens, lot 7 blk 2, Cambridge: $25.00

Cyrus A Walker et ux to J H Serviss, lots 5, 6, 7, and 8, block 4, Dexter: $600

Emily H Painter and husband to Barbara Hackworth, 1-7 of w hf of ne qr 31-31-3e: quit claim: $50.00

Geo W Bowen et al to Barbara L Hackworth, 1-7 of w hf ne qr 31-31-3e, quit claim: $50.00

S R Price et ux to John M Clover, lots 7 and 8, blk 14, Burden: $550

A B Taylor to William H Cline, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 18, H P addition to Winfield: $500

Mary J Swarts et al to S D Martin, lots 49, 50, and 51, blk 103, Ark City: $30.00

Valena L. Irwin to Eli Read, lot 12, blk 4, New Salem: $3.00

T E Gifford et ux to Arnold Conklin, lots 4, 8, 9 and 10, blk 9, Moffet's ad. to Udall: $300

T E Gifford et ux to John A Conklin, lots 5, 6, and 7, blk 9, Moffet's ad. to Udall: $350

Thomas F Lee to William A Lee, lots 16, 17, and 18, blk 109, Winfield, and 42 feet off lots 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 & 20, Arkansas City: $4,992

Mary J Porter and husband to Barbara L Hackworth, 1-7 of w hf ne qr 31-31-3e, quit claim: $50

Ira L Kellogg et al to B L Hackworth, 1-7 of w hf ne qr 31-31-3e, quit claim: $50

J T Hackworth et ux to B L Hackworth, 1-7 w hf ne qr 31-31-3e, quit claim: $50

J P Short et ux to John A Eaton, 75 feet off w end of lot 12 blk 128, Winfield: $7,500

Elizabeth Tidd to Mary R Bell, s hf of se qr and nw qr of se qr and se qr of sw qr 17-30-s-5-e, 40 acres: $50

William H Day et ux to Atlanta Town Co. sw qr of sec 15 and e hf of se qr 16-30-6-e, 240 acres: $3,000

John W Strother et ux to David Martin et ux e hf sw qr 15-30-s-6-e, 80 acres: $500

J V Pierce et ux to Henry Meyer e hf of nw qr and ne qr of sw qr (ex 5 a) 30-30-s-6e: $1,000

Mary F Davis and husband to Chas F Bahntge, se qr 22-32-s-4e, 160 acres: $11,500

Chas F Bahntge to The College Hill Town Company, se qr 22-32-s-4-e: $22,400

Emma Watts and husband to Lillian M Johnson, lots 1, 2, and 17, block 4, Cambridge: $600

Mc D Stapleton et ux to Elisha H Long, 41 lots in Cambridge: $2,000

Martin L Kerns et ux to Marvin Allen, pt of 5-31-s-3e, 10 acres: $300

W M Malin et ux to H F Friend & N E Osburn, lots 2 and 3, blk 116; lots 15 and 16 blk 123; lot 12 blk 125; lot 3 blk 126, Arkansas City: $200

A J Thompson et ux to Mattie E Rodocker, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 286, Thompson's 3d ad to Winfield: $150

Dennis Harkins et ux to Calvin S Aker, lots 7 and 8 blk 27, Ark City: $100

Frances M Howey et ux to Nancy Jane Thompson, lots 21 and 22 blk 7, Arkansas City: $200

McDonald Stapleton et ux to Emma Watts, lot 17 blk 4, Cambridge: $20

John Hillier et ux to William McPherson, se qr of ne qr 25-31-d-7e and lots 8 and 9, 30-31-s-8e, 153 acres: $1,700

E A Henthorn et ux to E M Ford & F A Westover, lots 20, 21, and 22, 31-30-s-8e: $250

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

That the wheat crop will be somewhat short this year, no one who is at all posted will for a moment deny but that there will be an abundance for home demand will not be questioned. Many fields that were looked upon a few weeks ago as a failure are now found to be turning out from ten to twenty bushels per acre. The important question for farmers to settle now is how to realize the most money out of the crop. Dealers and manipulators of grain will endeavor to convince the farmers that wheat will not be worth more than sixty or seventy-five cents per bushel, but believe that every bushel harvested this year will bring $1.00. In order to secure this farmers must not be in too great haste to dispose of their grain. Hold on to it, and you will finally get a fair living price for your labor. Wellingtonian.

THE LUNATIC CAPTURED SURE.

He Follows The Walnut to Douglass and is Raked In. Now Locked Up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The gentle-hearted men, women, and maidens of this city can now rest their weary frames. The days and hours of eager watching for the lunatic to stalk into their doors and eat them up are at an end. The lines can now be slackened on the poor, hen-pecked husbands who haven't been allowed outside the family domicile after dark for two long weeks--kept there to protect the women from that devilish lunatic. The poor men can now go to the lodge or stay up town till twelve o'clock, working the lemonade and ice cream dens. The wild and wooly, armed-to-the-teeth lunatic has been captured--yes, absolutely captured. But he wasn't captured here; oh, no! He had to leave this town to get taken in. He stayed around here two weeks to give us a chance, but we treated him as coldly as though he wasn't worthy of the least respect. Even the ladies didn't call on him. We don't blame him for feeling insulted and shaking the dust of our city from his brogans. Mr. W. W. Smith was down from Douglass Saturday, and says this perambulating armory was captured at Douglass Friday morning. He was taken in by several men--who didn't know him--in a field near the timber at that place. He made bold resistance--with his legs, but they ran him down. He seemed as weak as a kitten and as "crazy as a bed bug" from continual exposure and starvation. After the captors disarmed him, took him to town, and found out what an awful character they had taken in, all swooned away and are still very low--not able to venture out. Mr. Smith had read in THE COURIER with much interest all about this wild man and identified him as soon as he got his eyes on him. He told the captors that they had arrested an awful character. Then they could hardly find anybody to assist in looking the lunatic up, and the whole town is under lock and key, fearing that the poor fellow will get loose. If that wild man would just introduce himself to people, or take somebody along to do it for him, he could create bigger consternation than a whole band of Apaches. He could sweep this whole country with one fell swoop. It is with a mighty loud, long sigh of relief that THE COURIER reporter notes this capture--for the women's sake.

THURSDAY NIGHT'S SOCIAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

It used to be said that about the driest and most unsocial gatherings one could attend was a church social. It isn't so, by any means, of church socials now-a-days, at least not those given in Winfield. There is a generous rivalry between our church organizations as to which can give the pleasantest entertainments--preserving that high plane of moral excellence that all exhibitions in the name of a church should have. Of course the double purpose of these meetings is to secure funds for contingent church expenses and to give those in attendance a pleasurable evening. In addition to this they afford an opportunity for the ministers and flocks to meet and converse with members of their churches on other than strictly church topics, and also to extend their acquaintance among those who, while not always "believers," are often "supporters" of churches. It is at these gatherings that the real genuine minister of the gospel sows the seeds of charity, courtesy, and kindred virtues from which a hopeful harvest may afterward be reached. The world dislikes the pinch-faced, over-particular and ever sanctimonious person about as much as the truly good hate the sniveling hypocrite. And it goes without saying that the most popular minister and the most influential one for good is he who can occasionally lay aside the "robes of priestly office" and mingle among his neighbors much like other men. Not that he should forget his calling, and engage in amusements the nature of which brings him into dispute among his followers, but he may, with perfect propriety, take a hand in any one of the half a hundred pastimes which please the young folks and entertain "children of larger growth." THE COURIER notes with pleasure that Winfield pastors belong to that school which refuses to crucify the body because it enjoys a hearty laugh, or condemns the soul to everlasting perdition because it finds convivial spirits while on earth. But we have wandered somewhat from our text--the Methodist social. It was one of the most enjoyable. Men and matrons, belles and beaux, girls and boys, were all there in full force, with their winsome smiles and pretty array. Of course, the main attraction, aside from the congeniality of those present, were the ice cream, raspberries, etc. There were six tables presided over by Mrs. C. D. Austin and Mrs. Dr. Pickens; Mrs. W. R. McDonald and Misses Maggie Bedilion and Nina Conrad; Mrs. W. H. Thompson and Mrs. J. W. Prather; Mrs. A. H. Green and Misses Anna Green and Hattie Andrews; Mrs. G. L. Rinker and Mrs. James Cooper; Mrs. S. G. Gary, Mrs. N. R. Wilson, and Miss Hattie Glotfelter, and a very busy and attentive bevy they were. The cream ran out long before the crowd was supplied--though they started in with twenty gallons or more. The Methodist orchestra, Messrs. Crippen, Shaw, Bates, Roberts, and Newton, with Miss Kelly at the organ, furnished beautiful music during the evening. It was a most enjoyable entertainment throughout. The seats having been removed, awaiting the placing of the new ones, the church made an excellent place for such an entertainment.

BORDERS AND CLIPPERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Arkansas City's base ball club has at last edged to the front, by a squeeze. The game between the Border club, of A. C., and the Clippers, of Burden, resulted in a score of sixteen to fifteen in favor of the Borders. It was a very fine game, and drew a large crowd of admiring spectators. Some brilliant playing was done on both sides. The boys showed grit and practice. The game was for the championship of the county. It is not very good grace in the Borders trying to walk off with this championship on the first game won this season. It will now be in order for the Borders to defeat our Cyclones, now, as reorganized, the best club in this section. Then it can tuck the county championship in its vest pocket and look for other fields to conquer. Both these clubs are composed of a very gentlemanly lot of fellows, and their visit to our city was appreciated, as was beneficially attested by Ray Oliver, A. J. Dougherty, Tom J. Eaton, Byron Rudolph, M. H. Ewart, A. H. McMaster, I. Martin, and Frank L. Crampton, who went down into their pockets $11.50 worth for the banqueting of the clubs at the Central. This is commendable enterprise and drew warm appreciation from the visitors. Everything, both on the ball ground and socially, was perfectly harmonious: free from that jaw and blow usually heard in contest games. The Borders didn't play the last half of the ninth inning, it being late, and they having the game anyhow.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

An Anthony man was out fishing last week, and becoming dry, he drank some water out of a stagnant pool. Soon after arriving home, he became sick and was thrown into spasms. A doctor was sent for, and by the aid of a powerful microscope and a dark lantern, he discovered that there were several toads in the man's stomach. He immediately baited a fishing hook with red flannel, and slyly slipping it down the man's throat, caught them both. The above report came in with our "dispatches" yesterday. It is astonishing what funny things happen in Anthony. Harper Graphic.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

It is learned that the college grounds at Winfield are located on what has been known as the Dr. Davis farm, east of the city, and a very beautiful situation. It was a question with the locating committee, at first, whether to accept the twenty acres of land offered or the $10,000 in money offered in lieu of the land. The question was referred to the college trustees, but they referred the decision back to the locating committee, and they finally elected to take the land. Wichita Beacon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Independence had some fun with a darkey the other day. It appears that the colored man disturbed a religious meeting and was arrested and placed in the city jail, from which he broke out. The city marshal fired ten shots at him, frightening the people of that good place nearly to death. They all got after the negro, who was finally rearrested, after having been knocked over with a rock while in the act of jumping a fence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The article headed "Vindication" in your e. c., and presumed to be signed by me, I declare to be a fraud. I never signed any such an article or knew anything about it.

J. N. FLEHARTY.

SOUTHWARD WE GO.

Winfield Will Lock its Doors and Hie Away to Arkansas City for the Fourth.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The matter of Winfield going down to Arkansas City, in full force, to soar the Great Bird of Independence, is assuming definite proportions. Our reporter, on consultation with a number of our merchants, finds them ready and anxious to close up and go. This is the proper thing to do. The great custom and desire of people everywhere to "go somewhere" on this National Holiday is too great to be curbed. Arkansas City is a part of our grand county, has made big preparations for a glorious celebration, and is right and proper that Winfield should respond to her invitation. The Democrat says Robert T. Lincoln will deliver the oration without fail. A large excursion train will leave Wichita at 6 a.m., taking on excursionists as they go down. Several coaches will be reserved for this city. It will leave A. C. at 11 p.m. The fare will be one price for the round trip. Let the Winfield folks secure the Courier Cornet Band and go in style. Chief Fire Marshal Clark informs us that our department will go with skeleton paraphernalia and full uniform. The Juvenile Band has already been secured by A. C., and Tony Agler will exhibit his menagerie. The steamer, "Kansas Millers," will make regular trips up and down the Arkansas River, and everyone, from the small boy with toy pistol and one suspender, to the big country man with his hundreds of acres and a mortgage on his home, can all ride free. Several huge balloons will ascent--giving all a free ride to the moon. We'll be there, you bet.

THE A. R. STEAMER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Arkansas River Navigation Company expects to have its steamer at Arkansas City as an attraction on the Fourth. Speaking of this boat, on the 14th inst., the St. Louis Globe-Democrat said: "A small tow-boat, intended for the upper waters of the Arkansas River, left this port recently for her destination, Arkansas City, Kansas. The distance she will have to travel before arriving there is over 1,400 miles. The boat was built at Carondelet, by Allen & Blaisdell, is 75 feet long, 15 feet beam, and 3 feet hold. The hull is built entirely of the best boiler steel, is provided with engines of the stern wheel type, 8 inches diameter by 42 inches stroke, with boiler of fifty horsepower." She draws only twelve inches of water and is designed to go under a bridge with only twelve feet clearance. Attempts have been made heretofore to navigate the shallow waters of our upper rivers and smaller streams, but this is the first boat built, with abundant capital at hand, to develop the navigation in a proper manner."

TELEPHONE CIRCUIT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

There seems no doubt that Winfield and all towns in a radius of twenty-five to fifty miles will soon be "helloing" through the telephone. The matter is being agitated all around. The Wichita Beacon says: "E. E. Peek, traveling solicitor for the United Telephone Company, is in the city for the purpose of looking up the probabilities of establishing a telephone line between Wichita, Wellington, Winfield, South Haven, Belle Plaine, Caldwell, Arkansas City, Geuda Springs, and other places. Nothing is asked for by the company except patronage. Let the people of Wichita and the towns above named patronize this enterprise. It is exactly what is needed here."

FAILURE AT UDALL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The general merchandise form of Nathan Shriver & Co., at Udall, filed an assignment deed in the Register's office Friday. Wm. C. Miles is the Assignee. The liabilities are about sixteen hundred dollars, including Wichita firms, over $800; Bliss & Wood, of this city, $27.50; and W. F. Wilkinson, our cigar man, $21.50. The remainder is scattered among creditors in Kansas City, Atchison, and St. Joe. The Bank of Commerce, Udall, is in $106, and J. Snodgrass & Co., that city, $130. The assignment is made to secure a chattel mortgage of A. Smith for $160. The assets are not known, supposedly too small for mention.

THE D. M. & A. SURVEYORS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The surveying corps of the D., M. & A. came in Friday night. The survey comes down through Fairview township, across Timber creek near the bridge. The city survey was being made today, but will not be definitely settled as yet. The managers of this line have all in readiness to begin to throw dirt the first of July and push it with vim. The permanent survey is made as far as Udall.

FUNERAL OF JOSEPH W. PEARCE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The funeral of Joseph W. Pearce was preached at his residence, in Beaver township, Thursday afternoon by Rev. J. H. Snyder. The deceased was 50 years 11 months and 6 days of age. A large family is thus bereft of a husband and father. A very large concourse of neighbors and friends attended the occasion of the funeral. The remains were interred in the Tannehill cemetery.

REAL ESTATE IN WINFIELD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Real estate at Winfield has gone away up out of sight on account of the Methodist college. Just wait until the students arrive; then board will go down to two dollars a week and the livery stables will bust up, and town lots will be cheaper. Harper Graphic.

VISITORS 300 STRONG.

Wellington Visits the Queen City on a Picnic Excursion. An Appreciated Visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Wellington doesn't enjoy the benefits and consequent joys of a beautiful park. Our Riverside Park has become familiar to them as the prettiest one in this section. Last year she got up an excursion to our park--this year the Baptist Sunday school of that place arranged one. Its prearranged date was Wednesday, but the rains descended and it was postponed to Thursday. At ten o'clock the special train pulled into the S. K. depot, bearing three hundred Wellingtonians in picnic array. Our Baptist Sunday school and citizens with the Juvenile Band received them. But Providence had overestimated the love of Baptists for water, and the park was too wet for their reception. The Wellington folks were accompanied by Southwell's Knights Templar Band, of twelve pieces, and brightly uniformed, one of the best bands in the State. Headed by the Wellington Band and followed by our Juveniles, the picnickers were escorted to the rink. Arriving there, the bands discoursed charming music and Mr. Samuel Dalton, superintendent of our Baptist Sunday school, gave a terse and pleasant welcome address, which was responded to very happily by Mr. F. P. Neal, of the Wellington National Bank and superintendent of the visiting Sunday school. Mr. Neal said as they were not from a college town, we needn't expect much from them. Rev. Reider, of this city, and Rev. Saunders, of Wellington, also made short and appropriate remarks.

Our citizens were present in numbers--especially our Baptists, who flew around variously in entertaining the visitors. Like all picnic excursions, the crowning event was the dinner. It was spread in variety and abundance, fit to tickle the palate of a king. The Rink forms a good substitute for the park, as an alternative, plenty of room and splendid ventilation. In the afternoon, many enjoyed social intercourse with our people in the Rink. A number of the excursionists were driven over our city, taking in the various places of interest: College Hill, Riverside Park, the Fair Grounds, etc. But a regular Presbyterian sprinkle broke in on this enjoyment. It was very fortunate that the Wellington folks couldn't occupy the Park. To walk around under its branching elms, enjoy its sweet odors, warbling songsters, beautiful blue grass, and fine boating course would have been a charm to remember. A similar excursion from our city last year was compelled, by the dampness, to picnic at Manning's Opera House and forego the main charm of the occasion: the park. The next time they come, we will try and order good weather in advance. Fine patters of weather at this season go with surprising alacrity, and about the only way to secure a pattern is to get into the good graces of the clerk beforehand. Our people enjoyed greatly this visit of our neighbors. They were fine looking, intelligent people, of admirable social qualities, and we hope to have many such visits. The excursion train started for home at five o'clock.

The next item is most puzzling! Especially the title, which is not mentioned in any way, shape, or form in the accompanying article...MAW

HANAN AND SAIRS.

[Note: Under the above heading, the following article was written. I have no idea what the COURIER was trying to convey. It appears that the article concerned two individuals by the name of "Hanan" and "Sairs." MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Nothing so stirs the blood of the average citizen as a first-class business from the shoulder dog light, and nothing so brightens the anticipations of an ambitious reporter. A saucy "I'm the biggest dog in town" bull purp met a meek looking shepherd "dorg" between THE COURIER den and the postoffice Wednesday. The shepherd said good evening, tipped his hat, and tried to walk by, but the saucy purp impeded his way and seemed inclined to step on the neck of the tame-eyed shepherd. Like many gentle looking men, however, the s. d. didn't propose to succumb to bigotry and gall, if the b. p. was twice as big as he. He grabbed the b. p. by the back of the neck, and, without any foolish delay, scratched him, tore him, and beat him, amid the plaudits of a sympathizing audience. That b. p., when the outraged and basely insulted s. d. was pulled off, limped away with the determination to treat fellow beings with due respect, giving legitimate room in any of the walks of life. There is a human moral in this dog fight.

NOT MUCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. W. Henthorn, of the Burden Eagle, writes: "We think we have your 'bad' man corralled. He answers the description of your lunatic. He will be detained until Sunday morning. Trust you will have no more trouble from this source." Very wise scheme, Brother Henthorn, to palm off one of your lunatics on us. Oh, no! You can keep him. Our lunatic became disgusted and left. We were too sensible for him. Our women have sworn vengeance on lunatics and are determined to get up a posse and fire bodily the next one that comes along before the asylum is done. Keep him there. He wouldn't feel so much at home here, besides we haven't room for him.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Equestrianism seems to have led captive the fancy of many of the young and middle aged ladies of this city, and every evening more or less ladies may be seen mounted upon handsome horses enjoying the pure air and invigorating exercise of a gallop about the city. Besides being a graceful accomplishment, it is one of the most healthful exercises that can be indulged in and beats roller skating and croquet playing all to pieces. THE COURIER is glad to note this fact, and hopes that it may be more generally indulged in. It is one of the best preventives of doctor bills in the world, and you seldom hear a lady given to this habit complain of sick-headaches and kindred ailments.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

As our reporter was pounding along over North Main early Thursday, he encountered a lady from the country who was endeavoring to ascertain what engaged butter was worth. This is the last sad blow to the scribe's intellect. The lunatic is nowhere to engage butter. We have heard of and tasted bald-headed butter, aged butter, sweet sixteen butter, salt butter, dirty butter, pale-faced butter, and oleomargarine, but we must confess we know not what engaged butter is, and we long to fathom its virtues.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

"By the bye," says Geo. A. Broadbere, editor of the Tonganoxie (Kas.) Mirror, "you can say that the bottle of Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diarrhea Remedy left me by your agent two years ago, proved to be the best remedy I have ever used. I have no doubt but it saved my oldest son's life." The above shows conclusively that there is nothing like having the great life preserver at hand at the right time. It is put up in 15 cent, 50 cent, and one dollar bottles. Sold by Brown & Son.

[There were others ads like the above one that I did not type up. MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Wellington Daily Press now comes to us in enlarged size--a six column folio, beautifully printed, and as pretty and smiling as a maiden of sweet sixteen. Such a paper, with the dispatches and all the home news, such an one as THE DAILY COURIER, means unremitting labor and large expense, but Brother Stotler has been there before and knows how it is. We wish him all the success and happiness attainable in his increased corpulency.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Last Tuesday the articles of incorporation of the Latham Town Company were filed with Secretary of State. Latham is a new railroad town in Union township, Butler County, and is about fourteen miles southwest of Beaumont and on the K. C. & S. W. railroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The charter of the Atlanta Town Company of Omnia township in this county was filed with the Secretary of State last Tuesday.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of The Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

O. M. Roberts, Udall, was down Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

W. N. Wilkerson, Douglass, was again in the Ell city Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

F. M. Freeland took in the antiquated village of Oxford Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Wm. Becker and George Bacastow were up from Creswell Friday, guests of the Central.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hodges and family got off Saturday for a permanent residence at Ponca.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

W. E. Standley, of Arkansas City, was up Wednesday attending a meeting of the commandery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Senator Hackney is in Reno County looking into the Frankie Morris insurance and murder case.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. F. Baldwin, traveling agent for the new evening daily in Kansas City--The News--was in town Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Rev. W. H. Cline, Wellington's M. E. minister, with his wife, was among the excursionists Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. N. Young, President of the K. C. & S. W., and Ed P. Greer left for Topeka and other places Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

O. M. Nulty and Doc. Blakslee, Cherryvale, were over today on business with J. N. Young, of the C. K. & S. Sw.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Landlord Crampton was all smiles today as the perspiration oozed from his brow. He fed one hundred and sixty-three today for dinner.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Dr. Snediker, of Emporia, arrived today. He brings numerous testimonials and abundant references. Those suffering should consult him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. Charles Patterson left Friday to join her husband in Minneapolis, for a permanent abode there. She stops in Chicago for a short visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Dr. Hornaday from Rock, in company with Dr. Walls, of Indianapolis, Indiana, called upon the COURIER Thursday. The Doctor is visiting at Rock.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

We have a communication from Mr. H. A. Johnson which we will give consideration if the gentleman will show up at this office for identification.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Brettun filed the alimentary canals of about three hundred individuals, and landlords Harter & Hill nearly ran their coats off doing the guestorial honors.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The corpulent frame of Jake Musgrove, of Geuda Springs, was seen perambulating our streets Thursday. Jake is one of Geuda's most prominent stock speculators.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Ralph N. Folks, city editor of the Daily Press, was among the Wellington picnickers. He is a member of Southwell's band and a very pleasant young gentleman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Charley Phenix is home from a three months jaunt in California, most of which was spent in San Francisco. He gives some very interesting descriptions of that wonderful city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. W. C. Root has been in the city for several days and is warmly welcomed by his many friends. He is now a resident of McPherson and is in the stock business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. Souer, construction train master of the Southern Kansas, is here to put in additional side track, grade, and otherwise improve the S. K. yards and depot. He will be here two weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Charles D. Linn, son of S. S. Linn, broke a small bone in his foot Thursday. He was fixing the binding attachment for his reaper when it fell, striking his foot and cutting his shoulder.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

H. P. Standley and J. L. Huey were up from Arkansas City Thursday, H. P. remaining to attend the special conclave of Knights Templar last night, when the Temple degree was conferred on Capt. Nipp.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Curns & Manser's real estate office now sports a handsome canvas awning. It would be a brilliant idea to have nothing else on Main street. They are convenient and give the street a fine appearance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

D. Knox brought into our office this afternoon a stick of pitch pine two feet long and very heavy. Mr. Knox cut it off the top of the Alleghany mountains in 1872. It is quite a curiosity to a home bred Kansan.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

E. P. Wadhams, Register of Deeds of Coffey County, was in the city Friday. He visited Cowley on business with Mr. Darnell, of Liberty township. This was his first visit to Winfield and he was highly delighted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Tisdale will fly the Great Bird of Liberty in grand shape on the Fourth. Rev. B. Kelly, Senator Long, and other speakers from here will be present. The celebration will occur in Gay's grove, a very acceptable place.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Tom J. Rude, J. P. Newman, D. C. Brooks, W. J. Frazier, W. E. Harlow, G. M. Cisna, H. F. Broft, J. H. Frazier, J. W. Graham, and Levi Quier were among the "visiting statesmen" who were witnesses of the base ball contest Thursday from Burden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Holmes & Son have got fairly opened in their new grocery. The store room is new and their goods all fresh and first-class. We predict a big trade for this firm, for they know how to please their customers and will do it. See their card in this issue.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Wellington, having lost in the contest for the Methodist college, consoles herself with the fact that she has one of the fastest horses on record, as demonstrated at the recent Wichita races. Well, this kind of stock suits some people better than a Methodist college.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

James Hall, for some time past connected with the Spotswood grocery, left Sunday evening to take charge of Jarvis, Conklin & Co.'s loan office at Howard. All will regret to see him leave, but wish him success. He will not move his family for some time.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Joe Miller informs us that last week the cowboys made a raid on Hunnewell, and finding the City Marshal drunk, rounded him up in jail, declaring they would have peace. The marshal begged to be let out, but they kept him in all night. There was no blood shed and everything was quiet after caging the marshal. It might be a good thing to jail the marshal every time if it has this effect.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Henry Tincher is back from his western trip. He went with his horse and buggy, through western Kansas into Colorado, down into the Panhandle and back via No Man's Land to Winfield. He has enough of the wild and wooly west and will stay here. Mr. Tincher brought back as a souvenir of his trip a pair of buffalo horns that he secured within a half mile of the southwest corner of the State in old Kansas County.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. R. Scott, the painter, who was so ready to swear that he obtained intoxicants and got drunk in Farnsworth's lunch room, and then on the witness stand swore that he drank sweet cider and got "sick," got a good deal sicker yesterday. He was hauled up, as soon as the Farnsworth case was over, before Judge Turner and plead guilty to a "plain drunk" and got $12.25. Then Sheriff McIntire gobbled him and in Justice Snow's court Scott's pocket was relieved of $23.50. It costs something now-a-days to go off on a little booze. A double dose, one in municipal court and one in the State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Grenola Hornet remarks: "Winfield is truly becoming great. Last winter the legislature gave her the asylum for the feeble minded, last week the committee selected for that purpose voted to locate the Methodist college there; now she comes to the front with a genuine case of elopement, and the people, as well as the newspapers, are yelling at their rival towns, 'How do you like us now?'"

You bet you! We take no back seat for any metropolis this side of London, Abe. We are a full fledged city, with every adjunct--standing on the pinnacle of fame and prosperity, with our finger on our nose slyly winking at those who would feign to rival us.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Geo. W. Miller is highly pleased with the big cattle trade consummated yesterday. Old Guthrie bossed the cattle through. Mr. Miller says he is the best man he ever had for this business. Mr. Kokernut, the man whom Mr. Miller bought the cattle, returned yesterday to Gonzales, Texas. Mr. Miller speaks highly of Mr. Kokernut as a gentleman and a businessman. The cattle were in a No. 1 condition and never had a bunch delivered in a better condition. They were two months on the drive to Hunnewell. The cattle were three year olds and a fine bunch. Mr. Miller shipped 500 to Chicago and will ship the balance at once.

ENTIRELY TOO PRECIOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The lunatics have evidently been informed that our imbecile asylum is nearing completion and are rounding up here to reserve rooms. We will state right here that it won't be done for several months, and those desirous of entering its portals will please keep "scarce." A lunatic was run in by Marshal McFadden last night. He is the same ragged end of humanity who was picked up here a few weeks ago, near Manny's brewery, and turned loose because he was found outside of the city limits and therefore beyond the jurisdiction of the dude ordinance. The armed-to-the-teeth lunatic is still at large. The ladies are organizing a posse and will likely make a speedy capture. But the individual raked in last night was the hardest looking piece of humanity that eyes ever beheld. His clothes were worse than the little end of nothing. His frame had endured absolute drouth for many moons, and it carried several quarter sections of real estate--regular black loam. Before putting him in the jail, the water works, three or four men with brushes and eighteen bars of electric soap were turned loose on him for several hours. Then he was clothed new, his hair combed, and several inches cut from each of his finger and toe nails. The transformation was wonderful: making him a regular dude. A gentleman from near Oxford, who used to work in the Topeka Insane Asylum, says this fellow is an escaped inmate. He had seen him there often. The fellow is a perfect imbecile--don't know whether he's afoot or horseback, can't tell his name or where he came from. He looks as harmless as a kitten. The asylum officials will be notified to come and get him. He was an aimless wanderer, eating any rubbish he could catch. He has no resemblance to the description sent out for Felkner, the wild and wooly lunatic.

ANOTHER TRAGEDY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The report of a pistol, a howl, a child's scream, then all was quiet, and a tragedy had been enacted in broad daylight, on South Loomis street. Men, women, and children in the immediate neighborhood soon gathered and gazed with awe on the weltering victim where he had fallen. Women, eager and curious to have a "peep," worked their way through the crowd, said "ugh!" and passed out. As the corpse was being hurriedly removed from sight, a small boy shouted, "there he goes!" as a resolute man tried to edge calmly away. At once he was the cynosure of all eyes. "He killed him!" cried the small boy again, and the murderer was collared by strong arms. "Your name!" sternly interrogated one of the capturers, as THE COURIER reporter grabbed his tablet and faber to take the man's pedigree. "He--he was a dangerous character, gentlemen--sure to hurt somebody, so I took the law into my hands and killed him! Said the murderer, with tremulous voice. "It is well," replied those in charge. "You are free." The crowd looked satisfied, the man smiled, and the small boys said, "He's a daisy!" Marshal McFadden was the assassin. Mr. Frazee is minus a dog. The animal took a fit, everybody thought he had the hydrophobia, and the marshal was sent for. He was wallowing in the yard in slimy froth and was immediately dispatched to dog heaven. And the world still wags. The mad dog season is upon us and it will be well to dispatch, just like this, every cur that has signs of phobia.

SIX MONTHS OUT OF JAIL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A curious wager was lately paid in Las Vegas, New Mexico. Mr. J. S. Lynch, a wealthy and liberal stockman, in order to save a young man who was going straight to Sheol by the whiskey route, wagered him $1,000 that he could not abstain from drink totally for six months. The young man's pride was aroused; he took the wager, and won it; and Mr. Lynch paid over the money at the end of the time. Such practical temperance men as Mr. Lunch are not numerous--even in Prohibition Kansas. The young man was the editor of the Las Vegas Optic, and of unusually bright intellect. On receipt of the wager, he wrote what he terms a thousand dollar article, "Six months out of Hell." He tells of thrilling Bacchanalian experiences. Here is one: "The room in which we write may be solitary now. It was not in our drinking days. Then it was convivial enough. Bummer was never many hours away from us. Sucker spent the evenings when he knew we were 'at home,' and swore eternal friendship. Leech protested that our wit, like our wine, was such as to 'drive dull care away.' Sponge called us 'old boy' in such a hearty manner as he asked us to drink and left us to pay for it--and now where are they? As we have heard the piano forte in Las Vegas ask, 'O where are the friends of my youth?' Hath Damon forsaken us? Hath Pythias proven false? Or are we less attractive than we were?"

Reader, he has "been there," you say. None other can know.

NOT GUILTY, SIR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Robert Farnsworth, who was arrested the other day for selling intoxicants in his Ninth Avenue lunch room, had his trial in Police Court Thursday and was found innocent. A dozen or more witnesses swore that he kept nothing but sweet cider--that wouldn't intoxicate a chicken. The man who told Marshal McFadden that he would swear to having got stuff there that made him drunk testified that he drank sweet cider there and it made him sick. The facts of the case are that this fellow had been drinking alcohol, used in his vocation, put sweet cider on top of it, and the mixture upset him. All who know Bob discredited this charge from the start. He has always shown himself to be an honest, enterprising man--always acting on the square. He has taken an active part, too, in every public enterprise that has been advanced.

SOMETHING ROTTEN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A. W. Patterson got on a "high" at Arkansas City the other day, stamped the inwards out of an innocent and valuable bird dog, sent a bullet through A. A. Newman's plate front, and terrorized the whole town. He was hauled up before a petty magistrate the next day and fined two dollars and costs--about twelve dollars. The Democrat gives vent to its disgust. "If a country lad comes to town and gets a little too much bug juice in him, he is jerked up and fined from six to ten dollars, and placed in the cooler if he does not pay it. But let one of our city bums get drunk and raise 'a little h l' on the streets and he generally has to pay from $1.00 to $2.00. There is indeed something rotten in the management of the affairs of the city."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

To judge by the sparkling Daily Graphic, one would think Harper was a metropolis, but the following is a dead give away. The town must be a regular cow pasture, in which "whispering lovers" occasionally meander around among the gentle kine. "A young man and his best girl were taking a near cut across the court house yard last night, looking attentively at a beautiful spot in the heavens that attracted their attention, when they fell over a cow, and before they got clear over, the cow rose up, causing them to turn a complete somersault. The cow and the girl were mad, but the fellow did not say a word, he was so full of emotion."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Tuesday evening was the occasion of a most happy surprise party at Robert Craig's, in South Winfield. James Craig and Bertha Pickett were married the evening before. No one knew it but Judge Gans, but like all such things it leaked out, so the Judge and his wife and about forty of Winfield's best people gave the newly made couple a rousing supper. The table "groaned under its load of luxuries." The presents were numerous and useful. After a splendid speech from the Judge, all went home happy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Some gentleman brought in a live centipede this morning, captured ten miles southeast. It is six inches long and has thirty-eight legs. A kitten was playing with it in the yard, someone poked out a long stick; it crawled up the stick and was transferred to a tin can. It was left with L. M. Williams, and now appears among his curiosities.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The incorporators of the Winfield Methodist college are Thomas Audas, of Wichita; C. A. King, of El Dorado; B. C. Swarts, of Anthony; B. Kelly, of Winfield; M. Y. Gates, of Wichita; J. G. Botkin, of McPherson; A. L. Redden, of El Dorado; D. J. Chatfield, of Wichita. The value of the corporation property is $95,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A few Sundays ago a preacher over in Winfield startled his congregation by saying: "Brothers and sisters, remember our communion services next Sunday forenoon. The Lord will be with us during the morning services and the Bishop in the evening.

Argonia Clipper.

SUMMERING IN THE OZARK MOUNTAINS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. Ed. P. Greer, who is spending a month at her father's (Mr. E. P. Kinne) ranch in the Ozark mountains in southern Missouri in a private letter gives the following description of the country. The many friends and acquaintances of Mr. Kinne in this city and county will probably be interested in thus hearing from him.

Letter from Mrs. Ed. P. Greer.

Today we rode with papa on his tour to Springdale Ranch. Each week he rides around the boundary line to pay off the men he has working for him in various parts. The ranch contains 9,000 acres of land, and the whole will soon be enclosed by fence: some rail and some barbed wire. We started at eight o'clock this morning and arrived home at half past five this evening. The first few miles lay through an uneven rocky valley, then a steep climb up the mountain side. The whole day has been lovely, cool and bright. All along the road the wild flowers were in bloom and the air was freighted with their fragrance. The wild roses grow in great profusion. They are low bushes with small roses, and "climby" ones with large fragrant blooms which range in color from a very delicate to a deep pink, with the most exquisite colors I ever beheld. Then the bright scarlet mountain pinks; the petunia and hollyhock; canary flower; purple and white larkspur; verbena from the palest pink to deep scarlet; and lilac, to deepest purple; one with a delicate, bell-shaped white blossom; a bright, salmon colored one, which blooms in large clumps. All are exceedingly beautiful. Indeed the mountains are one mass of brilliant and beautiful flowers, interspersed with lovely fern, wherever there is dampness enough for them. Where it is dryer grow what the natives call the mountain farren, more commonly known as "tracker," of which there are several varieties. Everywhere cool, bubbling springs are found. They usually issue from the shelving of rock projecting from the mountain site. They flow away in little rivulets over the white pebbles to find their way to the larger streams. Upon the ridge or summit of the mountain, it is usually quite level. The first we crossed gave us only a view of taller ones on each side, heavily wooded and strewn with flowers. Descending to the valleys we passed many farm houses. The people here have a mania for buildings; there will be from three to eight houses on a farm but not one will be decent. To use the popular phrase, "you can throw a cat through the cracks between the logs," even in dwellings, while many have no floors. The temples of learning are few and far between. In all our ride we only saw one. Papa is putting up one on the ranch and has hired a teacher to take the school for $25 per month and take an order on the district when they do not have the money. This is considered good wages. Many of the people are so ignorant that they object to their children attending school. They give the same reason that Huckleberry Finn's "pap" did when he forbid him to go to school. Indeed, me thinks that Mark Twain must have visited Missouri, or he never could have written anything which so accurately describes the people I find here.

The Ozark (weekly) News claims this to be the garden spot of the world. Nature has done much for this country. The land is fertile and very productive. The water cannot be surpassed and the scenery is lovely, but when we turn to the people one wonders how such incongruities can exist. Missouri surely rests under a curse. The people are demoralized and we sometimes would be led to think that they are very little above the brute in intelligence. Never did I feel so proud of our sunny Kansas. The moment I crossed the line, I was made aware of it by the drummers leaving the car and returning with their hands full of beer bottles and the expression of relief which they gave "to be out of a state where a fellow was obliged to be thirsty." Gradually, the farther in we got the deeper were the marks made by tobacco and whiskey. In every garden the tobacco and potatoes grow side by side. In almost every town; some, if not all, of the occupants were demoralized by drink. Often the mothers are too intoxicated to care for their little ones. Every hotel has its bar. You cannot turn without seeing a saloon sign, even if the town has but half a dozen houses. In conversation with an elderly gentleman of much intelligence, a native of Ohio, but a citizen of Missouri for more than forty years, he asked where my home might be. "I am from the banner city of the banner county of the banner State in the Union," I replied. He looked completely dazed, and managed to ask where so many banners might belong. He seemed impatient to know, but I waited a little, and then told him, "Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas." He looked disappointed--thought Missouri was as good, yes much better than Kansas. Prohibition did not help her any, etc. Well, perhaps it don't for him, but it does for me. I will take Kansas every time.

At noon we stopped in a narrow valley between two tall mountains, having ridden some ten miles. It was a lovely spot. Three springs came from the sides of the mountains, and, uniting their waters, flowed in a pool across the road. Immense trees afforded abundant shade. The air was ladened with the perfume of numerous wild flowers, and from the raspberry vines, which grow wild also, we gathered enough to take with our lunch. Leaving here we climbed another mountain, a rough, steep place, requiring all of our stickative power to keep one going. Everywhere the long, graceful flora trailed over the rocks; the air was cool and pleasant. On again descending into the opposite valley, we spied an abundance of fine raspberries. With our dinner pail, tin cup, and hats, all picked berries and soon had one five quart tin pail full to carry home for supper. Then after riding up and down for several miles, we ascended one of the highest mountains. Along its summit for about a mile, or perhaps more, there was a natural macadamized road. The mountains are all densely wooded, and as we looked off this one, down into the valley below, then up the side of the next mountain, there were trees, trees, everywhere. Then as we again descended, we reached the pinery, where thousands of dollars worth of pine lumber have been cut. Most of the trees are small, being the new growth. The air was laden with the peculiar, and to me agreeable, odor of the pine. Farther on in the low valley we crossed several babbling brooks and small farms. In two fields men were harvesting wheat. The great fields of golden grain formed a pleasing contrast to the green walls of trees which rise on the mountain behind them. One thing I noticed was the change in the temperature. When on the ridge of a mountain, we sometimes were obliged to use our wraps. On descending to the valleys, we were more than comfortable without them. After a two miles ride over the worst road I ever saw, we reached our own gate, having ridden about twenty miles. We had seen part of the east, south, and west lines, and had traveled almost all the time on the ranch. It was a long, rough ride, and what with jolting, clinging, and curtseying (to keep the overhanging branches from tearing our heads off), we were very tired. This morning as I finish this letter, after a restless sleep, during which I made the acquaintance of dozens of chiggers, I still think that the pleasure of my trip and the delicious berries we ate at tea are sufficient reward for all the little inconveniences I have had.

SOME IMPROVEMENTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

We are glad to note the intent of the Methodist folks to send their church spire heavenward. The plans for it are drawn up and work will commence at once. It will be of modern architecture, very neat and substantial. The new seats have arrived and Mr. Armstrong and Geo. Case are putting them in. They are of novel and easy design, angling pews, and will be the finishing touch to a really beautiful and comfortable church building. The pulpit elevation has been extended to the south wall, raising the choir, and presenting a much better appearance. Winfield will always lead the procession for fine church conveniences.

TOO SUDDEN DEATHS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

W. E. Dockson came in from Arkansas City Saturday. He informs us of the drowning of Willie Belk, a lad of seventeen, working in the Republican office. He was caught in a whirlpool in the Walnut, just east of Arkansas City, while bathing. The body had not been recovered this morning. D. A. Matlack, representing the cigar and tobacco house of J. W. May & Co., Nevada, Missouri, died at 12 last night at the Leland Hotel. He arrived at Arkansas City Thursday and was suddenly paralyzed, lingering till last night. His wife got there yesterday.

FARMERS' CO-OPERATIVE MILLING ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Farmers' Co-operative Milling Association, at a meeting held in Arkansas City last Saturday, decided to use steam instead of water and expunged the clause in the constitution, "And the canal adjacent thereto."

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. Sheriff's Sale to be held July 20, 1885. G. H. McIntire, Sheriff, to sell property real estate property to settle District Court suit. W. C. Robinson, plaintiff, vs. Andrew J. Cress, defendant.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. R. L. Walker, Registrar, Land Office at Wichita. Settler making final proof of his claim before Ed. Pate, District Clerk at Winfield, Kansas, on July 3, 1885. Settler: Freedom Jones, of Winfield P. O. Witnesses: W. J. Humbert, J. W. Campbell, Harvey Miller, J. C. Corbin, all of Winfield P. O., Kansas.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

THE WEB WORM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The web worm has done a great deal of damage in this county. It has destroyed whole fields of corn in some sections and many fields have been partly destroyed or greatly damaged. It has not confined its ravages to corn fields, but has attacked tomato and cantelope vines, cabbages, and other vegetables. J. F. Martin thinks he is damaged $600 outside of damages to corn. Others report similar damages. The greatest ravages in this county appear to be in the valleys of the Arkansas river and Grouse creek. From all we hear, however, we judge that the ravages of this worm have been light in this county as compared with those of other counties and other states, for it has appeared in all the central and western states. The reports we have received in the last three days seem to indicate that the worst is over and that probably it will not do much further damage in this county. The last rains seem to have discouraged them. It is possible, however, that the present warm weather will revive them and set them to work again, but the crops are getting older and more distasteful to them all the time.

The web worm is not a new enemy. He has been here before but has never before done so much damage in this county as this year. He has been known in other parts of the country and has done great damage in former years, but as yet the means to fight him successfully have not been discovered. He seems to care little for Spanish green and other poisons that have been tried on him and other means to "head him off" have been futile. He is from a certain kind of a miller which flourishes in a moist, warm atmosphere, and moves in flocks or swarms of millions. Thus fields are frequently infested only in patches. They lay their eggs on low and tender weeds, vines, and plants near the ground, where the worms are hatched and feed on the tenderest plants and weave their webs. Some hold that they will not attack corn unless it is young and tender and then only when there are no tenderer weeds and vines in reach. Some think they will not attack corn that is kept clear of weeds; but Barney Shriver tells of a corn field which was about half of it worked clear of weeds when the web worm made its attack. In that part of the field which was clear of weeds, the worms destroyed all the corn; and in the part which was full of weeds, the worms took the weeds and left the corn. Other farmers have related to us similar events and circumstances. It would seem from these that weeds might be valuable in corn fields in web worm times. But it is only the tenderest weeds which they prefer to tender corn leaves and melon vines. It seems that only the young and tender corn suffers from them. That which has been long growing is too hard for them.

We conclude that they can live and flourish only when in warm moist weather vegetation springs up quickly and grows rapidly so as to be tender and that ordinarily their ravages would be confined to the month of June. In such a season as this they might work on into July. In an ordinary season everything which is planted early would be beyond their ravages and they could do no damage. Early planting this season has not done so well as usual on account of the web, but that which has survived the wet weather is exempt from the worm ravages. By the way, would think that a worm that could eat tomato and potato tops could eat anything.

A KANSAS EDITOR'S HOME.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

What is so rare as a day in June on a Kansas farm owned by a Kansas editor? Nothing. Maj. Joseph K. Hudson, the proprietor of the Topeka Capital, took me with him in his buggy Saturday evening, and we returned Monday morning. The farm is on the high lands, southeast of Topeka, two miles away. From nearly every acre of it you can see the capital city; it is so near that you might, by a long step, put the State House under your feet. Plenty of air, trees, shade, strawberries, lots of talk--absolutely and truthfully no politics at all--and a day in June never to be forgotten.

Hudson is the son of an Ohio printer and abolitionist and temperance man, and was brought up in that way, so to speak. When our Union Generals were returning fugitive slaves to their Rebel owners, a lot of young men in his vicinity, near Salem, Ohio, determined to go into the service, but not as slave catchers. So they came to Kansas to enlist. Probably I first met young and lively Joe Hudson about that time; he would naturally find his way into an abolition newspaper office. His Company became Company C of Col. Jas. Montgomery's Third Kansas, and C. also, in the Tenth. After the consolidation Hudson served as Lieutenant, Captain, and Major (some time on Gen. Schofield's staff) over four years and was finally mustered out in Texas, on the Rio Grande. During his whole term of service, he never took a glass of beer, whiskey, or of any other intoxicating drink, and yet he was as lively and frolicsome a boy as ever wore the army blue. He said yesterday that he had one big temptation when his time of office was nearly over. He captured a supply train on the Rio Grande, a very valuable one. Its leader said to him: "If you will go to bed tonight and let us alone, I will put twenty thousand dollars under your pillow or have it put there, and no one can know anything about it. It will not be the first time I have had such transactions with Federal officers." Hudson says he felt tolerable weak in the knees; he told the officer that he was poor, but he would stay up that night. The train was loaded on the steamboat and sent down the river.

The young man was engaged to be married to Miss Mary Smith, before he enlisted. He tried once very hard, and with Jim Lane's assistance, to get a leave of absence and go home and get married; but he did not succeed. So he wrote to Mary to meet him in Wyandotte; she made the journey alone, and they were married in that town.

Since the war Maj. Hudson has been a farmer in Wyandotte County, the publisher of the Kansas Farmer, and now for several years the publisher of the daily and weekly Capital. Like almost everybody who has lived in Kansas over twenty years, Hudson has seen downs as well as ups. But he has never lost his courage; an indomitable and tireless worker, he is on top now and almost sure to stay there. He is just completing a fine office building for his paper, has other valuable property in the city, and this beautiful farm. Here he comes every night to be at home with his delightful family, an accomplished wife and grown-up daughter, Miss Mamie, and two fine children of about 12 and 14, a girl and a boy. Mrs. Hudson has been a frequent contributor to the Farmer and the Capital, and thus has become known in thousands of Kansas homes. It is such a home as they all deserve: books, music, pictures, fruits, colts, calves, eight or ninety pigs, fields of clover and blue grass, and nothing but respect, kindness, and love in every cheerful room and on all these broad acres. The readers of the Capital will like that paper even better after reading this little sketch of the man and woman who have made it, and I hope I have not offended Joseph and Mary by speaking with the freedom of an old friend. Web Wilder in the Hiawatha World.

REDUCTION IN POSTAGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Next Wednesday morning, July 1st, commences the operation of the new law concerning postage under which letter postage will be two cents per ounce or fraction thereof instead of two cents per half ounce or fraction thereof as at present. This change will not have the effect to reduce the postage on the largest class of letters, those weighing a half ounce or less, and will therefore be no perceptible relief to the most of the letter writers, but there is a large class of mail matter on which it will reduce the postage about one-half, and it will be a great relief to real estate men, insurance agents, registers of deeds, clerks of the courts, superintendents of public instruction, sheriffs, bankers, and others who send many heavy letters. Persons receiving such letters will be relieved of a large amount of the "postage due" which they now have to pay on letters coming to them on which the prepaid postage is insufficient. The operation of the "postage due" system discloses a large class of penurious or careless correspondents who victimize the persons to whom they address heavy letters. This new law will relieve these victims to a considerable extent. For instance, the register of deeds, First National Bank, P. H. Albright & Co., and Jarvis, Conklin & Co., pay each from ten to twenty dollars a year for postage due stamps, and considering that they fully prepay the postage on the letters they mail, it is likely that the new law will reduce their postage to the extent of forty to one hundred dollars per year. It may be surprising to some to learn that some firms in this city pay from two hundred to five hundred dollars a year in postage and that with some of these a great bulk of their postage is on letters, weighing more than half an ounce. We estimate that the new law will make the receipts of the Winfield office for postage on first-class matter one thousand dollars per year less than it would be under the old law.

The other change in the postage, which takes effect July 1st, relates only to newspapers direct from the office of publication and dealers in newspapers, making the rate one cent per pound instead of two cents as heretofore. As nearly the whole bulk of the newspapers published in this city are circulated in the county and through the mails free, this change will not amount to much reduction in postage here. For instance, the DAILY COURIER sends only three pounds out of the county daily, paying only six cents a day, which amounts to about eighteen dollars a year. This will be reduced about eight dollars a year. The weekly COURIER sends about fifty pounds a week out of the county, which amounts to a dollar a week, or fifty-two dollars a year. This saving is hardly worth mentioning when we consider in comparison the great metropolitan newspapers whose circulations of thirty thousand to two hundred thousand copies, are mostly outside of their own counties. A New York daily which circulates sixty-seven thousand copies through the mails outside of New York County, prepays postage at the rate of about four hundred thousand dollars a year, and the new law will reduce its expense for postage about two hundred thousand dollars a year. This law was engineered through in the interest of the great metropolitan monopolies in newspapers, to give them additional advantages over the newspapers published in smaller cities and towns and enable them to monopolize the newspaper business still more. The paper on which newspapers are printed costs us two or three cents per pound more than it does them because we have to pay more than two cents a pound freight from the east. They have the paper at their doors, with minimum freight charges, and have been sending their papers here to compete with ours, through the mails, at less freight charges than we have to pay. Now the government has reduced their freight charges one half, while ours remain at the old price.

GENERAL GRANT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Gen. Grant's autobiographical history of the war promises to be the most famous book of modern times. The competition for the honor of publishing it was so great that pretty much all the profits will find their way to the General's own pocket, and the sales will be enormous. The successful competitors were Charles L. Webster & Co., this company being Mark Twain. This firm commands the distribution for the whole United States, and has already orders on hand for 200,000 copies, from various publishing houses throughout the country. J. R. Stoddard, of Philadelphia, takes 25,000. The work will be a monument to the printer's art, as well as to the fame of Gen. Grant. Money is being lavished upon it; the paper, printing, binding, everything will be of the costliest, and the cover will contain a facsimile representation of the medal presented to Gen. Grant by the Congress of the United States. The first volume is in proof and is illustrated by a portrait of Gen. Grant as a young man, in the form of a lieutenant, copied from a photograph in the possession of Mr. George W. Childs, of Philadelphia. The second volume will have a portrait of the General of recent date. General Grant was very angry at a recent paragraph in a city newspaper to the effect that Gen. Badeau was writing his "history." There is not the slightest foundation for this assertion; in fact, every line is written or dictated by himself, and the internal evidence will be conclusive that Gen. Badeau, the "Vagabond" of Noah's Sunday Times and Messenger, nearly thirty years ago, is not the author of General Grant's war record. The work will be in two volumes, the first one of which will not make its appearance till December, the second a month later. The price will be $3.50 per volume.

WHO HOLDS THE CORNERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Eagle says that last week the southwest quarter of the southwest section of land in the state was taken up by a homesteader, but does not tell his name, which is an important omission. We ought to know his name and the name of the owners of the northwest, northeast, and southeast corners of the state. We need to know who are the four angels who stand and hold up the four corners of Kansas, as Gabriel, Raphael, Michael, and Uzziel stand at the four corners of Heaven, or as Aldebaran, Regulus, Antares, and Fomalhant were said to support four corners of the material heavens. Come out, men or cherubim, whichever you are, and let yourselves be known.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Patronize your home industries. It is the only way to build up our town. "You scratch my back and I'll scratch yours," is an uncouth saying but has a world of meaning and wisdom for people of all classes, and points to the fountain head of prosperity in every calling. Trade with your home merchants, give them confidence in your patronage and they will answer you with a larger and better stock of goods at lower prices. Keep the money at home as much as possible and in that way help to make our community prosperous. And while the good work goes on, don't forget ye poor editor in his den, who will strive to give you a first-class paper in every respect, and solicits just so much of your patronage as his paper merits.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The matter of the constitutionality of the new incorporation law came up before Judge Torrance Monday. The city attorney fired in points of law in its favor, while the kickers shot legal lore against. The Judge takes the matter under consideration until Thursday. It is a question of vital interest to Winfield, and its adjustment is awaited with much interest.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Missouri seems to be the tornado state this year. Though other states have suffered the usual amount, Missouri has suffered much the most. Some of its twisters have reached across the line into Kansas, but not to do much damage. Kansas has a few little whirls in the northern and western part of the State but not very serious. In fact, Kansas is usually far from being the worst state for cyclones. Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, Missouri, and some of the more southern states have each suffered much more from tornadoes in the last ten years than has Kansas.

THE HIRED GIRL QUESTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The servant girl question is one which agitates all the cities and large towns of the country. People who have a considerable income, or are in delicate health, or lazy, or have more work on hand than they can well attend to, wish to hire their domestic work done and this creates a wide demand for servant girls. This demand would doubtless be readily supplied but for the conditions attending such employment. The average house-keeper does not want a bright, intelligent, ambitious girl to do house work, for such a girl has too much self-respect, considers herself an equal, and will not stand any kind of treatment which is not civil and courteous. It has become a common saying among housekeepers that they do not want to hire girls to play their piano, entertain their visitors, or do their reading. The complaint most often made against servant girls is that they do not allow the lady of the house enough privileges, that they take possession of the whole house, run things in their own way, and if remonstrated with, they leave in a tantrum.

From what we have seen, heard, and observed, we should say that the model hired girl would be a self-winding machine which can wash, sweep, cook, make beds, and serve the table like an automaton, but who knows nothing else; a machine which never gets out of repair, is always neat and clean, has no reason, thought, or ambition other than to do house work and has no feelings which may be wounded. We should say that a girl who is ladylike and refined, who likes to read, desires a good education, and likes intelligent company, is not fit for a hired girl. Some people, ladies as well as men, love to have someone over whom they can domineer, on whom they can vent their spleen when they are ill-natured and out of sorts, someone to scold and grumble at, and a hired girl who will stand it is to them a treasure.

But the average American girl is self-respecting and self-assertive and will starve before she will allow herself to be treated in this way. She wants to know something besides housework, wants to be respected and admired; therefore, she utterly loathes the idea of becoming such a menial as is demanded in a hired girl. Therefore, ignorant Chinese and men who are only fit to be slaves are substituted for work which only females are naturally best fitted to perform. Colored women who have lived the best part of their lives in slavery generally suit our American housewives for servants, and some of them, it is said, will not stay with a mistress who has not enough "style about her" to abuse her servants. Foreign girls of the poorer class are also sought as the best class of servant girls. Even with these the infection of "wanting to be somebody" is spreading and spoiling large numbers of the best servant girls of the country.

It is therefore not strange that the self-respecting girls, native to this country, prefer almost any other work or occupation to that of a servant girl which is thus made to seem so degrading. It is not strange that our girls who need to earn their own living and depend upon their own labor for their future felicity and prosperity avoid housework and are earnest applicants for employment as school teachers, clerks, amanuenses, telegraph operators, factory operatives, dressmakers, and sewing girls.

There are, of course, many American girls who can earn their living in no other honorable way, are fitted for no other work, who do not feel very deep humiliation in the station, are willing to admit that they are a lower order of humans, and will continue to do housework for others, but these comprise only a small class comparatively, and generally those who have been fortunate enough to fall into families who always treat them with genuine kindness and consideration.

We can see this evil and can see that it is a growing evil, but we cannot prescribe a remedy which will be likely to work. There is nothing low or degrading in housework itself anymore than there is in school teaching, singing, or lecturing. If the girl doing housework were to be treated with the same consideration as is the girl who teaches or lectures, and if society would measure girls by their real worth and attainments rather than by their occupation, the evil would be abated and ambitious girls would not be ashamed of or disgusted with housework.

We can get along with a lecturer, music teacher, or novel writer if her personal habits are not cleanly, neat, and lady-like, but in a housework girl these habits are to us indispensable. If we would be willing to eat, drink, and wear that which is prepared by a girl, we certainly should not object to her presence at the table or in the parlor. The kind of a girl we should want to do housework is one who is physically able to do the work required, who knows how to do it quickly, thoroughly, neatly, and well, and who is willing and anxious to do it as we want it done and when we want it done. This would be what we pay her for doing, and if it took the whole of her time we ought to pay her very large wages for her work. But no girl ought to be required to labor more than ten hours per day. She ought to have at least eight hours for sleep and four to six hours for recreation, reading, study, and society. Of course we do not hire her to entertain the family, but if it would be a pleasure to her and to the family, there is no reason why she should not read or sing or play to the family, and there is no good reason why a clean, tidy girl, such as we want to do our cooking, should not be allowed any pleasure she might derive from conversation, or music, or reading enjoyed by the family, or by sitting at the table or in the parlor at times when her duties as waiter at the table or other duties would permit of it. In short, there is no good reason why she should not be lady-like and be treated in a lady-like manner. But says our lady friend, if you treat a girl that way, it will spoil her and make her worthless to you. "Give her an inch and she will take an ell," and give the ell and she becomes your boss and runs things in her own way.

This is all utter nonsense. The merchant who treats his clerks well and kindly as equals in other respects is the one who always has the best and most efficient clerks. They honor and respect him and try to please him. Other good clerks who know him are anxious to get a situation under him. If one is so foolish as to do as the lady says a girl would do under good treatment, he is discharged and a clerk of better sense is readily found to take his place. So it would be with hired girls if society made housework as respectable as selling goods, and if housework girls were treated with as much courtesy and consideration as clerks. And then you would have hired girls not only efficient and faithful, but intelligent and refined, perhaps more so than your own daughters, and that would be bad again.

But this millennial time cannot come. It is out of the question in this age. Society forbids it. So our wives must still continue to worry and fret their lives out of them about servant girls.

FOR THE YOUNG.

Dr. Kirkwood's "Children's Day" Sermon at the Presbyterian Church, Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

"He that is born in thy house, and he that is bought with thy money, must needs be circumcised; and my covenant shall be in your flesh for an everlasting covenant." Genesis 17:13. "Thus Esau despised his birthright." Genesis 25:34; last clause.

We ought to know what our relation is to God, to the state, to the church, to society, and to our families. We ought, also, to know what are our rights, our duties, and our privileges in all these relations. Today I am to talk to you about our relation to God, and our special relations in the family; together with some of the rights, duties, and privileges belonging to these particular relations.

In the first part of this text, God speaks about his covenant. A covenant is a bargain. When you boys have marbles, one may have some "white allies," or "chinas;" another may have some common black taws. You agree to trade. One of you will trade so many white allies for a larger number of the black taws. You agree on the number and you make the trade. But you haven't the marbles with you, so you agree to meet tomorrow and exchange the marbles. That is a bargain, or a covenant. By it you are bound to meet tomorrow and make the exchange. It is the same thing when one man wants to sell a farm, and another wants to buy. They meet and talk it over. They look at the farm. They agree on a price and the terms of payment--how and where the money shall be paid, and when possession shall be given the buyer. They then have a lawyer prepare the papers according to their agreement, they sign and seal the papers, and the covenant or bargain is made. The main point which I want you to understand is that a bargain is an agreement between two persons, or parties, binding each to do certain things, and that such a bargain is a covenant.

Now, God made a covenant, that is a bargain, with Abraham, for the benefit of Abraham and his son, Isaac, and his grandson, and then for all the children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren of the family, on down until through one of those great-grandchildren, Jesus Christ, the covenant should take in all other people; while it should be for the special benefit of all who, for themselves, should accept the offer God makes and close the bargain with him.

In this bargain God promised that he would be forever the special friend, protector, and Savior of Abraham, of Isaac and his children through all ages of the world. He promised that He would do them good while they lived in the world. He promised that He would give them a good land to be their home while they lived in the world. He promised that He would save them from sin, and make them pure and good and true and noble. He promised that He would make them ready for a better world than this--a world where nobody does wrong, nobody is ever sick, nobody suffers pain or sorrow, and nobody ever grows old and dies. He promised that when He had made them ready for that world, He would take them to it to be happy forever. Young and strong to grow stronger and nobler and wiser and happier every day.

But while God promised all this, He made Abraham promise that he would do all that God wanted him to do, and so on for all the grandchildren and great-grandchildren always until that child should be born through whom the people of every nation should be allowed to receive the benefits of the bargain.

Abraham agreed to do this and then the covenant was sealed by the sacrament of circumcision in Abraham; and all his children were to receive the same seal and pledge of their rights under the bargain, and their obligation to do their part.

When this was all settled, God gave to Abraham for himself, and his children through Isaac, the land of Canaan to be their home in the earth until Christ should come. Then, in the right time, He brought the children of Abraham into the possession of this land of Canaan, and protected them in it, and made them a great and strong and rich and happy nation--one of the greatest nations of the earth. And he kept them in that land until Christ came. When they did wrong--when they forgot to do their part of the bargain, God punished them, but still kept them for his people, and kept the land of Canaan for their home.

When Christ came, He taught the people that the bargain with Abraham was for the benefit of all men of every nation in the world who would agree to it. He taught them that Canaan was meant to be the picture of that blessed home which God was keeping and making ready for all who agreed to the terms of the bargain and kept their part of it. He taught them that every father and mother who accepted the terms of the bargain should have the benefit for themselves and for their children, just as Abraham's children had the benefit of it, in having their homes in the land of Canaan. So that the case now stands this way: All who have made the bargain with God by joining his church have the promise for themselves and their children that God will be their father, savior, and protector: that He will provide for all their needs on earth; that He will save them from sin and make them pure, good, noble, and true, ready to go to heaven; and that He will at last take them there to be forever well and happy and strong and young and beautiful--to grow forever stronger, wiser, happier, and better. To your parents, and to you, children, God has promised all this as his part of the bargain; and, that it may be sure to you, he gave His only son, Jesus Christ, that he might live and suffer and die for your sake.

On their part, your parents have promised God that they will obey his will as it is taught in the bible. They have promised that they will serve Him with all the love of their hearts and souls, and with all the strength of their bodies and minds, while they live in the world. They have promised, also, that they will teach you all about this bargain they have made for you with God; that they will teach you all that He requires you to do; that they will show you how to do it so that you may know how to obey and love and serve Him, and may do all His will and receive all the benefit that God promises as his part of the covenant. And in the pledge, as the seal of this bargain for you, your parents have had the sacrament of baptism with water given to you. You have the right to be baptized. You have the right to all the benefits and privileges and duties of this covenant with God because you are born of christian parents. You are born with this right to the blessings of this covenant just as you are born with the right to a share in the property of your parents and their loving care in this world. And because you are so born, you have the right to have from your parents full instruction, teaching you the knowledge of the value and worth of these claims, the knowledge of the rich inheritance that God is preparing for you, and how to live that you may received that inheritance and be forever rich and happy and good.

"But one may be born the heir to a rich inheritance and yet never get it."

There are many ways in this world by which one may miss getting that to which he is born the heir. I have not time to tell you of more than one. Esau was the first born son of Isaac. He was the grandson of Abraham. By the law of that country and people, he was entitled to a higher place than his brother, Jacob. It is just like the eldest son of Queen Victoria, or Emperor William. These sons are born with the right to the thrones of Great Britain and Germany when the queen and the emperor shall die.

Esau did not think his birth-right was worth much. He did not understand its value. He did not consider it much honor to be a prince of Jehovah. So, one day when he was very hungry, he sold his birth-right for a single dinner--just such a dinner as you can buy any day for ten cents. "Thus Esau despised his birth-right," and lost it forever.

So you may lose your birth-right under your parents' covenant with God. If they neglect to teach you how much it is worth; if they neglect to teach you how to obtain it through faith in Jesus Christ and obedience to the will of God; or, if you, being taught about it by your parents, in the Sabbath school and in the church, yet think that it is not worth much, that you can make it all right at anytime you please; and if you neglect it to seek after the things which belong only to this life, working only for earthly pleasure, enjoyment, and success, and fail to love and obey and serve God according to the bible--if you do thus, you lose your birth-right. You lose all claim on God because you fail to keep your part of the bargain. You sell out all your birth-right for a mess of pottage. You sell out all your claim on God, all your share in heaven, all your birth-right to a home in heaven, and to the blessed and glorious life in heaven, for what is no better than a ten cent dinner. You despise your birth-right. You lose it forever. And there is danger of your doing this. You are tempted to do it all the time.

There is only one way to obtain the good of this birth-right, and that is to come to Jesus, accept him as your savior, love him with all your heart, obey and serve Him with all your strength. If you live in this way, you shall keep your birth-right claim alive, God will do all his part, and will bring you into everlasting life and joy in heaven--the world which lies just beyond this, just on the other side of death. And the Lord Jesus is in the world now, pleading with you to so live. He has sent me today to plead with you, for Him, that you will not despise your birth-right, but hold it most precious; that you will come to Him and claim all its privileges and benefits; that you will keep the terms of the bargain which your parents have made in your behalf; that you will love and serve Him for His love in living and suffering and dying on earth that you might have all the good which He promises to give. But some of you think that it is not sure that you can get the good which Christ promises. Let me illustrate this. A Sabbath school teacher was trying to make his class of boys understand what it is to believe in Christ and receive His gift of eternal good. He took out his watch and opening it to the boy next him, said: "I give you this watch." The boy looked at the watch, then at the teacher, blushed and looked down, and that was all. Then the teacher offered it to the next boy in the same way; but he too, with a look and a little laugh, let it alone. So it went with a dozen boys. Not one of them offered to take it. Near the foot of the class was a little boy, to whom in turn the teacher said, "I give you this watch." "But," said the boy at the head of the class, "you don't mean that it is his to keep?" "Yes, I do; that is just what I intend to do. The watch is yours, my boy, to keep." "But," said the first boy, "I didn't know that." "Well," said the teacher, "didn't I offer it to you?" "Yes--yes--but--" "But," replied the teacher, "you didn't believe me; and Johnnie did. You had no faith; Johnnie had, and he took the watch when it was offered him."

Just so, children, Jesus offers you this everlasting good; and just as simple a thing is the faith which takes it from the hand. Some of you older people may say, "that is too childish a view of so great a subject." I charge you older people to remember the words of the Lord Jesus, viz: "except ye be converted and become as little children, ye shall in no case enter the kingdom of heaven." The older boys were too knowing to accept the teacher's watch. They didn't believe him. The little boy believed him; took him at his word, and got the watch. You older people don't believe the Lord Jesus, and don't get His blessing. The children believe and get it, and are saved.

And here let me say, many of you children think that for you to come to Christ and become His servants, would be to make your life sad and gloomy, and spoil all your pleasure. But that is not true. He wants you to be happy. Just as He made these "birds to sing in the fullness of their enjoyment of life, so He made you to be happy in the enjoyment of life. The singing for joy of the birds is His praise. And He loves your laughter and enjoyment so well that He says, "Jerusalem shall be full of boys and girls playing in the streets thereof." But Jerusalem is heaven; so there shall be the gladness and laughter of boys and girls in heaven.

No, my children, living with Christ is not dull and sad. To live with Christ as your friend is the best, happiest, noblest, purest, and truest life you can live. It brings no shame to those who live it. It brings no sorrow and remorse of conscience. It does no hurt to others. It does good to yourselves, and to everybody else. It makes the world better and brighter and happier. It makes death easy, and it makes all the world and the life beyond death glorious.

May the gracious Savior turn all your young hearts to Himself, and keep you in his covenant, and bring you into this inheritance!

To you, parents. I have a word to say. You have made this bargain with God for yourselves and for your children. Let me ask.

1st. Are you performing, for yourselves, your part of the bargain? Are you keeping covenant with God?

2nd. Are you careful to teach your children their birth-right privileges and duties under this covenant?

3rd. Are you careful to teach these children the value of their birth-right?

4th. Are you careful to teach them the folly and danger of neglecting this birth-right with its privileges and duties?

5th. Are you careful to teach all these things, not by words only, but also by your own exemplary living as becomes the children of God?

It is better to answer now and, if you are wrong, if you find yourselves failing herein, to get right here in this life, rather than put off until you stand before the judgment throne and there discover your error when too late--to realize the failure when you see the everlasting loss of the children for whom you made covenant with God, and for whose loss, through your failure in duty, you will be filled with eternal remorse and clothed with everlasting shame. If you are faithful to your duty here, your duty to your children, God will take care of them, and keep them, and bring them home with you to His everlasting rest.

THINGS WORTH REMEMBERING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

That a bag of hot sand relieves neuralgia.

That warm borax water will remove dandruff.

That milk which stands too long makes bitter butter.

That salt should be eaten with nuts to aid digestion.

That rusty flat irons should be rubbed over with beeswax and lard.

That it rests with you, in sewing, to change your position frequently.

That a hot, strong lemonade taken at bed time will break up a bad cold.

That a cup of strong coffee will remove the odor of onions from the breath.

That a little soda-water will relieve sick headache caused by indigestion.

That tough meat is made tender by lying a few minutes in vinegar water.

That a cup of hot water drank before meals will relieve nausea and dyspepsia.

That well-ventilated bedrooms will prevent morning headaches and lassitude.

That one in a faint should be laid flat on his back, then loosen his clothes, and let him alone.

That cold tea should be saved for your vinegar barrel. It sours easily and gives color and flavor.

That a solution made of lime and sprinkled over vegetables will destroy worms and bugs.

That consumptive night sweats may be arrested by sponging the body nightly in salt water.

That a fever patient can be made cool and comfortable by frequent sponging off with soda water.

That you can take out spots from wash goods by rubbing them with the yolk of egg before washing.

That to beat the whites of eggs quickly, add a pinch of salt. Salt cools and cold eggs froth rapidly.

That the hair may be kept from falling out after illness by a frequent application to the scalp of sage tea.

That white spots upon varnished furniture will disappear if you hold a hot plate from the stove over them.

A LITTLE DUBIOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Our Kansas National Guards are now dreaming of blood-curdling, war-painted scalp-lifters. They have received an inkling that they are liable to be ordered out at any time by the War Department to pulverize the obstreperous Cheyennes, who are liable to come Caldwell-ward. Of course, the boys will go with a vim, if the order does come, and their legs don't go back on them. Just think of the scalps of our brave and noble boys being lifted by red devils and hung on a wigwam to dry. Ugh! Horrible thought! Some have anticipated this trouble and had their scalps taken off by the tonsorial act, many being as bare as a prairie meadow. The bald-headed members of the Company, made so by nature, are in clover and anxious to go. But seriously, the boys are likely to have a picnic. Of course, there will be no fighting. Uncle Sam will foot the bill and the boys will have a glorious vacation, should they go.

POSTOFFICE JULY 4.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The postoffice at Winfield will be open for delivery on Saturday, July 4th, from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Mattie Woods, who accompanied Miss Jessie Stretch from the former's home near Burden, to this city Tuesday, left this afternoon for an extensive trip in Colorado.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. Ed. G. Cole departed Tuesday for two months with her parents at Ontario, Canada, and Ed. will undergo the cares and vicissitudes of his first widowerhood.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Our dudes have not appeared on the streets today. Bain dissected them so thoroughly that their pants are all warped and their dudeship very sick.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Leota Gary is home from a most enjoyable month's vacation in Illinois, and will soon be at her old post in the Register's office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. E. P. Greer and children got home Wednesday from a month in the Ozark Mountains, in Southwestern Missouri.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. G. W. Miller, taken suddenly and seriously ill Sunday, is much improved.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings!

As Gleaned by the Scribes of the Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

THE BAPTIST CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The services at the Baptist Church were well attended yesterday. The music was very fine. Rev. Reider chose the following text: Luke XVII-6 [?] "And the Apostles said unto the Lord, increase our Faith," and the Lord said, "If ye had faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye might say unto this sycamore tree, be thou plucked up by the root, and be thou planted in the sea, and it should be done."

The usual announcements for the week including the following special ones. The young people's meeting will be changed to 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, evening. Prof. Merriman, of Indiana, is here and will hold a service of song Monday evening. The Baptist Missionary Society will meet Thursday afternoon at 3 p.m. The W. C. T. U. meets Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock with Mrs. Curns.

The words of the gospel are as much superior to heathen morals as its doctrines are to heathen mythology. The speaker referred to forgiving as an essential part of christianity. The Apostles asked to have their faith increased. I am not surprised at this request. They did not ask this in order to lighten their burdens but to make them stronger in the fight, and to be better able to forgive. Here we have presented before us a case where God is ready to grant the request, but not just in the way desired. The way God has of working out his ways was referred to and illustrated in Paul's manner of reaching Rome, being imprisoned and taken there. Faith is in the root of obedience; in order to give acceptance to God it must flow from the heart. Do you know why so many fail in business? It is from a want of faith in God and failing to honor Him. Faith brings omnipotence into the soul. The success of Moody and other eminent men was referred to. If you have the true faith, it has great virtue. Let us remember whatever we ask of the father in the name of Jesus, whatever we ask, do it through the son and we shall be granted it. Before we can perform good works, we must have faith. It is what Jesus does for you, not what you do. Faith Purifieth the heart. The folly of calling ourselves believers when we show an unforgiving spirit was forcibly shown, and these persons were begged to fall on their knees before God and pray for the right spirit. The sin of an ugly temper was spoken of and the congregation was warned to govern this, by praying for help.

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

After the Sunday school and the usual morning lesson, Elder Myres took his text from the third chapter of Phillippians, the 13th and 14th verses: "Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended; but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus." These are the words of Paul in his epistle to the Phillippians. The subject of the Elder's discourse in the morning was, "Paul, the man of one idea." This one idea of Paul's was the christian character. Paul was a man who could be trusted to teach Christ to the people, and it seems that he was the best qualified to go out among the Jews and Gentiles--and was appointed by God as the only one of the apostles to plant the christian religion in the strongholds of the world. Paul was not a man who made religion a secondary matter, but made it a specialty and a life sacrifice. His whole aim in life after he became a follower of God was to forget the past and strive for the prize in the future: "Pressed toward the mark for the prize." In this epistle of Paul's to the Phillippians he admonishes them to beware of evil workers. He wished to impress upon their minds that there was but one idea and that was to gain the prize: not allow themselves to be led or drawn away from this idea. Paul was not a fanatic--it was not a limitation of his knowledge that made this one idea his only thought but he saw the value of working for Christ--saw and understood the rest and peace in store for him in the future and was always trying to teach the people to follow in his footsteps. This was his calling and never did man do his bidding with more zeal, more nobly. And it was a remarkable characteristic of Paul that he never thought he had attained perfection in faith and in his work and zeal for Christ. He says, "Brethren, be followers together of me and mark them which walk so as ye have us for an example. (For many walk of whom I have told you often, and now tell you even weeping, that they are the enemies of the cross of Christ.)"

The announcements were the Ladies' Aid Society at Mrs. Smedley's on Thursday afternoon and the lecture of Hon. Geo. W. Bain at the Opera House on Tuesday evening, under the auspices of the Woman's Relief Corps. The admittance to the lecture is but 25 cents and it is hoped and expected that a large audience will be in attendance. After the services Mr. J. W. Sickles and wife united with the church by letter.

THE UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

In the United Brethren Church a review of the lessons for the quarter was the order in the Sabbath School. The quarter just closed has been the most prosperous one since the organization of the Sabbath Schools. The pastor, after announcing the lectures for this evening and Tuesday evening by George W. Bain, discoursed to his congregation, taking for his text Malachi 3:16. Theme, "The importance and benefit of social or class meeting." He made the following points: That the class meeting as a form of religious worship has the approval of the word of God; that to the Christian it is a means of grace; that it supplies a social feature in church life that could not be well obtained without it. We become better acquainted with each other; our eyes are opened to the struggles of the soul through which we severally pass. This draws out our sympathies, and forges more closely the bonds of Christ in fellowship. The class meeting is a means of grace--a gospel service--to others. The young, the weak, and the faltering are encouraged and strengthened. Appeals were made to our personal experience and incidents to illustrate were cited. Many who were unsaved have been awakened by the testimony of devoted Christians. An instance was related of a skeptical lawyer who had gone to take the testimony of those who should speak with a view to the contradiction of religion, but after hearing their testimony, the credibility of the witnesses and the unity of their testimony awaked him to the truth of religion and brought him to Christ. Other illustrations were used. The Savior took advantage of his potent influence as we find in case of the man delivered from demons (Mark 6:19) and of the woman at Jacob's well (John 4:28 and 29).

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

We notice that the web worm, which has been creating such havoc in the corn fields, is spoken of by various papers as the "army" worm and "wet" worm. It has none of the habits or characteristics of the army worm, and there is nothing about it suggestive of the name "wet." It is said to be identical with the cotton worm of the south which frequently destroys the cotton crop. Burden Enterprise.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Wanted. To exchange a good farm in Barton County, Kansas for cattle. F. N. Strong, Winfield, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

TO FARMERS' SONS AND DAUGHTERS

The Kansas State Agricultural College

OFFERS AN EDUCATION THAT PAYS.

The College, located upon a fine farm at Manhattan, Riley County, is well equipped with buildings worth $100,000: farm, stock, and apparatus worth $50,000. Eighteen instructors and over 400 students. Endowment, half a million dollars. Income, $40,000.

ITS 23D YEAR BEGINS SEPT. 10, 1885.

Providing a thorough course in English, Mathematics, and Sciences related to the great industries of the State, and genuine training in Agriculture, Horticulture, Blacksmithing, Carpentry, Sewing, Household Economy, Printing or Telegraphy, with

Tuition Free.

Other expenses are reasonable, and some opportunity is found for earning a part of expenses by work on the farm or in the orchards, vineyard, gardens, grounds, offices, or buildings.

A FULL FOUR-YEARS COURSE

Begins with a review of the common branches, and entitles a student to the degree of bachelor of Science at its close, but a shorter courses gives each year an excellent training for the work of life. For full particulars or catalogue, address

Pres. GEO. T. FAIRCHILD, Manhattan, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

GRAND CLEARING SALE

BIG BARGAINS IN INDIA LINENS.

SWISS LAWNS.

Summer Silks, Gauze Underwear, Fans, Parasols,

In fact everything in Summer Wear at

Greatly Reduced Prices.

NOW IS THE TIME TO SECURE

BIG BARGAINS

Will also make Big Reductions in

BOOTS AND SHOES

for the next 30 days to close them out.

GOING EAST.

Come and see us when you need anything: will undersell all competition.

J. P. BADEN.

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. W. M. Johnson, Administrator, Notice of Final Settlement in Probate Court in the matter of the estate of Alfred S. Johnson, deceased. Deadline: July 4, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. Sheriff's Sale by G. H. McIntire. Real estate to be sold to settle suit by R. R. Conklin, Plaintiff, vs. Ira D. Black, Lydia C. Black, and L. D. Putnam, Defendants, on August 3, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. Sheriff's Sale by G. H. McIntire. Real estate to be sold to settle suit by Thomas S. Kentz, Plaintiff, vs. William Grenhaw, Mary Jane Grenhaw, and Henry Clem, Defendants, on July 13, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. Sheriff's Sale by G. H. McIntire. Real estate to be sold to settle suit by M. L. Read and M. L. Robinson, Plaintiffs, vs. The Winfield Creamery, Defendants. Date: August 3, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. Sheriff's Sale by G. H. McIntire. Real estate to be sold to settle suit by J. B. Lynn, plaintiff, vs. James Wilson, defendant. Date: July 6, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Recap. R. L. Walker, Register and James L. Dyer, Receiver, Land Office at Wichita, Kansas. United States vs. Heirs of Dionis Capretz. Real estate involved. Settler must appear for hearing in the U. S. Land Office at Wichita to submit evidence relative land claim.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR PARDON.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, Frank Wilson, who is now and has been for more than four years last past confined at hard labor in the Penitentiary of the State of Kansas, will, on Thursday, the 16th day of July, A. D. 1885, or as soon thereafter as he can be heard, make application to His Excellency the Governor of said State and the Board of Pardons, for a Pardon for the crime of which he was convicted in the District Court of Cowley County, in said State, to wit: For an assault with a deadly weapon upon one Hugh H. Siverd, in the attempt to break the Jail of said Cowley County, and by the judgment of said Court he was sentenced to confinement at hard labor in the Penitentiary of said State for ten years.

FRANK WILSON, Applicant.

By H. V. Welsh, his Attorney.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

[Skipped Winfield City Markets.]

OUR NEW FEATURE--THE LATEST MARKETS.

Today's Markets in Chicago and Kansas City By Special Telegraph

To The Daily Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

CHICAGO, July 1, 2 p.m.

Wheat, cash: 88. Wheat, August: 90-1/8. Wheat, September: 92-1/4.

Corn, cash: 47-3/8. Corn, August: 47-1/3.

KANSAS CITY, July 1, 2:00 p.m.

Wheat, No. 2 red, cash: 74-1/4. Wheat, No. 2 red, August: 77-3/4.

Corn, cash: 37. Corn, August: 39-1/2.

Hogs: $3.80

HON. GEO. W. BAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Hon. Geo. W. Bain, Kentucky's silver-tongued orator, gave our people a feast Sunday at the Baptist church that will not soon be forgotten. Long before the hour of beginning services the church began to fill and an incessant throng poured in until every available space was occupied. The music was lovely, by the regular Baptist choir and Crippen's cornet orchestra. Dr. Kirkwood assisted Rev. Reider in the preliminary services. The lecture was grandly eloquent, logical, and bristling--one sparkling with gems of thought and truth, put in a novel and convincing way. The subject of temperance has been discoursed upon so often in Winfield, every phase being numerously presented, that the many facts concocted therewith are a part of our ground-work--have become commonly accepted truths. But Mr. Bain's wonderful magnetism, modern and practical expression, gave the theme new and entrancing interest. His eulogies on Kansas' proud and foremost step in the prohibition of the liquor traffic were beautiful and thrilling. He spoke of the contrast between the Winfield of today and that of four years ago, when he was last here--then saloons along every business street, now none--a city whose civility, morality, and christianity is surpassed by none. He showed whiskey to be the basis of the nation's present financial depression. Store houses are everywhere piled from floor to ceiling with goods awaiting customers. On the other hand thousands of people are naked and starving, where vice has been preying on homes, making them desolate. Five hundred million dollars yearly, that ought to act as a medium between these desolate homes and over crowded store houses, is being sapped from the laborers of this country. Turn this money loose on the store houses, and prosperity, happy homes, and a glorious people will result. Throughout it was as fine a temperance address as was ever listened to in this city.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

In the last issue of the Telegram the spiritual quill pusher of that sheet defames the virtuous character of the fat man of the COURIER, by accusing him of working the cigar and soda fountain joints of the town nightly. We see the trouble. The aforesaid party watched the fat man a few evenings ago until he approached the fountain, and then sided up, hoping he would give him the first drink of the season, and the fat man cooly ignored him. He done this from no unkindness, but he had been warned time and again never to tempt a ravenous appetite. If he had treated the spiritual man, today he would have been writhing in delirium tremens, caused by pop and soda water, and the soda fountain man would have been suffering to the extent of fifty cents.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. H. V. Welsh, an attorney from Ottawa, was here Monday, filing papers looking to the pardon of Frank Wilson, sent to the "pen" from here four years ago for an assault with a deadly weapon upon Capt. H. H. Siverd, then our jailor. He was in for horse stealing, it will be remembered, and in putting in the prisoner's breakfast one morning, he attacked the Captain with a stove leg, producing dangerous wounds--wounds that were as nearly fatal as anybody wants. He plead guilty to jail breaking and murderous assault and got ten years. Mr. Welsh says Wilson's people live in Ottawa County and are highly respected.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

George Sanderson met with a very serious accident Saturday. He was loading stone from his wagon onto the cars, just east of the S. K. depot. His team started, he jumped from the car to the wagon, but grabbed the lines too late. The team started, throwing him from the wagon and dragging him some distance. The wheel struck him on the back and shoulders, giving him jars that may remain for all time. They thought at first his back was broken, but it is only a severe wrench. Dr. Graham has him in hand.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Burden Eagle remarks: "THE COURIER has estimated that the locating of the M. E. College at Winfield will increase the population of that city at least 5,000 in five years. One thousand souls a year! Say, COURIER, a Methodist college may add to your city's prolificness, but we think you soar a little too high in your mathematical calculation."

The figures are all right, good, straight Methodist figures that always balance. Some have put the increase much higher, but we are charitable and prefer a sure basis.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Dennis Robertson returned from Clark County last week, where he has been for the past four or five months and where he just proved up on a claim two miles and a half east of Ashland. He says they have had plenty of rain, the crops are flourishing wonderful, and the herd law is in operation and works like a charm. Everybody seems confident and the country is enjoying a steady, healthy boom.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The fourth annual camp meeting of Christian unity and holiness will be held at Melville's Walnut grove 5½ miles southeast of Winfield, commencing July 9th and closes July 21st. M. S. Haney of Illinois will have charge of said camp meeting.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. Knowles, residing three miles and a half southwest, has left us splendid samples of timothy. It is ready for cutting and will go two and a half tons to the acre.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Emily Kuhliman, of the State Normal, will be here on the 13th inst. to give instructions in the Primary work before the Normal.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of The Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. W. Heck was up from A. C. Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

P. McCommon was over from Burden Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. M. Napier, Udall, was in the hub Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Robt. Ratliff was down from Udall Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

C. W. Connelly was down Tuesday from Udall.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire went down to the Terminus Saturday on criminal "biz."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Lizzie McDonald has returned from a three weeks visit in Quincy, Illinois, and elsewhere.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

R. A. Wolf, who has been visiting D. Mater for some time, left Monday for New York City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed G. Cole and the Doctor and Miss Nellie Sundayed with relatives in Wellington.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

James N. Young and Ed P. Greer have gone to St. Louis on business connected with the K. C. & S. W.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Rev. H. D. Gans preached to Burden people Sunday. That place has a good Christian congregation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Sadie French is home from a delightful vacation of a month or more with her parents at Olathe.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. O. Wasson, R. A. Simpson, and W. E. Hinton, from Fulton County, Kansas, came in Saturday evening.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A. F. Hopkins left Sunday for Ottawa, to take in the Inter-State S. S. Convention and visit friends there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. B. Garvin, for some time past assistant with Curns & Manser, left Saturday evening for a month at his old home, Wheeling, West Virginia.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. J. W. Millspaugh and daughter, Mrs. I. N. Ripley, of Burlington, Iowa, a sister of Mrs. E. S. Bliss and Mrs. F. H. Bull, came in Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Wm. Symmonds, of Navoo, Illinois, an old acquaintance of John Tyner, is in the city prospecting for a location. Of course he'll stay.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Fred N. Dickey will travel for the Greenwich Manufacturing Co., which carries all hardware specialties. Mr. Dickey will commence about July 15th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Twenty-six cars of soldiers with their ammunition, horses, and artillery passed through Emporia Friday, to go into camp at Caldwell--in case of further Cheyenne trouble.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Ed Nicholson was in from the Grouse valley Saturday, and says the web worms have entirely disappeared in that section, having done much damage, but leaving some hopes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. Goodrich, residing in northwest Winfield, has a beautiful pet, captured in the Territory the other day--a lovely spotted fawn. It is a nice yard adornment and beats a poodle dog badly for a pet.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Misses Ida and Ella Trezise are home from a two week's visit with Mrs. Samuel Cox, nee Miss Etta Stout, in Clinton, Missouri. They had a delightful vacation--one filled with many pleasant recollections.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Jim Hall was up to the new town of Atlanta Friday and reports big excitement. A sixty foot store building is going up and the lumber is being laid down for a livery barn and various buildings.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. Robert Thirsk, of southeast Walnut township, left THE COURIER a quart of as fine raspberries as ever tickled the plate--perfect beauties, as large and luscious as any blackberries we ever saw. They were the Gregg variety.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. Bennet Pugh leaves us a beet that very much resembles a pumpkin in size. It is sixteen inches in circumference and weighs several pounds. Mr. Pugh lives in the third ward and says that such beets are no rarity with him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Prof. W. E. Merriman is delighted with the prospects opening up before him in our city. Prof. Merriman, as a music teacher, has been remarkably successful and will no doubt receive more work here than he can attend to himself.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Emporia Republican says that the officers and directors of the D., M. & A. held a meeting in that city Friday, mentioning among the officers present our C. C. Black. The meeting was to conclude the contract for the building of the road.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Rev. J. E. Leaky, of this place, has received a call to the charge of the Baptist church at Weeping Water, Nebraska, and has accepted. His family moved there on Monday. He has spent a few week there already, and seems to be well pleased.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Addie Hudson left Saturday evening for Cherryvale, where she will join her sister, Mrs. M. L. Garrigus, and go to Kokomo, Indiana, for a year at College. Miss Addie is a very bright young lady and we are glad to note her ambition to go higher in the matter of learning.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

W. G. Seaver, the eye optician, and W. E. Meredith were over from Dexter Tuesday. W. G. says Dexter will flap the wings of the Great American Eagle in the most approved style on the Fourth--a regular old fashioned picnic, dancing, speeches, and fireworks, mixed with red lemonade and toy pistols.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Marshal McFadden disturbed the slumbers of George McFarland and Jennie Gasoway, at one of our hotels Tuesday, and they now languish in durance vile. They hail from southern Cowley. They were registered as man and wife, but the "statoots" will likely contradict.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Hon. Geo. D. Thompson and Messrs. E. W. Haag and W. W. Robbins came over from Harper Saturday evening, returning Sunday morning. They were here to consult with Chas C. Black regarding Northfield, the new town laid out on the D. M. & A. in Kingman County, of which company the gentlemen are members.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

John Murray, from Indiana, a heavy dealer in lumber, was here Monday looking out a location to start a lumber yard. He is doing this on the strength of the D., M. & A. He likes the town very much, and no doubt will make this a distributing point for other yards. Captain Huffman and Mr. Murray leave for Kansas City Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mr. T. R. Bryan is down from Kansas City. He will return the last of the week with his family, who will reside there. Thus Winfield loses one of her best families. But Mr. Bryan's strong attachment to the Queen City and his property interests here will make this the center of attraction and no doubt, bring himself and family, at some time, to again make this their home.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Hon. George W. Bain called upon us Monday. We find him to be the same big hearted, cultured gentleman as when we knew him years ago. His whole soul is wrapped up in the saving of his fellow men from the demon drink, and he practices what he preaches. It makes us feel better for days after we meet such a man. Long may he live and continue the good work.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Marshal McFadden cares not for king nor potentate--all must be served alike. Will Hudson's fine gray steed was found lariated across the street and sidewalk Monday, and was brought before Judge Turner to the tune of $12.25. A nuisance on the premises of W. L. Moorehouse, back of Spotswood & Wallace's store, also received $12.25 of the Judge's attention. The dignity of the "statoots" must be vindicated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A. P. Rendleman, of Goreville, Illinois, brother to Mrs. Julia White, the victim of the late tragedy, arrived Monday and will return Tuesday with the children. The matter is as big a mystery to him as to our people. He assigns no cause for the deed on the part of White. White's brother, C. T., from Nashville, Illinois, is also here, and will remain some time. He is a good-looking, well-dressed young man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire took in Alonzo Norris near South Haven Monday, for horse stealing. Norris stole a good horse from one of his neighbors, brought him over here Saturday week and sold him. Our sheriff spotted him while here, as a bad man, and when Norris went back home and settled down with gaily innocence, Sheriff McIntire quietly went over and took him in and lodged him in Summer's bastille. McIntire went over today to attend the preliminary at Wellington.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

H. C. Buford is in Washington urging his claims for the Winfield postmastership. Before he left here he announced that he would be postmaster in two weeks. His two weeks will be up Saturday, next. Meanwhile, Geo. Rembaugh is quietly studying the mysteries and duties of the position. It is announced that the two weeks following July 4th the first assistant Post Master General will devote to changes in presidential offices, during which time no personal applicants will be noticed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Rev. Wm. Parker came in from Oak Valley Tuesday, on his way to Clearwater, and tells us of a serious episode of two fast young men who came to Oak Valley with a fine livery rig. They got full, in some mysterious way, started home, and ran pell mell through two wire fences. The horses were cut to pieces and died in two hours, amid groans and horrible agony. The young men were put in a schoolhouse to sober off and the next morning viewed the three hundred dollar wreck and were taken down with the "blues."

A GRAND LECTURE.

Hon. Geo. W. Bain Entrances One of the Largest Audiences

Ever Gathered in Our Opera House.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The popularity of Hon. Geo. W. Bain, Kentucky's great orator, in Winfield was magnificently attested in the immense audience that assembled in the Opera House Tuesday to listen to his lecture. "Boys and Girls, Nice and Naughty, or Pendulum of Life." Every chair was occupied--as large and enthusiastic audience as ever greeted any entertainment in this city. The Courier Cornet Band was out, and captivated all with the beautiful music, on the street and in the hall. This band never fails to elicit enthusiastic commendation from all at its every appearance. Mesdames Hunt, Soward, Crippen, and Dalton, of the Woman's Relief Corps, under whose auspices the lecture was given, and Judge Soward and Capt. Hunt occupied the rostrum, and Mrs. E. P. Hickok, president of the Corps, introduced the lecturer. For an hour and a half those present were held captive by Mr. Bain's wonderful magnetism and eloquence.

"Life is not all a joke," said Mr. Bain, "along the pathway of everyone lies many golden opportunities. We have but one chance to embrace each. Waste that chance and it is gone forever. What a great thing is youth, with a clean, white page before it, without a blot or a scratch, with the opportunity of writing thereon a life of glory and honor. What a deplorable thing is age, with its page all blackened, no marks for grand deeds or enabling thoughts--the opportunities of a lifetime gone. The nice boys and girls--those who act right, and think right, usually make the successes of life. The naughty boys and girls--those always buried in meanness and disobedience and trickiness, usually make the failures of life.

"I haven't much faith in reforming a life after it has grown for years under vile influences. There is a spot in every life that, if it can be touched, will lift it from the lowest depths of degradation. But it takes rare circumstances to touch it. The little New York wharf rat, looked upon as the lowest specimen of humanity, has in him traits that can be cultured, and softened by the higher feelings of humanity, and honorably place him on the highest pinnacle of fame. There are many briar patches of experience in life--many a pure and honest heart beats under a bundle of rags. It's no disgrace to be honorably poor. No position is so low that it cannot be made the stepping stone of great things. Shakespeare once wove wool and finally wove himself into the eternal memory and laudation of the whole world. Abraham Lincoln split rails near his log cabin home, to at last become crystallized in the heart of every American. Franklin set type until he set himself indelibly into American history. James A. Garfield walked the tow path, accompanied only by an honest ambition and an old mule, and at last walked into the highest office of the Nation and the everlasting praises of an admiring people.

"Idleness is the Devil's workshop everywhere. It has been said that there is only one dollar's difference between work and play and the man that plays always get that. Young man, never depend on luck--never sit around and wait for wealth and honor to turn up. They will never do it. Only by the sweat of your brow, can you carve them out. Don't be lazy. I have seen men so lazy that it would rest me to look at them. Don't meet the small--run over him and make him feel ashamed of himself. The snail could live in the age of ox-carts, wooden plows, and spinning wheels, but he has no place in this age of steam engines, electricity, and numerous wonders in rapidity. Never think that you can afford to be idle--however rich. Look at the idle, showy city dudes. Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed as one of these; yet, strip them of their glittering array, and they are the advance guard of the great army of dead beats. They are foamy, shallow nonentities--the thinnest make-believes. Be a man: work out the good there is in you. There is an angel in everyone of you, but it takes many hard strikes to get it out. When a boy, I thought: 'make me a man with a black mustache and I'll be an angel.' I am a man with a black mustache, but I'm not an angel yet. Life was then all poetry--some of the poetic effusions I then made, had I committed suicide, would have been positive evidence of my insanity.

"At twenty-one I awoke in the terrible war of the rebellion to find life a grave reality. It's a weighty thing to live. We are the image of God and the absolute sovereigns of all other creation. Whether we enter the counting office of eternity bankrupt or with a big cash account, we must live on and on forever. When the very best man cannot fill the true measure of manhood, there will the dandy and dude appear. If you want the extremes of greatness and ridiculousness, compare true manhood to modern dudeism. The country boy said, when he saw two dudes on the avenue: 'Lord, what fine game we do see when we ain't no gun along.'"

Here Mr. Bain described "Miss Dude" with her little poodle and hollow cranium and fine "togs."

"If this showy humanity was put in the scale of true worth with the manhood and womanhood of this country, it would be tossed as an elephant would toss an ounce gum-ball. Honor, virtue, and integrity will win. We want no dandies or butterflies. Look nice, dress well, but don't pay more attention to outward array than to inward culture. The girls want cautioning that they don't pay more time to the flowers on their bonnets than those in their hearts. Be happy: never be somber or repellent. Don't be an iceberg, making a chill all around you. Look at the bright side of life. Throw off the sorrow and grasp the sunshine. But under the riffles of pleasure, always find principle. Have moral courage as well as physical bravery. A man with physical bravery and no moral stamina is like an electric light over a graveyard. Be of clean heart and true character.

"I was out driving with Judge Soward this afternoon and he told me all about Cowley County (if he didn't, this is a wonderful county)." Judge Soward said: "I've been through the war, in many places of this country, and I've studied character, but a higher standard of human character than the people of Cowley County I have never seen."

"A man said to me after my temperance lecture Sunday night: 'I am a newcomer, but I didn't come here specially because of Winfield's grand prospects--I came here because of its morality, christianity, and general good character--because it is a grand place to raise my children.'"

"When I go back home, I shall not boast altogether of a great railroad center, a wonderful agricultural county, etc., but I shall say, 'Bring your children here to grow up where the influences are elevating, and ennobling, with every educational advantage.'

"I would rather be right than president. Ever since God made this world, principle has had the track. Everything must go down that gets in the way. Stick to principle and you'll go through all right. Be useful. Graduate in everything. Girls, store your minds with useful knowledge and your heart with true womanhood. Moral beauty lasts forever: physical beauty fades away. Hold up the true standard of manhood as high as men hold the true standard of womanhood. Conquer the kitchen as well as the classics."

It was a grand lecture throughout, whose beauty can only be glanced at in such a gist as this. Mirth bubbled up all through it as a relief to the weight of truth and facts. The Woman's Relief Corps did a splendid thing in affording our people this treat, and were rewarded appreciably. They netted about $125.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mc. D. Stapleton was over from Cedarvale Tuesday. He is one of Cowley's oldest pioneers, having been prominent in the eastern part of the county for fourteen years. Way back in the years that tried men's souls, he ran a general merchandise store at Cambridge. A few years ago he went to Cedarvale and is doing well. As a guarantee of his enterprise and good judgment, we remark that he will hereafter be a regular reader of THE DAILY COURIER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Hon. John D. Maurer was over from the Grouse valley Tuesday. He says the web worm has left and corn is looking grandly. The wheat is mostly harvested and promises well. He says the S. K. is putting in Torrance's first telegraph office today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Henry Goldsmith contemplates a fine new plate front in his post-office building, with a corner entrance. Good scheme. Do it quick.

ANOTHER GOOD ENTERPRISE.

The Kansas National Guard's Association of Winfield Organized.

An Armory and Hall.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The charter of "The Kansas National Guards Association," of Winfield, has been filed with the Secretary of State. The corporation is formed for the purpose of purchasing ground and the creation of a building to be used as an armory. It is formed for a term of twenty-one years, and its capital stock is ten thousand dollars, divided into one hundred shares of one hundred dollars each. It is made up of Company C. K. N. G., containing sixty members, and St. John's Battery Company, of thirty-three members. It is controlled by six directors, those chosen for the first year being Thomas J. Harris, Frank W. Finch, C. E. Steuven, N. A. Haight, O. Trump, and W. E. Tansey. This is a splendid move, one that should receive the hearty co-operation of every citizen. We have the oldest and best drilled militia company in the State, composed of enterprising, reliable, and energetic men. Under the law passed by the late legislature, every militia company of the State is furnished full uniforms and $100 a year for armory rent. We have half of the only artillery company in the State, with the Captain, N. A. Haight, and First Lieutenant, W. E. Tansey. Cities in different parts of the State have been trying to get our battery; but owing to both our militia and artillery companies being the oldest and best drilled, Capt. Tansey, representing Winfield before The State Militia Board last month, held the captain and lieutenant, two guns, and half the State company here. The other half was stationed at Topeka. But in order to hold the prestige now established, we must have an armory, and this corporation is intent on having it. The members propose to construct a stone building one hundred feet long, two stories, the upper a splendid hall, suitable for any entertainment. They expect our citizens to go in and help them--take a number of shares and boost it in word and action. We think our people will recognize, at once, the benefit of such a building and offer without reluctance a friendly hand. The Directors of this association met last night and elected W. E. Tansey, president; Frank W. Finch, secretary; and Tom J. Harris, treasurer.

A SHIRT TALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Arkansas City, along with her gigantic "medicine" record and other eccentricities, still follows the superstitions of old--with a success that is causing wide comment. The reporter's credulity has been worked on until he takes the whole business in. The statement is verified by individuals of "known integrity" and common sense and must be so. Last Friday evening a drowning occurred in the Walnut, just east of Arkansas City. The search for the body was assiduous and fruitless until Sunday morning, when an old lady told them to get an old shirt of the drowned boy, put it in the current of the stream fifty yards above where the body sunk, and it would float down and sink over the body. This was done. The shirt floated about fifty yards, when it left the current a little way, whirled around, and went down. A boat was anchored, a hook put down, and the first pull brought up the body, with the shirt lying across the breast. Of course, it is hard to believe any such thing. But the fact exists and there must be a theory. The most plausible one is that the body went down in a whirlpool, and the shirt, through necessity, followed the same course.

A PLEASANT TIME.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Saturday evening was the occasion of a very enjoyable time at the pleasant residence of S. D. Pryor and wife, it being Mr. Pryor's birthday. The following couples were present: M. L. Robinson and wife, Dr. Kirkwood and wife, C. W. Taylor and wife, L. M. Williams and wife, H. B. Schuler and wife, J. C. Fuller and wife, Dr. Elder and wife, Henry Brown and wife, Mrs. Geo. W. Miller, Mrs. Brooks, Miss Brooks, Mrs. R. B. Waite, Mrs. Hartman, and S. C. Smith. The evening soon passed away and it was nearly midnight when the party broke up. All enjoyed themselves. The refreshments were very fine. Dr. Kirkwood presented Mr. Pryor with the birthday cake, which was decorated in a unique and tasty manner. All left wishing the evening was only longer. May Mr. Pryor enjoy many such birthdays.

THE COURT HOUSE GROUNDS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

All are interested in beautifying and improving the Court House grounds. They need a friend now badly. In places the grass is heavily seeded, which should be mowed and scattered over the thin spots and places that are growing up to weeds. The ground around the trees should be forked up in a circle at least three feet from each tree, otherwise they will suffer, if not die, in the hotter part of the season if it should be dry. All of this would be worth ten times the cost of the few dollars that it would take to do it. Will the chairman of the Board of Commissioners please give it attention, if possible for him to do so? Observer.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Miss Lina Conrad, one of Winfield's most accomplished young Misses, will leave her many friends on Tuesday evening for Toronto, Canada, where she will enter the Ontario College of Music, conducted by Prof. Farringer, formerly of Winfield. Miss Lina has been a successful teacher of piano music for some time past, but not being satisfied with her present attainments, is ambitious to succeed to the highest accomplishments in the musical world. With such energy and pluck, we predict for her a bright and prosperous future. She will spend at least one year in the Ontario College of Music, when she will return to her parents and many friends who will welcome her home. Lina, you have the best wishes or all your friends and associates.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Chas. E. Fuller has retired from the Winfield National Bank, to engage in other business for himself. Charlie's many years' service as cashier of this bank have won for him the esteem and confidence of all. Clear, careful, energetic, and honorable in business, genial and accommodating in manner, his daily transactions with the public have always been agreeable and satisfactory. He has the essentials to success in any vocation. He will soon launch his business shingle in the loan, investment, and insurance business in this city. Everett T. Schuler takes the cashier's desk in the Winfield National. He is capable and agreeable and will be very acceptable to the patrons of that bank.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

J. H. McFarland, overseer of the Osawatomie insane asylum, came down Monday and took away our lunatic--the last one left. This is the harmless, simple individual who was found aimlessly wandering around in these parts, escaped from Osawatomie. We hope the bosses of the State asylum will keep a keener eye on their lunatics until our asylum is done. We have had all the truck we want with such individuals--our women are wrathy and liable to hurt any lunatic that is again found running around loose near here, especially if he comes as a perambulating armory like the wild and wooly lunatic. This is absolutely our last fire at lunatics.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Tuesday a man came into the postoffice with a letter to mail weighing a little over a half ounce and inquired what would be the postage on it. The clerk answered: "Four cents tonight, tomorrow two cents will be enough." "Well," said the writer, "I will hold it until tomorrow."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mike Castillo, a young Irishman from Maple City, figured in our police court last evening. He was in Arkansas City with some "chums," got some "medicine," and came up to the hub, where he thought he could paint the city much redder. Here he got a little more "booze"--the "statoots" don't say how--and down at Sol Fredrick's stable he wanted to pulverize somebody--got his wicked gun out and made wild flourishes, just as though he had sand enough to bore an antagonist. Cost, $12.25.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Wichita Eagle claims that the web-worm attacks only fields where the corn was planted very late and is very weedy; that it does not deposit its eggs on the corn, but on parsley and other weeds of low spreading habits. If the Eagle is correct, it stands corn raisers in hand to keep the weeds out of their fields if they have to wade knee deep to get at them and pull them up. In most seasons, however, the weeds can easily be kept down by proper cultivation in due season.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

There are a great many of last year's spring chickens in the market. One old hen was seen on the avenue Thursday with nine rings on her toes, indicating that she was born in the early summer of 1876.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Wichita census taker returns a population of 16,019 for that city. In 1880 its population was less than that of Winfield now. In 1890 Winfield will have a greater population than Wichita has now.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The citizens of Cambridge have subscribed six hundred dollars for the erection of an M. E. church in that village. Work is to be commenced at an early day, and the building is to cost $1,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Kansas City is the name of a new town that has been started in Kansas County, the southwestern county of the State. Its name will advertise it. Kansas City, Kansas County, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Elmer Oliver departed Thursday for Denver, where he takes a position under the Adams Express Company.

THE D. M. & A.

The Contracts Let and All in Readiness for Active Operations.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Chas. C. Black got in Saturday from a meeting at Emporia of the D. M. & A. officers and directors. He informs us that the contract for the construction of three hundred miles of the line, from the east line of the State, near Baxter Springs, to Larned, Pawnee County, was ratified. It is given to John Fitzgerald, of Lincoln, Nebraska, and S. H. Mallery, of Charlton, Iowa. These gentlemen are contractors of large experience and means. They begin grading at Belle Plaine on July Fourth. That place has a big celebration, and the grading is commenced on that day as an additional attraction. The work will be pushed as fast as men and teams can be got to do it. The D., M. & A. Company have laid out the new town of Northfield, between Conway Springs and Kingman, in the southeast corner of Kingman County, and lots go on sale next Thursday. Mr. Black is highly pleased with the outlook for the D., M. & A. The counties all along the line are enthusiastic for it and no difficulty seems likely to present itself anywhere in obtaining the required bonds. There will be no cessation in the construction--it will be whooped right through to completion. Trains will be running through Winfield by fall.

MORE SCHOOL ROOM A NECESSITY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The action of the School Board in providing more school room for immediate use is certainly a wise and timely move, and adding to the Central school building is the most economic and desirable. It saves, at this time, the purchase of additional grounds, and it saves, also, largely in the cost of the building, as the north wall of the present building can be utilized, and the cost of an entire basement saved. This, also, puts the room where it is easily accessible from all parts of the town. With the proposed addition, it will add much to the appearance of our Central school building, and make it an ornament, a finished and complete structure. It is impossible to accommodate our schools with our present room; we must have accommodations for at least 250 additional sittings, to, in any way, make our schools efficient. Our schools are overcrowded, our teachers are overworked, more room and more teachers are absolutely imperative. The School Board in February last were compelled to exclude from our schools all children under the age of seven, and even then, with our new East Ward school added, every room was overcrowded. It is our duty to provide for at least 250 more pupils than our largest enrollment of last year. The School Board expect, and should have, the hearty cooperation of every citizen interested in our schools. If this matter is now hastened, the additional room can be ready for occupancy October 1st, and our schools can then commence with plenty of room and plenty of teachers, and our people can then demand from teachers first-class work in every way. Let every voter go to the polls on the 8th of July, vote for the bonds and thus aid in this enterprise of most vital importance to our people and to our city. CITIZEN.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds yesterday.

L D Randall et ux to Annie E Austin lot 18 blk 21 Udall. $94

Albert A Newman to L H Miller lots 11 and 12 blk 29 Ark City. $175

I J F White to L W Miller pt of 24-34-6-e. $10

Viola G Crabtree and husband to E H Long lots 6-7 and 8 block 15 Burden: $2,200

Benj F Cue et ux to Mc D Stapleton w hf se qr and s hf sw qr 24-31-7-e 160 acres. $200

E H Long et ux to Mc D Stapleton lots 6, 7 and 8 blk 15 Burden. $2,000

Eli Earhart et ux to Mc D Stapleton lots 27 and 28 and sw qr se qr 31-30 and lot 2-6-31-8e 159 acres. $1,000

W H H Marris et ux to Eli Read w hf sw qr 3-34-5-e. $2,500

THE OCCUPATION TAX.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The occupation tax ordinance went into force Wednesday and soon the collector will be on his rounds. The attorneys of the city say this ordinance is O. K., and City Attorney Hackney says if anybody thinks it isn't all right, legally or otherwise, let him run up against it. The city government means stringent collection, and the condition of the city exchequer seems to bear them out. They have weighed carefully the necessary and contracted expenditure and resources for the coming year, and find that with about fifteen hundred dollars from the occupation tax, the city will come through square. The city tax levy is as high as the law allows, ten mills, and other resources must materialize.

THAT WORM AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The plague of web worms that has been invading us, is said to be the regular cotton worm of the south; will some gentleman from the cotton states give us the probable time the worms will stay with us. I have lost one crop of potatoes by them and would plant another provided I could so do by the middle of July. There would be considerable corn planted yet if there was any assurance the worms would leave soon. There is considerable speculation over this worm question. It took the writer nearly one hour to convince neighbor Gameka and one or two others that the worms could not possibly have escaped from the wormery of Mrs. Davis, who is keeping silk worms.

Neighbor Chase calls them Salemites, owing to their pitiable appearance of goneness when ejected from their feeding places, and their pertinacity in trying to get back, and he wants them transferred to Richland.

The moths or millers that lay the eggs from which the worm is hatched are plenty here yet. I am watching them closely and may write again if I find anything likely to prove useful to the public. TISDALE.

FALSE ENTIRELY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Agent Kennedy, of the Santa Fe, informs us that the report a few weeks ago that the Santa Fe Company had determined to take up their track from Mulvane to Seeley and continue their line from Douglass to Seeley, is false. No such thing was ever talked of. The Santa Fe may continue their road from Douglass to Winfield and Geuda and on through the Territory southwest, but nothing definite has been done regarding this move, and when they do make it, the track from Wichita down will not be disturbed--trains run as ever. Udall can rest easy, cool her pulse, and continue her prosperity. The railroad company intends to do nothing to the detriment of that place.

CHILDREN'S DAY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Sunday was "Children's Day" at the Presbyterian church. In the morning the church was beautifully decorated by the Sunday school classes of Dr. Kirkwood and Mr. Taylor and others and the pastor delivered an eloquent sermon to the young. As this is the last sermon the Doctor will preach to the young, it will be published entire in THE COURIER at the request of the Sunday school. Superintendent Myres had prepared special responsive readings for the Sunday school, a general review was had, and all the exercises were of unusual interest. These days are a grand stimulus to the young.

ED PATE'S GRIST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Edward G. Maitland has filed his petition in the District Court for a divorce from Malvina H. Maitland. Savilla M. Stucker also wants a divorce from Eli I. Stucker. The police court appeal cases of City vs. J. C. McMullen, for fencing in fire plug, and City vs. W. A. Lee, for blockading streets, were filed Monday.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Timothy, like everything else, is a big success in Cowley. Tom Harris has left us a bunch, raised on Lafe Devore's farm, down the Walnut, with heads nine to twelve inches long and very luxuriant stalk. Timothy is getting popular with our farmers, and the acreage is yearly increasing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Senator Hackney is in Wichita on legal "biz."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Odd Fellows have closed a contract for the second floor of the Moorehouse addition now being erected back of Spotswood & Wallace's grocery, for a hall. It will be of good size, splendidly ventilated, and a most pleasant room. The Odd Fellows will furnish it finely.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Mrs. T. H. Soward and baby boy left Wednesday for several months visit in Summerville, Pa., with her relatives. The Judge will be a terribly forlorn and disheveled "widdy" before their return.

TO CLOSE OUT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Three patterns of Summer Silks at thirty-five cents. Few patterns much better at 50 cts.

M. Hahn & Co.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

OTTER ITEMS. "NETTIE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Ed. Barnes is on the sick list this week.

Whooping cough is still raging among the children.

Cloverdale is preparing for a grand Fourth of July celebration.

Preaching every 3rd Sunday at the Otter Creek schoolhouse by Rev. York, at 11 a.m.

Notwithstanding the hot weather the Otter Creek school is doing excellent work under their wide-awake teacher, Mr. Hardin. It will close in two weeks.

Our Temperance Union was treated to a rousing speech last Sunday night by A. H. Limerick. The house was well filled and everybody enjoyed it hugely.

Our people are to have a Sunday school and Temperance Union picnic in a few weeks. Let everybody put their shoulder to the wheel and make this the most enjoyable event of the season.

TISDALE. "GROWLER."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

We are anxiously waiting the action of the D., M. & A. Co.

Our oats crop is unequaled in the memory of the oldest inhabitant.

The wheat harvest is progressing slowly on account of wet weather. We expect to save the crop in good shape.

Corn is all O. K., except a few fields of late planting. Cowley will crib a wonderful amount of corn this fall in spite of the worms.

Mrs. W. W. Curdy, wife of Humboldt's leading merchant, accompanied by her son, spent last week with her sister, Mrs. E. P. Young.

The most of our farmers are running their hogs on grass without corn and they (the hogs) look well, even better than when fed solely on dry corn.

Mrs. A. C. Davis has quit feeding her silk worms and has an immense pile of cocoons to show for her labor. We trust she may find a profitable market for the little yellow balls. They have cost her a great deal of hard work and anxiety.

We hear that our old time friend, W. H. H. Marris, has located in New Salem and gone back to his first love, dry goods. We trust Mr. M. will act as "leaven" in that community and that Salem will be better for his living there, yet we fear for Bro. Marris' future. We commend him to kind providence.

The grand and glorious Fourth is the all absorbing topic of the day, and, we propose to have a grand time at Tisdale. The grove on A. T. Gay's farm has been cleared out, a number of speakers have agreed to be on hand, music provided and, in short, everything prepared and a good time is inevitable. Don't fail to come and bring your aunts and cousins and a well filled basket.

TORRANCE ETCHINGS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Ed Higbee is chilling.

Rev. F. A. Brady, of Udall, has been in our city for several days.

Quite a crowd from Torrance attended church at Cambridge Sunday night.

Miss Mattie Rittenhouse and Eva Reynolds were in Cambridge Friday.

Supt. Limerick and wife, of Winfield, were guests of Mrs. Elliott last week.

Miss Linda Colvin is spending several days with Miss Ida Straughn, of Cambridge.

Torrance is to have a telegraph line right away. I understand the operator is here.

Miss Lou Wilson is taking music lessons in Winfield. She makes two trips each week.

The Mite met with the Misses Haygood Saturday evening. Will meet with Miss Laura Elliott a week from next Saturday night.

Mr. Will Higbee and wife left last Thursday for Schell City, Missouri, on a visit to relatives and friends. They expect to be gone several weeks.

Quite a crowd of the young folks went down to Mr. A. O. Elliott's last Wednesday evening, and made ice cream and had a general good time.

Mr. Will Swim, formerly of Torrance but now of Winfield, spent several days in our city last week among his old friends. Come again, Will.

Last week I promised to tell all about the picnic. Well, I think it was a day of disappointment to most everyone, as it rained and there was no picnic.

CHERRYVALE. "JASPER."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Rain, snow, ice, floods, chintz bugs, grasshoppers, and worms all conspire to make Thanksgiving a farce and twine the heart of the granger to wrath.

Cedarvale and Sedan are both working for the G. A. R. reunion, and either will heartily support the other after its own chance is gone. A good reunion beats anything.

A mass railroad meeting was held in Kenson's opera hall last Tuesday night. The meeting seemed in favor of the Le Roy project. No great faith was manifested in the D., M. & A. People are a little afraid of it.

The Galalea is a new side wheel steamer launched in Big Cana just above the mill. It is a well built, good looking pleasure boat, with a capacity of twenty to thirty persons and gives a new twin to the pleasure system in this neighborhood.

Jasper had the pleasure of visiting court last week, and shaking hands with the various officers attendant thereon, but missed the pleasing smile of our old reporter, Frank K. Raymond. Court is no good without Frank and you can't make it so.

Uncle Johnny Rush is again abroad in the land, loaning money and collecting. Among other things he has collected a good variety of photographs of good looking widows. He reports business very favorable in central Cowley, where he resides, and will return soon.

A mild, glorious rain set in Friday morning, refreshing and sustaining the corn and suspending the depredations of the worms. It now seems that the terrible gauntlet is about run by the corn crop of 1885, and if the drouth does not catch it in July and August we are saved yet.

The district court made some rulings regarding our city case which we cannot fully understand from report. It is said they have the effect of declaring the act creating cities of the third class unconstitutional. If THE COURIER knows anything about it, we would like to have the benefit of its information.

Wm. Hines, Jr., who is farming the well known Thompkins place, became involved in a row with Orin Thompkins last Monday night, and the latter came off severely butchered up. The real merits of the case are not known to your correspondent; but the ground where Milton Thompkins was so cruelly murdered two years ago seems to be the natural theater for strife and trouble.

UDALL. "H."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Web worms are hurting late corn in spots.

Oats are a splendid crop and wheat better than at first thought.

D., M. & A. surveyors have run their second line through town and have gone east.

Udall is preparing for a colt show some time in August or September and expects to have premiums sufficient to draw a big display.

A bed of brick clay has just been discovered near town and now to the finest building stone in Kansas is to be added a first-rate quality of brick.

Our M. E. friends did not succeed in raising funds enough Sunday to pay off the indebtedness on their church, but with true Methodist pluck, they will keep at it until they do.

Our police judge has taken a trip to the mountains and wore off his robes of office along with his other clothes and left the town without a referee in case of a battle; but after the "mill" last week, the council got together and appointed the Hon. Enos M. Buffington to wear the ermine.

Two of our oldest citizens afforded the town some excitement one day last week by a little set to. It began with a sort of biographical sketch that seemed to indicate their belief in the evolution theory, but they got "way back," and tried to prove that they were made descendants of canine mothers and damn-lyers, whatever that is, and, like their betters oftentimes, when they failed to convince each other by words, they resorted to "arms" (and legs) and had a battle in the true Marquis of Queensberry style. They fought two rounds, the first, round the head and face, and the second, they clung round a hitching post, till they were rescued from each other by that bold consecrator of the peace, the marshal. Result: two pretty good fellows scratched up and the city treasury a few ducats ahead.

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

No dust complained of yet, but oh, "the mud" is all you hear.

Mr. Adam Sipe and Mr. Sumner made Winfield a flying visit on Sunday.

Harvesting only half through. There will be an extra crop of cheat this year.

Miss Nellie Martin has been with her sister, Mrs. Schwantes, for several days.

Mrs. A. Shelton and daughter were at Mrs. Ad Rucker's Saturday afternoon.

Rev. Bowles preached at Bethel Saturday night to a right attentive little company.

Mrs. Foose's daughter, Mrs. Perkins, and her daughter, spent Friday last in Winfield with friends.

Alex. Shelton thinks it is much hotter in harvest than it was last January, and would like to engage someone to carry an umbrella over him the rest of the time.

The hot weather is about to get away with J. A. Rucker, so he thinks he will stop singing for the present. He says the pupils are apt and can go ahead without him, while he takes a needed rest.

Mr. Andrews, a brother-in-law of Jerome Hassell, who moved to Nebraska in March, is in these parts; thinks if he can suit himself, he will stay. If not, he will return to Illinois, where his mother resides.

The surveyors of the D., M. & A. railroad passed through these parts last Friday. Farmers feel somewhat blue over the way they seem to divide farms. But go ahead, if you think there is no hereafter.

Rev. Knight did not fill his appointment Sunday evening, but sent a "hand" who seemed to answer the purpose. But why not change the preaching place to Uncle Robert Weakly's? Think the congregation would be much larger and on hand every Sunday. They are clever folks at Uncle Rob.'s, and I think they would endorse the change.

Mr. Green, of Fairview township, met his daughter, Mrs. Lukens, and three children, at Winfield last Saturday. After making their visit, they will return to their home in Washington Territory. She seems very well pleased with their home, but thinks some things quite odd. For instance, harvesting is not done just as soon as wheat ripens, but when the farmers can best attend to it. They never hurry themselves about it, but when they have ample time to attend to it they take sacks and fill them just with the heads of wheat and leave them bunched up until threshing time and thus they finish up their wheat crop and do away with granaries.

OUR WOMAN'S SUFFRAGE SOCIETY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The meeting of the Woman's Suffrage Society at the residence of Mrs. Strong on Tuesday inst., was presided over by Mrs. Caton, who responded to the calling of her name by reading an extract from Senator Harris' speech at a recent meeting of the W. S. A. of New England, in which he asserts the following.

"That which fits man to take a share in the government also fits woman to take a share in the same. Is there any stake in the country like a mother's interest in her children? Can any man suffer from crime as she from crime against her? Who is interested in the school, in the law which defends persons and property, in the great institutions of education and charity, in the policies that affect wages and diminish taxes, in the legislation for temperance and virtue, if she is not? Women are wielding now some of the greatest and most beneficent affairs of the day: Mrs. Leonard in the State Board of Charities; Mrs. Ware, promoting the prison for women; Clara Barton, organizing the hospital service of the army, or at the head of the institution at Sherborn, or later, bringing all the nations into the convention of the Red Cross League; Miss Freeman, presiding over the College at Wellesley; Mrs. Orinton in the Indian Right Association; Mrs. Livermore, addressing temperance meetings. Who is to be degraded and who is to be harmed if their vote be counted?"

Mrs. Finch read, "Some reminiscences of well known women," which was intensely interesting. Miss Strong gave for her response, "A woman suffrage lecturer lately brought down the house with the following argument: 'I have no vote, but my groom has. I have a great respect for that man in the stables, but I am sure if I were to go to him and say, 'John, will you exercise the franchise?' he would reply, 'please, mum, which horse be that?'"

The open chapter of "How to Win," by Francis Millard, read by Mrs. Garlick, is only the beginning of a series of advice and instruction, which all our young ladies ought to hear.

E. D. G.

WEB WORMS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

For the information of our young entomological correspondent, "Typo," from Hackney, I will state that in a letter from C. V. Riley, Entomologist of the Department of Agriculture at Washington, in acknowledgment of a box of the web worms sent to him June 19th, he says: "They are the larva of the small moth Eurycreon rantalis--it is very destructive this season over a wide extent of country in Kansas, Missouri, Texas, and the Indian Territory." Where they can be used with safety, he recommends Paris Green and London Purple mixed with water and sprayed as for potato Beetle.

The last week in my corn fields, I used a cracker box lid hinged to front cross piece of each cultivator. This strikes every hill in a vertical position, jarring the worms to the ground, when the dirt is thrown over them, running the shovels as deep as the teams are able. In the pastures they have a decided preference for the clovers, eating all kinds down into the crowns. Timothy, orchard grass, oat grass, and blue stem are exempt from their ravages. All vegetables, except tomatoes, are greatly damaged and destroyed in this neighborhood. The replanted corn and late corn, has, in a measure, been destroyed. Some fields of millet have been eaten as bare as a floor. In some fields the moths are yet busy depositing the eggs for a second drop of larva. I have seen the leaves of some young apple trees injured. No other varieties damaged as yet. JACOB NIXON.

Kellogg, Kansas, June 29, 1885.

A COSTLY COW.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Irve Randall has a very costly cow. Last fall he tied her in the street, to the corner of his yard fence. Charles Maus came along, after dark, with one leg carelessly hanging over the edge of the wagon bed. His team shied at the cow, the wheel cramped around and broke his leg. He brought suit for a large sum for damages. The case hung fire until the other day, when Irve compromised it for $275. There was considerable question, in the eyes of the evidence, whether a trial wouldn't find Maus equally careless, in his position in the wagon, etc., with Randall, but Irve preferred to settle the matter rather than fool away time and costs in legal controversy.

FARMERS, THRESHING MACHINE MEN HOLD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Do you know that we have the largest and best stock of brass goods, pipe fittings, hemp and rubber packing, machine and cylinder oils, waste, and, in fact all kinds of supplies this side of Kansas City. Call and see us and get anything you may want at low prices.

Ostrander & Stayman, Foundry and Machine Shop, N. Main st.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

FOR SALE. A fine farm, situated on the Walnut river, 10 miles southeast from Winfield and 7½ northeast from Arkansas City, consisting of 278 acres, of which about 80 acres is under good cultivation, 65 acres of good timber, and the remainder in pasture; two good houses, one good barn, one outhouse; orchard bearing choice fruits; two good wells and plenty of stock water the year round; all under good fence. Object in selling is to retire. Call no or address Mrs. M. A. Greaves, Winfield, Kansas.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The broken roof stone of the Washington monument was replaced in position without difficulty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Pope has rebuked Archbishop Guibert, of Paris, for criticizing one of the Cardinals.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

James P. Austin, an insurance agent of Boston, Mass., has failed for $35,000. His assets aggregate $8,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The French Chamber of Deputies, by a vote of 206 to 120, refused to exempt priests from serving in the army reserves.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

It was reported that 140 persons were killed by the explosion in the Pendlebury colliery near Manchester, England, recently.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Max J. Weiser, mailing clerk at the postoffice at San Antonio, Texas, has been arrested, charged with purloining registered letters.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Business failure for week ended June 18 number for the United States 294; for Canada 32; a total of 226 against 207 the week previous.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Austrian Government has objected to Carl Jonas as American Consul at Prague on account of his "offensive liberalism" in Austria in former years.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Fire at Portland, Maine, destroyed the building owned by S. M. Layman and damaged the two adjoining buildings. Loss, $50,000; insurance, $25,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Turkish troops have captured eighty Bulgarian brigands, including the leader, a former Russian Major, and several Russians. Fifteen were killed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The will of Robert Treat Paine, of Boston, Massachusetts, bequeaths $50,000 to Harvard College for the maintenance of a professorship of astronomy in the university.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Lieutenant Stevens, of the Ninth Cavalry, has returned to Fort Reno from Oklahoma after having thoroughly secured the country. No colonists were found in that section.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

An aeronaut named Patterson fell from a hot-air balloon which collapsed recently at Charleston, West Virginia. Patterson was crushed to a shapeless mass. He left a wife and family.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

George A. Rogers, convicted at Baltimore of wife beating, received fifteen lashes at the hands of Sheriff Airey recently. He was the first white man whipped in Maryland for that offense.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Nearly the entire force employed at the Para Rubber Shoe Company's works at South Farmington, Massachusetts, went out on a strike the other morning in support of the striking bootmakers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A serious strike of stonemasons occurred in Berlin recently. The efforts of the strikers to prevent other masons from working on buildings in process of erection led to riots and many arrests were made.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

James Russell Lowell arrived at Boston on the 20th from England.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Senator Sabin, of Stillwater, Minnesota, was reported seriously sick of inflammation of the bowels.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Fires in the native quarters of Lagos, West Africa, recently destroyed over one hundred houses.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Four thieving Bannock Indians were killed the other day at Rossfork Agency, Idaho, by the Indian police.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

At Newport, N. H., recently the Nettleton block was destroyed by fire. Loss, $100,000; insurance, $41,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The finding of $75,000 in the rear of the Cincinnati liquor establishment of Louis Schertz, recently deceased, is reported.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

As a result of the recent earthquakes in Cashmere, 3,081 persons lost their lives, 70,000 houses were laid in ruins, and 33,000 animals perished.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

An appeal was issued recently by the Irish National League of America for funds to aid the Parnell party in the approaching elections to the British Parliament.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A freight train broke in two on the grade near Hiattville, Kansas, recently. Some cars were ditched and burned, their loads of matches and oil having been fired.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Serious riots occurred in Madrid recently, consequent upon the enforcement of sanitary regulations. Two workmen were reported killed and several wounded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Henry Thill, a wealthy farmer living near Maryville, Missouri, while intoxicated, drove into a ditch and was thrown from his wagon and killed, his neck being broken.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The arrest of the clerk of the English Consul to Teheran by the Russian authorities at Askabad, was the occasion of a fresh dispute between the foreign offices of Russia and England.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Rev. W. F. Morrison, ex-Grand Counselor of the Indiana Order of Chosen Friends, who, on June 12, was convicted of grand larceny, was sentenced to ten years in the State prison at San Francisco recently.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The clearing house returns for week ended June 20 showed an average decrease of 12.4 compared with the corresponding week of last year. In New York the decrease was 17.4. In Kansas City the increase was 45.2.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Denis Kearney announced his intention to run for Governor of California next year on the workingmen's ticket. The chief plank in his platform will be that municipalities have a right to regulate workingmen's hours of labor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The Kansas City Base Ball Club has disbanded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Reports were in circulation in Paris that the Sultan of Morocco had claimed French protection from Spanish aggression.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

It was believed in Washington that the Austrian Government had refused to receive the credentials of Mr. Kelley, the American Minister.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

It is rumored that Prince William, the grandson of Emperor William, will succeed the late Baron Von Mauteuffel as Governor of Alsace-Loraine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Every house in Sherbrooke, Dakota, was blown over in a recent storm except the county building, which was held down by the safe. No one was hurt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Disturbances have again broken out in Fletcher County, Kentucky, and it was thought probable that the State troops would have to be dispatched to the scene.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A dispatch from Tourcoing, near Lille, France, states that a boiler in Coster's scouring works exploded, killing seven persons and wounding forty others.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A mob at Tralee, Ireland, wrecked the office of the Kerry Sentinel recently. The attack was made because of an alleged defection from Nationalist principles.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A meeting of Irish dynamiters was held at Mons, France, Sunday, at which it was resolved to call a convention at Antwerp. The speakers made the usual violent attack upon England.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A family consisting of six persons were poisoned at New Orleans recently by a female servant. A doctor was called in at once, and all will probably recover. The servant was arrested.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The steamer Long Branch, while returning to Peekskill, New York, from Newburgh the other day with 1,300 excursionists on board, broke her paddle wheel and came near drifting on the rocks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

A party of sub-lieutenants in the navy becoming enraged at some stories which appeared in a local newspaper at Portsmouth, N. H., forced an entrance into the residence of the editor and assaulted him the other morning.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Lord Garmoyle has settled down at his late father's residence and has resumed correspondence with Miss Fortescue, the actress. It is expected that they will be married within a year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The First Comptroller of the Treasury has disallowed items amounting to $3,200 in the account of Mr. Hallett, Supervisor of Elections in Boston. The accounts as rendered amounted to about $9,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Hog cholera was reported causing great loss to the farmers in the neighborhood of Shelbyville, Illinois. One farmer lost forty head of fat hogs in one week and many others had the disease among their droves.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The through express going east on the Panhandle Road collided with an empty accommodation at [?], twenty-seven miles from Pittsburgh, Pa., recently. Both engines were thrown from the track. The engineer and fireman were insured.

[Could not read name of place of accident: big streak in paper.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

At Faufkireben, Hungary, recently, Herr Lisch, the inventor of new dynamite patents, was killed by a fearful explosion which occurred in his house while he was packing boxes. His mother was also killed. The roof of the house was blown off.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

George W. Dent, brother-in-law of General Grant, received a letter from President Cleveland, notifying him of his suspension from the office of Appraiser of the Custom House in San Franciso. Thomas Beck, recently appointed, becomes his successor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

Sitting Bull and fifteen braves in war costume called at the War and other Departments, and finally on the President, at Washington, recently. There was a general hand-shaking, but no speeches, and the Bull said he wished he could have seen all he was now seeing when a boy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 2, 1885.

The order for the removal of the telegraph wires from the roof of the Treasury Department building at Washington not having been complied with, the telegraph company has been notified that they will be cut down. The wires on the roof of the White House will also be summarily removed.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1885.

JUDGE TORRANCE'S DECISION.

On the Petition to Extend the Corporate Limits of the City of Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

At Chambers, before the Judge of the District Court of Cowley County.

Petition of the City Council of the City of Winfield, for an Order Extending the Corporate Limits of said City.

An act of the legislature which authorizes the District Court, on petition of the city council, to enlarge the corporate limits of a city, when in the judgment of the court it is advisable, and will advance the interests of the city, and will cause no manifest injury to private rights, by the annexation of unlimited territory lying adjacent to the city limits, and which act does not specify the facts or conditions upon which said annexation shall depend, except that the territory to be annexed shall be adjacent to the existing corporate limits of the city, is unconstitutional and void for two reasons:

First: Because it assumes to confer upon a judicial court powers not of a judicial character; and

Second: Because it is an attempt on the part of the legislature to delegate legislative power to a tribunal which, under the constitution, can neither receive nor exercise any delegated legislative power whatever.

This is an application by the City Council of the city of Winfield for an order extending the corporate limits of said city over a large extent of territory lying adjacent thereto. The application is made under the provisions of an act of the Legislature passed at its last session, and published as chapter 97 of the Session Laws of 1885. Notice of the application was given by the City Council as required by the act. At the time and place fixed by the notice for the hearing of the application, several of the owners of real estate, included in the territory sought to be brought into the city limits by this proceeding, appeared by their attorneys and objected to the hearing of the matter, on the ground that the act is unconstitutional, and therefore ineffectual to confer upon me any jurisdiction to act in the premises.

On consideration of this objection it seems to me that the constitutionality of this act is extremely doubtful. I recognize the fact that Courts, and especially the Judge of a nisi prius court at chambers, should hesitate to declare an act of the Legislature unconstitutional, so long as there is a reasonable doubt as to how the question should be decided. But with my present doubts of the validity of this act, I hesitate more to proceed to incorporate this additional territory within the limits of the city of Winfield, then to declare the act unconstitutional. If this territory should be annexed to the city limits, and my doubts as to the validity of the act should finally prove to be well founded, much useless trouble and expense would be incurred in the meantime, both to the public and private individuals, and probably much more vexatious and expensive litigation than would be involved in having the constitutionality of the act settled in the first instance by the Supreme Court.

I am inclined to the opinion that the act of the Legislature, under which this proceeding is instituted, is unconstitutional for two reasons.

First. It assumes to confer upon the Judiciary of the State functions not of a judicial nature, the Courts of this State being vested by the Constitution with judicial power only. And,

Second. It is an attempt on the part of the Legislature to delegate a part of its legislative power to a tribunal, which, under the constitution, can neither receive nor exercise any delegated legislative power or discretion whatever.

To appreciate the force of these reasons, it becomes necessary to refer to some of the general provisions of this act, and also to some of the provisions of the Constitution of the State.

The act in question provides that whenever the City Council of any city of the second class desires to enlarge the limits thereof from the territory adjacent thereto, the Council shall, in the name of the city, present a petition to the Judge of the District Court of the county in which said city is situated, setting forth by metes and bounds the territory sought to be added, and praying that such territory may be added thereto. Upon such petition being presented to such Judge, he shall proceed to hear testimony as to the advisability of making such addition, and if, upon such hearing, he shall be satisfied that the adding of such territory to the city will be to its interests and will cause no manifest injury to the persons owning real estate in the territory sought to be added, he shall make an order declaring such territory a part of the corporate limits thereof, and subject to the laws and ordinances pertaining thereto. Application for adding separate parcels of territory to such cities may be made in the same petition, and, upon such an application being made, the Judge may order any or all of such parcels added thereto. Any person feeling himself aggrieved by the order of such Judge, may appeal from such order to the District Court of the county in which such city is located, by filing in the office of the Clerk thereof, within ten days after such order is filed in the office of said Clerk, a bond conditioned for the payment of costs.

It will be readily seen from the terms of this act that it was the intention of the Legislature to confer jurisdiction of the subject matter of the act upon the District Court itself, and not merely upon the person holding the office of Judge of said Court, since an appeal lies from the decision of the Judge to the Court over which he presides.

It also plainly appears from the language employed that the Court is to exercise its judgment and discretion in deciding upon the advisability of making the addition, and the extent of it, and in deciding whether the interests of the city will thereby be promoted, and whether manifest injury will be done to persons owning real estate in the territory sought to be attached.

Section 1 of Article 2 of our State Constitution provides that "The Legislative power of this State shall be vested in a House of Representatives and Senate."

Section 1 of Article 3 of the same Constitution provides that "The judicial power of this State shall be vested in a Supreme Court, District Courts, Probate Courts, Justices of the Peace, and such other Courts, inferior to the Supreme Court, as may be provided by law."

The Constitution also provides for the Executive department, which is separate and distinct from both the legislative and judicial branches of the State government.

It is evident from the provisions of our own constitution, and the similar features to be found in the general framework of all American Constitutions, both State and Federal, as well as from the whole history of constitutional law in this country, that it was the intention of the people that the exercise of legislative, executive, and judicial functions should belong to separate and distinct departments. And these different classes of powers having been distributed to different departments by authority of the same instrument, there is an implied exclusion of each department from exercising the functions conferred upon either of the others.

The Government of the United States is one of enumerated powers, and Congress has only such legislative power as is expressly granted to it by the Federal Constitution, or given by necessary implication. But not so with the State legislature. In creating the legislative department of this State the people by the adoption of the constitution, granted and entrusted to the legislature full and complete power and authority, and the sole responsibility of making all the laws for the people, subject to such restrictions and exceptions as are contained in the constitution itself, and the limitations which are imposed by the constitution of the United States.

And so in respect of the judiciary of the State, our constitution confers upon it judicial power--full, complete, and exclusive it is true--but only judicial power.

Under our system of government it is the exclusive province of the legislature to make the law, and to alter and repeal it whether existing in the form of prior statutes, or in the principles of the common law, and it is the sole function of the courts to interpret the law as they find it to exist, and to apply it to the facts in the decision of cases pending before them. It is not competent to the courts to adopt their own views as a legal criterion by which to determine questions of right and wrong between private individuals, or private individuals and the public. It is true courts must adjudicate upon and enforce and protect the rights of all persons lawfully coming or brought before them, in so far as such rights inhere in a subject matter within their jurisdiction, but in so doing their decisions and judgments must be controlled, directed, and moulded by the law itself--that is by those rules of civil conduct which the legislative will has prescribed. It may be said that it is a judicial act to determine what are the facts in a particular case, and whether they bring the case within the operation of some provision or principle of the law. It is true that such determination requires the exercise of judgment and discretion, and, if it pertains to a subject matter of a judicial nature, and the power or duty of making it is conferred upon a judicial tribunal, then it becomes a judicial act. But, before the determination can be made, the provision or principle of law must first exist, and must contain a rule of action sufficiently definite to guide the judgment of the court, and enable it to apply the rule to the facts of the case. If the act in question had specified the facts and conditions upon which the annexation of additional territory to the corporate limits of a city should depend, and had referred the duty of determining the existence of such facts and conditions to the district court, there would be more room for an argument that such determination would be a judicial act. But this act specifies no facts upon which the annexation shall depend, and the only condition belonging to the land to be annexed, which the act mentions, is that it must be adjacent to the corporate limits. Now, it seems to me that property to be annexed must of necessity be adjacent or contiguous to the corporate limits, in order to subserve the general purposes and uses of the corporation, and that the naming of this single condition furnishes no definite rule or guide whatever. But if the whole subject of the incorporation and regulation of municipal corporations, including the enlargement and diminution of corporate limits, is a matter purely of legislative power and discretion, as I will presently attempt to show, then it would be doubtful whether the determination of a matter arising under the act in question would be a judicial act, although the facts and conditions upon which the annexation should depend had been specified in the act itself.

It seems to me that a court does not exercise judicial power when it determines a question, the decision of which merely involves the individual notions of the judge as to what is expedient to be done to subserve the public interests of a municipality. And it seems to me from the fact that judicial power alone has been vested in the courts by the constitution, leaving out of view the argument to be drawn from the distribution of the powers of the government to separate departments, that the maxim expressio unius est exclusio alterius is applicable, and that it was the intention of the framers of the constitution that the courts should possess no powers of a different nature, at least no powers which do not in some just sense partake of a judicial character.

It was contended by counsel representing the city council, on the argument of this application, that because the judiciary article of the constitution left the jurisdiction of the district courts to be determined by the legislature, that it therefore follows that the legislature may confer upon them jurisdiction of any matter which it deems expedient. In the interpretation of any written instrument all of its provisions must be looked at for the purpose of ascertaining its true meaning. By applying this rule it is clearly apparent, not only from the provisions of the judiciary article itself, but also from the fact that the other powers of the government are apportioned to other distinct departments, that the legislature is authorized to confer upon the district courts jurisdiction of such matters only as call for the exercise of judicial power.

I have offered such reasons as have occurred to my mind which tend to show that cases which may arise under the act in question cannot be judicially determined under the provisions of the act itself, as well as some reasons tending to show that the general subject matter of the act does not relate to a question which calls for the exercise of judicial power.

If the creation and regulation of municipal corporations, including the extension of their corporate limits, is not a judicial question, the inquiry at once arises to what department of the government does this subject pertain. There can be but one answer to this question. The creation of a municipal corporation, and the defining of its corporate powers, involve the exercise of purely and exclusively legislative power. Judge Dillon says, "the proposition which lies at the foundation of the law of corporations of this country is that all corporations, public and private, exist, and can exist, only by virtue of express legislative enactment creating, or authorizing, the creation of, the corporate body. Legislative sanction is absolutely essential to lawful corporate existence."

In Atchison vs. Bartholow 4th Kans., 142, our own supreme court says, "the creating of corporations and making provisions for the organization of cities, towns, and villages, have so long been regarded as the legitimate exercise of legislative power that it would not only be useless but inexpedient to question the propriety thereof now. All agree that they are the rightful subjects of legislation, and are within the general grant of legislative power contained in section 1 article 2 of the constitution."

Judge Cooley says that "municipal corporations are mere auxiliaries to the state government in the business of municipal rule." The question of determining when the public interests require the creation of these aids to the state government is one of the most important trusts committed to legislative discretion. It is a question of public policy only.

Formerly municipal corporations were created, and their corporate powers conferred, under special charters granted by the legislature. But our constitution now provides that the legislature shall pass no special act conferring corporate powers, and requires the legislature to make provision by general law for the organization of cities, towns, and villages. Judge Dillon says, "since the leading object of an American municipal corporation is to invest the inhabitants of a defined locality or place with a corporate existence chiefly for the purposes of local government, it is obvious that the geographical limits or boundaries of the corporation ought to be defined and certain. The boundaries are usually described in the charter or constituent act, or a method is prescribed therein by which they may be ascertained and settled. Because residence within the corporation confers rights and imposes duties upon the residents, and the local jurisdiction of the incorporated place is, in most cases, confined to the limits of the corporation, it is necessary that these limits be definitely fixed. They are established by legislative authority. The power to incorporate a place necessarily includes the power to fix and change the boundaries."

In the case of Wyandotte vs. Wood, 5 Kan. 603, the supreme court of this state decides that the enlarging of municipal boundaries, and thereby extending the laws of the municipality over the annexed territory, is the creation of corporate powers.

In Shumway vs. Bennett, 29 Mich., 464, the Supreme Court of Michigan says: "It is not in the power of the legislature to abdicate its functions, or to subject citizens and their interests to the interference of any but lawful public agencies. The judicial power must be vested in courts. Such legislative and local authority as can be delegated at all must be delegated to the municipal corporations, or local boards and officers. The definition of corporate bounds is second in importance to no corporate interest whatever. If it can be delegated at all, so as to include any but single settlements, it must be delegated to some body recognized by the constitution as capable of receiving such authority, and having local jurisdiction over the territory to be incorporated."

It seems to me to be unnecessary to further discuss the nature of the power by which municipal corporations are created, and their corporate powers conferred. Now, has the legislature, by the act in question, attempted to exert its legislative will or discretion by determining the circumstances and conditions under which the corporate limits of cities of the second class may be extended? Has it prescribed any limit upon the extension of the city limits? Is not the whole body of land comprising the county, outside the corporate limits of a city, contiguous thereto? Is the court to make an order by which Jonah shall swallow the whale? Is the order to embrace productive farms, agricultural homesteads, and large tracts of land used solely for the purposes of husbandry, or only small parcels of land which have been platted, or are held for speculative prices in anticipation of a coming "boom?" Upon these questions the act is silent, and the legislature has not expressed its will or judgment. It is true the land must be contiguous, but, as before remarked, it would be difficult to annex land which was not contiguous, and it would serve no very useful purpose if it was added. This act looks like an attempt on the part of the legislature to delegate legislative power, and I think it is. And the trouble with it is, that it attempts to delegate such power to a tribunal which has not the shadow of a right to exercise legislative power, under the constitution. By an express provision of the constitution, the legislature may confer upon the tribunals transacting the county business of the several counties such powers of local legislation and administration, as it shall deem expedient. It has also been the immemorial custom to bestow limited powers of local legislation upon municipal corporations. With these exceptions it is incompetent for the legislature to delegate any portion of its legislative power. Where the constitution has located the law-making power it must remain, and the legislature cannot relieve itself of the responsibility thus placed upon it by designating other agencies upon which it shall rest. It is the foregoing considerations which create in my mind a very grave doubt of the constitutionality of the act of the legislature, under which the proceeding is prosecuted, and to the end that this question may be settled before greater complications shall arise, I will decline to entertain this application, which will be dismissed, on the ground that I have no jurisdiction in the premises. The following authorities and adjudged cases, bearing on the questions of law involved in this decision, have been considered by me: 1 Dillon, Mun. Cor. (2nd ed.) Sec 17 and 124, and note on p. 123, referring to Mayor v. Shelton, 1 Head, 24; Cooley Const. Lim. (4th ed.) Pp. 106, 141-143 and 110-112; People v. Carpenter, 24 N. Y., court of appeals, 89; People v. Bennett, 29 Mich., 451; State v. Simons, S. C. Minn., decided Dec. 18, 1884, and reported in Northwestern Reporter Jan. 3, 1885; People v. Nevada, 6 Cal. 143; People v. Provines, 34 id., 520; Burlington v. Leebrick, 43 Iowa, 252; Kayser v. Bremen, 16 Mo. 58; Gibony v. Cape Girardeau, 58 Mo. 141; Kirkpatrick v. the State, 5 Kas. 673; Wyandotte v. Wood, id., 142; Auditor of State v. R. R. Co., 6 id. 500; Fulkerson v. Com'rs, 31 Kan. 128.; Powers v. Com'rs, 8 O. S. 290; Lloyd v. Wayne, S. C. Mich., decided April 9, 1885, and reported in Cent. Law Journal, July 3, 1885.

E. S. TORRANCE,

Judge 13th Judicial District.

OUR CELEBRATION.

A Cowley County Home.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Senior editor and his wife had a most delightful fourth of July celebration at the residence of J. W. Millspaugh, in Vernon township. Mr. and Mrs. Millspaugh are old residents of this county, having been among the early settlers. They came here with a large family and have been prominent factors in the history and development of this county. They have a magnificent farm, built up from the undisturbed and treeless prairie of fourteen years ago, now covered with waiving grain, luxuriant corn, and meadows and pastures of cultivated grasses, all interspersed with groves of maple, cottonwood, and other deciduous and fruit trees and a magnificent orchard with hundreds of trees now loaded down with apples, peaches, and other fruits in great variety. The lawn around the residence is beautified with flowers of various kinds and interspersed with beautiful shade trees. The barns and outhouses are in good condition, the stock are of the improved varieties, and are now supplied with plenty of the best grasses, shade, and cool, clear, fresh water pumped from the depths by a magnificent windmill. In winter they are well sheltered and appearances show that they are not unacquainted with corn.

On the 4th a long table was set in a beautiful grove near the house. The table was loaded with all the substantials and delicacies of the season, a true index of the abundance surrounding that rural home and the taste and culture of its inmates. It was the occasion of a family reunion, of daughters, sons, step-sons, and grandchildren, to the number of twenty-five. Mr. I. N. Ripley, of Burlington, Iowa, was, we believe, the only one of the family absent, for Mrs. Ripley was present as were Mr. and Mrs. Robert Highman, of Attica, Kansas; Dr. and Mrs. Bull, of Winfield; Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Bliss, of Winfield; Mr. Union Millspaugh and Mr. Frank Millspaugh, of Attica, and we hardly know how many other children and grandchildren; but we observed that the grandchildren were numerous, bright, and interesting; all good looking and some of marked beauty. It was a joyous occasion and everyone was in the happiest and liveliest mood. Mr. H. Beck was out there taking some pictures of groups in sundry positions, and before we left Mr. and Mrs. S. G. Gary, of Winfield, arrived and joined in the social pleasures of the day.

Long may our honored host and hostess live to enjoy their happy home and the love and devotion of these two generations of their descendants, and the next, which will be about in due time.

MORE MURDER AT ASHLAND.

Dr. Lafield Killed in Cold Blood and Robbed of $800.

A Terrible Storm.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Clark County comes in for criminal notoriety with a vim. It has recently had two despicable and revolting murders. Like every new county, it has its "bad men," though Ashland is a remarkably temperate, civil place for a border town. Last week Julius Murat was shot through the heart. He went with his wife and child from Pleasant Valley, this county, and took a claim near Ashland. Afterward Mrs. Lindsey, mother of Mrs. Murat, and two sons came to Clark County. She took a claim near Murat that had not been occupied by the young man Clouch, who had taken it for three months. Old man Clouch had said his son was holding the claim till his daughter would be of age to take it. Murat and the Lindsey boys were going out to dig a foundation for a shanty for their mother. Murat got there first and was spading, when old man Clouch and a young Kentuckian, Bill Churchill, came up. Murat had never seen either of them before. Without a word Churchill shot Murat through the heart. One of the Lindsey's arrived just in time to catch Murat as he fell, when Churchill fired another shot. It went through Murat's shoulder and into Lindsey's arm. The murderer was arrested and placed in the bastille at Dodge City. Murat's body was brought to this county for interment. Mr. D. Rodocker shows us a letter from Miss Rose Frederick, well known here, chronicling another terrible murder. Dr. Lafield, Ashland's dentist, received $800 from the east a few days ago. That night, with it on his person, he was shot dead, and the money taken. The murder was for no other cause than robbery. Tobe Taylor, a drunken cowboy, was arrested for the crime, though there is no positive evidence against him. The same letter tells of a terrible storm that swept over that section the other day. Two storms met, one from the northwest and one from the northeast. Everything in their track was inundated and much property swept away. Dugouts by the dozen were filled with water and caved in, leaving the occupants homeless. And most of the wells, not yet being walled, caved in. It was very destructive and a hard blow on those trying to establish homes in the "wild west."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Cambridge News, with its usual discrimination and good judgment, says: "The Winfield DAILY COURIER is not only a credit to our county seat but a credit to grand old Cowley. We are proud of THE DAILY and hope it may keep on and upward."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A number of the Kiowas, Comanches, and other tribes of Indians came to the Chilocco school and demanded their children, saying that there would be war and they wanted to make soldiers of them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The ferry boat on the Arkansas river at Geuda Springs has been moved to the mouth of the Chilocco creek for the accommodation of freighters and others.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

John Nichols wears a grin from ear to ear. He is now the father of the seventh boy. John is doing well and has set up the cigars.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

J. P. Woods and H. J. Metz, Chicago men of wares, were doing the Eli city Monday.

A PLEA FOR MISSOURI.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

It was with much interest that I read Mrs. Ed. P. Greer's letter from Southwestern Missouri. To say that she excels in description would but faintly express my appreciation of the beautiful pen picture she drew of the lovely scenery of that particular locality; further on, however, she spoke of the people and their miserable condition and customs, and then she touched my feelings.

Mr. Bain in his splendid lecture in the Baptist church said: "that next to home should love our country," and I say that next to country, we should love the state which gave us birth. As I am a Missourian, born and tried, I want the good people of this banner city, of the banner county, of the banner state, to not judge all the people of that grand state by the illiterate inhabitants of the Ozark mountains.

You may travel from the rock-bound shores of Main to the placid waters of the Pacific, and not find a state or territory abounding in more natural resources than old Missouri.

We have navigable waters all over the state. The Iron mountains, near St. Louis, are world renowned; nearly everyone is familiar with the rich deposits of lead at Joplin; even Winfield people know what splendid coal comes from Richhill, the same being prolific in Henry, Johnson, Cooper, and numerous other counties. I, who have been blackened and nearly choked with the miserable dust called coal here, can yet see in my day dreams or twilight revelries the grand old shell-bark hickory fires crackling and spitting on the hearth.

Timber of all kinds is abundant, from the poor, tall, slim sycamore sapling, to the magnificent walnut and hickory, which not only delightfully warms our homes and delicately cooks our food, but fills the pockets of every boy and girl in the state with their splendid fruits.

I have seen bushels of hickory nuts in our store houses as big around as a silver dollar, the kernels of which one tap of the hammer would lay out in two tempting halves. Pecans, too, we have carried home by the bushels, to say nothing of hazelnuts as big as filberts, walnuts, chincapins, etc.

Mrs. Greer mentions raspberries as growing wild. I have gathered blackberries, strawberries, plums, haws, grapes, gooseberries, currants, and persimmons in just such profuse quantities, and they all grow wild, free for all to enjoy and to have, without money and without price.

We have neither chalk nor gypsum deposits there, the soil being too rich for its production, and all the sand is shipped into the state; nature reserved those three valuable productions of mother earth for prolific Kansas.

And now I come to the people. That many of them, especially among the mountains, are hopelessly ignorant and illiterate I must concede; but in every instance you will find them natives, born and reared under the old slave system; the majority of the Missourians being bright, active, intelligent, and hospitable people, whose doors are always wide open to the stranger, and who do not grab at every nickel, for the land flows with milk and honey, and they don't need your money.

Their public school system, almost in its infancy yet, is conceded to be one of the best in the Union. I have driven over miles and miles of that state and found a schoolhouse every two miles, north, south, east, and west. The Normal at Warrensburg turns out from fifty to one hundred teachers annually, while the State Normal at Kirksville does even better. The standard salary heretofore has been small, but there has been a gradual increase for the better, and in one particular they are in advance of enlightened Kansas, for they pay their teachers according to their desserts. I am personally acquainted with several primary teachers who receive $80 a month, while here the good and the poor, the experienced and the inexperienced, primary and grammar teachers, have been receiving the same salary. I often meet people here who are familiar with some of the many Universities, Colleges, and Seminaries of Missouri. I know that at one time twenty different states were represented at Mr. Kemper's University, Boonville, so renowned had it become as an institution of learning.

My Alma Mater, the Missouri Female College, was not far behind in sending into the world intelligent and accomplished ladies.

Yes, sad to say, Missouri still struggles under the curse of rum, but I was a member of the W. C. T. U. for a number of years, and I speak from personal experience when I say that the ladies labored more assiduously and faithfully for temperance there than I have ever seen them do in prohibition Kansas. There is only one reason why they have not succeeded as yet, they hadn't the political power of Kansas to back them. But their prayers are being answered now, and it will not be many days until a drummer will have to go clear to the Atlantic ocean to get something besides fresh water to drink. I know of several towns where there are no saloons today. But to sum it all up, the reason, and only reason, why Missouri is so far behind in enterprise is simply her political standing; "but what is bred in the bone is," and they can't help their opinions any more than we can ours. But as time rolls on and the old fanatical ideas have been supplanted by intelligent thoughts and unprejudiced reasoning, Missouri will take a leap, and then look out.

I love this glorious banner state, and expect to live and die under its grand prohibition law, yet in the old time phrase, and for which I hope to be pardoned for using, I believe in giving the devil his dues, and not in judging an enlightened population of 2,500,000 by a few illiterate ignoramuses hidden away among the Ozark mountains--not in the Kansan dug-out, but in log huts without a floor. Mrs. Will B. Caton, Missourian.

SOME "FIGERIN'."

Cowley's Assets Over Twenty Four Million Dollars.--Big Statistical Record.

THE COUNTY IN TOTO.

Our Agricultural, Live Stock and Financial Condition as per Assessors' Returns.

INDUSTRY, PROSPERITY AND HAPPINESS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

County Clerk Hunt has completed the tabulation of the Assessors' returns for the different townships of the county. THE COURIER, always enthusiastic in heralding to the world the wonderful resources and advantages of the modern Garden of Eden, Cowley County, has gleaned with much care and labor a complete and detailed abstract of the county's condition, which it herewith presents. And it is certainly a grand record. Fourteen years ago a bare plain--now a beautifully improved county with its millions of wealth and over thirty thousand industrious, intelligent, and enterprising people. It is a wonderful exhibition of the grand results attainable by industry and push in such a county as Cowley--

of rich soil, heavenly smiles, and sunshine.

THE WHEAT CROP.

Last fall the farmers of this county sowed 60,053 acres of wheat, an increase over the former year of 2,847 acres. Some experimental individual sowed two acres of spring wheat. Last winter was a very hard winter and while the year before but 1,128 acres were winter killed. The acreage lost this year must have been thribble this. The assessors' books seem to be minus this year a blank for winter killed wheat, which was a grave omission, but we can safely put the loss at 3,000 acres, leaving us a present acreage of 57,053, throwing our acreage 1,153 less than last year. Last year's wheat crop was one of the best the county has ever had, averaging over twenty-five bushels per acre. This year has been variously disastrous to this cereal. In the spring it was thought the crop would be less than a half yield, but the reaper has proven that two-thirds yield, or fifteen bushels per acre, can be safely counted on. Though not so thick on the ground, owing to winter kill, the grains are exceptionally plump and the heads all splendidly filled. Assuming this average, we will have 855,785 bushels. To this add the old wheat now on hand, and we have 1,005,785 bushels, about 34 bushels for every inhabitant in the county. Small crops in all parts of the country, the oriental uncertainness and other things, indicate that the price this year will greatly exceed that of several years back--at least 80 cents. This will give us for our wheat crop this year $804,628, or about twenty-seven dollars for every man, woman, and child in the county. And this wheat will all have ready market at home--none of it need be shipped away. Our large flouring mills furnish a market for all we can raise, and much more, insuring a better price than in any shipping or speculative market. Vernon again takes the lead in wheat with 6,604 acres, with Beaver a close second with 6,512 acres.

RYE, FOR PASTURE.

Some of our farmers sow rye for winter pasture, and we find this year 1,071 acres, 28 acres less than last year.

CORN CROP.

Owing to the partial failure in wheat and other crops, the corn acreage this year is immense. 20,001 more than last year--132,778. Then the unusually good prices for corn in 1884-1885 was a big impetus to larger acreage. The condition of corn up to the present time has been very discouraging. The web worm, following late planting, greatly set back much of the corn and entirely destroyed some. But at present the web worms have disappeared, leaving the fields badly stripped, but far from dead, and under the present genial atmosphere and timely rains, is looming up magnificently. If we get the needed rain during the latter part of July and first of August, there is no doubt of its making the usual average, forty-five bushels per acre, or a total of 6,975,000 bushels. It is hard to get at the exact worth of this corn. A large part of it is fed to hogs and other livestock for slaughter and in this way is doubled in value. But taking the present year as a criterion, we can safely place the average price at thirty cents per bushel, which will give us the handsome sum of $1,792,503--over half a million more than last year, or about $60 per capita. Of this growing corn, Pleasant Valley almost doubles any other township, 18,897 acres, with Bolton following up with 9,619. There was a surplus of old corn on hand March 1, 1885, of 468,223--742,408 bushels less than last year--caused by the advanced price.

THE OAT CROP.

The oat crop this year is 132,778 acres, against 9,587 last, an immense increase of 128,241 acres. Our farmers are beginning to appreciate the superiority of oats as a feed. The oats are very promising, indicating an average of fifty bushels or more per acre, or a total of 6,638,900 bushels. Estimating this worth fifteen cents per bushel, it gives us $995,835.

IRISH POTATOES.

The acreage of Murpheys is 1,630, an increase of 53 acres over last year. 160 bushels is always a sure average for Irish potatoes here, giving us a total of 260,800 bushels, and at fifty cents per bushel, our potato crop will be worth this year $130,400. The acreage of sweet potatoes is 93, insuring us $13,975.

SMALL PRODUCTS.

Our farmers don't go much on buckwheat, having sown but 5 acres; the acreage of sorghum is 497; of castor beans 15, a decrease from last year of 87 acres; of flax 68; of tobacco 1; of broom corn, 338. Last year we had twenty acres of cotton; this year none.

TAME GRASSES.

That this county is unexcelled for tame grasses, has been clearly demonstrated, and we find the total acreage this year 22,588, an increase over last year of 6,502 acres. It is divided: millet, 14,475; timothy, 1,716; clover, 1,387; orchard grass, 1,527; other grasses, 164.

TAME AND PRAIRIE HAY.

In 1884 our farmers cut 25,661 tons of tame and 42,724 tons of prairie hay--an increase in tame hay of 2,805 tons and in prairie hay 8,840 tons. This is the most hay ever cut in any one year in Cowley. Putting this hay at the lowest average per ton, $3, we have a value of $205,155, $34,925 more than last year. Our hay production is no small item.

GARDENS, DAIRY, AND POULTRY.

If there is one thing more than another that Cowley prides herself on, it is the industry of her women. While the men are bossing the fields, and charging about the web worn and the elements and perspiring in behalf of their wheat, corn, oats, castor beans, sorghum, hogs, and "sich," the women are dancing around in their long aprons making a record to for out-distance the lords of the fields. Our women are independent and "don't care nothin' for nobody," when it comes to true womanly accomplishments and worth. They rounded up, during the past year, 622,323 pounds of golden butter, 85,477 pounds more than the year before; $41,582 worth of poultry and eggs, and, with perhaps a grudging masculine lift occasionally, $17,974 worth of "garden truck." Richland township takes the champion belt on butter, with 49,339 pounds, an average of nearly 100 pounds for every woman in the township. Bolton follows closely behind, with 46,402 pounds. Richland is also a whooper on poultry and eggs, $6,801 worth, leaving every other township nearly half. Bolton township is the champion on milk, coming up with $3,097 worth $2,864 worth makes Walnut a close competitor. They can't down Vernon on "garden truck." She took the cake last year and again comes up smiling this year with $5,290 worth, Creswell is her nearest competitor, with $2,972. Vernon leaves all others more than half. And she raised $2,374 more produce than the year before. The grand total of the milk sold in the county was $7,618 worth. There were only 570 pounds of cheese made, against 10,142 pounds the year before. This is a decrease of 9,572 pounds. The total receipts from our garden, dairy, and poultry were over $200,000, fifty thousand dollars more than for the year 1883. This is a grand showing for the enterprising, intelligent, and energetic ladies of Cowley.

LIVE STOCK.

The live stock interests of Cowley are yearly increasing in quality and value. The records show 11,860 horses and 2,025 mules; an increase of 2,204. We have 38,815 head of cattle, an increase of 4,256; 50,416 head of sheep, a decrease of 45,584--almost half. This was caused by the decrease in price of wool, the hard winter, and consequent disease among all breeds of sheep. We have enough hungry, yelping canines, if turned loose with just a small chance, to kill every sheep in the county in one night--3,712. Our dog increase has been doggoned good, 468; but they seem to have had but a meager appetite or opportunity; for mutton, having killed but 485 sheep. There was a wool clip in 1884 of 323,802 lbs., an increase of 21,574 pounds over 1883. The value of this clip at fifteen cents per pound was $48,570. This year's clip will probably run down to 100,000 pounds. Our swine record shows 61,540 head, a decrease of 9,019. This is probably due to the shortage of corn in some sections and the high price of pork in the early spring. Our increase of 6,460 in horses and cattle is badly offset by the decrease of 54,603 in sheep and hogs. Dexter leads in cattle, having 2,747, followed by Bolton with 2,545 and Silver Creek with 2,417. Bolton takes the belt for hogs, 5,154. Creswell is her closest competitor, 4,608. Bolton is also champion in horses and mules, coming up with 1,090. Pleasant Valley is next in horses and mules with 810, Vernon rubbing her closely with 802. Harvey is ahead on sheep, showing 9,039, Dexter being her only creditable competitor with 6,588. Bolton is entitled to another prize, for hogs, showing 5,164, leading Creswell 551. Beaver, Pleasant Valley, Richland, and Vernon, each show over four thousand swine. The value of animals fattened and slaughtered during the year was $702,877, an increase of $97,221.

OUR ORCHARDS.

We have 64,005 bearing apple trees; 7,234 bearing pear trees; 357,455 bearing peach, 39,180 bearing plum and cherry trees, while the total number of fruit trees, young and old, is 801,294. This shows an increase of 452,174 fruit trees--a magnificent exhibit for a county of Cowley's age, one for which we challenge the west for a competitor, age considered.

SMALL FRUITS.

Cowley has 62 acres of raspberries; 228 of blackberries; 44 of strawberries; and 113 of grapes, from which there were made up to March 1st, 1885, 598 gallons of wine.

BEES.

There are 74 stands of bees in the county, which produced in 1884, 635 pounds of honey.

ARTIFICIAL FORESTS.

Cowley has 106 acres of growing walnut; 126 acres of maple; 5 acres of honey locust; 743 acres of cottonwood; and 364 acres of other varieties--all planted by our ambitious husbandmen, and are one year old and over.

THE MONEY RECOMPENSE.

Here is just what our farmers have reaped in dollars from their year's work.

Wheat, $804,628; Corn, $1,792,563; Oats, $995,835; Irish potatoes, $130,400; Sweet potatoes, $6,975; Sorghum, etc., $1,000; Hay, $205,155; Garden, dairy, and poultry, $200,000; Animals slaughtered, $702,827; Horticultural, $17,571; Wood marketed, $6,105; Wool clip, $48,579. TOTAL: $4,657,844.

This is an increase of $1,203,235 over the previous year: a grand record.

The farmers of Cowley are reaping splendid results. And this money is not being secreted in their nether garments, but, as is exhibited all around, they are laying it out in valuable, substantial, and decorative improvements--getting ready to live in a manner becoming agricultural kings.

OUR FENCES.

Though but a youth as yet, Cowley makes a good showing in fences. We have 1,187,381 rods of stone, hedge, and wire fence, nearly four thousand miles, worth half a million dollars. Vernon township has the most number of miles, 270, Richland following with 262, Pleasant Valley 242, and several others close to their heels.

POPULATION AND VALUATION.

Below we give the population of the county by townships, compared with last year, and the assessed valuation for 1885.

1884 1885 1886

Beaver 814 810 $128,176

Bolton 1228 1356 214,571

Cedar 983 958 107,658

Creswell 879 1056 256,133

Dexter 1129 1229 180,079

Fairview 634 665 107,974

Harvey 608 738 77,493

Liberty 758 771 80,801

Maple 719 758 117,638

Ninnescah 776 980 200,814

Omnia 453 431 53,477

Otter 471 587 55,141

Pleasant Valley 936 1103 225,483

Richland 905 1365 212,468

Rock 648 756 124,856

Sheridan 701 639 84,367

Silver Creek 1311 1610 203,473

Silver Dale 790 845 82,633

Spring Creek 586 715 103,983

Tisdale 938 576 92,882

Vernon 965 1066 239,495

Walnut 1285 1604 239,747

Windsor 1097 1207 266,198

Arkansas City 2828 3814 373,966

Winfield 3917 5151 670,747

Total Township Population: 1884 - 26,449. 1885 - 30,790.

Total Assessed Valuation 1885: $4,509,858.

Arkansas City and Winfield certainly show increases to be proud of, while the increase in all parts of the county exhibit forcibly the popularity and splendid advancement of the Garden of Eden, Cowley County. An increase in population of 4,341 in one year is a showing for Cowley to be proud. Of course, to place Winfield's population properly, those inhabitants lying outside the corporation, legitimately belonging to the city, must be noted. The population of Walnut township is largely swelled from Winfield, and Vernon gets several hundred. The correct census of the Queen City of Southern Kansas would show over six thousand bona fide residents. The loss in Tisdale township and the big increase in Richland is caused by the recent division of the townships.

The abstract of assessment shows the aggregate value of lands in the county to be $2,080,830; of town lots $774,450; of personal property $1,229,218; and of railroad $484,288. This makes a total valuation, as given above, of $4,509,858. Our total valuation last year, as taken by the assessors, was $4,042,837, showing a magnificent increase for this year. This is the blank year for real estate assessment, so that grand increase is all in improvements. Nothing could speak louder for the wonderful material advancement of our county. The assessed valuation of taxable property never represents more than one-fifth of the real value. It is safe to place the total valuation of our taxable property at $20,000,000. Now, add to this the value of the year's crops, $4,657,844, and we have as the total assets of Cowley County twenty-four million, six hundred and fifty-seven thousand, eight hundred and forty-four dollars, or over eight hundred dollars for every man, woman, and child in the county. With a communistic division, the man blessed with eighteen children would certainly be at high tide.

APPEAL TO THE CITIZENS OF WINFIELD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The National Guards, as will be seen by THE DAILY COURIER of June 30th, and the Battery and Infantry Companies have organized themselves together for the purpose of building a drill hall and armory. These companies are enterprises which should receive the hearty support of every loyal citizen of Winfield. If the boys should ask you for a little money to aid in this enterprise, they should receive encouragement of the most substantial kind. Aid the boys, not only with words of cheer, but with your money as well. These companies are composed chiefly of the laboring men of Winfield, who are willing to do all they can toward the erection of this building, but as their means are limited, they alone cannot give the required amount, so that the building could not be completed without outside aid. Cowley County is going to have an armory, and the National Guards mean that Winfield shall have it. Therefore, be ye ready when the Committee from the Company shall wait on you, to give them the support which they not only need but deserve, as well, and the boys will put up a building which will be a credit to our city.

Miliary and Battery Companies of Winfield.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

P. F. Wright arrived in California all right.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Howard T. Johnson and L. N. Flesher were over from Wellington Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. Samuel Kennedy, father of agent Kennedy of the Santa Fe, is here on a visit from Peabody.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Oliver G. Hammon and Ellen J. Ingle are the latest matrimonial firm, having secured license from the P. B.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Strong, of Rock, were down Friday on their way to spend the Fourth with their daughter, Mrs. Ed. Pentecost, at Arkansas City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Farmer's Bank folks have about determined to make their fine new bank building, on the Harter corner, three stories, with a basement. Our Masonic order is negotiating for the upper story for a lodge room.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Miss Dora B., aged seventeen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gentry, was laid away in South cemetery yesterday afternoon. The funeral took place from the residence, conducted by Rev. B. Kelly. She had been a victim of white swelling from her early childhood.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Will Hudson and little son left Saturday evening for a two months visit in Buffalo, N. Y., taking in also Niagara Falls and other places of interest. Will will lay in his fall jewelry stock during his absence--killing two fowls with the same stone, you see.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Spotswood & Wallace had the cellar of their store inundated Wednesday. The cellar under the new addition filled up, running into the cellar of the old building. They worked until midnight banking up, and finally got it checked. There was a slight damage, but not to any extent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Justice Snow united in the holy bonds of matrimony Thursday, Alonzo B. Roberts and Miss Nellie McCormick. Mr. Roberts is of the firm of Roberts & Nelson, painters in this city. Miss McCormick has lived in this city some time. We wish them much joy, a long life, a happy old age.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The trial of George McAfee and Mary Gasoway, who were found in derogatory circumstances early one morning recently at one of our hotels, resulted in her pleading guilty. She got $24, and lacking $19.50 of having wealth enough, now languishes in the bastille. He asked for continuance and his trial will put off to the 11th inst.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Some time ago Mr. Will Wilson, in throwing some trash over the fence at his residence, lost off his finger a fine enameled gold ring. Edwin Lee, one of Mr. W. A. Lee's little boys, found it and by the initials, Mr. Lee found the right owner. Mr. Wilson, the manly fellow like he is, bought the boy a beautiful picture book, full of nice pictures, which pleased the little fellow wonderfully.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

We have heard expressions of wonder at the magnificent showing of our county in eggs, chickens, butter, and "garden truck." Those who think it strange that our county should find a market for so much of these kinds of produce should visit J. P. Baden's establishment in this city. See the piles and car loads of these things, which he buys and ships daily, and wonder only at Baden for the result.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Judge Gans filled out the last blank in a marriage record, Thursday, that was opened up December 17th, 1881. It shows 1640 couples to have climbed the golden stair of wedded bliss in the four and a half years since that date. There is a mighty big statistical showing in this record: if it could be conveniently aggregated. But Judge Gans wouldn't do it, and the reporter's inexperience incapacitated him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Permit us through the columns of THE COURIER to publicly express our heartfelt thanks to Messrs. Reed and Oliver, painters and paper hangers, for their gift of excellent work done on the parlors of the Baptist parsonage recently. We have never had more gentlemanly men about our home than Reed & Oliver. They are skilled workmen, and those desiring work done in their line can do no better than employ them.

MR. AND MRS. J. H. REIDER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

W. R. McDonald and Col. Whiting had a slick game played upon them Thursday. While the Colonel was around collecting gas bills, someone stole his account book from his pocket. Some time afterward a party entered Mr. McDonald's store and presented a bill for $1.25. Mr. McDonald was very busy at the time and made no objection to the demand, thinking it was someone deputized by the Colonel, as he had the regular book, etc. The Colonel coming in afterward demanded the bill a second time. This was a slick game.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Henry E. Asp writes us from the road that the K. C. & S. W. road will be completed to the Cowley County line July 4th and to the new town of Atlanta July 11th. They are making things hum up there notwithstanding the rains. Henry got the Hickory township bonds on the 20th ult. and Ed. Greer took them to Topeka to register on the 30th, whence he went to St. Louis with them, where he meets President Young to transact further business for the road. Henry and Ed. are developing into railroad builders, but cannot be said to beat Jay Gould in that line yet.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Prof. Sou-ah-brah, of Rangoon, Burma, India, was at the Brettun yesterday, on his way from Newton to Ottawa. He is an East Indian of much culture and talent, and is on a western lecturing tour. He lectures on the social customs of the East Indies, and carries an elaborate wardrobe of the curious and elegant costumes of his people. He will reach Winfield with his lecture this fall. He very much resembles our American Indians in looks--long, black hair, brawny complexion, and high cheek bones. But in dress he is very neat, in a conventional American suit. He talks English fluently.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A certain party's appetite got the best of him Wednesday. He was in the shop of a painter. The painter had just mixed a concoction of lamp black, vinegar, and alcohol to paint a blackboard. Stepping out a minute, upon coming back he found the cup somewhat lowered and the party smacking his lips and having that look on his countenance that a man generally does just after taking a drink. The painter was scared and after carefully looking up the concoction, started for a doctor. The doctor advised him to watch his blackboard preparation hereafter. The next thing we hear, as the young man has a taste of the preparation, will be the swallowing of blackboards, nails, legs and all, simply for the coating on the boards. Keep an eye on your blackboards, for that man is certainly dry.

ANOTHER COMMUNICATION ON CITY AFFAIRS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Friends have asked me, "Why are you arrested by the city so often, when there seems to be no cause?" I answered Mr. Armstrong, of Tisdale, in this way: "I belong to no ring or clique, but act on my own views as best I know how. But why I should be spotted each time there is a new ordinance to take effect, or a new Marshal makes his entrance on the area of the town site, is more than I can tell. One of the arrests was for stacking hay in the city limits. This ordinance actually prohibited stacking as much as a wagon-box of hay outdoors. I had plenty of hay in one mile of town, and teams to draw it to town. But I saw the situation of my neighbors--widow women with orphan children--compelled to stack their hay outside of the city, to the mercy of thieves, and then pay a dray 25 cents each day to draw them a feed of hay, when they were depending on their cows for almost the whole of their support. To meet this unfair and inhuman ordinance square in the face, I hauled in a large stock of hay and took the consequence. In the District Court Judge Torrance dismissed the case at the cost of the city. In the last twenty days, I have been arrested twice and fined simply for having a few sample machines in front of my implement house. I am on a side street, west 9th avenue. On the day of the last arrest, on east 8th avenue, I noticed about two car loads of salt piled on a platform outside of the sidewalk. On the same day, on Main street, I noticed in front of a hardware store fish poles, pumps, ice chests, rod iron, and other traps, until the sidewalk was not more than six feet wide. I speak of these facts to show that this prosecution is malicious, and is damaging me unjustly over the county. Unprincipled men are using it against me. One editor, in the east part of the county, published my arrest and did not say what for. A man in Colorado saw the item and wrote home to his wife to know what Lee was arrested for. This same paper told its readers that the K. C. & S. W. railroad was just the thing until they found it would miss their town, then cried out with a loud voice that the county would be ruined if the bonds carried. I am in favor of a good city government and wholesome ordinances, such as laying sidewalks, grading streets, making fire limits, draining cess pools, removing hog pens, shutting up disorderly places of business--anything that tends to improve the health of the city and give work to the laboring class and raise our city in the estimation of people abroad. This should be encouraged. But such ordinances as grant the right to a revengeful man to arrest a businessman for having a few sample implements in front of his door simply because in time past he ran over his rye patch and made him a little mad, or grants some young spirt the right to jerk his opponent simply because he sees fit to wear a yellow and black checked coat cut short behind, with tight pants and a jaunty little hat, or to say that a lady must not be found on the streets after a certain hour, or a man shall pay a license to do business when his tax is as much as five men ought to pay, is to make a laughing stock out of us, and damage the welfare of our now prosperous city. The last ordinance will drive away good businessmen that would otherwise locate here.

W. A. LEE."

BURDENWARD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The reporter boarded the early freight Wednesday morning, and went through to Burden C. O. D. Arriving, it began to rain, as it does every time he goes up there, but having on a very thin coat and a pair of leaky shoes run down at the heel, he felt no uneasiness whatever. Burden is growing right along. Jones & Snow are putting up an elegant store building on Main street, 35 x 146. The Burden Librarian Lyceum building, built by the town, is a neat and tasty building, 43 x 63. It will be one story and will contain an elegant library. The seating capacity of this building will be arranged opera fashion. This enterprise shows the refinement and intelligence of the people of Burden. The ladies of the M. E. church have made a beautiful silk quilt which they are raffling off to raise funds to finish the parsonage. The names of these ladies are too many to name, thirty-two in all. THE DAILY invested in this raffle and will pray from time to time that it may be the lucky one. We stopped with mine host, J. S. Leedy, of the Commercial. We will recommend this hotel to the traveling public as the place to get a good meal. After dinner we got a team of H. W. Young, which was one of the best we ever held the string behind, and started for Cambridge. We were surprised to see the corn looking so well along the trip. We saw no signs of worms. The crop looks fine. Arriving in Cambridge we found everything O. K. Returning to Burden we waited patiently for the freight. The grade at Burden is excellent, far surpassing Winfield. It is a gentle slope from the head of Main street. The water runs off like unto a shed. While looking at the gutters carrying off this flood, we noticed cork after cork floating by; there must have been 10,000. Our curiosity was aroused and we inquired what it meant. All seemed to think they floated from the back yard of Bro. Henthorn of the Eagle. We examined these corks and found them to be genuine. The grade of this town is a dad give away. The people of Burden say that the acreage of corks is on the increase. We think Burden a very pleasant place and her people very agreeable.

A SOCIETY EVENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Spotswood was, last night, the scene of a most enviable gathering of our young society people. The occasion was in honor of the Misses Sarah Bass, of Kansas City, and Sarah Gay, of St. Louis, accomplished and attractive young ladies who are visiting their aunt, Mrs. Spotswood. It was one of the jolliest companies; all restraint was banished under the royal hospitality of the entertainers. Those present were Dr. and Mrs. Emerson and Misses Nettie McCoy, Julia Smith, Libbie Whitney, Jessie Millington, Bert Morford, Hattie Stolp, Nellie and Kate Rodgers, Lizzie and Margie Wallis, Gertrude McMullen, Ida Johnston, Sadie French, Minnie Taylor, Leota Gary, Maggie Harper, Anna Hunt, Mary Hamill and Lizzie McDonald; Messrs. J. J. O'Meara, W. H. Smith, F. F. Leland, B. W. Matlack, T. J. Eaton, Eugene Wallis, Lacey Tomlin, D. H. Sickafoose, W. H. Whitney, M. H. Ewart, Byron Rudolf, Harry Bahntge, E. J. McMullen, Everett and George Schuler, James Lorton, Charles Dever, Frank Robinson, Addison Brown, Fred Ballein, S. D. Harper, and F. H. Greer. Music, cards, the "light fantastic," and a collation of choice delicacies made the time pass most pleasantly. Mr. and Mrs. Spotswood and daughter, Miss Margie, and the Misses Bass and Gay did the honors of the evening very delightfully, and reluctantly did the guests depart, with appreciative adieu, wishing many more such happy occasions.

RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

At a special communication of Dexter Lodge, No. 156, A. F. & A. M., the following resolutions were adopted.

WHEREAS, It has pleased the Supreme Architect of the Universe in His infinite wisdom to call from labor among us to refreshment in the Supreme Grand Lodge above, our well beloved brother, M. H. Reynolds, therefore, be it

Resolved, That while we deplore his untimely end, we bow in humble submission to the fiat of our Supreme Grand Master while our deceased brother takes his seat as a member of the Supreme Grand Lodge above.

Resolved, That in his death, Dexter Lodge, No. 156, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, loses one of its most earnest and faithful craftsmen, and one who has ever taken great pleasure in hewing out the rough ashlers and fitting them for use in the erection of our Masonic Temple, which is the earnest desire of all good and true Master Masons.

Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be furnished to the bereaved wife and parents of our deceased brother; a copy spread upon the minutes of the lodge, and a copy furnished to The Eye, Winfield COURIER, and Telegram, with a request that they publish the same.

JOHN D. MAURER, W. G. SEAVER, S. H. WELLS, Committee on Resolutions.

WEDDING ANNOUNCEMENTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

THE COURIER don't like to give anything away--and we won't. But we caught him in the act Thursday and here goes; but don't tell anybody just yet--it hasn't come off. Mr. Alonzo R. Roberts, one of Winfield's substantial young men, was granted a license Thursday to lead to the altar Miss Nellie McCormick. Now, we predict that he will shoot us for this--with some fine cigars. Samuel S. Hamlin and Susan McQuain were also given the certificate, Saturday evening, that has made them one.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

AN INNOCENT CLIPPER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

"Postage on newspapers is now only one cent per pound, just half what it has been heretofore. Score one for the newspaper man. Clark Co. Clipper."

The Clipper is a Hindoo glorifying the juggernaut which is about to crush him. Probably the Clipper has been paying twenty cents a week as postage on its exchanges and other papers sent out of its county. This will be reduced ten cents a week or $5.20 a year. Nine tenths or more of its circulation is in its own county on which it has paid on postage, but it has probably paid at least two cents a pound as freight on all its paper from the east, possibly a dollar a week or fifty dollars a year and as it does not receive this through the mails, it gets no reduction of freight below two cents per pound cost to get the paper into Clark County. His eastern competitors have been freighting their paper through the mails into Clark County at two cents a pound. Now the government has undertaken to freight their paper into Clark County for one cent a pound while the Clipper continues to pay two cents a pound and attempts to compete with them. Cannot you see the point? Mr. Clipper?

Suppose you are engaged in the manufacture of tin pans at Ashland, and suppose you buy your sheet tin in New York and pay two cents a pound freight to Ashland. Then suppose that Dobbs is a rival tinner beside you for whom Uncle Sam has been in the habit of carrying tin pans manufactured in New York, through the mails to Ashland at two cents per pound, or the same rate of freight that you pay on the sheet tin; so if you could manufacture in Ashland as cheaply as Dobbs could manufacture in New York, you have had an even chance to compete with him in the Ashland market. Now suppose Uncle Sam should reduce his rate of freight on tin pans from New York to Ashland to one cent a pound, but refuses to carry your sheet tin at less than a cent an ounce, 16 cents a pound, and then only in bundles not exceeding four pounds each; would you be crowing about "scoring one for the tin pan maker who makes his pans in Ashland?"

The law reducing the rate of postage on newspapers was engineered through by eastern monopoly papers on purpose to crush out all such newspapers as the Clipper and all newspapers whose circulation is chiefly local in their own counties. Will this poor, innocent lamb continue to "lick the hand upraised to shed its blood?" Uncle Sam is giving some of these eastern monopolists hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to enable them to crush you out and such as you. Suppose they cannot crush you out, they can and will reduce your profits wonderfully and enrich themselves thereby. You will save your $5.20 a year. Uncle Sam takes from you $525.20 a year and gives back to you $5.20 of it, giving the balance of $520 to the eastern monopolists and still you are happy.

We do not believe there is a newspaper printed in Kansas that will not be damaged by this reduction ten times as much as benefitted; and there is no reason, sense, or justice in charging letters thirty-two cents a pound and books eight cents, in order to enable the government to carry the publications of eastern monopolists at a cent a pound.

NOT SO FAR IN FACT, BUT TOO FAR IN EFFECT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

In Dockson's new city directory for Winfield, it is stated that Winfield is 265 miles southwest of Kansas City. We suppose Mr. Dockson counted miles by way of Topeka, Newton, and Wichita along the Santa Fe railroad, in which case he is correct but grossly misleading. By way of the Southern Kansas railroad, the distance is only 240 miles, while in an air line the distance is only 180 miles. When the K. C. & S. W. railroad is completed between Winfield and Kansas City, the distance of travel will be reduced below 200 miles, and we expect the time of transit will be reduced from thirteen to eight hours. When we can take an eight hours stop from Winfield at 11 o'clock p.m. to Kansas City at 7 o'clock a.m., do our business there and leave at 11 a.m., arriving in Winfield at 7 p.m., having been absent only 20 hours, there will be much more fun and less expense in visiting that city. The fare will be reduced to six dollars each way, or less, and the necessary time will be reduced twenty-two hours. We shall then be nearer to Kansas City than we now are to Topeka. Now it takes 45 hours to make a trip to Topeka and return by passenger train. The reasons are that we have but one train a day and it wastes time in delays and changes at Udall, Wichita, and Newton, and arrives at Topeka at such hour in the night that one must wait seven hours there before he can attend to any business. We need a through train to Topeka leaving here and there at 11 p.m., and arriving here and there at 7 p.m.

DEATH OF PROF. NORTON.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

H. B. Norton, who will be remembered by old Kansans as at one time being a Professor in the Normal school at Emporia, died a few days ago at San Jose, California, where he had lived for the past ten years, connected with the State Normal college of that state. Capital.

Prof. H. B. Norton was one of the original founders of Arkansas City, having settled there in the spring of 1869 on the raw prairie, with about a dozen other Emporians, for the purpose of locating a county seat for Cowley County and building up a city. In this work he struggled manfully, and was a power in the early history of our county. For six years the name of Prof. Norton was another name for Arkansas City and the present prosperity and importance of that town is largely due to the untiring energy and wisdom of H. B. Norton in the stages of its foundation and early growth. Prof. Norton was a man of high education and culture, a first-class educator, a noble, liberal, earnest man. It was our fortune to know him well and to be frequently, almost constantly, his opponent in the early struggles for local supremacy between our respective cities, but notwithstanding these unfavorable circumstances we learned to admire, respect, honor, and love him for his many high qualities.

[Note: Millington had a convenient loss of memory with respect to when Norton came to Cowley County. Millington was not here at the time Norton & party arrived.]

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The executive committee of the Methodist college trustees held a meeting in the Methodist Church yesterday, to look over the plans and get things in readiness for the commencement of the College. Hon. A. L. Redden, of El Dorado, chairman of the Board, and Revs. J. D. Bodkin, of McPherson; Thos. Audas, of Wichita; and B. Kelly, of this city, were present.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

It is not generally known that nutmegs are poisonous, but Dr. Palmer writes to the American Journal of Pharmacy, detailing the case of a lady who nearly died from eating a nutmeg and a half, and he points out the fact that the toxic effect of the drug are described in both the National and United States Dispensatories.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

One of the two free circulating libraries in Philadelphia, that of the Friends in Germantown, permits no works of fiction upon its shelves, yet it loans nearly fifteen thousand volumes a year, and about twenty-five thousand people come annually to read in its rooms.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

It is stated that President Cleveland will visit Kansas in September. We bet he will not, but if he does, he will visit Winfield of course. If he comes, we shall entertain him as nicely as we can and not let George Rembaugh or H. C. Buford get a word with him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The new directory of Chicago contains nearly forty thousand names more than the last one. The city population is estimated at seven hundred thousand.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The city of San Francisco, according to the latest directory, contains about three hundred and twenty-five thousand people.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Rainbelt is a new town in Kansas, and is probably the only place in Kansas where there are no rains. We conclude they have no rain there from the name adopted. If they had plenty of rain, they would never have thought of such a name. We have observed that as a rule the towns are named for what they are not. Those which have the word city attached to their name rarely amount to anything. Kansas City and Arkansas City are two noticeable exceptions to this rule.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Women have just been elected, for the first time, to positions on the Glasgow school board. When Scotland breaks through the trammels of conservation, in any particular, it is usually safe for the rest of the world to follow.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

It seems to be definitely settled that the D., M. & A. will run from Belle Plaine direct to Kingman and miss Wichita by many miles, so the Eagle is crying "sour grapes" in a half column article.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The suit of the flying "Dutchman" of the Commercial House against Dan Cisler of the Central and C. C. Callahan, of the Brettun, for disturbing the peace, while rustling for grips at the Santa Fe the other night, caused some interest in Justice Snow's court Tuesday. The victims were found guilty. Dan paid $1 and costs, $18, and Callahan appealed his case. The rivalry between our hotel drummers is getting mighty warm.

DECADENCE OF THE SHEEP INDUSTRY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The falling off of the number of sheep in Cowley County as shown by the assessors' report published yesterday, from 96,000 to a little over 50,000, means much more than the figures imply. It means not only a loss of 45,500 sheep to the county but a loss of the general increase in that kind of property which would have kept pace with the increase in other kinds of property had the sheep business continued to be profitable, and this increase should have been at least 25,000, so the loss of the sheep to the county should be reckoned at 70,000. Then again it means that sheep are not worth more than one half as much per head as they should have been had nothing occurred to reduce the profits on sheep growing, so that while our county should have 125,000 sheep worth $4 per head, equal to half a million dollars, it has 50,000 worth $2.00 each, amounting to $100,000, and the amount received by our sheep men for sheep sold or disposed of could scarcely have reached another $100,000, showing a dead loss to the county of three hundred thousand dollars. But this is not all. The reduction of the price of wool has reduced the profits of wool growers $20,000 to $30,000 a year. All this loss is directly traced to the tariff of 1883 reducing the duties on foreign wool about twenty percent.

This reduction affects the sheep growing of our whole country in the same way, causing an immense loss to the industrial interests of the country. And this loss affects not only those engaged in sheep culture and wool growing, but every other agricultural and labor interest in driving capital and labor from wool growing to compete in other industrial pursuits, thereby reducing the profits of those other branches of industry.

Now, we ask, where is the resulting benefit to compensate the country for all this tremendous loss? Who gets the benefit of this reduction of the tariff on wool? The wool growing interests are robbed of what they had a right to expect when they invested in the business, but who gets any benefit from this robbery? Does any consumer of woolen goods buy any cheaper than he would have done had the tariff of 1867 remained on the statute books? It is probable that articles of woolen manufacture retail at somewhat lower prices than they did two years ago, but this would be fully accounted for in the improvements of machinery and general accumulation of experience and skill in manufacturing which tends to reduce the cost of manufactured articles from year to year. There is not the slightest reason to conclude that the people of the United States buy woolen goods a cent lower than they would have done had no change been made in the duties on wool.

One of the express objects of the tariff reduction of 1883 was to reduce the revenues to the government. It was held that our government collected more revenue than it needed. The result of the reduction on wool and on many other articles was to increase the importation to such extent that the revenues therefrom were increased instead of diminished, and this object of the reduced tariff was more than defeated. The first year of the reduction of the duties on wool, the revenue on that commodity increased a million and a half dollars. It probably benefitted the manufacturers of wool in this country to such extent as to partly or fully neutralize the damage which the reduction on manufactured woolen goods damaged them. We believe in protecting American manufacturers against foreign manufacturers, but not against American wool growers. We believe in putting the tariff on wool at as high a rate per cent of value as it is on the manufactured goods. This would protect our wool growers against foreign wool growers, and our wool manufacturers against foreign manufacturers only, and that would be fair and just.

CURIOUS CALCULATIONS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

If you take the northeast one-fourth of the State of Kansas in a square form as nearly as practicable, the 6th principal meridian will be the west line of that fourth of the State, and the township line between townships 23 and 24 south, will be the south line. The city of Newton in Harvey County will be within that northeast quarter of the State and near its southwest corner, and the Newton men who have been blowing so much about that northeast pocket will themselves be found in the pocket. The center of that pocket will be 20 miles west and 6 miles south of Topeka, and 9 miles east and 40 miles north of Emporia. The south line will be 27 miles south of Emporia, passing through the counties of Harvey, Butler, Greenwood, Woodson, Allen, and Bourbon, about 10 to 12 miles north of the Sunflower railroad. Topeka, the capital of the State, is located in the northeast quarter of that northeast quarter of the State. That quarter contained a year ago about one-half of the population of the State, but we think this year it falls a considerable behind, and that in two or three years more it will contain not over one-third.

The geographical center of the State is in the northwest township of Rice County; township 18 south of range 10 west, about 12 miles northwest of Lyons. The east half of the State contains nearly all of the counties of Jewell, Mitchell, Lincoln, Ellsworth, Rice, Reno, and Kingman, the whole of Harper, and a little of Barbour. Sub-dividing the east half of the State into four quarters as nearly square as possible, Topeka would be about the center of the northeast quarter of the east half; Emporia would be barely over the line in the southeast quarter of the east half, and Cowley County would occupy the position of the southeast corner of the southwest quarter of the east half of the State.

LETTER POSTAGE. THEY DON'T UNDERSTAND.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Some of the businessmen and others came into the postoffice this morning to swap two cent stamps for one cent stamps, and commenced sticking one cent stamps on letters, one stamp on each. When convinced that the single rate of postage was still two cents, and that their letters would not go unless two cents in stamps were on each, they wanted to swap back.

It is strange how many persons fail to read or fail to understand correctly what they read. One lady insisted that she read in the COURIER that letter postage would be only one cent on and after July 1st, and was offended when we assured her that she was mistaken.

Letters will not be forwarded unless prepaid by at least two cents each. The only change is the following: a single rate of two cents will pay in full a letter weighing not over one ounce. (Formerly a single rate was limited to one half ounce.) The rate that now applies is the following: two cents per ounce or fraction thereof.

COWLEY'S INVALIDS.

How Much "Medicine" It Takes to Keep Their Interior Department Status Quo.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The month of June has gone, and with it a large quantity of "medicine." But, as astonishing as it may seem, we are left the consolation that out of the great irregularity in our interior department, there have been very few funerals--they will come later when the drug store "physicians" begin to dance to a tune like this: "Anyone who shall violate any of the provisions of this act (the legislative medicine regulator), shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall be fined in any sum not less than one hundred dollars nor more than one thousand dollars, and be imprisoned in the county jail not less than thirty days nor more than ninety days, and shall forfeit his permit issued under the provisions of this act, and for a period of five years his right to obtain a permit." Who can afford to take such a risk as that? And yet the records indicate that a number in this county are doing it! Winfield druggists filed, the first of June, 655 statements, representing 469 pints of whiskey and 169 bottles of beer, with about 200 pints of "other drinks," for "medical, mechanical, and scientific purposes." The June record shows a decrease in whiskey and an increase of 153 bottles of beer. The only druggist handling beer here gives notice that he will handle no more. So our city will be beerless this month, as far as our druggists are concerned. Arkansas City's druggists, in May, filed 1848 statements, representing 1092 pints of whiskey and 375 bottles of beer, with 250 pints of other drinks. The June record shows a decrease of 174 statements and 250 pints of whiskey. The "physicians," on close (?) examination, recommended "more beer," and the record shows an increase of 681 bottles over May. And the month of July, if the Fourth don't turn up a blank, will be as big as Jumbo, and twice as liable to kick. It will be the eternal ruin of some of the vendors. Following is the June record as gleaned from the Probate Court filings.

[I skipped this tabulation. Hard to ascertain all the figures given.]

[Note: It showed druggists in Winfield: Williams, Glass, Harter, and Brown. It showed druggists in Arkansas City: Steinberger, Butterfield, Fairclo, Mowry & Co., Eddy, Kellogg & Co., Grimes & Son. It showed druggists in Other Towns: Avery, Grand Summit; Woolsey, Burden; Roberts, Udall; Rule, Cambridge; and Phelps, Dexter.]

Thus it will be seen that, compared to Arkansas City, Winfield enjoys the acme of health. Arkansas City is about off her pegs. And it is boldly averred, too, that not half the statements signed are ever recorded or filed. Every druggist, the first of every month, with uplifted hand and the "so help me God," swears before the Probate Judge that his filing represents every ounce of liquors, etc., that have gone over his counter. Can he afford to run the risk of violation and perjury too? He may do this successfully for a time, but when he does run against the pricks, it means jail, disgrace, and bankruptcy. And some of them are bound to do it. Grimes & Son show a record that demands investigation, and will be investigated. Steinberger has lost his famous "rep," but still makes a showing that ought to entitle him to diamonds--if he can evade the cold grip of the law.

CITY "DADS."

What Was Done at Their Meeting Monday Night.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The rulers of the city held their regular commune Monday night, with Mayor Graham and Councilmen Connor, McDonald, Myers, Crippen, Harter, and Baden present. Citizens' petition to drain streets in southeast part of the city was referred. John A. Eaton's building permit was granted. V. R. Bartlett was granted permission to move his office building to lot north of Sam Myton's. Petition of John Lowry to bring certain lands into the city limits was received and an ordinance to that effect ordered. Sidewalk petition of P. H. Albright, et al., for extension of East 10th avenue walk was referred. An ordinance, in recognition of citizens' petition, was ordered, allowing the fire department members a stated salary per month. The following bills were paid: J. H. Rice & Son, ordinance book, $7.50; Mater & Son, blacksmithing, one dollar; City officers' salaries, June, with expenses $185.43; J. C. McMullen, rent fire dept. building, $25; J. C. Fuller, rent Council Chamber, July, August, and September, $30; B. McFadden, burying dogs, $4; J. P. Baden, lanterns for fire department, $4; Wm. Moore & Sons, stone, $38.86; H. L. Thomas, crossings, $24.15; Cal Ferguson et al, election rooms, June 2nd, $8; Black & Rembaugh, printing, $7.25. The bill of Della Deroshe, $5,000, for injuries sustained by being thrown from a wagon in crossing Mann's gutter, was rejected. Cruel Council! Bills of A. H. Doane, $1.75, and J. C. Kelly, $22.50, pauper claims, were referred to the county commissioners for payment. Letter from the Attorney General regarding the Imbecile Asylum site was read. A resolution was adopted widening Fifth St., to include lots 4, 5, 6, and 7; and J. B. Lynn, S. H. Myton, and A. T. Spotswood were appointed to appraise the damages. An ordinance to attach certain territory to the limits of the city was rejected. An ordinance providing for the payment for site of the Imbecile Asylum was favored. An ordinance was ordered taking into the city all platted territory lying adjacent.

THE COUNTY FATHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Board of County Commissioners have been in session since Monday. Most of the time has been occupied examining and allowing claims against the county. Notes to the amount of $900 having been erroneously assessed in Sheridan township, it was expunged. Henry Chavis, a colored man, committed to the county jail from Justice Snow's court in March, for three months, and latterly five dollars fine for stealing lumber, etc., was released, he not having the "spondulics" to put up. R. C. Smith, a Justice in Silverdale township, was required to file new bond, one of the bondsmen, H. N. Chancey, having withdrawn. Tax sale, in 1879, of lot 2, blk 2, Arkansas City, was declared invalid, A. A. Newman having paid the taxes, as required by law, and the amount of sale was refunded. Tax sales on lots in blocks 29, 133, 135, and 76, Arkansas City, were declared off, being erroneous. The Jersey Cattle Co., of Silver Creek township, were rebated on double assessment of $3,035. Viewers report in E. Kerns county road was adopted, ex ½ mile. A. J. Naramore was awarded contract for keeping Joseph Naramore, an imbecile pauper, in Sheridan township. W. H. Melville and Mashes Scofield county roads laid over to October. Damages awarded in J. Olmstead county road to J. M. Boyle, $75; C. J. Boyle, $62.50; and Miss Hackworth, $25. E. J. Johnson, J. Hurt, and Wm. Reynolds were appointed to appraise s hf se qr and e hf sw qr and nw qr 36-33-6 school land. Tax sale of lot 15, block 143, to C. M. Scott, in 1881 was declared "off" and money ordered refunded. A. G. Ege, sent to the bastille from Judge Snow's court for two "plain drunks" at once, was released, and told to sin no more.

FILL 'ER UP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Some very fine grading is being done on East 11th Avenue and on 8th Avenue near the Roller Mill. This grading is a good thing, but don't other places need it much worse? South Main street is a disgrace to the city! It is numerously adorned with cess pools and the tuneful pollywog sings his sweet cadences uninterruptedly. Citizens out for pleasure rides avoid it as they would a stinging adder. We are aware, Jap, that a thousand or more whisperings of advice are daily poured in your ears from people who know how everything ought to be done. But THE COURIER now enters the wedge in a mighty honest cause. Grade South Main street and shut off miasma and Miss Pollywog if it takes the wool off, and every other street in town has to be neglected. It takes the cake for pure "cussedness."

ATTENTION ALL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Dr. Brandom, one of the twin brothers of the Eye and Ear Infirmary and Surgical Institute, of Wichita, Kansas, will visit Winfield, at the Central Hotel, every first Monday and Tuesday, and every third Monday and Tuesday of each month. For particulars, see large bills.

TO THE CITY MERCHANTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

It is of daily concern to the merchant, whether he deals in dry goods, groceries, or other wares, how he can best secure and hold customers for his goods. The various methods of advertising and other means resorted to in order to secure this essential object, are evidences of an ever present anxiety in regard to it. The fact that no customers means no sales, and no sales, with undiminished expenses, means ultimate failure, stares every merchant in the face. From the standpoint of a farmer who has intercourse and frequent business relations with the businessmen of our city, and who also from his occupation has the strongest fraternal feelings for the toiling agricultural class, it may not be unwise, as it is not unkind to speak of the relations, etc., of these two classes and offer a few suggestions. Your city has acted with generosity toward the farmers and others in providing a number of free watering troughs, where, with no inconvenience, their horses can be watered as needed. The great favor is highly appreciated, as indeed it ought to be. But let me ask the businessmen, what are you doing for your customers? There is usually seen placarded at the entrance of factories, "No admittance except on business." The merchant, with different relations to the public, cannot act in this exclusive way. His place of business is, from necessity, for free admission to all. Should it not be a place for the exercise of hospitality, to such as both need and deserve it? Shopkeepers are frequently annoyed by an inconvenient number, usually composed of the same individuals hanging about the store room, whose conversation is about on a par with the custom they give the proprietor, being "no good," until "patience ceases to be a virtue," and he is forced to post in the back part of the room, "No loafers wanted." This necessary course is accompanied by some anxiety on the part of the merchant, for fear that, while it may work a reform, may not result beneficially to his money drawer. The merchant must be a social man in order to draw customers, but at times, no doubt, he feels that there must be a limit in this regard, that he may avoid inviting loaferism. Individuals out of employment and commonly not very anxious about getting it, and who seek companionship about shops and stores instead of their families, may be properly termed loafers. With this class I have little or no sympathy. But there is a class of persons who quite frequently remain in your store room for a few hours at a time, not from choice but real necessity, who are more or less embarrassed in consequence, and this embarrassment is off-times intensified by an intentional lack of chairs or other means by which they may for a time rest themselves, to which is sometimes added the looks and actions of both the proprietor and clerks, intending to convey the impression that if you are done trading, you had better go. For this class I have the deepest sympathy. And who should not? They are the wives and daughters of our farmers, who have come, perhaps, several tedious miles to the city to do their trading, who were weary with home toil before starting and not at all rested by their journey. They may have no relatives or special friends in the city at whose house they may remain for a time, or until their husbands attend to needful business, and who are more or less detained by meeting fellow farmers and conversing on interesting topics. This delay in town is most generally proper and commendable, for it is here that the farmer, getting away from his isolation, finds the best opportunity to meet his friends; and it's well to him, for he can visit the implement stores, walk the streets, and if desired, can sit on a dry goods box, but it's not so pleasant with his wife and daughters. These ladies also meet their friends, but the pleasure to them is greatly marred by the embarrassed circumstances, that I have before indicated, surrounding them. They all the time realize the fact that if they are not selecting or purchasing goods, that their room is needed or desired. City ladies have no occasion or desire to longer remain in stores than necessary to make their purchases, but it is to be hoped that you will be able to see that their country sisters cannot do as they, act from choice, but are pressed by necessity. I will not theorize, but remind you of a known fact that, other things being equal, the merchant that gives the most attention to the comfort of his customers will get most of the trade. If you want friends (customers), than you must be friendly. Many of the best dry good houses have stools ranged along the counter on which customers may sit while making their selections. This may not be possible in every retail business house; but by regarding its importance and giving it attention, very much may be done in obeying the injunction, "Whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them." The best advertisement that can be used is the presence of happy customers. Such not only buy themselves, but induce their friends to buy. I am aware that this is a delicate subject to treat in a newspaper article, and that its solution by the merchant will call for the exercise of sound judgment and christian charity. Make a little more space if necessary in your store and supply it with chairs to accommodate the country ladies and give them to understand that they are welcome to use them, and see if it will not pay. J. F. MARTIN.

OUR CHEYENNE KILLERS.

Company C., K. N. G., in Great Danger of Having to Assassinate Cheyennes.

A Big Day for Barbers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.



Our Militia Company have stacked arms, gathered together, and are ready for "wah!" The air has been blue all day with war and rumors of war, and the end is not yet. Wednesday Capt. C. E. Steuven received this dispatch from Governor Martin: "State Guards, Winfield: There are alarming reports of an Indian invasion of Pratt and Comanche counties. Hold your company in readiness for duty and at short notice." The captain soon had his company marshaled at the Fire Department Building, with arms and anxious countenances. The circulation of the news made a stampede for the barber shops and tonight an inventory of the company would find no wool. And a close examination would reveal no false teeth or buttons--all shaken off. Pale faces are numerous, and as the Guards pace their beats around the "stacked" arms, the solicitous voices of Capt. Steuven and Lieutenant Finch goes safely along the line, "Hold your spines, boys, brace up! We may not have to go after all," when a gleam of light could be seen flitting over the countenances of the boys as they sat around the camp fire (a dry goods box) and a groan of relief rent the air. But really the boys seem liable to have a picnic. The settlers in the western border counties are in a frenzy and are liable to leave unless militia aid is sent. Our boys would soon lay out a little band of Cheyennes. Ugh! A chance they want!! Their legs want exercise. Seriously speaking, it would be a nice trip for our companies and the Indians are liable not to fool around such fighters. They could have a gala time on the plains and return fat and hearty. Of course, our Light Artillery has the same orders. Capt. Steuven telegraphed for ammunition and guns. A second dispatch was received this afternoon, saying to disband, but be in readiness for a telegraphed call at any time. Get ready to bid the boys good bye.

MORE ABOUT CITY AFFAIRS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

DEAR COURIER: I thought I would speak about our city dads & Co. How very strict they are to enforce certain ordinances to make the world outside think we are a very nice city. It won't do to hitch a horse or cow or any such thing to eat the grass. Oh, no, that won't do, but I tell you what will do: It will do to make a poor man build 150 feet of sidewalk outside of any business or travel, to raise the price of lots of one of the dads, and have the walk unconnected for years by crossings, and plow up the street and oblige us to wade in mud to get to and from home. Yes, that will do, and it will do to leave stinking frog ponds all along Main and Manning streets, from 10th to 15th streets; of course, that is admirable, and it will do to quarrel with a certain man about a few goods displayed on the side of the street. Now, there is nothing to hinder draining those mud holes with half the fuss and labor already expended, and abate the nuisance and stinks, and save the health of the people. What say you? A. H. HYDE.

We are giving such communications as the above to our readers for what they are worth. We think our city government are doing nobly. They are making and enforcing many new, excellent, and salutary ordinances and are improving things as fast as possible, but they cannot do everything that needs doing in a minute. The complaints we hear from sundry persons who think they are injured by the enforcement of certain city ordinances and regulations, are really a commendation to the city officials and the complaints of the same persons that others are not so strictly dealt with will have a tendency to call attention to other things which need to be done. We predict that all these things will be attended to as rapidly as possible.

LYNCHED AT GIRARD.

The Negro Who Outraged a White Girl at Baxter Springs Hung by a Mob.

The Lynchers Come up by Train From Cherokee County and Are Identified.

The Mysterious Killing of One of the Parties Near Baxter Springs.

The Theories Regarding it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

GIRARD, KAN., July 7. Late in the afternoon, of the Fourth of July, a girl thirteen or fourteen years old, was waylaid, outraged, and horribly mutilated near Baxter Springs in Cherokee County, by a colored boy named John Lawrence, who was arrested for the crime, and for fear of being lynched, was taken to Columbus on a hand car that night. A mob followed and in some manner a young white man by the name of Wolf was shot and killed near Columbus. The colored boy was lodged in jail and the next morning brought to Girard and put into the alleged county jail here, which is nothing but a mere shell. Heavy irons were kept on one of the boy's ankles. When the 11:22 train arrived from the south yesterday, about forty men got off at or near the station and scattered through the town. At about twelve o'clock the Sheriff received a telegram from the Sheriff of Cherokee County, which read: "Get our little nigger out of town before the Gulf train gets there." Half an hour later a number of armed men made a dash for the jail, broke down the iron door, took the prisoner out, marched him up one of the main streets, untied a horse hitched to a wagon in front of a business house, threw the colored boy in, and drove off, armed men surrounding him and keeping the citizens from interfering. They took the negro about two blocks west of the jail and hung him to the rafter of a house just being completed by Arthur Sharp. One of them, said to be the father of the girl, emptied his revolver into the body, three or four bullets striking it. The raid was so unexpected that the people here were entirely taken by surprise and those who did try to interfere had revolvers pushed uncomfortably close to their persons and were warned to stand back. A coroner's jury was impaneled and after hearing testimony rendered a verdict that the "colored man, whose name is unknown to the jury and whose age is supposed to be about seventeen years, came to his death by strangulation, caused by hanging by a mob composed of from twelve to twenty men, at least two of whom were from Baxter Springs, Cherokee County, State of Kansas, and whose names are H. C. Tripp and Captain Price, and that the act was felonious." The body of the victim was then cut down and buried by the city authorities.

LYNCHERS IDENTIFIED.

GIRARD, KAN., July 7. As the men who participated in the lynching here today were all unmasked, they were identified almost positively by many people. Among them were H. C. Tripp, who is said to be a traveling salesman for McCord, Nave & Co., of Kansas City, and Captain Price, both of whom were named in the coroner's verdict. It is also said that R. J. Hines, Thomas Ward, and John M. Cooper, of Baxter Springs, were among the mob. The father of the young girl was also supposed to be present.

THE KILLING OF THE LYNCHED.

COLUMBUS, KAN., July 7. This city was thrown into a wild state of excitement by the report of a murder committed in the southeast part of town, on the Gulf railroad track. The murder is the outgrowth of a rape committed in Baxter Springs about six o'clock Saturday evening. Excitement ran high there over the rape case, which was committed by an eighteen year old colored boy on a sixteen year old white girl. The deed was done about three-fourths of a mile from Baxter, and was one of the most diabolical in the annals of crime. The brute was arrested and an officer immediately started to Columbus with him in a buggy. A crowd soon after collected, and eight men, headed by the now infuriated father of the girl, started for Columbus on a hand car. They intended to get there ahead of the officer and prisoner, organize a mob, take the fiend from the officer, and hang him. Arriving at a crossing about one mile south of the Gulf depot at 9:30 p.m., they stopped, took their hand car off the track, and started up the railroad track for town. They had just left the hand car and were going along in pairs, when all at once a shot was fired from behind, which struck one of the rear men in the lower part of the back of the head and came out at the top, killing him instantly. Consternation prevailed among the mob, and they hurried up the track in quest of help. Sheriff Layne and Under Sheriff Turner, who had received a message from Baxter to watch for the hand car, had started down the railroad track from the depot, and met the excited men, who acted like a scared bunch of sheep. Sheriff Layne, after hearing a portion of their story, put the seven men under arrest and started back to the scene of the murder. Arriving there the Sheriff made a thorough examination of the surroundings, but could find no evidence that anyone was lying in the grass at the side of the track, and he came to the conclusion that one of their own number was walking behind the murdered man, and that he pulled his revolver out to examine it and that it accidentally went off, although the uncle of the dead man, who was walking beside him, says there was no one behind them. Yet the uncle can't get over the fact that a man came running up to the men in front, saying that "two of our men are shot." As the man fell over dead, his uncle also stumbled, and fell over the west side of the track. There is one man of the crowd missing, and it is supposed that he is the man who did the shooting at Baxter. It is believed that the father and brother of the prisoner left there in time to beat the men who were coming on the hand car, and that they shot this man in order to divert the attention of the lynchers from their object. Another hand car of men pulled in from Baxter about fifteen minutes after the first car, all on the same mission. Threats are strong against the black brute, and Sheriff Layne and Under Sheriff Turner have taken extra precautions to protect their prisoner.

THE KENTUCKY OUTLAWS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

MOREHEAD, KY., July 7. Three more arrests were made today of members of the Tolliver faction, the parties being J. P. Day, T. A. Day, and James Oxley. There was county court today and everything passed off quietly. Mrs. Vina Martin was arrested on a warrant charging her with selling poisoned food to the proprietor of the Cottage Hotel, where Craig Tolliver is held under guard, the alleged intention being the poisoning of Tolliver. The State militia are standing guard, and everything is orderly.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Militia National Encampment at Philadelphia broke up on the 6th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The overdue steamer Gallia of the Cunard line, arrived at Queenstown on the morning of the 5th and proceeded to Liverpool.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A dispatch from Madrid, of the 5th, stated that the cholera was increasing at all points except Murcia. Extreme misery and destitution prevailed at Aranjuez.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Mikado of Japan has bestowed the ribbon of the third class on D. W. Stevens, who for many years was First Secretary of the United States Legation to Japan.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

E. Erickson, aged thirteen, A. Ludkins, age thirteen, and M. Rhodes, aged ten years, went in bathing above the mill-dam at Owatonna, Minnesota, recently, and all three were drowned.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Big Bear, the Canadian rebel, was captured near Carlton by the mounted police, recently. He said that he and his band were on their way to surrender, having run out of provisions.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Le Figaro of Paris announced recently that M. Grevy, President of France, intended to retire from public life at the expiration of his present term of office, which takes place in January next.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

During the celebration at Milwaukee on the 4th a collision took place between the State troops and citizens, a considerable number of the latter being intoxicated. Several persons were injured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

According to advices by the steamer Oceanica, the conflagration which occurred May 20, at Toyama, Japan, was of exceptional magnitude, destroying 5,917 houses. No estimate of the loss was given.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

While a number of young men were firing a brass cannon at Fultonville, New York, on the 4th, it went off prematurely, killing William Van West, and so badly injuring Charles Maxwell that he died soon afterward.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

At Detroit, Michigan, recently, James Parker, a carpenter of that city, shot his wife and then himself. He was killed instantly, but his wife will probably recover. The cause was domestic unhappiness, caused by drink.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

E. J. Sherlock et ux to R S Whitson, lot 12 and e hf of lot 11, block 230, Fuller's add to Winfield: $550

Rachael Frederick and husband to W. L. Mullen, pt sw qr 27-32-4e: $300

P Willis Smith et al to Wm B. Norman, pt lot 5, blk 40, Udall: $22

Louis Fitzsimmons et ux to W B Norman, lot 3, blk 38, Fitzsimmons' add to Udall: $250

Susan Wert and husband to Tolles & Hon, lot 2 and se qr of nw qr 10-31-7e: $800

Mary J. Swarts and husband to J R Inglis, lots 5, 6, 7, 8, 25, 26, 27, and 28, blk 287, and lots 10 and 11, blk 193, Ark City: $425

T M McGuire et ux to Geo H Crippen, lot 15, blk 127, Winfield: $1,000

Elizabeth Bruce and husband to F M McGuire, lot 15, blk 127, Winfield: $1,000

F J Hess et ux to Lewis W Coombs, lot blk 127, Ark City: $100

[Note: Lot Number not given in item above.]

Tyler H McLaughlin et ux to L W Coombs, lot 25, blk 127, A. C.: $100

Lizzie Benedict to Wm A Nix, lots 25 and 26, blk 140, A. C.: $100

Miles S Williams to C L Butts, lot 2, blk 48, Williams ad to Udall: $40

Robt M Connelly to Adinah Davenport, lot 4, blk 76, Winfield: $500

William Greenwell to D L Hoblit, lots 2 and 3 and sw qr ne qr and se qr sw qr 4-34-6-e: $440

Anson B Moore to David L Hoblit, s hf sw qr and ne qr sw qr 4-34-6e: $600

Nathaniel Moore et ux to David L Hoblit, se qr 5-34-6-e, 160 acres: $450

Allen S Kunk to J K Quinn, lot 7, 6-32-7-e, 36 acres: $200

Sarah French to Alonzo B French, lot 3 and pt of lots 10, 4, and 9, blk 66, Winfield: $1,100

C Collins to Mary C Kelso, pt lot 3-31-34-3e: $25

Bartlett Mendenhall et ux to Almeda R Mendenhall, s hf ne qr 1-30-6e, 80 acres: $700

Addison L Crow et ux to Jonas Messenger, s hf se qr and ne qr se qr 2-31-6-e: $1,600

C P Crow to Jonas Messenger, nw ¼ se qr 2-31-6-e: $100

Jas E Topliff to Chesley Deerberry, lots 27 and 28, block 27, Ark City: $50

B W Matlack to C M Scott, lot in blk 93, Ark City, quit claim: $1.00

C S Seitz to Cordelia Eldridge, lots 11 and 12, blk 146, Ark City: $100

Julia McLawry and husband to Cordelia Eldridge, lot 18, blk 78, Ark City: $80

J W Hutchison et al to Frank Danks, lots 26 and 27, blk 140, Ark. City: $180

William M Herren et ux to Alfred M Penland, sw qr se qr 35-30-6e: $650

Nathaniel R Mountjoy et ux to J A Anderson, n hf ne qr 8-31-5e, 80 acres: $00

L E White to John H Driggs, e hf se qr 3-31-6e: $1,600

Highland Park Town Co. to Anna C Hall, lots 1 and 2, blk 21, H P ad to Winfield: $200

JUDGE GANS' GRIST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

T. R. Bryan made final settlement as guardian of the Corkins heirs.

Benj. F. Wood made final settlement in the estate of R. B. Wood, deceased.

Wm. Baxter made final settlement in the estate of Wm. O. Baxter, deceased.

Jacob S. Hackney made final settlement in estate of Francis Whistler, deceased.

Udora Pierce filed petition for appointment as administrator for estate of Joseph W. Pierce, deceased.

Robert Manson and Maggie, connected with the Chilocco Indian school, were granted a wedding certificate yesterday.

John Moses and Eliza Dalesburg, of Torrance, were the first wedded result of the Ga-l-o-r-i-o-u-s Fourth. Judge Gans united them in the holy bonds yesterday.

Howard Rude, of Comanche County, and Carrie Pearson, of this county, have also flown off on the gold-tipped wings of the matrimonial bird, having procured a license Friday.

The Judge also joined in the unalloyed bonds of matrimony a few days since, Mr. George Laycock and Fannie Paris. Both are young people of much worth, and promise a long, happy, useful life. George is the son of one of the prominent contractors of this city, Mr. D. R. Laycock, and the bride is the daughter of Uncle Wesley Paris. THE COURIER wishes them a straight journey with a heavenly ending.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

TURNBULL WAGON.

If you want a wagon that will last you 20 years, run lighter and turn shorter than any other wagon, buy the TURNBULL WAGON.

I respectfully refer parties wanting a wagon to the following men who have bought and are using them. W. A. LEE

Will Allen 3 miles west of Winfield.

John Hahnihan Maple City.

G. H. Allen 1 mile west of Winfield.

D. McGaw Cambridge.

O. E. Fleharty Winfield.

R. E. Bacon Tisdale.

Jno. S. Grimes Polo.

L. L. Rudd Udall.

G. W. Peters Burden.

I. N. Davis Maple City.

Sylvanus F. Beck Winfield.

Newton Yarbro Floral.

Lewis Cooper Winfield.

C. White Udall.

Lewis Cooper Winfield.

J. L. Mason Winfield.

D. C. Stephens Floral.

John C. Barton New Salem.

Q. M. Victor Winfield.

J. A. Rupp Winfield.

Dr. Wright Winfield.

J. C. Wilson Cambridge.

C. L. White Winfield.

Ambros M. Roe Oxford.

A. Conrad. Tisdale

Fitzgerald Bros. Indian Territory.

W. S. Brown Cedarvale.

M. P. Byers Winfield.

S. C. Kelly Otto.

Jas. H. McGee Burden.

Alfred Young Tisdale.

Sax P. Martin Cambridge.

W. C. McDonald Winfield.

Fred A. Beard Otto.

M. F. Pitt Winfield.

Joseph Nichols New Salem.

James Baker Otto.

C. P. Cothren Cedarvale.

A. D. Turk Winfield.

Oliver Leyerley Tisdale.

James Utt Cedarvale.

Nathan Thorp Winfield.

H. C. Miller New Salem.

Amos Biddle Oxford.

J. Keller Arkansas City.

Jno. Worthington Winfield.

P. F. Haynes Arkansas City.

Bellville Winfield.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Recap. In District Court: H. C. Stivers, Plaintiff, against Mary N. Stivers, Defendant.

Petition for divorce. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for plaintiff.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

[Skipped Winfield City Markets Report.]

OUR NEW FEATURE--THE LATEST MARKETS.

Todays' Markets in Chicago and Kansas City By Special Telegraph To The

Daily Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

CHICAGO, July 8, 2 p.m.

Wheat, cash: 86-1/2. Wheat, August: 88-3/8. Wheat, September: 90-1/2.

Corn, cash: 47-3/4. Corn, August: 47-1/4.

KANSAS CITY, July 8, 2 p.m.

Wheat, No. 2 red, cash: 76. Wheat, No. 2 red, August: 79.

Corn, cash: 37-3/8. Corn, August: 38-1/2.

Hogs: $3.65.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Lovers of the writings of Sir Walter Scott will be pleased to know that there is in this county an old gentleman, Mr. Andrew Brown, aged over seventy, who knew Sir Walter well, when a lad. The old gentleman takes great delight in talking about and telling of the antic tricks the good old Sir Walter, now dead fifty-three years, was want to play on the boys that visited him at Abbott's Ford. He tells an excellent one of the boys collecting and going on Sir Walter one night for some sport. He was prepared. Fixing a box full of pastry, doughnuts, or something of the kind, he told them of what was in store if they could find it. They went at it in breakneck style. After they had about torn their clothes off and Scott was sore laughing, he put them onto its whereabouts, and a feast it was. Miss Hattie Brown, a daughter of Mr. Brown, is living with W. A. Lee and will attend our Normal Institute.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Still are connubial ties thrown into the hopper of the mill of justice to be rent asunder. Elijah Tyner has filed his petition with District Clerk Pate for a divorce from his wife, Anna Tyner. He charges her with combing his hair with stove wood and other weapons of torture, and guilty of other acts of extreme cruelty. It would look as though the cart was before the horse again. It's a mighty mean woman who would treat her husband thusly. It's an innovation and we don't blame Elijah for kicking for freedom. Frank J. Barton has a wife and is yet wifeless, she having vamoosed and refuses to return to her first love, and he wants a divorce. The appeal case of J. E. Hayner, vs. G. M. Gardener, to recover $111 on a promissory note, has been filed in the District Court from Judge Blackman's bench.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

G. A. Coles, the disabled soldier stopping at the 9th Avenue Hotel, was one of Custer's soldiers. At the time Custer was killed, he was fifty miles away hurrying to the scene of slaughter. During this time he was shot through the head, which has brought on fits and disabled him forever. He has been in Uncle Sam's hospitals since 1876. He is now on his way to Fort Smith, Arkansas, where his folks live. This winter he is in hopes of obtaining a good pension from Uncle Sam of $70 per month. He needs it and by all means should have it. Our W. R. C. here donated funds to help him on his journey.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A man appeared here yesterday from Arkansas City with froth in his mouth and two navy revolvers in his belt. He was mad, and thirsted for b-l-o-o-d. His wife had run away with a handsomer man. Marshal McFadden invited him to lay off his revolvers while under the canopy of our city, which he did. The fellow swore, by all that was bad and unholy, that he would kill the male eloper the first time he "set" eyes on him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Elsewhere in this issue will be seen the quarterly statement of the First National Bank of this city. It makes a remarkably fine showing. Its deposits are $283,130.90--a record that can't be duplicated by any bank in the west in a city of Winfield's age and size. It is not only a voucher of the popularity of this bank, but a splendid exhibition of the wealth and prosperity of our county.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Grant Stafford went over to Pittsburg, this State, to spend the 4th with his future mother-in-law. P. H. Albright received a dispatch from him this morning saying, "Am water bound!" This is a new name for it. It looks as though old Cupid had Grant this time. It will likely take a matrimonial certificate to fix the bridges.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

At one of Wichita's leading dry goods stores, a fashionably dressed lady entered, and with majestic carriage, swept into the hosiery department. "Let me see some of your cheap 35 cents hose. I desire to make my hired girl a pair." What a nice thing for eminent ladies to think of hired girls.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Ah, no ! e. c. didn't get its druggists record from THE COURIER this time. The record would have had some intelligence if it had. If we had a printer who couldn't get up a better table than that, we would pass him free, and like a cyclone, to the jungles of Africa. He wouldn't do for our Imbecile asylum.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Southern Kansas has been in bad luck this year--the floods have all struck it. But the repairs are all substantially in again and the train moves clear through with as much alacrity as ever. Agent Branham and Expressman Snowhill again smileth.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

While in Topeka last week, a representative of THE COURIER met the State Board of Charities. They have completed the plans for the Feeble Minded Institute here, and the Architect will be down next week to stake off the grounds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The "kids" from eight to fourteen years of age have organized two base ball clubs and are uniformed. At a game last week the score in nine innings was four to five. This beats Cowley County's past record. Burden Eagle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Prof. Wilkinson, of Emporia, conductor of the Normal here, called today. Mr. Wilkinson ranks among the first educators of the state and is a very fine looking gentleman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. George Ropes, Architect of the Imbecile Asylum, was a caller this afternoon. He is here to stake off and overlook the grounds for the building.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Miss Emily Kuhliman, of the State Normal, will be here on the 13th inst. to give instructions in the Primary work before the Normal.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

P. C. Kirkland, Oxford's banker, paid Cowley's hub a visit Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

W. R. McDonald left today for Hazelton, Barbour County, for a short business trip.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A. C. Clark, F. C. Brown, and W. A. Lichtenwalter were here today, from Independence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

George M. Miller was over from Cherryvale yesterday. THE DAILY will visit him hereafter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

H. B. McKinney, one of F. A. Brady's insurance men, has taken a claim in Western Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

H. H. Swim, who has been out in Ford County, Kansas, holding down a claim, returned Friday and is much pleased with that country.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. Phelps, the gentlemanly funny writer, formerly connected with the Geuda Springs Herald, is to become a citizen of Udall.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Rev. W. H. Harris, of Creswell, was in the city Tuesday, returning from Maple City, where he orated on the Fourth, via Grenola. Maple City had a pleasant celebration.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Senator A. L. Redden, of El Dorado, was accompanied by Miss Bessie Cannon, a cousin, to the meeting of the college trustees here Tuesday. They have quarters at the Brettun.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

C. L. Swarts, Arkansas City's handsome, auburn-haired attorney, was up Tuesday. He says the people of Arkansas City are greatly disappointed at the result of their celebration.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Marshal McFadden is making it sultry for dogs that refuse to put up the city tax: $1 for males and $5 for females. Several have already been brought before Judge Turner to the tune of $12.25.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. D. C. Irwin came in from Attica to spend the Fourth with his uncle, aunt, and cousins, the family of Mr. J. W. Johnston. Master Wallace Johnston returned with him for a few weeks visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Silliman left Tuesday for a few days rural recreation at Mr. C. A. Peabody's farm in the Grouse valley. Mr. Silliman has an interest with Mr. Peabody in a cattle ranch over there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mrs. Mary Lewes, of Branford, Canada, came in Saturday for a visit of a few weeks with her brother, James Jordan. They had not seen each other for twenty-five years. The meeting is a very happy one.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Quincy Robertson, one of the COURIER force, will spend this week with his parents, in Walnut township, for rural recreation. His months of faithful labor will allow a week's vacation with easy grace.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Ledrue Guthrie went to Winfield Monday afternoon for a short visit with Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Mendenhall. Mr. Guthrie will return immediately, but his wife will remain several days. Wellingtonian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

J. O. McKinlay, late banker of Udall, together with young lawyer Higgins, left on Monday evening in quest of a location in the western part of Kansas. And so that country is fast settling with more pluck and ability.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

W. H. Whitford, who has been with T. F. Axtel for some time, left Tuesday for his home in New York. We are sorry to lose Will. He has made many friends here. We hope he may conclude to return.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

C. A. Coles, manager of the Rink, has invented a machine for repairing rollers on skates. It is a big thing. Mr. Coles will travel and sell these over the country. Ostrander & Stayman, our live machines, are putting them up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Joe H. Supernaw, an early day Winfield boy, came in from Joplin, Monday, looking as handsome and millionaire like as ever. He was with our 'bus line years ago, and also one of the stage men from here to Wichita in pioneer days.

[Paper had "Supernaw" above. I could only find "Jas. Superman" listed as a resident in Winfield in 1880. MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Capt. C. M. Scott, of Arkansas City, has an addition to his ranch. It is a beauty and couldn't be bought at any price. C. M. is said to be recovering from his exuberance at its advent. A lovely little prattling daughter is enough to upset most anybody.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

John Moses and Eliza A. Dalesburg, of Arkansas City, were made one Monday by Judge Gans. We wish them success through life, that no storms may pass over their wedded bliss, that their two hearts may beat as one for ever and ever. Amen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Rev. F. A. Brady was down from Udall Tuesday. He delivers his sermon, "The Model Woman," in the Arkansas City Baptist church next Sunday evening. This is a grandly eloquent and practical sermon and the people of the Terminus will enjoy a treat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Joseph Brown and Della Moore; Geo. W. Bean and Letha McGinnis, both colored couples, had the connubial knot tied by Judge Gans Tuesday. Joseph was rushing frantically around after Judge Gans in the still hours of last night--it was a rushing case to head off the would-be interceptor of an elopement.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

We would suggest to parties living upstairs and business offices upstairs to be careful of the passers-by on the street. A couple of ladies of this city were covered with tobacco saliva yesterday while passing along the street. Gentlemen, buy you a spittoon or stop using tobacco.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mrs. C. M. Lukens, daughter of Mr. T. S. Green, of Akron, has returned from Washington Territory, to live. Her husband will follow in a few weeks. She says that in Washington Territory people head their wheat, haul it right to the thresher, sack the grain, and let it lie in the field till they get ready to haul it in, not fearing rain or other damage. Their system is irrigation. Our Bethel reporter got "off" on this.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Our Sheriff is in a bad box. The Kansas City Evening Star says he was arrested in Wyandotte the other day for murder, and gives quite an account of the arrest, alluding to him as "Young McIntyre." The Star reporter had better get off his goggles. He puts the ox before the car. McIntire was the officer who made the arrest, instead of the "young murderer." If the Star will look over THE COURIER this evening, it will get the straight of it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The hotel rustlers are having a little legal tussle. Arthur Fresh, the flying "Dutchman" of the Commercial, has had Dan Cisler, "Lum," of the Brettun, arrested for diffing him on the cheek with a stone, while wrestling grips at the Santa Fe train the other night. The boys deny the charge and make war. The poor devil who lands in Winfield and escapes the "Best hotel in the city!" yell and grab of these runners will be a good one. Their rivalry is equal to the Chicago union depot. The cheek of a hotel rustler ought to be too much for any boulder.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

E. A. Maybee had a dog--a $5 female dog. He tried his best to give the animal away, but not until Marshal McFadden and Judge Turner got their work in to the tune of $10 did anyone come along to relieve Mr. Maybee of his "dorg." The Marshal gives notice that any man who don't walk up to Treasurer Pryor and "whack up" the tax on his canine, will be hauled up before the Captain as soon as found, with absolutely no leniency. Those hitching stock across the sidewalk or in the street will be treated ditto. Our dog is dead and our old cow has strayed off. We are doggoned happy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

We have heard of ecstatic bliss; we have heard of bliss that reaches out and takes hold of all the glories of imagination, but we never saw as exuberant Bliss as was exhibited by our C. A. Monday. For fifty-five long years he has been without the soft echo of "papa" from a prattler on his knee--no rosy cheeked little one to be the adoration of its sire. No wonder he didn't know when he came uptown Monday whether he was a-foot or horseback, and ejaculating with floury tone, "I am a dad! Whoop!!" He was finally cornered and cooled down for particulars. It's a boy, and Mr. Bliss is several inches taller. Congratulations are certainly in order.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. Felkner, a brother to the wild lunatic that broke Winfield all up a few weeks ago, was here Sunday from El Dorado in search of his brother. He says that the man arrested at Douglass isn't his brother. He thinks his brother is trying to work through to Texas, having got an idea that his wife is there. He says it was gross carelessness in the officials of the asylum that allowed him to get away. The lunatic thinks the whole world is against him and is determined to down everybody that tackles him. He was one of Butler County's first physicians, and had an immense practice, overworking himself. His mind became unsound a year ago. The brother is very anxious for his capture.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Bryan got off last evening for their new home in Kansas City. Elder Myers, in mentioning the request of Mr. and Mrs. Bryan for a church letter to deposit with the Kansas City church, spoke beautifully of the noble work they had done in the erection of our Christian church building and the maintenance of the church, and the city generally. They certainly hold a very warm place in the hearts of Winfield people, who rest in the hope of their returning to this city to reside some time. They carry a host of well-wishes. Master Willie was a proficient and ambitious member of our Juvenile band and leaves it with regret to the band and himself.

AMERICA'S EAGLE!

How It Soared Over the Garden of Eden--Hunka Dora on High!

THE TERMINUS' 4th CELEBRATION.

Struck by a Cyclone--$1,000 Damages--Big Crowd and Terrible Sickness.

VARIOUS DOINGS IN COWLEY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Another ga-l-o-r-i-o-u-s Fourth has come and gone. The Great American Eagle of freedom has flapped off the ends of its wings, feasted on red lemonade, soda pop, and hunka dora speeches, and is laid up for repairs. Our reporter got in a balloon Friday evening and fell out at Arkansas City amid the roar of fire cracker and the shouts of the small boy with one suspender, a toy pistol, and fourteen sore fingers. The freight train was numerously loaded Friday evening with Winfield folks, to turn loose their liberty valve and see the white elephant from the tip of his tail to the end of his proboscis. Hitched to the tow string of Dick Howard, the genial Republican faberizer, and Charley McIntire, the pious man of the Democrat, our reporter was kept from under the chariot of over exuberance and numerous caldrons always set for the innocent. The American bosom heaves like a surging sea, on every Fourth of July, with an unquenchable desire to go somewhere, they don't care where. The biggest end of Cowley rounded up at the terminus, seeing wonders in the air. At least ten thousand people were surging around looking at each other--men and matrons, young men and maidens, boys and girls. At 4 o'clock in the morning the First Light artillery, which had gone noiselessly from here during the night in charge of its captain, N. A. Haight, split the air in twain with cannon's roar. At 10 o'clock the procession formed. It was headed by our juvenile band, under its splendid leader, Harry Halbrook, and we must remark right here that the boys distinguished themselves grandly, eliciting the highest praises from all. It was their first public appearance away from home and the proficiency they exhibited was a surprise to all. Their selections were beautiful and splendidly rendered throughout. The Buckskin Border Band of The Terminus, ten pieces, were out for the first time in their buckskin uniforms, fringed like unto the ranger of the plains. Their appearance was very unique and their playing good. It is a new band, and of course, is not yet at its best. The Winfield Fire Department marshaled by its chief, Will Clark, all in their bright uniforms, with cart and hose, with alarm bell attachment, was conceded to be the best feature of the procession. The procession was formed as follows: Winfield Juvenile Band; city government; Knights of Pythias; Winfield Fire Department; Buckskin Border Band; thirty uniformed little girls, representing the states; Ladies Relief Corps; Gents on Horseback; Rag Muffins; trade representations, citizens, etc. Rev. S. B. Fleming read the Declaration of Independence and Col. H. T. Sumner, of Arkansas City, delivered the oration. The grounds were in terrible shape owing to the late rains and backwater from the river. The approach was a half mile long and mud all the way. The weather clerk turned the crank the wrong way. The greased pole was the only public amusement on the grounds and a Winfield boy got the lucre off the top. Winfield usually gets there. Private enterprises for extorting, with as much ease and grace as possible, the lucre of the people, were as numerous as usual on such occasions. The public always takes so much money to a celebration and will get rid of it if they do have to give it away.

BASE BALL

The base ball contest between our Cyclones and the Border Club of Arkansas City was the biggest and best feature of the celebration, and the finest game, for interest and science, that has ever been played in the county. It was witnessed by over two thousand people and the interest was intense. At the end of the fourth inning, the game was eight to three in the Border's favor. The Arkansas City fellows threw their hats in the air and emptied their pocket books in wagers. Then our boys began to go up and it became our fellows' time to yell. The club purse was thirty dollars. The score stood as follows, at the close of the game.

[Could not read the statistical data well on innings, positions of players. Am just going to list the players on each team.]

CYCLONES:

Beam, pitcher; Tidd, Land, McMullen, Holbrook, Jones, Russel, Smith, Gray.

Total: 13 runs, 20 outs.

BORDERS:

Perryman, pitcher; Godfrey, Henderson, Miller, Wright, C. Wright, Hilliard, G. Wilson, J. Wilson.

Total: 12 runs, 22 outs.

At the announcement of Winfield's victory, all was drowned in shouts by those of the winning side, while Arkansas City was very sick. The Winfield lookers on had their pockets about a thousand dollars fuller. Everything was perfectly harmonious throughout the game.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Arkansas City was numerously unfortunate in her celebration. She advertised remarkably well and got an immense crowd, but their attractions failed to materialize. Robt. T. Lincoln wasn't there; the band of red-skins in battle array wasn't there; the "Kansas Millers" steamer, stranded down the Arkansas, wasn't there; and the excursion train was a snare. The base ball game was about the only thing to show up as expected.

AWFULLY SICK.

The sickest lot of humanity ever gathered together in Cowley County graced Arkansas City Saturday. By night about 1,000 men were almost overcome by "medicine." Just how they obtained it will be shown later when the dispensers begin to quake under the cold arm of the law. A dozen or more are in the vice and are liable to be badly mashed. Such debauchery was a disgrace to our fair county, and of course received the frown of all good citizens of the terminus. "Medicine" flowed, in some places, with appalling boldness. The "cooler" and a dozen or so extra buildings were chuck full--of men. Last year's celebration in this city was disgraced by but one or two plain drunks. Of course, in such a vast crowd this is remarkable--couldn't have been so in any other city than Winfield. But Arkansas City was too sick. Her Drug Stores want dissecting, and they will get it. THE COURIER must confess Winfield's share in this disgrace. Our boys, like the rest, let temptation steal their manhood on this occasion, and got several sheets in the wind, and are now lamenting it. The whim that the day excuses such actions is all bosh. It will never do it.

PROMISCUOUS.

Our Fire Department took the cake.

V. Beard was on hand, from here, with his peanut roaster, intoxicating everybody.

Our George Black raked in numerous sheckles with his elevated railway--a novel scheme.

Arthur Bangs took down the Juvenile Band and superintended his 'bus line to and from the grounds, doing a rousing business.

About 600 went down from Winfield. If the excursion train had come at ten, as expected, with coaches enough, 3,000 would have gone. Through the efforts of Agent Kennedy a train of six coaches was secured to bring our crowd back at 12 p.m.

Hank Paris and Green Wooden transported the Fire Companies down, and ran a hack to the grounds, wearing out six teams and filling their pockets--if they did have to give a mint as license.

Dick Howard of the Republican, extremely enthusiastic at first over the Borders, was so twisted by our Cyclones that he won't recover for a month. He still persists that Arkansas City's club can lay it over our boys.

A LITTLE LATE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Monday as our foreman was making up the forms for THE DAILY COURIER and while he was about ready to justify the last column, a long, lean, six foot specimen of humanity, with leather leggins, such as the fearless cow boy wears, came stalking in with the boldness of a Texas steer, and inquired: "Is there any chance for a job?" The foreman looked up from his stooping position, dropped his rule, turned pale, and with a trembling voice said. "N-n-no, I believe not; we have all the help needed for the present." At this a voice was heard from the front door, "Come on Dick, there is no chance for a job here." This relieved our foreman very much, but the shock caused THE DAILY to be 45 minutes behind time.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

THE WEEKLY COURIER this week is the best paper, for home news, ever turned out in this section, which will be readily conceded by every reader. It contains over eighteen columns of home news, in solid minion type--four times as much as any other weekly published in the west.

COWLEY'S NORMAL INSTITUTE.

It Opened Monday with 108 Enrolled--Flattering Prospects.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Cowley County Normal Institute opened Monday in the High School building with a splendid outlook. One hundred and six were enrolled--almost double the first day's enrollment of any year since the Institute's inception. Sixty is the largest recorded for any first day up to this year. Prof. J. N. Wilkinson, of the State Normal School, is conductor, and Prof. A. Gridley, Miss Ella Kelly, and Mr. Will C. Barnes, all educators of experience and ability, are instructors. Of course, County Superintendent Limerick has general supervision. The teachers are vigorous and ambitious, exhibiting great interest in the enhancement of their vocation. The Institute is a marked contrast to that of last year, in attendance. Over half are new faces, if anything an improvement in appearance over any past Normal. Last year the Institute was held seven weeks, with one session a day. This year it will be but four weeks, with two sessions daily; morning, from 10 to 12; evening, 4 to 6. Following is Monday's enrollment.

A. GRADE.

S. W. Norton, H. S. Wallace, H. G. Norton, J. C. Bradshaw, Oliver C. Fuller, Julia L. Caton, Chas. W. Roberts, F. E. Haughey.

B. GRADE.

Cora Beach, Mrs. Amy Chapin, Hattie Daniels, Emma S. Howland, Joe Kephart, Maggie Kinney, Mary E. Miller, Laura Phelps, John R. Smith, E. W. Stark, Jennie Brengle, Willie Coombs, Clara Davenport, Lida Howard, Anna Kuhn, Mary Manser, Carrie A. Plunket, Anna Robertson, Maggie Stansbury, Hattie Utley, Allie Wheeler.

B. 2 GRADE.

W. E. Angerman, T. J. Baker, M. A. Cronk, Lizzie Campbell, Mollie Dalgarn, W. H. Garrett, Edith Holland, Viola Krow, Emma Lycan, J. F. Rowe, John Stevenson, Minnie Turner, Hattie Brown, Iva Crane, W. F. Craddock, W. T. Clover, H. A. Ewen, E. M. Garrett, Mamie Henson, Julia King, Belle Page, Eva Reynolds, Millie Taylor, Geo. C. Whitson, Lottie Wilkinson.

C. GRADE.

Anderson, E. M.; Anderson, Nettie; Abrams, Sarepta; Bertram, Belle; Bush, Belle; Baker, Annie; Barnett, Clara; Cochran, Jennie; Doty, Willis; Frederick, C. A.; George, Estrella; Goodrich, Cora; Honold, Geo.; Hunt, Marian; Honold, Lena; Holland, W. B.; Iry, Minnie; Ireton, Jenning; Jacobus, W. V.; Johnson, Henry; Kerr, Joseph; Kyger, Edgar; Myers, Aggie; McDorman, Fannie; Merydith, Metta; Miller, Alice; Nichols, Jessie; Nichols, Belle; O'Neil, Lizzie; Plank, Nellie; Rittenhouse, Mattie; Robertson, Josie; Race, Etta; Roseberry, Carries; Rice, Ettie; Robertson, J. E.; Smith, Dora; Singleton, Joe; Stafford, M. S.; Sumpter, Flora; Stevenson, Ettie; Shephard, Julia; Taylor, Mary; Tinsley, Maud; Vanorsdol, Mattie; Victor, Mattie; Weimer, Anna; Walton, Lillie.

MORE CELEBRATIONS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Cowley County celebrated the Fourth everywhere. Our Tisdale correspondent tells of the grand time at Tisdale. Burden is always up and coming. Her A. O. U. W. Lodge gave a most pleasant ball and banquet Saturday evening. They had fixed everything with the weather clerk and got a regular Presbyterian sprinkle, cooling the air splendidly for the occasion. The gathering was one characteristic of Burden--genial, refined, and happy, as good as many places twice the size can turn out. The music was furnished by the Burden orchestra, of which Frank McLain and Fred Collins, musicians of fine ability, were the principal lights. J. W. Henthorn, the handsome and always affable faberizer of the Eagle, was master of ceremonies. Our reporter hasn't enjoyed an occasion more in many moons. At Udall the celebration was unique. After eloquent and highly interesting addresses by Rev. F. A. Brady, Udall's Baptist minister, and Rev. Father Kelley, our Catholic priest, the old settlers held an experience meeting, telling of the many individual and serious happenings of pioneer days in Cowley. They had various other entertainments, and the day was most pleasantly spent.

Dexter was also the place of a jolly gathering on the 4th, the particulars of which we have not yet received.

The celebration at Oxford was attended by about one hundred and fifty of our people, who were considerably disappointed. The grove was poor and artificial and the attractions poorer.

The pleasantest celebration was had by some of our young folks, entrancing Misses Nellie Cole, Leota Gary, Sarah Gay, Sarah Bass, Hattie Stolp, Gertrude McMullen, Ida Johnston, Lizzie McDonald, and Hattie Andrews; Messrs. H. E. Kibbe, George Schuler, F. F. Leland, B. W. Matlack, Amos Snowhill, Lacey Tomlin, Frank Robinson, Addison Brown, and Charley Dever, who packed their baskets and hammocks, etc., and hied down the river to Prof. Hickok's farm and spent the day under the branching oaks, on a pretty blue grass lawn, amid the festive chiggers and balmy breezes.

Arkansas City was numerously shaken up with the 4th celebration accidents. One Armstrong went to shoot a fellow sinner in the Hasie Block billiard hall, when Dailey stepped in between and got the ball in his leg. Jim Hedley got his proboscis into somebody's business and got it cut off smack smooth. Several boys were run over, as usual, and badly mashed, while a hundred or more got bruises for remembrance.

A MURDERER ARRESTED.

A Young Man Who is Wanted in Arkansas Taken in by Sheriff McIntire.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Some weeks ago a young man about 28 years old, calling himself Lon Pence, came to this county and went to work for George Brown, a few miles north of here. Sheriff McIntire "caught on" to some suspicious moves of this young man and at once spotted him as a fugitive. Pence seemed to have got uneasy. He told Brown that he had a sudden call on business elsewhere, but would return in ten days, and "got up and got." Our Sheriff traced him, through forwarded letters, to El Dorado, where he drove a hundred or more miles on his track, but losing it, he returned. He again looked for more letters at this office from Arkansas. Last week two letters came, one from Pence saying to forward his mail to Wyandotte. Sheriff McIntire went at once to that place, and posting the postmaster, piped the postoffice for several days. Finally Pence, whose real name is George Ellis, came to the postoffice after dark, and the postmaster, instead of going for the key to open up the office, as solicited, went to the hotel and notified McIntire, who came down and took the young man under his wing. Ellis is now in our bastille, awaiting the Arkansas authorities. At first he refused to say anything about the matter, but finally confessed that the shooting took place near Salmon Springs, Arkansas, where he put a load of buckshot into the frame of J. Moore. He was renting one of Moore's farms and they had serious difficulty over it. Moore, after visiting him several times about it, came again, when Ellis opened the door and gave him a sure-death shot-gun charge, fleeing out the back door, a fugitive ever since. From what Sheriff McIntire can get from the Arkansas officials, it was a cold blooded murder, and Ellis will likely hang. A letter was found on his person from his wife, warning him from going to Kansas City, where his father lives, as the police were on the watch for him, and stating that she had destroyed the boards and evidence of the crime, and ending with, "for God sake, leave for Arizona," where he had a sister.

REMOVED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A. Herpich, the Merchant Taylor, has removed his establishment to the front rooms over the postoffice, where he will be pleased to see all desiring first-class goods, perfect fits, and guaranteed satisfaction. The liberal patronage of the past is thankfully appreciated, and its continuance solicited.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

We have concluded to quit handling beer and let some other druggist handle it for the time being. BROWN & SON.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Holiness folks hold a camp meeting at Oxford, beginning on the 20th inst. M. L. Haney will have charge.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The County Commissioners have been in session since Monday morning, their time being mostly taken up in allowing claims.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings as Gisted by the Scribes of the

Daily Courier. Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A heavy rain took possession of the city Sunday morning, and encroached largely upon the audiences at the different churches. But the evening was calm and fair and all turned out to feast the spirit.

THE BAPTIST

pulpit was filled as usual by the pastor, Rev. Reider. His theme was, "Christ the only Liberator, or True Freedom the need of the hour." John viii:36--"If the Son therefore shall make you free, ye shall be free indeed." In recognition of the determined step of our forefathers in planting freedom in America, we celebrate all over the Nation the Fourth of July. But in doing so too little thought is given to what our forefathers endured in insuring us this liberty--their spilt blood and thousands of sacrifices. Blessed is that word "free." Better have no life at all than think and act only by permission of another. True men would rather feed the vulture upon the battle field. But in the broad light of civil liberty, we can't understand the tyranny of tyrants. Few really appreciate their freedom. They have never been slaves. They cannot recall the sacrifices and noble deeds of those who released their own bonds. We may be basking in the sunshine of civil liberty and yet be slaves--bound in religious bondage. Millions are thus slaves. He who dreads the anathemas of a priest or pope, who may be continually wallowing in debauchery, confides in Him his family secrets. His daily life is in bondage worse than the black slavery of the south. His reason is prostituted to superstition and his soul enslaved. Jesus alone can make us free. Truth only can liberate. Skepticism has never liberated slaves. Infidelity has never broken shackles. We may boast of our political freedom and yet be slaves to our carnal hearts. With greed and avarice, we may be slaves to the accumulation of wealth, for our children to quarrel over or for the coffers of an adjusting lawyer; or that ourselves and children may associate with the "upper tens." He alone is free who is master of himself. Man's evil passions without the subduing grace of God will place him in shackles more binding than the imagination can picture--worse than the slavery of the negroes, the bondage of Libby prison or the darkest dungeon, slaves of sin and Satan, bondage eternal. But we have words of promise through which nothing can shut us out from heaven. We may be on the verge of perdition, we may have steeped our hands in the blood of our fellow man, but if Jesus makes us free, your entrance is clear. I leave you to settle individually whether or not a murderer can enter the Kingdom of heaven. Jesus' blood cleanseth from all sin and you only have to accept His terms. You must be punished for your past sins, whether in person or through our substitute, Jesus Christ. He offers to bear the stripes for us. When the divine law is satisfied death becomes a friend--its sting is taken away. The Great Emancipator calls on us to accept freedom. Don't let Satan blind you with false liberty. He is the master of counterfeiters. Don't rest your hope on faithful church attendance, baptism, church communion, religious benevolence, or worldly integrity alone. Mere morality is self-righteousness, fanciful, unfounded--it will make your bed in hell. You must know God. You must have zeal in liberating others. Freedom comes in prayer. "Seek and ye shall find."

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

Elder Myers' evening theme was "Hearing God's Son," based upon Matthew XVII:5, last clause--"This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased; hear ye Him." Two thousand years ago this son was born and nations were commanded to hear Him, and the command has resounded down the ages to the present day. First spoken by John on the banks of the Jordan, its echo will never die. Christ is supremely higher than any teacher the world has ever known. His relations to us obligate us to hear Him. He is the source of all creation. The first chapter of Genesis heralds this before, and John, years afterward, makes a like chronicle. Christ is the motor that keeps the world in motion. He is not only the creator of all, but our redeemer and preserver. He holds in obeisance the whole earth. He preserves Nations, communities, and individuals. He it was who lifted the German Empire from its thraldom, and raised up Lincoln to guide America out of slavery and save our Nation. He is our prophet, priest, and king. He is the prophet of whom much was said under the old dispensation in the Old Testament. He is our royal priest--our advocate and interceder at the judgment bar. He pleads our weaknesses and shortcomings. He is king--our supreme ruler. He has conquered all, his greatest conquest being over death. He is sovereign both in Heaven and upon earth. He is enthroned in the heart of every true child of God, and all are His heirs who harken unto Him. They are saved who are led by the spirit of God. Inattention is the damning curse of the age. He who would reap the fruits of Heaven must bow before the throne and deny all sinful indulgences. The greatest minds of earth bow at His feet. Our earthly toil is for that which passeth away--our heavenly interest endures forever.

THE UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH.

Owing to the sickness of its pastor, Rev. Snyder had no preaching yesterday. The Sunday School was held with its usual interest. The Methodist church was also without services, the church not yet being seated. The new seats and improvements will likely be finished by next Sunday. The M. E. S. S. was held at 3 in the Baptist church.

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

Sunday morning's rain drowned our reporter out, but the pencil was in the pew all right in the evening. Dr. Kirkwood announced a congregational meeting Wednesday evening after prayer meeting, to consider the pastor's resignation; a full attendance is earnestly desired.

1. The Doctor preached from Deuteronomy, ix:1-2-3: "Hear, O, Israel, thou art to pass over Jordan this day, to go to possess nations greater than thyself; cities great and fenced up to heaven."

2. "A people great and tall, the children of the Anakims, whom thou knowest and of whom thou has heard say, who can stand before the children of Anak."

3. "Understand, therefore, this day, that the Lord thy God is He that goeth over before thee as a consuming fire; He shall destroy them and shall bring them down before thy face, so shalt thou drive them out and destroy them quickly, as the Lord has said unto them."

The people that then passed the land of Palestine represent the world unregenerate living in sin so dire and disgusting that their deeds cannot be related in the hearing of a modest audience. The children of Israel represented the church of God, placed in the world and called to be the instrument of God, to punish sinners and destroy sin. The instrument has always been small in comparison to the foes they have to conquer, but strong and potent in accordance to their confidence and fidelity to the instruction given and their faith in the power and presence of Him who commissioned them. They were commanded not to trust in themselves or say because of our righteousness the Lord has chosen us, but reminds them of their sinfulness and how they have been educated by chastisements by sinning and repenting. Up to that trust or faith and reliance in the willingness and ability of God to deliver them in turn, they battle through the prowess of their own generalship, thereby elevating them in honor and dignity before the nations that surround them. And so the battle has continued with victories marked and wonderful, with defeats sad and humiliating, but always making the church to harken, to repent of its sins, to prepare, in the strength of God, for new onslaughts and new victories, ever marching on to bring the kingdoms of this world to an acknowledgment of the kingship of Christ.

[I do not understand why reporter outlined three items above.]

SHOT DEAD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

N. T. Snyder telephones us from Arkansas City that Charley Soup, a lad of fourteen, living in Silverdale township, accidentally killed himself Sunday. He was handling a revolver, in some way, when it discharged, the ball going clear through his right breast and killing him immediately. Of course, "he didn't know it was loaded."

FARMERS, THRESHING MACHINE MEN HOLD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Do you know that we have the largest and best stock of brass goods, pipe fittings, hemp and rubber packing, machine and cylinder oils, waste, and, in fact all kinds of supplies this side of Kansas City. Call and see us and get anything you may want at low prices.

Ostrander & Stayman, Foundry and Machine Shop, N. Main St.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. "OLIVIA."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. Bovee is in Kansas City.

Mrs. Orand is indisposed, yet not down sick.

Mr. Harry Bryant has returned from the west.

Mr. Edward Crane, of Springfield, Missouri, is here on business.

L. M. Dalgarn spent the 4th and Sabbath with Salem friends.

The Roberts brothers bought the wild pony of the Condert boys.

Plenty of rain this season to keep croakers from having a drouth.

Mrs. Edgar has returned from her visit to Grenola and reports a delightful time.

Mrs. Bovee is with her daughter, Mrs. Wesley McEwen, and is preparing to go east on a visit.

Mr. Eli Reid has sold his store and it is now presided over by the new owner, a gentleman from Tisdale.

Rev. Knight was absent for several days at work in some other corner of the vineyard. He immersed fifteen.

Mrs. Pratt, of Wellington, daughter of Rev. Knight, is making her parents happy by a visit to their Salem home.

Mr. Sam Copeland was thrown from his pony and his ankle was dislocated. Dr. Crabtree put it in place again.

Harvesting is the main topic of conversation and nice weather is devoutly hoped for to gather in the golden grain.

Mrs. Lucas, Sr., and daughter, Mrs. Hayes, are visiting friends in Ottawa, Kansas. Hope they will have a fine time.

Mr. Starr is back to Salem from the west to look after the interests of his wheat crop, which is decidedly a cheaty crop this season.

Rev. Bicknell's family are suffering with whooping cough. Dr. Downs is trying to relieve the poor little baby as its sufferings are seemingly intense.

Mrs. Condert has returned from her long visit to friends in Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and different places, and thinks Kansas is the "banner" state for certain.

The Ladies Aid Society is doing nicely and is accumulating quite a nice little mite toward the church fund. May they be Providentially blessed in their good work.

Miss Pearl Friend has been the guest of the Misses Jackson, Saunders, and Cayton for over a week. She seems to enjoy country life and we enjoy her presence and society.

Mrs. Carter, of Iowa, with her husband and baby, are visiting her sister, Mrs. Pixley, but alas, she now languishes in the bed of affliction with malarial fever, but under the care of Dr. Crabtree is improving.

Eddie Condert was thrown from his pony and it jumped on his neck and was hurt badly. Dr. Crabtree was called but said his injuries were not serious, although very painful. He is almost well at present.

By the way "Growler" says Mr. Chase calls the worms Salemites. All right, Mr. Chase, perhaps you may want to be sheriff some day, and you will want us poor worms to vote for you, but we expect to be beautiful butterflies ere then, and will joyously elude your official hand.

Misses Mary Dalgarn and Ola Crow will be city ladies for a few weeks, as they are attending Normal. Our best wishes go with the girls and we wish them the reward due good, studious school ma'ams. Good bye, girls, we shall miss your friendly greeting at Sunday School and elsewhere.

Beautiful, faithful, kind and true,

"Old Frank," good-bye, it makes me blue,

To think no more with thee I'll ride,

No more can pat thy glossy side

Nor gently draw thee with the rein

When driving o'er the flowery plain.

Alas! Another fills thy stall,

We with the sweet must take the gall,

For men will trade, buy, and sell horses,

Which is perfectly right if all are suited.

Mr. Joe Martin now owns Olivia's pet among the farm horses.

The members of the Christian Church held a basket meeting in Rev. Irwin's grove on June 28th and had an excellent meeting and a good time socially. Good will and kind feelings seem to prevail in our churches in peaceful Salem. Let harmony always prevail and our Sunday Schools will be full and jails empty, we hope. Let the youth of the land all get interested in Sunday School work and help build a grand and glorious kingdom on earth and be ready to meet the "king of kings" when He cometh to make up His jewels.

There was not much noise in Salem on Independence day, yet a happy little number gathered at Mr. Joseph McMillen's and passed the time joyfully, or seemed to. Well filled baskets were carried to the old schoolhouse, swings were up in the grove, and all did as they pleased to have a merry time. The hammock received its share of attention. When the hour to dine arrived, the young men were on hand with a bountiful supply of lemonade, candy, oranges, and peanuts, and also helped the ladies with arranging the snowy table cloths upon the long and handy tables and soon a feast fit for men or angels graced the groaning boards. Such a supply of chickens roasted, chickens fried, and goodies of all kinds besides, 'till the groaning was contagious and the pleasant company were all too full for utterance. After dinner music and singing, with a short but good little speech from Col. Jackson. Many more were expected but for some reason failed to put in an appearance. It was certainly good to be there. Some of the young people drove over to Burden in the evening and then all returned to their pleasant homes pleased with their celebration of the glorious Fourth.

TISDALE. "GROWLER."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The oat fields are nodding for the reaper.

Misses Mattie and Mamie Young are visiting their aunt in Humboldt.

Our young folks that went to Arkansas City the 4th came back poorer and wiser. "So goes the world."

Base ball, sack races, wheelbarrow races, etc., filled up the time until near sundown, when the young folks adjourned to Bourdette's Hall to "trip the light fantastic." So ended one of the most enjoyable gatherings ever had in this township.

After an hour spent in refreshing the mortal portion of ourselves, we were again called to listen to fine music by Miss Ballard, after which a few short speeches among which were pretty remarks from John R. Smith and Uncle Johnny Roberts, of Walnut township.

Long before the time appointed wagons and carriages filled with happy people and good things to eat were wending their way into Gay's grove, and soon the grounds were filled with beaming faces of lads and lassies all bent on making the most of the time. The grounds were in splendid order, reflecting credit on the committee in charge. Long before eleven o'clock the seats were all well filled. The exercises opened by singing "Praise God from Whom all Blessings Flow." Miss Ballard, of Winfield, presided at the organ. An impromptu speech from Ex-Senator J. C. Long came next. John disclaimed having any ability to "fly the bird," but when he got down to his work 'twas easy to see that the old Eagle had his master. J. C.'s fifty minute talk was a real feast and was enjoyed by old and young. Capt. H. H. Siverd gave us a pleasant little speech of thirty minutes, containing a good deal of wit and much sound sense. The Captain seems to know how to win the favor of the ladies. His appreciation of pies, cakes, etc., shows cultivation. We all hope to see the Captain and Senator soon again.

TORRANCE ETCHINGS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mrs. J. H. Reynolds has been quite sick again.

Most everybody in Florence attended the celebration at Dexter on the 4th.

A son of John Reynolds was buried last Thursday. He was sick only a short time.

Mr. Wagner and Miss Ermie McGee attended the celebration at Arkansas City on the 4th.

Frank Pierce and Link Branson have sold their interest in the livery stable to H. R. Branson.

Misses Mattie Rittenhouse, Eva Reynolds, and Ermie McKee left Monday for Winfield to attend the Normal.

Mr. King was bitten by a copperhead snake last Thursday. He was quite sick for a day or two but is able to be around now.

Miss Emma Howland, of Winfield, and Miss Alice Harden, of Cambridge, spent Thursday night with Miss Eva Reynolds.

Mr. Ed. McLean, and Miss Kate Paullin, of Burden, drove through our city Saturday and stopped at Capitol Hill. They were out hunting picnics.

Mr. Will Barcelow, of Indiana, is on a visit to his brother in this city. He is quite a nice looking young man, and my wish is that he will remain with us.

Misses Alice and Lyda Taylor, who have been spending several weeks with friends in Sedgwick, returned Monday evening. They were met at Winfield by their brother, Ab.

SILVERDALE DIST., NO. 28.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. Jack Hart, of Winfield, has moved on his father-in-law's farm.

The web worms destroyed the gardens, taking sweet potatoes, cabbage, beets, etc.

Will Clemens has rented the widow Toley's [?Toney's] farm for a term of three years.

Mr. J. Weakly and Mr. Strieber and wife went on a visit to Mrs. Strieber's sister, Mrs. Hughes, on the Walnut river, on the 4th.

Although the COURIER is warmly welcomed, and read by a number of our citizens, I never see any items from this part of fair Cowley.

A number of our people celebrated the 4th at Arkansas City, and to judge by them coming home next day "they saw the thing through."

Wheat is all harvested, and stacking is in order when it does not rain. Wheat is good and our farmers were fortunate in saving it, considering the rains.

Corn is looking fine and, save a few fields that were washed out by the overflow, there is a good stand. Mr. Jeff Eaton has the banner field of corn.

There is no preaching here on Sunday. Why don't some good preacher find this corner of the vineyard and come to the help of the heathen? Think this would be a good opening for an evangelist. OBSERVER.

Some of our people here have organized a Sabbath school, with Mr. Al Gilkey as superintendent, and are getting along nicely. High water and rainy Sundays are rather discouraging to a country Sabbath school. Success to it.

Mr. Doug. Searcy's family met with a bad misfortune last Saturday at Arkansas City. They had started home from the celebration and their little four-year old boy fell out of the wagon, the wheel passing over him, breaking his leg in two places. His recovery is doubtful.

We have some of the best land of which Cowley can boast in the valleys of Grouse and Silver Creeks, and some enterprising, go-ahead farmers, and wide-awake busy farmers' wives and handsome daughters as you will find anywhere in Kansas. But to read the county papers you would not know that Cowley County's southeast corner was inhabited. However, we do not blame the COURIER, but think the people are so busy minding their own affairs they do not have time to attend to their neighbors, harvest being numbered among the things of the past. I took a stroll through the neighborhood and will send you a few of the many things.

AKRON TINKLINGS. "FAY."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mrs. C. Metzger from Wichita, is visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Page.

The Presbyterian Sabbath school was reorganized lat Sunday. It will now be ably managed by Mr. C. Baxter and K. P. Burt.

Some of the young folks celebrated the Fourth with an ice cream supper at Mr. T. S. Covert's. The evening passed very pleasantly with music and games.

Mrs. Lukens and children have returned from Washington Territory to their old home. Their numerous friends are rejoiced to see them back again. Mr. Lukens will remain till after harvest.

"Dreamer," your article of June 25th regarding some imaginary correspondent, induces us to think you had overeaten of boiled cabbage and beans with mince pie for dessert, or you never would have had such ridiculous dreams.

BETHEL. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Several Bethelites went to Arkansas City on the 4th, some to Winfield, others to Walnut river, while the remainder stayed at home and enjoyed themselves.

Wheat harvest is over, but the farmers have the blues again, not because it is done but because the wheat is in a good condition to spoil if the rain continues two or three days longer.

The addition to George Brown's house is nearing completion and it will be a right neat and convenient house when finished. Mrs. Brown looks very much fatigued over the work she has had to do this spring.

Mrs. Annie Slade, who has been staying at John Weakly's some time, will from now on make her home at Winfield at Mrs. Silver's. All who know Mrs. Slade seem to love her, and her friends here are loath to give her to Winfield.

A hard wind storm passed through this section last Saturday evening, demolishing an old house for J. A. Rucker, a two gallon can of oil, a washboard, and some other things of like note, but too tedious to mention. No other damage that I have heard of in this section.

The postmaster at Winfield sent Mrs. Ord Rucker a card to come and get a registered letter last week, which she did as soon as convenient, but instead of finding money in it, as she expected, it contained the pictures of her sister and family who reside in Kentucky, whom she had not seen for years.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

All those indebted to the late firm of A. T. Spotswood will please settle their accounts at once. I am needing my money and must have it. Your accounts are made out. Come in and get them receipted and oblige. Yours truly, A. T. Spotswood.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Mr. W. J. Hodges came up from Ponca Tuesday, accompanied by seven Tonkawa Indians, who took back loads for him. The chief, Sam Houston, was along. They were intelligent, more than average in looks, and patterned rudely after the American style of dress. They are a band of two hundred who were removed, a few weeks ago, from Ft. Griffin, Texas, to the Ponca reservation, where Mr. Hodges is trader. Photographer Rodocker got their "phizzes," after much importuning. They were afraid the camera would kick.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Frank Edwins, a printer, took too much Potassium, Capsicum of Ginger, Polipeltam Peltatum, and Spirits of Frumentium, which caused him to use very unbecoming language. He took this concoction on account of being shot in the shoulder some years ago. $5 and costs and he is much wiser. On account of his disabled condition, he was turned loose.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

SHEEP FOR SALE. I have 400 sheep for sale, consisting of ewes, lambs, bucks, and wethers, 7 miles southwest of Douglass. They are of the Copeland flock and in fine condition. For particulars call on or address Charles M. McKinnie, Douglass, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

FINE STOCK SALE. I will sell at public sale at Wellington, Kansas, on Thursday, July 16, 1885, fifty head of high grade Kentucky Short Horn Cows, with calf by imported Poll Angus bulls. Also 20 head of yearling Angus Graded Bulls, ready for service. Also 12 head of yearling Angus Heifers. Sale to commence at 1 o'clock p.m. Terms: 12 months time given on approved bankable note, drawing 12 percent interest per annum, from date; 6 percent off face of the note for cash. J. W. Connell.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

FOR SALE. A fine farm, situated on the Walnut river, 10 miles southeast from Winfield and 7 ½ northeast from Arkansas City, consisting of 278 acres, of which about 120 acres is under good cultivation, 65 acres of good timber, and the remainder in pasture; two good houses, one good barn, one outhouse; orchard bearing choice fruits; two good wells and plenty of stock water the year round; all under good fence. Object in selling is to retire. Call on or address Mrs. M. A. Greaves, Winfield, Kansas.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

BARGAINS! BARGAINS!!

Having desired to go out of the Queensware business our entire stock of

Queensware, Glassware, Plated ware

AND CUTLERY

will be sold at

Greatly Reduced Prices,

until the entire stock is disposed of. We do this to make room for an

Exclusive Grocery, Grain, and Feed Business.

Now is the time to

GET BARGAINS

for these goods. Our stock is the

LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE

in the country. We have a car load of

Fresh Jam and Jelly Glasses,

and will offer bargains in these goods, to the trade.

SPOTSWOOD & WALLACE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

SANTA FE LUMBER YARD.

Lath, $3.60 per 1,000. Lime, $1.25 per barrel. Standard Hair, 30 cts. per bushel.

Washed Hair, 40 cts. per bu. Doors, 2-6, 6-6, 1-3/8, with hinges and white knob locks, $1.75. Doors, 2-4, 6-4, 1-1/4, with hinges and white knob lock $1.65. Plank, 2 x 12 in., 12, 14, 18, 20, $1.70 per 100 feet. Clear yellow pine flooring, $2.50 per 100--4 or 6 inch. Second yellow pine flooring, $2.00 per 1.00--4 or 6 inch. We warrant our lime equal to any sold in Kansas. A full line of doors, blinds, gate hinges, screen doors, cupboard locks, latches, etc. We deliver goods, free of charge, to any part of the city.

A. H. McMASTER & CO.,

1321 Stewart Street, Cor. River Ave.

Telephone No. 86.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

SHELLENBERGER & SHEBLE,

WOOL COMMISSION MERCHANTS

8 North Front Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

Kansas wool a specialty.

Liberal cash advances made.

Correspondence solicited.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The European money exchanges were generally reported flat for the week ended June 27th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The heaviest rain storm for fourteen years visited Baltimore on the 28th. The fall was 4-47/100 inches.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

John McCullough, the demented actor, has been taken to the Bloomingdale Asylum, New York.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

During a saloon row at Cleveland, Ohio, the other night, Charles Hoppe was fatally stabbed by Conrad Hoehn.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Theodore Paulsen and Lizzie Mulroady, both employed at Crane's Renovating Works, Pueblo, Colorado, were drowned recently while boat riding on a small lake near the city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

James Compton and Edward Freeman were struck by a passenger train on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad the other night, near Zanesville. Compton was killed, but Freeman may recover.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Governor Hoadley said recently that he would not be the Democratic candidate for Governor of Ohio at the coming election. He predicted Democratic success in that State, and said the Democratic party there was perfectly solid.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

All the clerks in the employ of the Vicksburg & Meridian, and Vicksburg, Shreveport & Pacific Railroads have been asked to resign. It was also stated that the office of the Queen & Crescent road in New Orleans would be removed to Cincinnati.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Saturday evening Thomas Dugan, a butcher, and Mike Murphy, a copyist, both of New York, fought over the attention paid to Mrs. Dugan by Murphy. Murphy was thrown to the ground, and received injuries from which he died.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The clearing house returns for the week ended June 27th showed an average decrease of 18.8 compared with the corresponding week of last year. In New York the decrease was 26.2. In Kansas City the increase was 68.3 and in Memphis 60.6.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The President recently made the following appointments: Edward L. Heddan, Collector of Customs for the District of New York; H. S. Beattle, Surveyor of Customs for the District of New York; S. W. Burt, Naval Officer of Customs for the District of New York.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Advices from Tonquin state that heavy storms have prevailed over the region in which the Fisher's Islands are situated, in the water between the Island of Formosa and the mainland of China. Two French torpedo boats were sunk during these storms, but the crews were saved.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Marshal McMichael has removed a Democratic subordinate for "offensive partisanship."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Ben Holt (colored) was lynched recently at Adams Station, Mississippi, by a colored mob for the murder of his wife.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Over a thousand new cases of cholera were reported in Spain on the 20th. The ratio of deaths was excessive.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

After an interval of three days the earthquake shocks again occurred with great violence in Seringanur, Cashmere.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The postoffice at Rochelle, Illinois, was robbed the other night of a considerable amount of stamps and several letters.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Fire at Grand Rapids, Michigan, recently destroyed the greater part of the works of the Grand Rapids Manufacturing Company.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The paper to be used hereafter for United States checks will be distinguished by a water mark of the letters "U. S. T. D.," instead of by silk threads as formerly.

[Print was obscured on listed water mark...could be "U. S. I. D." is correct.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

News was received in Montreal from London that the Canadian loan of £4,000,000 was subscribed for three times over, and that it had been taken up at about 1.01.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The statement cabled from London on the authority of a Vienna correspondent of the Times that the appointment of Mr. Kelley to be Minister to Austria has been withdrawn, has been officially denied.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

An "infernal machine" of a rather clumsy pattern was sent by mail recently to L. Lum Smith, publisher of a weekly paper at Philadelphia. It was a wooden box about five inches square and three inches high.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A daring attempt was made recently to steal a million roubles from the Imperial Treasury at Soman, a town in Southern Russia in the Government of Kiev. Seven persons were arrested on suspicion of being concerned in the attempted robbery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Supreme Court of California has rendered a decision in the celebrated Hill-Sharon divorce case, denying the plaintiff's motion to dismiss the appeal and staying all proceedings for the payment of counsel fees and alimony pending the appeal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Jacob M. Smith, who figured so prominently in the dispatches recently, in a conspiracy to burn his pacing house, in East Atchison, was taken before Probate Judge Lockes, who, after a full examination before a jury, adjudged him to be insane.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Canadian fishermen were reported exasperated over the temporary arrangement made with the United States to bridge over the difficulty created by Congress in repealing the fishery treaty. Bloodshed was feared, and a Dominion steamer was sent to prevent it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

R. M. Thompson, of Washington and of Nashville, Tennessee, has been disbarred from practice before the Interior Department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Dr. E. M. Willett was elected Supreme Medical Examiner of the Catholic Knights of America at Louisville, Ky., on the 30th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Westmoreland County (Pa.) Coal and Coke Company, having a capital stock of $500,000, has failed. The liabilities are not known, but are heavy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Snow was reported to have fallen in Greene County, N. Y., on the night of the 20th of June. It was extremely cold for the time of year in the Catskill Mountains.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The head chief of the Utes, in Southern Colorado, has given assurances that no further retaliation would be made for the assassination of the six Indians by cowboys.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Edward A. Boyd and George H. Boyd, father and son, convicted of defrauding the Government by illegally importing plate glass, were sentenced at New York, the father to two years' imprisonment, the son to $1,000 fine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A. J. Dumont, late Naval Officer of New Orleans and Chairman of the Louisiana Republican State Central Committee, blew his brains out recently at his home in Algiers. Family trouble was said to have been the cause of the act.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The latest Russian advices from Vladivostok say that a Russian steamship which attempted to enter Port Hamilton was intercepted and forbidden to enter by an English man-of-war. The English were said to be fortifying the port.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Nearly $500,000 worth of lumber was destroyed by fire at Antigo, Mich., recently. Among the heaviest losers were J. H. Weed and S. H. Bryant & Co. The insurance was unknown. The fire caught from sparks falling from a smoke stack.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

While Prof. Shippy and family were rowing in the Des Moines River at Algona, Iowa, recently, the boat upset and all were thrown into the water. Mrs. Shippy and two children were drowned. Shippy was rescued. Shippy was the principal of the Algona school.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

A recent dispatch from Teheran stated that 1,000 persons were at work constructing the trans-Caspian railway. Warlike preparations were still being continued by Russia. Rumors were in circulation in the bazaars of Teheran that war would probably occur after the trans-Caspian railway was completed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The mercantile failures for the six months ended the 30th of June were reported by R. G. Dun & Co. as 6,004, as against 5,510 for the first six months of 1884, an increase of 494. In liabilities, however, there is a marked diminution, the amount being for the first half of 1885, $74,000,000, as against $124,000,000 in the first six months of 1884.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The Paris Institute has awarded the biennial price of $4,000 to Dr. Brown Sequard, of New York, for his discoveries in physiology.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Official notice was given at Simla, India, that the issue of furloughs would be restricted until the Afghan boundary dispute has been settled.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

Strikers in the Cleveland, Ohio, rolling mills forced the engineers to bank their fires on the 2nd. Affairs were threatening, but no other violence was attempted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

All survivors of the ill-fated steamer Italia, including the captain, have been ordered to remain at Gallo, pending a thorough investigation by the Italian Consul.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

The East, West, and North River Districts of Canton Province, China, were reported inundated recently. There were many breaches in the dykes, and great loss of life.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

It was thought recently that on account of defects existing in the bookkeeping of the Navy Department, the Government would adopt the system in vogue in the British Navy Department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 9, 1885.

In answer to inquiries from State officials, the Postmaster General has ordered that penalty envelopes cannot be used to forward correspondence on State affairs, even when enclosed with matter properly mailable in penalty envelopes.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JULY 16, 1885.

WINFIELD'S LOSS.

The Presbyterian Congregation Meet and Consider the Resignation of its Pastor,

Dr. Kirkwood.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

It was with the deepest regret that the Presbyterian church and people of Winfield learned of Dr. Kirkwood's determination to resign his pastorate here for the chair of Mental Philosophy in McAlister College, Minnesota, a new Presbyterian college just being founded. The Doctor has won many warm friends during his labors here. A man of broad experience, of profound knowledge, and good social qualities, as a minister he is eminent. His eloquent, deep, and logical sermons are never lost to memory. But his labors, for some years before coming west, were in college work. He loves it, and believing that he can as well serve his priestly calling in that capacity, he has determined to again take it up. His last sermon will be preached the second Sunday in August. His congregation met Wednesday evening to consider the matter, and passed the following.

WHEREAS, In the providence of God our beloved pastor, Rev. W. R. Kirkwood, D. D., has been called to a new and important field of labor, in the line of higher christian education, and,

WHEREAS, He has asked the people of this congregation to join with him in a request to Presbytery to have the pastoral relation dissolved, therefore be it

Resolved, 1st. That while uniting with him in the request, we sincerely regret the necessity for so doing.

2nd. That in thus severing the ties which for nearly two years have bound us so closely together, we desire to bear testimony to the zeal, ability, and faithfulness of Dr. Kirkwood as a gospel preacher, to his fidelity as a pastor, and to his untiring devotion to the Master's work.

3rd. That our best wishes for his future welfare, and our earnest prayers for God's blessing upon him shall accompany him to his new field of labor.

4th. That a copy of the foregoing resolutions be furnished Dr. Kirkwood, a copy spread upon the records of the church, a copy given to the local press for publication, and also a copy sent to the Interior.

Mr. James Kirk was moderator of the meeting and Mr. J. W. Curns, secretary. Mr. S. S. Linn and Dr. Elder were appointed to present the matter before the Presbytery.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The "Flying Dutchman," of the Commercial, and Lum Callahan, of the Brettun, had it in grand shape Thursday night at the S. K. train. B-l-o-o-d has been on the moon for some days, and this time they both clinched determination on the same pilgrim, each bound that he should banquet at his hotel. The Flying Dutchman was the flyest and Lum began to chew him up, slightly paralyzing his "phiz." The Flyer took it all very nicely. He is not inclined to row--in business from the word go. Because of his embarrassing foreign dialect, and his rustling qualities as a rustler, his rivals want to down him. Fresh is not the greeny he appears, and will give them choel before they get through.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The decision of County Attorney Asp was read Friday before the Board of County Commissioners in the D., M. & A. bond matter. He cited the law making it imperative that the amount of stock, after being voted, be subscribed. It is very likely too that the State Board of Equalization, as last year, will raise the county valuation to an amount sufficient to legalize the $100,000. The value was raised eleven percent last year. The Board ordered the County Clerk to subscribe the full amount of the bonds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A gentleman, with a heart as big as an elephant, has donated us an editor's club, which has been appropriately labeled, "dynamite, hands off," and hangs on the wall in clear gaze. It weighs twenty-seven pounds, is of solid tarred cedar, and would upset the determination of a giant. When a man comes in with a gory look and cross eye, we just point him to that club. He only has one chance. All not heeding its warning are now in their cold, cold graves.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Some member of high degree in the Ancient Order of Sons of Guns, plowed up, on his own gall and cheek, the Cyclone base ball grounds, on South Main street, Thursday night. The proprietor was perfectly willing that the boys should have the grounds and a lease was drawn up yesterday. The club will move their ground further south and fence it in. They offer five dollars reward for the one placing the rapscallion of the plow.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We are pleased to learn that the Cyclone band of our city has made arrangements to secure instructions from Mr. Harry Holbrook, of Winfield, who is a bright, reliable, and energetic young man and a first-class instructor. Mr. Holbrook has charge of the Juvenile band of Winfield and the most excellent music that the Juveniles furnished last Saturday attests his ability as an instructor. A. C. Democrat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Normal met at the Court House Friday at e p.m., to hear the lecture upon Kindergarten work by Miss Emily Kuhlman. The lecture was upon the primary steps in numbers, how to teach small children. The teachers received much knowledge upon this branch. Miss Kuhlman shows that she fully understands her specialty of Kindergarten work.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Now that paper shirts have been introduced, according to the Dry Goods Bulletin, it will be in order to print a novel on the back of a set of shirts. Then when a man reads the first installment, he will go right off and buy the whole set and sit up with his shirts at night until he has finished the story.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

George McAfee, of A. C., who was found a few weeks since in a female room at the Lindell, was convicted in Justice Buckman's court this morning and in default of about $25 enjoys the luxuries of the Hotel de Finch, where the other half of the irregularity has been for two weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Over one hundred dollars has been contributed by our businessmen to be used in fencing and seating the Cyclone base ball grounds, which the boys expect to have done, and charge a small admission fee, for the $100 contest Thursday with the Borders of Arkansas City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The A. C. Democrat heralds the warning to look out for a wedding, in which a youth whose brogans have crushed the flowers of some sixty springs, and a maiden rare and radiant who has, upon about seventy different occasions, celebrated her natal day, are the high contracting parties. Look out for squalls.

COUNTY COURT.

What the County Fathers Have Done Since Our Last Report.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The viewers report in the M. L. Wilson county road was adopted and damages awarded Barney Shriver, $80; and H. Gibson, $30. The petition of the D., M. & A. company for condemnation of its right of way was granted. Petition of H. H. Martin notifying the Southern Kansas to repair crossings in Vernon township was granted. Advertisement for propositions for superintendent and matron of the poor farm was ordered. The County Clerk was ordered to subscribe the amounts voted to the capital stock of the D., M. & A. by Ninnescah, Fairview, and Dexter. The county subscription awaits the decision of the County Attorney as to whether or not more than $66,000, the present legal limit, can be subscribed. Thos. M. Graham county road was rejected, and J. M. Hiatt road laid over to October. Viewers report in H. H. Brock county road, damages to E. C. Montagill, $10; W. E. Merydith road, no damages; E. E. Talley road, no damages; J. M. Dawson road, ditto; Frank Shock road, ditto; A. Sowers road, ditto; Thomas Cooley road, ditto; were all adopted. R. H. Vermilye road petition was withdrawn. Road petitions of Joseph Jackson, Windsor, J. S. Rash, J. W. Tull, and Henry Wilkins, viewers; Hurbert Ferguson, with John B. Plumb, Jack Donnelly and Theodore Brandenburg, viewers; Jas. P. Williams, Windsor, S. M. Fall, M. K. Hull and Shelt Morris, viewers; Alex Cairns, Tisdale and Liberty, John H. Mounts, John Duncan and M. N. Chaffy, viewers; L. D. Rorick, with M. Fleharty, J. M. Stinson, and J. W. Edwards, viewers; N. E. Darling, with John W. Tull, Joseph Shaw, and Henry Wilkins, viewers; Thos. M. Graham with Jacob T. Hackney and A. H. Jennings, viewers; R. T. Wells, with A. A. Mills, James Utt, and David Kantz, viewers; J. C. Barnett, with S. H. Sparrow, J. W. Conrad and Sid Cure, viewers; R. J. Gilbert, with John Reynolds, W. W. Underwood and R. Maurer, viewers, were granted. The County Clerk was ordered to purchase 100 copies of State road laws for use of county.

A TOUGH BUSINESS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The philanthropic heart of the Wellingtonian man was "all broke up" by witnessing seven coaches of Uncle Sam's Indian fighters go through Wellington Friday morning for the western border counties: "Our noble defenders were crowded in cars in a shape that would be a disgrace to a thoroughbred hog, while a short horn cow would blush to be caught in such a position. The pets and favorites, however, that do not do anything but command, had nice accommodations and wasted considerable room unnecessarily. Such treatment is all the 'serfs' need, or at least that was the opinion from an official standpoint expressed to a boy who was on the platform at the depot. There may be some excuse during war to treat soldiers like dogs, but we can't make up enough silliness of the Fourth of July character to find a reason why human beings should be forced to sleep in the aisle of an over-filled coach. Last night we walked over soldiers who seemed glad to get to sleep on the hard floor of the promenade of the car, and the dust and spittle made no difference to them. Just behind the car, however, were the officials, and they seemed to live so royally by the side of the misery that accompanied them that we felt like we had saved the price of a ticket to Siberia in taking in the train. It is glorious to be a defender of your country and stand as a mark for Indians' bullets; but please give us a job at pounding rock at the same price."

A SENSIBLE SUGGESTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

In olden times it was rulable for people to have their names plainly engraved or painted on the doors of their houses and even now, in the cities, it is quite fashionable. In conversation with John Teter last Saturday, he suggested that it would be a good plan for farmers, as well as townspeople, to have their names conveniently attached to their homes and it appears to us his proposition would prove very advantageous if generally adopted. If the house was close to the road, a small plate on the door would do; but if it was secluded, a small board on the gate post would answer. This arrangement would be convenient to hundreds of people in many ways. A stranger inquiring the way to a man's farm would have no difficulty in finding it. Townspeople driving along the road would soon know the name of the owner of every farm in the country. Farmers from one portion of the country could easily find the location of men with whom they are acquainted while passing along. These names could be neatly painted on small boards or on metal at little cost.

El Dorado Republican.

SPINAL AFFECTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Coldwater Star tells of a young lady of that place who was given a peculiar love charm by the gypsies; and at once proceeded to test it. Procuring a live toad, she cut off its toenails, and that evening while out walking with a certain young man whose love she desired to win, she slipped it into his pistol pocket. All went well until the toad crawled through a hole in the pocket and commenced a tour of investigation up the young man's spine, then the circus commenced. As the toad got above the waist band, he came in contact with the young man's flesh, and attempted to crawl up under his arm. A wild, frantic yell--a frightful contortion of the body--a terrific outspreading of the arms, and sawing of the air, rolling, tumbling, snorting, gasping, shuddering youth, a blood curdling yell of "snakes," and off came coat and vest, a desperate pull ripped the shirt, and out dropped the toad. The lady fainted early in the performance, and the young man is firmly convinced that the toad crawled up his trousers leg.

ALL BOSH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Harper Graphic airs properly the "horrible Indian details" of the western counties: "The present imagined and inflamed Indian warfare that is going on in southern Kansas is one of the greatest farces that has ever come under our observation. It is astonishing how soon foolish rumors, very often spoken in jest by the originator, grow into Indian outrages mountain high, arousing whole counties, and causing the people to desert their homes and rush out in pursuit of the phantom, when the fact of the case is that not a solitary Indian has been seen at Saratoga or any place else, as reported by you might say hundreds of people yesterday. The most remarkable thing in all the stories is that not a soul has seen an Indian; they simply heard of them being at this place or that, ten or twelve miles away, burning and killing everybody, hence the stampede, recruited as it went along with new victims to the craze."

PUT IN YOUR OARS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Street Commissioner Cochran informs us that very little of the city poll tax, which is almost exhausted, is being used in grading the out-streets of the city. Property owners along these streets are putting up the lucre, and as a result of this enterprise, are making the streets an honor to the city. If you want your street graded, don't squeal behind the Street Commissioner's back, but get those living on the street to go down into their pockets according to their means, from fifty cents to five dollars apiece, and it will be promptly and substantially done. Jap says he is prepared to grade South Main and shut off the tuneful polliwog as soon as the city council will order the deepening of the crossing sewers near the Hotel Stewart, which are so high that no water can run through. It is bound to stand in stagnant pools in the deeper gutters. The council should have these sewers remedied at once.

A BURNING SHAME!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Our bookkeeper straggled into Justice Buckman's Court Saturday, seeking whom he might down, and was accosted by a florid complexioned and woe-begone individual, with a wink, who handed him this note. "I am speechless, with two wives and sixteen children, and a mother-in-law. Give me a dollar. Capt. Siverd." The bookkeeper has not been here very long and, consequently, was unacquainted with this gentleman and, ways of the dark and tricks that are sly. So he pulled out the last penny he had and handed it over, while tears streamed down his cheeks, and the Captain said, "God bless you, my boy." Thus it is that unsuspecting innocence will be taken in. The Captain will go out and pass this penny for a five dollar gold piece. Look out for him.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The city of "Medicine" is getting up on its left ear over its lax city government and has numerously signed a petition asking the city marshal, city attorney, and police judge to resign.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Two ex-policemen of Pueblo recently passed through this city for the Indian Territory, accompanied by a friend. They traveled the distance of 460 miles without paying a cent of fare. The ex-policemen wore their uniforms and brass buttons, and hand-cuffed their friend, palming him off as a bad criminal whom they were taking back east. It's a cold day when a Colorado man can't invent a scheme to circumvent a grasping corporation. Wichita Arrow.

NORMAL SOCIAL.

The Pretty School Ma'ams Congregate for a Good Time.

Beauty, Gallantry, and Intelligence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The members of the Normal Institute held a social in McDougal's Hall Thursday, for genial commingling with each other and our citizens. Depositing his heart in the safe, under a time lock, our elongated reporter hied himself to the scene, and a happy, good-looking and entertaining lot of folks he found--among the ladies. The gentlemen, as usual at every gathering, were horribly ugly, in comparison. As our reporter stood awkwardly in the corner, with no place to put his big hands and no room for his huge pedal extremities, his eyes took in several things. County Superintendent Limerick was master of ceremonies. Elder Myers, of the Christian church, gave a sparkling welcome address, responded to very happily by Prof. Wilkinson, conductor of the Institute. Mrs. O. McGuire read a pithy essay on the educational profession, and Prof. Davis gave an applicable and mirthful little talk. Then a novel scheme was carried out, that of finding from what states the teachers present had come from to Kansas. Pennsylvania had two represented in a neat little speech by Mr. Littell, who mentioned that he was delighted with Kansas, but his heart was way back east--a sad blow to the girls. West Virginia also had two, one of whom, Mr. McClellan, told of its glories and sorrows, as compared to the Garden of Eden. North Carolina stood with the preceding ones, two, with the wittiest oration of all from Bob Holland. Kentucky had three, and Elder Myers and Prof. Craddock discussed its virtues and failings. George W. Bain, who is attending the Normal, wasn't present. Wisconsin had two to unfurl her banner, which was done very nicely by Mr. Arnet. Michigan had two, without any speechifier. Ohio had six representatives and one orator, Will C. Barnes, who thought the Sunflower state at the head of the procession. Hoosierdom came up with a boom, sixteen. The orators of the occasion were divided as to the merits of her school system. Mr. H. A. Owens thought it far inferior to that of Sunny Kansas, while Miss Fannie Stretch and Mrs. O. McGuire touched the ire of the native Kansan by going back on the Sunflower State--placing the Hoosier school system above ours. Illinois carried off the golden belt in numbers, twenty-one. Mr. S. F. Owens, H. S. Wallace, and Miss C. E. Plunket discoursed on its merits, while Mrs. Limerick was proud to have come from the state that gave us Lincoln and Grant and that had old John Brown. Iowa showed fourteen. Mr. F. E. Haughey spoke splendidly of her grand prohibition record and commended Kansas for her proud advance. The Empire State was represented by but one, Miss Celina Bliss. "Arkansaw's" spokesman was absent. But Kansas came up smiling with thirty-three, who had first taken up the pointer within her borders. Prof. Gridley, who was one of the first graduates of the State Normal, was chosen orator. He was proud to belong to the State of baked beans, grasshoppers, and chiggers, ending with a mention of her grand record. Prof. Limerick announced three lectures during the session of the Normal: Dr. Kirkwood, "Obedience to Law as Related to the Teacher," Prof. Jay, principal of the Wellington schools, "Our Boys," and Prof. Cowbric, principal of the Harper schools, "The Teacher's Place in the Nation." During the evening the musical talent was let loose, conducted by Prof. Merriman, closing with "America." It was a very pleasant occasion throughout. There should be more such socials during the Normal.

SHE IS BOUND TO SUCCEED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Remarks the Wellingtonian: "Wednesday we unintentionally overheard a conversation between two ladies in regard to a poor girl from the country who wished to attend the Normal Institute. The story was a sad one and never in our life did we wish more sincerely to be able to do a good deed than yesterday. The young lady was short of funds and going to a lady in this city with whom she was acquainted, she offered her services morning and evening to pay her board while the Institute lasted; but the friend, however much she might wish to accept such terms, had no place for her to sleep and could be of no benefit. It seemed so hard that such an occurrence could be possible in our young but grand state, and it set us to thinking about an endless variety of things that resulted in our having the blues. How many times has the paltry sum that would have aided this girl in her noble effort been spent in an idle drunk, and then again how numberless are the men whose daily income would have made one poor but ambitious girl successful? Many a time in this city have the ivory chips awaiting the next turn of the card been worth a score of times what this one girl required to gain the knowledge that would make her able to obtain a competent support. The cigars smoked in this city every hour during the day represent more money than this girl requires. An ordinary contribution for the barbarous Hottentot would have lifted this girl from the kitchen to the school room. Our merchants offer for sale mere trinkets that find ready sale that cost more money than this member of the human family needs to gain a chance to become a teacher. But then this one girl will succeed and we therefore leave the subject to eat our midnight sandwich."

NOT STRANGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Wellingtonian says: "John Stout, a prominent farmer from the upper Timber Creek country in Cowley County, called on the Wellingtonian yesterday. Mr. Stout lately had a valuable mare stolen from his barn and is out hunting her. Why he came to Sumner County we can't understand. We certainly have no more horse thieves in this county than those who steal from our own farmers."

Very plain! Any man with common sense would know better than to hunt a horse thief in Cowley County. Sumner has a monopoly. Eighteen in one year for the "pen" is not so bad. Then three just broke out of your jail the other night. For horse thieves, as varied in design and at prices that can't be discounted, go to Sumner! Cowley ran her's off in a slaughter sale some time ago, with Sheriff McIntire as the auctioneer.

THE COUNTY NORMAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The County Normal Institute is moving along finely. Our modest reporter dropped down among those in attendance and is prepared to say that it is the best looking of any Normal Cowley has ever had. In appearance, interest, and zealous intelligence, it shows a splendid advance. Educational matters, as our county grows older, are enhancing. It isn't everyone who can get a certificate now. Better teachers and better wages are becoming the motto of all people truly interested in education--the foundation of all that is substantial and ennobling. The attendance has now reached nearly a hundred and fifty.

THE MURDERER CALLED FOR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Sheriff L. P. Gatbreath came in Wednesday from Benton County, Arkansas, to get George Ellis, the young murderer, whom Sheriff McIntire took in so cleverly at Wyandotte last week. The Sheriff says the matter is looked upon as a cold blooded homicide. J. Moore, of whom Ellis was renting a farm, came on the premises and before he got to the house Ellis threw the door open and filled Moore's frame with buckshot, and then fled. Ellis seemed willing to return--in fact, manifested perfect indifference regarding the matter. Sheriff McIntire got a reward of $110, more than half of which was spent in the capture.

THEY WERE MAD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

As two old gentlemen were passing down Main street late Thursday evening with a load of prairie hay, one of the man got a "little too mucher" on one side and lost his equilibrium. So did the hay. The hay and men tumbled off in a heap. One of the men hit the ground and bounced like a rubber ball. No one was hurt, but their feelings were somewhat riled as they loaded the hay on again.

WOMAN'S SPHERE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The following essay was read by Miss Emma Strong before the meeting of the Woman's Suffrage Society, at Mrs. J. W. Curns, Tuesday afternoon. It is worthy of wide circulation.

All know what is the present understanding of this term. The name of woman is synonymous with all things beautiful, gentle, and affectionate, which makes her the fitting ornament for man's home, the pet and plaything of his idle moments for the "ministering angel, when pain and anguish wreathe his brow." This then is her sphere and indeed it is a pretty picture to contemplate. We would not blot out one of these attributes, but we question if this be all for which woman was created. The order of creation was upward; is it not then a logical deduction that His last creation was his masterpiece? That the Creator placed in her keeping His most precious trust, the care of His children. This points emphatically to the same conclusion: an expression of His confidence in her ability, physically and mentally, to be guardian of humanity.

Our boys are exhorted to be strong in principle and brave of heart; our girls to be good, but rather good by omission than by commission. Is this the proper training for the girls, the ones whom He has placed to be guardians of the children of tomorrow? Someone has said and truly, "The hand that rocks the cradle rules the world." Then indeed should our mothers "be as wise as serpents and harmless as doves?"

The "good treasures" stored in the hearts and minds of the mothers of today will be the foundation with which the character and interests of tomorrow must be built.

Raise the standard of intellectuality and usefulness of women, and just so far you will have advanced posterity; tell us of the mothers of any generation and we can safely prophesy what their sons and daughters may be. The useful, active, and earnest life of the pioneer women of America rendered them fitting mothers and teachers of the generation following, of which George Washington stood at the head. From such homes come all our great men, and our historians and biographers never tire in telling of the mother whose wise council was cherished by the son through life.

Little by little man is recognizing humanity's cry for the education of woman. He has already opened the doors of the college to her and now comes the petition to place in woman's hands that next great factor in the education of our American men: the ballot.

The ballot is an incentive to a broad education, it begets charity, it is the leveler of pride inasmuch as it makes of the poor man a sovereign and of the ruler a servant; it is a link that binds brother and brother; it is the inspiration of patriotism, and should our mothers not covet all these?

God gave to woman as to man, talents, and to woman, as to man, was given the commandment to increase these talents. Humanity pleads that this commandment be recognized and obeyed by both woman and man. The sooner woman is allowed to develop her talents, thereby fitting herself for the responsible position or sphere which, through the eternal laws of God, she always has and always will occupy, the sooner will the affairs of this world attain their true equilibrium and "man's inhumanity to man" be changed to brotherly love.

CONSUMPTION CURED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

An old physician, retired from practice, having had placed in his hands by an East India missionary the formula of a simple vegetable remedy for the speedy and permanent cure of consumption, Bronchitis, Catarrh, Asthma, and all throat and Lung Affections, also a positive and radical cure to Nervous Debility and all Nervous Complain, after having tested its wonderful curative powers in thousands of cases, has felt it his duty to make it known to his suffering fellows. Actuated by this motive and a desire to relieve human suffering, I will send free of charge, to all who desire it, this recipe, in German, French, or English, with full directions for preparing and using. Sent by mail by addressing with stamp, naming this paper. W. A. Noyes, 146 Powor's Block, Rochester, N. Y.

[Above was one of many medicine ads on front page.]

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The expert of Hoover, Owens & Co., the Corliss engine manufacturer, is here superintending the erection of Bliss & Wood's new engine. The Corliss is the most perfect engine manufactured--economical, noiseless, and safe. Bliss & Woods' is a two hundred horsepower, whose mechanism is one of the wonders of the age.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Some little rapscallions have been committing depredations on the several school grounds of the city, breaking down trees, knocking out window lights, and like vandalism. The School Board offers a reward of ten dollars for any one of the little rascals. They mean to make it sultry for them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Judge Torrance took in the Terminus Wednesday and Thursday, seeing steamboat and other novelties. A large party were to take a moonlight excurt down the river Wednesday on the steamer, but the engineer had skipped for St. Louis; and without a licensed engineer, the boat couldn't lift anchor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

As we walk around streets of certain parts of Winfield, we see a good deal of the flora of Kansas. That lovely flower, blooming so gorgeously along the sidewalks, with a brilliant yellow center and white corona of leaves, is the pig weed, or stink weed: either name applying. Mixed with it we see the beautiful rag weed, more lovely than its bright neighbor. Here and there we see the lordly sunflower towering up--king of all. There are numerous other ornaments, but these are enough. They are very rank, almost meeting over the walks in many places, making pedestrianism a thing of joy after a rain or dew, especially for ladies. The mixture of mud and water on these plants is good for ladies skirts after a rain. As the people make very little effort to have these weeds cut down, they must admire them. It would cost but little to cut them, and should be done now, before they go to seed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

One of the boys went home Wednesday, and seeing a girl swinging in the hammock whom he thought was his sister, he jumped in alongside her and made himself rather familiar, when to his chagrin and deep humiliation, he discovered that it was another lady with whom he had but slight acquaintance. He first tried to crawl through a knot hole in the floor, but finally crawled under the grass and stuck his head into a gooseberry bush, blushing like a bolt of red flannel. The other boys did not laugh any--oh, no! They were probably heard all over town. We promised not to give the above away, but the COURIER can't keep anything a secret that is good.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

THE COURIER's statistical resume of Cowley County is receiving gratifying comments, all crediting it as the best resume ever presented in this county. It was not a bunch of dry, repellent figures, but dressed in terse and lively form, with causes, effects, and comparisons. The day of labored figurative tables is past. People want to get all facts as conveniently, easily, and entertainingly as possible. This is THE COURIER's mode of giving them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The streams are getting clear again and the honest fisherman comes creeping back to town evenings with an elegant string of fish and mud on the widest part of his pantaloons.

Hornet.

A man with an elegant string of fish hung to the "widest part of his pantaloons" would certainly present a scaly appearance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

"Going to hell on wheels" is the irreverent manner in which an Illinois preacher refers to roller skates. The Winfield Courier thinks that if a fellow is going there, he might as well ride as walk. Besides Old Nick might be induced to put on a wheel, get a fall, and never rise again. Oswego Independent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Messrs. H. Lindhelm and N. M. Grunsfield, who have had quarters at the Brettun for some weeks past, with a view to entering the dry goods business here, left for New York this afternoon, to return in two weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Al Carr has been spending a few days with his friends here. He has been at Wellington for some time, but is now unsettled.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The notice for bids on the erection of the Imbecile Asylum is now being published in THE DAILY COURIER and all who want to put in bids should observe the conditions.

THE SCHOOL BOND ELECTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The election yesterday to vote $8,000 bonds for additions to the Central school building resulted in a majority of 109 for. The following is the vote.

First Ward. For: 102. Against: 54.

Second Ward. For: 56. Against: 12.

Third Ward. For: 68. Against: 17.

Fourth Ward. For: 8. Against: 42.

The vote of the 4th ward is a sad revelation. It seems to prove the inhabitants to all be Democrats, and of course opposed to education. Only eight voters who can read and write! Heavens, what a commentary!! And in Winfield--the banner city of the banner county of the banner State of the Union. We write this without the least trepidation knowing that none of those 42 fourth warders can read it.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official, and Social Notes as Gathered by Our Regular Washington

Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

While walking through the Navy Yard the other day, I met Commodore Sicard. "This," said the Commodore, holding up a chocolate-colored, six-sided prism an inch and a half in diameter, with round holes through it, and weighing over two ounces, "is a grain of the celebrated cocoa powder of which you have heard so much." "Is it made of cocoa?" I asked. "No, there is probably not a particle of cocoa in it. It takes its name from its color, but its composition is a profound secret. It is made abroad and furnished to the world at a reasonable rate, but I think we shall soon be able to make it ourselves. There are experiments going forward here which we expect to be crowned with success. The particular points of excellence of the cocoa powder over the old kind are that it burns slower at the beginning and more rapidly toward the end. In other words, it has a tendency to burn more rapidly under increasing pressure. With the black powder it is difficult to keep down the pressure, but it requires high pressure to make cocoa burn rapidly." "Is the cocoa powder economical?" "No, I cannot say that it is. It takes a good deal of it to impress a high velocity to a projectile. But when everything is properly adjusted, it is not impossible to give a velocity of more than 2,000 feet per second to a projectile." I thanked the Commodore and was glad to note another evidence that our Navy was waking up.

Numerous stories have been published in regard to the physical condition of Hon. Malcolm Hay, First Assistant Postmaster General. He certainly has the appearance of being in poor health. He sits in an armed easy-chair, with his head resting languidly back upon the cushion. He is very pale, and his voice sounds like that of a sick man, or of one who is just recovering from a severe illness. I am told, however, that he is not by any means so bad off as he has the appearance of being. He is really no worse than he has been for a number of years past. He is a very conscientious man, and attends to his work very diligently and carefully. He is not a strong man physically, to be sure, but he carefully husbands his strength and accomplishes a great deal. He works at his correspondence every night after he has gone home, and thus works off very much more than would be supposed.

A good story is told of one of the recent Western appointees in the Treasury Department. He had only just been installed, when, happening into one of the other offices, he beheld a silver tray and pitcher. His own room was furnished with an ordinary earthen pitcher and tumbler. The silver tray took his eye, and, returning to his room, he wrote a requisition for one upon the Secretary. The Secretary read the requisition and returned it with a verbal message: "Tell Mr. That he had better get the prairie mud off his boot-heels before he sends to me for silver trays."

Mr. Hay is something of a civil service reformer in his way. He does not always please the Congressmen and Senators, who have sometimes crowded him pretty hard for appointments for their constituents. He is determined that Congressmen shall be held responsible for the recommendations which they make, and has sometimes been rather pointed in the questions he has asked. He manifestly believes in doing business in a businesslike way.

Postmaster General Vilas is the last man in the Cabinet who was expected to be a civil service reformer and yet I was told by a candidate for office today that he lectured nearly everyone who called upon him upon this subject. "It is extremely difficult to see the Postmaster General at all; and when one does see him, it is only for a minute, and it is rather monotonous to have that minute occupied with a lecture on civil service reform. But that is the way very often," said this gentleman.

The single rate letter postage law, which reduces the rate to two cents an ounce, instead of two cents for each half ounce, as heretofore, has made very little change in the business of the Department. But the change is in the line of a reduction of taxation and will be universally welcomed. The present limit stops the flow of affection, description, and business often at the most interesting point. Under the new law, some of the favorite and well-worded excuses for cutting a letter short become unavailable, but as the act says nothing against a sputtering pen, or thick ink, or the making up, correspondents still have sufficient resources for excusing themselves when they get tired of writing. L.

A COMMUNICATION ON OUR GAS LAMPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

At the time our city council made the contract with the Gas company of this city to pay them $1,800 a year for the use of gas to light the city, many of our people thought it an outrage for the city to pay so large a sum of money for the use of gas only part of the night. I presume our city pays regularly for the use of the gas according to its contract with the Gas company. But does the Gas company carry out their part of the contract? As an actual observer, I can say they do not, for to my personal knowledge the lamp on the northwest corner of Mansfield street and 12th avenue has not been lit half the time in the last two weeks, and the nights it has been lighted, it has been done from half past to half past ten o'clock; and at this writing half past ten o'clock p.m., the lamp on the above corner is not lighted. Now, there must be something wrong about this business. I have called the attention of one member of the Gas company and also our city marshal to the matter, and still the lamp is not lighted, and our businessmen who have business to attend to downtown after dark have the pleasure of going home in the dark simply because the Gas company are permitted to leave the lamps unlit. I would respectfully call the attention of the city council to this matter that they may take proper steps to guard the interest of the taxpayers of our city and see that we get value received for the money paid for gas. JOHN W. CURNS.

MORE ON CHESS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Reading articles, pro and con, concerning wheat turning to cheat, in THE COURIER, I thought a little personal experience might throw a little light on the subject.

We bought a farm twenty-three miles east from Indianapolis, the cleared portion divided into four fields; and where the fields came together, stood the house. In one of these fields we sowed wheat cleaned seed. It came up and looked well; but all winter our poultry fed on the corner of the field (about a half acre), picking it close to the ground. In the spring it came up looking as green as the wheat around it. When it grew up and headed, it was all cheat. The dividing line where the cheat merged into wheat was closely defined. As far as the fowls ranged, a full crop of cheat--merged off into a good crop of wheat, excepting in low places, where water had stood in the winter long enough to freeze the wheat out. On the margin of these places, the wheat stood thick.

We conclude from that season's experience and after observation, that certain conditions change wheat to cheat. JAYE AREA DOUBLES.

ARRIVED AT LAST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The "Kansas Millers," the steamboat of the Arkansas River Navigation company, of which Messrs. Bliss & Wood are members, arrived at Arkansas City yesterday, having come fourteen hundred miles from St. Louis, in charge of Capt. T. S. Morehead. It anchored in the Walnut, at Ayres' mill. At Tulsa, in the Territory, the high water and drift kept her from passing under a large railroad bridge and delayed her too long to reach Arkansas City for the Fourth. Her crew and passengers, besides the captain, were James Johnson, engineer; Dr. Hull, an excursionist, and "Robinson Crusoe," a traveling scenic artist. The boat cost $7,000 laid down at Arkansas City; is of twenty-one tons burden; capacity for twenty passengers; requires a master and pilot, one engineer, and a crew of two. She draws ten inches of water, is seventy-five feet long, with fifteen feet beam, and has a steel, barge-shaped hull. The Navigation company expect to ply her between Arkansas City and Fort Smith in shipping flour. She crossed shoals in but four inches of water in coming up.

THE IMPETUS FELT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Things are shaping about for a boom in the way of new business buildings. Mr. Schuler is clearing the ground for the immediate construction of four twenty-five foot store buildings, at the rear of the Winfield National, to the alley, with offices in the second story. John A. Eaton will soon be at work on his fine bank building. Irve Randall and Ed. Weitzel have about determined to erect two store buildings, two stories and one hundred feet deep, on the lots just south of the Commercial Hotel. George Crippen will also soon erect a good building on the corner of Main street and 8th avenue, while a number of others are being projected. And many valuable new residences are being planned for erection soon. Verily, the great impetus made by our grasp of various big enterprises begins to materialize. Dozens of men of money and influence are daily visiting the Queen City with a view of location and investment. They all want to live in a city with the "git up and git" that ours exhibits.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Our fat man walked into a certain business house, on his rounds, to see who desired anything in the way of advertisements, and noticed that a drummer stood by the counter with his sample valises open. "Anything you want to say in the paper this week?" said the f. m. to the man behind the counter. "No," said the businessman. "I don't believe in advertising. I wouldn't give you a cent for all the advertisements." The drummer waited until the f. m. was halfway to the door, and then slowly taking up his sample valises, remarked, "Well, that lets me out. I don't care to sell on time to any man in this age who does not believe in advertising. When I want to strike up a trade with a dead man, I will go to the graveyard and swap tombstones. Good day, sir."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Editors have their peculiarities as well as other people. They practice and inculcate brevity, which is a virtue. They are absent-minded, which is a failing. It is not strange, then, that one not far from here should send a note to his lady love like the following. "Dearest, I have carefully analyzed the feeling I entertain for you, and the result is substantially as follows. I adore! Will you be mine? Answer." Then, after a moment of thought, he added in a dreamy, absent way: "Write only on one side of the paper. Write plainly and with real name, not necessarily for publication, but as a guarantee of good faith."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Night, 12 m. Chinch bugs, gadflies, katydids, millers, etc., by the thousands are having a base ball game around our lamp as we write. We just now put one's light out on first base, and one that is resting on the center field of our nose, to catch a fly, will be short stopped in about a minute.

BEFORE HIS HONOR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Police Court was kept red hot Thursday. Caroline Franklin, a colored lady living on south Fuller, charged Nancy Stevens, a colored lady, with disturbing the peace and quiet of affiant, by cursing and using obscene language, throwing stones, and making things lively around that corner of the city. $4 and costs, amounting to $15 in all, was the charge. In return for this Emily Stevens, the mother of Nancy Stevens, filed a complaint charging Caroline Franklin with disturbing the peace and quiet of affiant. The last case is set for tomorrow. When women get a little riled, you may look for fun.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

T. P. Carter was down from Burden Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Robert Ratliff and A. J. Werden were down from Udall Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

M. S. Briscoe, landlord of the Burden House, was over Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The rotund and always happy S. C. Strong was in the hub from Rock Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

W. M. Sleeth and son and Nate Snyder were up from the miasma City last Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

R. D. Fluke, one of Burden's most substantial young men, was doing the metropolis Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mrs. Hattie Albert, of Carrollton, Missouri, is visiting her brother, Gen. A. H. Green. She will remain two weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

B. F. Wood is putting a second story on his residence. This will give him ten rooms. Ray Brothers are doing the work.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mrs. S. F. Mitchell and daughter arrived Friday from Lockhaven, Pennsylvania, for a visit with her parents, Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Rothrock.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. Ed. Beeny and wife left Thursday, on the Santa Fe, for Colorado, to inhale the bracing breezes of the Rockies. They will be gone six weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Jennie Maybee brought a beautiful sketching into our office Wednesday evening. The sketch shows Miss Maybee's genius in this line, and is excellent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. B. F. Randolph, of Macomb, Illinois, is in the city. He is the non-resident of the firm of O'Meara & Randolph, and makes Winfield interested visits occasionally.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Holmes & Son have erected a fine awning in front of their grocery. L. W. Kimball did the work. They also have put gas in their building and are assuming city airs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Ray Rowe accompanied Miss Fannie Saunders to her home, near Salem, Friday, for a week's vacation. Miss Carrie Cassell spent last week with Miss Fannie.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Emma Kuhlman, of the State Normal, who is here conducting Kindergarten work, is the guest of Miss Mary Berkey, formerly her pupil. She is a lady of high attainments.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

County Treasurer Nipp left Wednesday afternoon to settle with the State Treasurer for Cowley County for six months since January last. Over $15,000 preceded him via express.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Ostrander & Stayman have just put in an upright ten horsepower engine. They are prepared to do any and all kinds of work as well or better than any machinists in Southern Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Sam Myton has an elegant addition to his fine business block, just north. It looks like a wart on an elephant. We should think Mr. Myton would feel sorely grieved every time he looks at it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Geo. W. Schaffer, excursion agent of the Terre Haute, Indiana, Excursion Agency, is again hung up at the Central. He thinks in a few weeks the emigration to this section will be immense.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Nick Hurley left Wednesday for a few weeks at West Side, Iowa, called by the Excelsior Binder company, whose binders he handles here. They want him to manipulate some machines there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

John A. Eaton showed us some very fine architectural drawings Friday, done by Willis B. Ritchie, the gentleman from Lima, Ohio, who is here to get up plans for Mr. Eaton's new bank building.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Nannie J. Platter has filed her second annual settlement with the Probate Court in the estate of James E. Platter, deceased. Also for second annual account as guardian of the estate of the minor heirs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Street Commissioner Cochran has made East Eighth Avenue a beauty and a joy forever. It is a splendid grade on one of the prettiest streets in the city. The slope of this avenue from the mounds makes the view enchanting.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Henry E. Asp got in Saturday from three weeks on the line of the K. C. & S. W., looking after the legal matters of the line. He looks like a veritable granger; and to complete his misery, he found his wife had left him, gone to visit at Ashland.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Hunt got off Wednesday for a month's visit in Detroit, Muskegon, and other places in Michigan, leaving Miss Anna as queen of their household. They anticipate a grand vacation. The Captain hopes to return a veritable fat man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

F. M. Freeland steps down and out of the Commercial Hotel Thursday. M. M. Kennedy, of Elk Falls, takes the hotel. Mr. Freeland has been in the hotel business for some time in this city and has made many friends. We wish him success in whatever business he goes into.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

H. G. Chipchase, telephone repairer for this circuit, came in from Wellington Thursday. He had a wild experience with the waves of Slate creek, near Wellington, a few days since, drowning a team and nearly losing his own life. He didn't know the creek was on a tear.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Rev. Thos. Audas, of Wichita, who was here Wednesday attending the meeting of the college trustees, was accompanied by his wife. Rev. N. S. Buckner and wife, of Arkansas City, were also here. Mr. Buckner was a member of the college locating committee, but is not a trustee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Rev. James Miller, pastor of Grace Methodist church, Bloomington, Illinois, and Elder R. E. Guthrie, one of Illinois' pioneer ministers, now residing at Wichita, dropped in on THE COURIER Friday in company with Mr. S. H. Jennings. Rev. Miller is Mr. Jennings' old Illinois pastor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The glorious Fourth completely got away with George Rembaugh. He has a haggard look and gets around like a snail. He holds his head steady and looks cross-eyed. It is a sad sight to see a bright and ambitious young man going down hill prematurely. All cursed be the temptations of the Fourth! He claims to be laid up by rheumatism.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Now it is George Buckman that is posing as a dude. He has shaved off slick and clean. It gives George a shark-like appearance. If he was a money loaner, it would be nothing out of place for him to ask eight hundred percent, and yet upon a close study of his "phiz," he might be taken for the main pillow in some religious denomination. The reporter left town this afternoon that wrote this.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Charley Schmidt came in Thursday from Kingman, Harper, and western towns. He reports the Indian scare rampant. People are flocking into those towns like wild-fire: on foot, horseback, and in wagons, with their bed-clothing and other small traps. None of them know anything but rumors. At Kingman a militia company has been formed and the people all through that section are congregating for self-protection.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Rev. B. F. Watson, of Leavenworth, presiding Elder of the Topeka District of the A. M. E. Church, is in the city to conduct a quarterly meeting. He has just returned from an inspection of the churches in Southern Colorado, which show many church buildings, and though small membership, much zeal. He is a fine looking, intelligent gentleman of splendid conversational powers. He is the guest of Andy Smith while in the city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Harris & Clark brought into our office Friday a stalk of corn grown on the farm of D. Taylor, two miles north of town. This is one of six in the same hill, and it is immense. The fat man didn't know what it was. The local hasn't found out yet, and never will. The corn stalk stands 11½ feet in height and weighs 12½ pounds. Score one for Cowley. She leads in corn as well as everything else. Mr. Taylor says he has about 80 acres similar to this. He, like the man spoken of in the Bible, knoweth not what to do with his prospective crop.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire took in Edward Elenwood Friday, supposed to be the fellow who stole Stout's horse. He has been working for Doc. Goodnight down on Grouse. He says he went from there to Burden last week, walked over here, and took the train for Mulvane to see a young man and his uncle, with whom he came from Indiana a year ago, and that he came back here yesterday. Our Sheriff went to Mulvane last night and found his statement false. Elenwood is about twenty-three and not of very good countenance.

A STATE ADJUSTER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

There is a fellow perambulating the streets of Winfield who says he is the "State Adjuster" of sewing machines. (He does not exhibit his commission from Gov. Martin, and we have failed to note the provision in the Constitution or laws of the State providing for the election or appointment of a State adjuster.) His plan of operation is to visit a house when the man is absent, tell of his high office, and ask to see the sewing machine. He goes at the machine, takes it apart, and discovers that some important part is ruined or about to be, and says he must substitute a new part for the old one, which will cost the owner four dollars. The lady wants more time and he says he will call tomorrow. He then secretly steals some of the fine, polished steel parts of the machine, and by a sleight of hand gets them into his satchel and leaves. The next day he returns, puts some worthless substitute in place of the parts stolen, gets his four dollars, and leaves to victimize the next. He tried it on in one house too many in this city. The lady did not miss the parts of the machine he had taken away until late in the evening when she wanted to do some sewing and found two of the most important parts of the machine missing. The man of the house did not have the "Adjuster" arrested as he ought to have done; but waited at home the next day and when the Adjuster came by, a little finesse managed to get possession of the stolen parts. He dismissed the fraud promptly, after telling him what kind of a chap he was. The fraud promised to sue, get even with, and advertise the man who dealt with him in that way.

THE RIGHT METHOD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Belle Plaine administers the proper medicine to the festive burglar. Suspicious looking characters were seen hanging around the depot, and extra precautions were taken to prevent a break on the depot and lumberyard nearby. Marshal Reed watched the depot and about nine o'clock at night discovered three men trying to break in at a window. Two of the men were standing at the window when Mr. Reed walked up; and laying a hand on the shoulder of each, said: "I am an officer and I want you two fellows." One of them pulled a pop and fired at Reed without hitting him. He returned the compliment, his shot entering the head at the left eye of one of the robbers, inflicting a mortal wound from which he died. Reed was attacked by the other robbers, who got away, and so bruised him about the head with brass knucks and revolvers that he was unable to leave his bed. The burglar paying the wages of sin had a long gray beard and mustache and seemed to be fully 55 or 60 years of age. He had in his pockets two cents, a bunch of skeleton keys, powder and tube through which to blow powder into locks, a pair of brass knuckles, etc., but nothing that would lead to his identification except a scrap of paper on which was written, "Wm. Burg, Fremont County, Colorado."

OUR EQUESTRIANS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The fancy of our young folks has succumbed to equestrianism and almost every evening a bevy are out with their glossy chargers for a gallop about the city. Last night a whole platoon of health invigorators and pleasure seekers, through the horseback medium, took in the city. The beauty and grace of the ladies was almost equaled by the gallantry and comeliness of the young chaperons while the handsome horses came in for a share of womanly praise. Among the company were Misses Edith Hall, Sarah Bass, Kate Rodgers, Minnie Taylor, Sarah Gay, Anna Hunt, Bert Morford, Ida Johnston, Lizzie and Margie Wallis, Lizzie McDonald; Messrs. Lacey Tomlin, Tom J. Eaton, Eugene Wallis, Chas. S. Dever, Frank Robinson, Ed. J. McMullen, Addison Brown, and F. H. Greer. Horseback riding is one of the most graceful and invigorating accomplishments, and the young lady who makes it a frequent practice will not have to paint the roses on her cheeks and her headaches will flee into the great reservoir of nonentity. It beats sitting in the "palah" fingering the "pianah" for your best fellow. Make him take you out riding. Roller-skating, croquet, and hammock are nowhere in comparison. Girls, if you would be happy, pretty, and buxom, cultivate equestrianism. Of course, advice to the boys is ungraceful--they get afoot anyway, and don't care a cent for rosy cheeked beauty or effeminate accomplishments. If they can steer clear of ice cream parlors, they are happy, and get off remarkably easy.

FORMERLY OF WINFIELD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Doctor Layfield, of whose murder last week at Ashland we gave an account, was several years ago a resident of Winfield. He was a relative by marriage of J. E. Conklin, and erected for the Conklin Brothers the Monitor building. His death was a cold blooded murder committed to secure $800, the proceeds of the sale of property in Champaign, Illinois. His wife was to join him today at Ashland, and was ready to start for Kansas when she received the awful intelligence of his murder. He was buried by the Odd Fellows of Champaign, of which lodge he was a member, and from the house whose grounds he had beautified with trees and flowers. The life of a good man has been sacrificed for money, and suffering and despair brought to those who were dependent upon him. Is it not a duty that Kansas owes to society to promptly inflict the death penalty for murder so foul?

A BADLY NEEDED ROAD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The petition of J. F. Martin et al for a road from Vernon township through the West Side Town Company's addition, across the Walnut and joining west 9th Avenue, has occupied the attention of the county fathers yesterday and today. The petition was granted, last evening, awarding damages of $600 to John Lowry and $650 to J. C. McMullen, providing the county was not held liable to pay such damages until Vernon, or it and Winfield jointly, constructs an iron bridge across the Walnut on this road. But owing to some irregularity in the petition, it was re-considered today and laid over to Monday. This road is absolutely necessary and should, and no doubt will, be made.

OUR SCHOOL MA'AMS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

One week of the Normal Institute has passed. Words are inadequate to express the amount of good that has been accomplished. The Professors and teachers are all alive to their work. Prof. Wilkinson has evidently great faith in the logic of facts. We can only glean a few of the many valuable items with which this Normal abounds. The week's enrollment now shows 144. There are two daily sessions--morning, 7:30 to 12; evening, 4 to 6. The morning lesson commences immediately with the exercises; afternoon, reading the scripture, singing, and prayer. The singing is conducted by Prof. Merriman, who understands his work thoroughly. A. M.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

There is absolutely no excuse for swearing outside of a newspaper office, where it is often indispensable in reading proof and looking over the paper after it comes off the press. The printer made a small mistake of twenty-seven hundred dollars last evening in the want of Mr. J. A. Webb for a partner to establish his soap factory here. It should have read: "I guarantee three thousand dollars profit for the first year, etc." The printer is dead.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The young men who are disposed to pass on the other side of the street and in other unfeeling ways dodge ice cream saloons when out walking with their dear girls should remember that all during the long cold winter, these same girls cheerfully and uncomplainingly furnished lights and fuel for their comfort, and the little cream and similar necessities they are willing to accept are but an inadequate return, at the best, for the last winter's favors.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We present Friday the first statement of the condition of the Winfield National Bank. It shows a most healthy condition and a profitable business. The bank has only been running under its national charter twenty days and the business is not yet fully turned over. A quarter of a million dollars is a nice little banking capital.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The school Board, at its last meeting, voted to offer a reward of $10 to anyone giving information of anyone committing depredations upon the school premises. This is business. Let no guilty one escape.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We have received the first copy of the Norwich News, published in the new D. M. & A town, in Kingman County. It shows big prospects for that hamlet.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Our Cyclones will play the Douglass base ball club a contest game Tuesday week, in this city.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

THE WANTS OF LABOR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We have our own notion of what is needed in this country for the promotion of the interests of the laboring man. They do not need a division of the property of the country, a hatred of capital or of capitalists, or a lot of dirty mouthed criminals like Parsons to go over the country and preach up robbery and violence; they do not even need strikes, but they do need union and a better understanding of what they need. Such understanding and knowledge they cannot get from demagogues but only from laborers like themselves. They need to have societies, clubs, and meetings in which none but industrious laboring men should be allowed to participate; or if they would invite orators or lecturers to address them, they should permit none but men of sound moral principles, honor, and patriotism.

The blatant demagogues who stir up the passions of laboring men to the commission of crime are their worst enemies, much worse confidence men than those who swindle them by confidence tricks, fraud, and false pretenses. Laboring men need to understand all kinds and all classes of frauds who would prey upon them and be prepared to give them proper treatment. They need education, newspapers, reading and association, whereby they may learn the dangers from frauds as well as the advantages which they might grasp and how to grasp them. They need a hatred of frauds and skill in detecting them, but they do not need a dislike of capital or capitalists as such. They will be capitalists themselves in due time, or at least well to do, if they can combine with industry good sense and intelligence. The majority of the capitalists of today were once laborers, who have been blessed with industry, intelligence, and enterprise. Perhaps they have been favored by what is called luck, but it may be noted that the lucky ones are generally those having the above named qualities. Of course, some of them have obtained their capital by dishonest means; but the rule with few exceptions is that such means end in disaster. Most of the noted frauds who have stolen by the tens of thousands to millions, have died in poverty or are now in prison or in Canada. There are some rich frauds who have stolen largely in a manner which the law does not reach, but those are comparatively few in numbers.

Of course the laborer needs as high a rate of compensation for his labor as he can get, and needs protection from imported cheap labor. The slums of Europe are continually poured into this country and employed to cheapen labor here. These are, as a class, ignorant and vicious. They leave a country where they were worse than slaves, having been paid but the merest pittance for their labor. They have lived in filth and dirt and practiced the most disgusting vices. They have never learned any reason except fear for avoiding the perpetration of any crime. To them one half the wages our native laboring men get is a bonanza, and they serve to cheapen our native labor to a large extent. These ignorant and vicious laborers become a majority in the large eastern cities and in many manufactories. These men, just escaped from tyranny, come here with a hatred of those who are better off than they, come with communistic notions and a desire to rob, or as they call it, to divide the property of the world. Among them are developed many who have "the gift of gab," and these become their orators and leaders. They influence the masses, control the trade unions and labor organizations, organize strikes, compel honest, intelligent, native laborers to join them for fear of brutal treatment or assassination, and thus our American laborers are kept from earning their needed wages for weeks and months, and are reduced to poverty and want, because of not being allowed to receive the rewards of the labor which these slums have so ruinously cheapened.

The old "humbug about making this land the asylum of the oppressed of all nations" has made it the cesspool of the filth, vice, and ignorance of all nations, which infects and degrades labor in all its branches and not only rules the destinies of laboring men in the larger cities and factories but is the balance of political power in the leading cities and States of the union. What the laboring men need is government prohibition of the importation of these foreign laborers and a strict quarantine against them, whether from China or any other foreign country. They are infected with diseases which are more fatal and dangerous than cholera or plague, and there is no good reason that they should not be treated as would be treated a ship load of cholera sufferers from Spain, or of yellow fever sufferers from Cuba. If we would assist and elevate these laborers in Europe, we should do it by sending our assistance there as we would send our assistance to cholera infected Spain; cure them in their own country instead of infecting our own people with the disease by bringing them here.

Then when we have shut off the contagion, we need to cure the patients here who are sick with the disease. Such men as Parsons, O'Donovan, Rossa, and others we could name, should be put in the pest house and there treated, so that they may not continue to spread the contagion. Then the processes of education, culture, and well paid labor must do the balance, and would surely do it effectively, and our laboring men would become prosperous and independent with an abundance if not capitalists.

THE TIMES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The New York Times says today: "A directory of living ex-convicts in the state of Ohio ought to be prepared from the penitentiary and prison records for the use of Surveyor Caldwell of Cincinnati, and the agricultural department at Washington. Commissioner Coleman's appointment to a clerkship of a man who served his term for stealing was evidently an error into which he was led by some old fashioned Democrats from Ohio, and a full list of discharged convicts would enable him to avoid such scandalous blunders in the future. But with Surveyor Caldwell the appointment of ex-convicts is clearly a settled policy and a complete directory to the guild would be a great convenience to him."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We wish a lot of Kansas Democrats would soak their heads so as to open the pores, and let these words of President Cleveland infiltrate their brains.

"It's a little strange how some men go at this thing. A very large proportion of those who want office come here from the far West, the South, and other sections near and remote. They take up quarters at the hotels, locate permanently, begin to drink whiskey, and think they are getting appointments. Now, if you will look over the list of men who have been appointed by me, you will see the names of none of those men there. Not by a d d sight. The men who stay at home and work are the ones who get places." Champion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Mississippi prohibitionists go at their work in a rational way and are satisfied with one step at a time. At their State convention, a few days ago, they agreed to work for a prohibition legislature without reference to political party lines, and as a first step in legislation to favor a local option law, giving notice, all the time, that they will oppose any party that openly oppose the doctrine of prohibition. They will succeed because, in time, they will have a majority of the voters of the State on their side of this particular subject, and they will have control of one political party.

WINFIELD POST OFFICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Business of the Year Ending June 30th, 1885.

SALES.

1 cent stamps. 51,199

1 cent due stamps. 400

1 cent envelopes. 3,577

1 cent wrappers. 10,943

1 cent postal cards. 105,688 171,807

2 cent stamps. 4,218

2 cent due stamps. 1,509

2 cent envelopes. 46,627 330,758

4 cent stamps. 4,218

5 cent stamps. 1,509

5 cent due stamps. 200

10 cent stamps. 2,898

15 cent stamps. 73

30 cent stamps. 66

Newspaper stamps. 497

Total Number Stamps Sold: 513,026

Total Receipts for Stamps, etc., Sold: $9,152.35

Total Receipts for Box Rents: $1,184.30

Total Postal Revenues: $10,336.65

ALLOWANCES.

Postmaster's Salary: $2,100.00

Clerk Hire: 1,400.00

Fuel and Light: 92.00 $3,592.00

Net Revenue to U. S.: $6,744.65

Besides the above the Postmaster's commissions on the money order business were about $200. The expenses paid by the Postmaster for clerk hire, fuel, lights, rents, and losses were about $700 in excess of his allowances. His net pay for his services did not exceed $1,600, and it was the first year that paid him well. The postal receipts for the year show an increase over the preceding year of $1,122.07 and raises the salary to $2,200 from July 1st, 1885. It will also entitle the office to an allowance of $200 for rents.

We estimate for the year ending June 30, 1886, should the office remain in Republican hands:

Sales of stamps, etc.: $10,300.00

Box Rents. 1,200.00 $11,500.00

Less salary and allowances: 3,900.00

Net Revenue: $7,600.00

We publish this for the benefit of some of our Democratic friends who are anxiously awaiting returns from Washington, and because we think it makes a very proud showing for the enterprise and intelligence of the people of the city and the country immediately surrounding it. There is no other office in the State supplying a population not greater than this which can compete with these figures.

RAILROAD DISCRIMINATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Commonwealth has complained that the newsboys on the trains through Kansas are not allowed to sell the Commonwealth and other Kansas papers, and the Leavenworth Times joins in the complaint. So Gov. Martin deems the alleged discrimination against the Kansas papers of sufficient importance to call the attention of the state railroad commissioners to the subject, asking them to see that the discrimination is at once corrected. Of course, they have no right to compel any newsdealer to buy and sell any particular newspaper, any more than they have to compel these same newsboys to buy and sell bibles and works on geology as well as the trashy books which they offer for sale, or to compel them to sell Kansas roasted green corn as well as roasted peanuts; but when there is a rule against Kansas newspapers, it is an outrage. We do not know that it could be made profitable to handle any Kansas newspapers on the trains, but if they could be handled without loss, the newsdealers on the trains and the authorities which control them owe it to the traveling public and to Kansas institutions to handle them and give to them an equal chance with other newspapers; and if they refuse to do so on other grounds than that of it being a losing business with them, it is, to say the least, unjust and unfriendly, not only to the newspapers discriminated against, but to the State of Kansas, and the railroad companies which will allow it on their trains are not deserving of a monopoly of Kansas business to say the least, and it is a token of an unfriendly spirit toward Kansas.

We would think that passengers on all trains going west past Topeka after 12 o'clock in the night would want the Topeka papers as giving the latest news, and that if well supplied with these, few newspapers from farther east would be in demand on the trains or at the stations thereafter, that Topeka papers would have the field west to Denver and Las Vegas and that the sales would be quite an amount. On trains going west, leaving the Missouri river in the morning, and on trains going east, Topeka papers would have no special advantage over Kansas City papers, but there is no good reason why these and papers of Leavenworth and other Kansas towns should be excluded or in any manner discriminated against. If the railroad commissioners can cure this disease, it will furnish another evidence that they are of much value to the people of Kansas.

"GO UP THOU BALD-HAAD."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Wichita Eagle tells about the "bald-headed" editor of the COURIER. We will inform the Eagle that there are no bald-heads connected with the COURIER or in Winfield for that matter, except a few dudes who shave their heads with a lawn mower. At Wichita bald-heads are so numerous that the Eagle supposes it is the regular thing and that a print shop cannot be run without at least one of them on the staff. We presume the Eagle editor has pulled his auburn tresses out by the roots before this. If he has not, he ought to. We once were in the gallery of the opera house in Wichita during a ball when there were about a dozen quadrilles on the floor. About one half of the male heads we looked down upon were as hairless and polished as a billiard ball. There are no such heads in Winfield.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The New York Tribune says: "Why there should be so much said about the insult to the United States flag by the Mormons in Utah, it is hard to say. In itself the flag is simply a piece of cloth--strictly speaking a striped rag--excepting as it is the representative of the authority of the government and the majesty of a great self-governing people, it is of no account. Now the Mormons have been resisting the authority of the United States, which that flag represents, every day, for many years. They have been defying the law which that flag represents and are today in a state of virtual rebellion against the law. They have insulted the sovereignty of the people in every conceivable method ever since the last Democratic administration before the war sent out a costly and disastrous expedition to suppress a Mormon rebellion. Why, then, should anyone be surprised that besides insulting the nation, its laws, and its sovereign people, the Mormons should also insult its flag? It is not worthwhile for the government of the United States to pay any attention to insults to its flag by the Mormon church until it has completely vindicated the majority of the nation against the continued violation of its law by the Mormon church for many years. When it has finished that work and duly punished the men who have been in open rebellion against the laws of the United States, there will not be left outside of the jails enough authorities of the Mormon church to be punished for lesser insults to the flag.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The graders on the K. C. & S. W. R. R. have graded as far as the Commissioners have condemned. The Commissioners went up Tuesday to condemn more.

DOWN THE "RAGIN ARKINSAW."

The Kansas Millers Practically Tested by the Arkansas River Navigation

Company and a Cargo of Interested Citizens, Grain, Etc.

Our Elongated Scribe Sandwiched In.

Cowley's New Steamer A Big Success.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Through the courtesy of Mr. Spencer Bliss, representing Bliss & Wood in the Arkansas River Navigation Company, our elongated reporter hauled himself from his couch at 3:30 yesterday morning, and in company with Mr. J. W. Millspaugh and Prof. Davis, sped away behind Mr. Bliss' bay chargers for the city of many "invalids" and much "medicine." The object was to join the Navigation Company, composed of James Hill, Bliss & Wood, Searing & Mead, and V. M. Ayres, and leading citizens of the Terminus, in an excursion down the "ragin' Arkinsaw" on the new steamer, Kansas Millers, as a practical test of its ability to master the sand bars and general "cussedness" of the American Nile. The hour of rising, though at first a severe shock to our delicate nerves, was such a charm that it will likely continue a life-time habit--if we have to sit up every night as on this occasion to do it. Dr. Evans and Mr. H. H. Hosmer were also among this bevy of early worms. It was a perfect morning; the tear drops of heaven had descended, making the air as soft and balmy as though wafted from the "fountain of eternal youth"--exhilarating beyond expression. A lovelier country can't be found under the blue canopy of heaven than that lying between here and Arkansas City. And just now it teems with promises of abundant crops of corn and other prospective cereals, while the shocks of golden wheat and oats continually dot the landscape. All along the road are the houses of many of Cowley's pioneers, and the evidences of their having laid up lucre where thieves can't cabbage it--in numerous tasty and substantial improvements exhibited all around. Reaching Arkansas City at 7 o'clock, a destructive raid was made on the ever unexcelled Leland Hotel. The balmy atmosphere inhaled on the road down was so bracing to the invalids of our party that all noses were upturned at the thought of a regulator of interior departments--known in Arkansas City parlance as "medicine" venders. A man is mighty fortunate to be able to stave off the "quick and sure" miasma grip of the canal, on entering the Terminus. Being full of Leland substantials, we delivered ourselves to the tender mercies of Archie Dunn and were soon landed on the banks of the placid Walnut, just east of the city, in the terrible presence of a Kansas steamer--a real, live steamboat, whose shrill voice sounded "all aboard.!" With a recklessness only attributable to enterprise, two more Archimedean levers were here put among the excursionists: Judge McIntire, the venerable and able editor of the Democrat, and Dick Howard, the young, energetic, and talented faberizer of the Republican. The excursion party, aside from those mentioned, contained sixty of Arkansas City's leading capitalists and businessmen, all the specially invited guests of Capt. Morehead and the Navigation company. The trip was made for a thorough exhibition of the merits of the boat--to show thinking and enterprising men just what it could do. No ladies were along. They were reserved for a time when less business and seeming experimental danger were ahead. The boat is a surprise to all--exhibits clear through the deep faith and determination of its projectors. It is a steel hull structure, seventy-five feet long and fifteen wide. Its gross capacity is thirty-four tons, with twenty deck or steerage passengers. It has two high pressure engines with eight inch cylinders, one boiler thirteen feet long and three and a half in diameter, giving 60,000 pounds tensible strength. Its canvas-covered deck has one hundred chairs and its license limit to excursions not over forty miles down the river, is one hundred and thirty. She has pilot, berths, cookery, and all the requisites of a first-class tow steamer: life-boats, plank floats, cork life-preservers, etc., with stern wheel propeller. It drew but thirteen inches of water yesterday and when loaded to its fullest capacity, will draw only fourteen. It is managed by T. S. Morehead, captain; Fred Barrett, mate; Samuel Clarke, formerly a machinist of Winfield, engineer; John Harrigan, fireman; H. P. Barnes, pilot; and Peter Yount, deck hand. James Hill, Spencer Bliss, C. Mead, and Allen Ayres represented the Navigation Company on this trip. At 8:05 the boat pulled out down the river for the land of the Noble Redskin. Prettier scenery can't be seen in this section than greets the eye upon either bank as you glide down. The velvety verdure was broken here and there by high bluffs, and, after you get down the Arkansas some distance, by low banks, giving a prairie view for miles around. The broad Arkansas, with the air impeded by but little timber, affords a more exhilarating breeze. The trip is delightful--charms one accustomed only to the dingy den of business. Going down, the steamer made over fifteen miles an hour. The river was swelled about thirty inches, but plenty of picturesque sand bars adorned it. As a practical test, the boat left the channel several times and glided over bars on which not more than eight inches of water flowed. The bottom could be heard grinding along on the sand. Being of steel bottom there is no friction and it seems impossible to stick the little steamer. About as bad places as the Arkansas contains were passed over with perfect ease. If the boat should happen to get stuck, however, only the fore could strand, and the aft will draw it back. The first cargo ever sent down the Nile of America was on board: five cwt. of flour and fifty bushels of corn, unloaded at Gilbert & Newman's cattle ranch, fifteen miles down. Thirty miles below Arkansas City, on the Kaw reservation, was found as pretty a grove as ever grew wild--a beautiful grassy incline, dotted with branching oaks, reminding one of some of the old Pennsylvania hillsides. Here the excursion landed and spent several hours, the principal of which was a grand feast which had been prepared by C. Burnett, of Arkansas City's St. Louis restaurant. It was soon demonstrated that, in "setting up" such "grub" for the crowd, Capt. Morehead had a government contract that threatened bankruptcy. Nothing but four life-boats and sixteen cork life-preservers saved the COURIER's lean man. Unfortunately, there was no "medicine" on board, and Dick Howard, of the Republican, is probably now sleeping his last long sleep. Returning, a speed of about seven miles an hour was maintained, in a current much swifter than when status quo. About half way up, an anchorage was made in a shady nook, and toasts given to the "Kansas Millers." Mayor Schiffbauer was master of ceremonies and Nate Snyder did the shorthand act. The Mayor voiced the warm interest of Arkansas City's businessmen in this promising enterprise. James Hill, general manager of the K. C. & S. W. railroad and father of this steamboat scheme, showed up the great saving to Cowley County in freight rates, in the success of this barge line. The company propose to put $5,000 into a barge fleet. It will be composed of five steel barges, enclosed, and forty feet long and ten wide, each with ordinary capacity of twenty-five tons. They will ply them between Arkansas City and Fort Smith and Little Rock. Flour, meat, hay, etc., will be taken down and coal and lumber brought back. Flour, etc., can be taken down for $5 a ton, half what it now costs by rail, to the best market we can get. As good coal as can be found in Colorado and Pennsylvania can be bought at $2.50 per ton at Ft. Smith and lumber at prices to greatly benefit the consumer, laid down at Arkansas City. The daily expense of running this line will be twenty dollars. The boat cost $7,000 laid down at its destination, and with the barges, will show an investment of twelve thousand. Capt. Morehead, under whose supervision the boat was constructed and brought up, said he had made a careful examination of the river all the way up and is satisfied, beyond a doubt, that it can be navigated with ease and profit to the company and people. The Captain takes great pride in this enterprise and shows an energy and knowledge of water most commendable. He says he can make the down trip to Ft. Smith, Arkansas, in four days, and return in six--three trips a month. He is convinced that in the near future two boats will be numerously plying the Arkansas to Arkansas City. The fifteen thousand dollars, appropriated and yet unused by Congress last winter for the improvement of the Arkansas river, will be applied for and promises to be forthcoming with other appropriations as soon as successful navigation is assured. Spencer Bliss, Judge Sumner, Judge McIntire, A. V. Alexander, and others made good speeches commendatory of the enterprise. The Navigation Company has divided its capital stock into 110 shares of $100 each. They were opened for subscriptions from those on the boat, and well on to $5,000, the amount necessary to construct the barges, was subscribed by H. D. Kellogg, J. H. Sparks, Ira Barnett, Herman Godehard, T. R. Houghton, Snyder & Hutchison, H. O. Meigs, Peter Pearson, Henry Endicott, Frick Bros., Wagner & Howard, S. F. George, C. H. Burroughs, A. V. Alexander, Mayor Schiffbauer, George Cunningham, Kimmel & Moore, Judge Sumner, and others. All were enthusiastic over the success, so far, of navigating the river.

On the boat is a queer character, a navigator and explorer who has been interested for years in the successful navigation of the Arkansas: L. F. Hadley, known along the river as "Old Robinson Crusoe." He is a Quapaw Indian by adoption, having been with different redskin tribes since he was eighteen, and is known among them as "In-go-nom-pa-she." Capt. Morehead found him at Pine Bluffs, Arkansas; he wanted to come along and the Captain took him in. His early hobbies were scenic sketching and shorthand, and he is making a complete map of the river's channel. His stay among the Indians has been of a missionary character, and his stories of Indian life, as given to the reporter, would make an interesting volume. "Robinson Crusoe" has made the Arkansas a study for years and has always been certain that it could be navigated. He is a native of Michigan and first got in with the Indians of Northern Michigan. In 1881 he came up to Arkansas City in the steamer, "Aunt Sally," which many here will remember, under Capt. John McClary. It was an old wooden snag boat and of course a poor test. Then Crusoe mapped the river also. He is indeed an eccentric character, possessing an astonishing amount of self-acquired knowledge.

The barges will not be completed for forty days, during which time the "Kansas Millers" will make excursion trips down the river. Winfield people couldn't spend a day better than in going down for such a trip. Captain Morehead and the Navigation company were assiduous in attentions to the guests on this trip. And the reporter found in Engineer Clarke a most pleasant and instructive escort through the intricacies of the lower deck. Mr. Clarke is an old Mississippi boatman, a thorough engineer, and the Company made a good strike when they secured him permanently.

We shall not soon forget our first trip down the "ragin' Arkinsaw" on a steamboat. The construction of this steamer is the inauguration of a great enterprise, and exhibits forcibly the characteristic "git up and git" of Cowley County men. Mr. James Hill, the father of the enterprise, and Capt. Morehead, who planned and superintended so successfully the construction of the boat, are entitled to special credit. Mr. Hill would like to see three locks in the Walnut, letting the steamer come up to Winfield, which she could easily do with these adjuncts.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. N. P. Overman, of this city, hands us his old home paper, the Marion, Indiana, Chronicle, containing this paragraph of unusual interest. "Julia Elizabeth White, a colored woman, died in Liberty township a week ago, one hundred and eight years old. Probably nowhere in the world is there a person who has reached so great an age. She lacked but a year of being as old as this nation. She was born during the revolutionary war. She was thirty-five years old when war was declared in 1812. She was thirty-eight years old when the battle of Waterloo was fought; and ten years younger than Gen. Jackson, who died forty years ago. Mrs. White died of old age. She was never ill. Her hearing and eye-sight never failed her. Her memory was excellent. She lived surrounded by hardships, with the humblest fare and apparel, but never grew childless nor forgot her faith in the Almighty. She was an interesting feature at a revival, where she was always an active worker. In the ecstacy of her delights, she was as supple as a girl of sixteen. She belonged to the denomination of Baptists. She died, being the mother of eleven children, thirty-seven grandchildren, eighty-two great grandchildren, thirty-three great, great grandchildren, and one great, great, great grandchild. The latter now lives in Marion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Normal, this session, is the largest and most successful ever held in the county. A number of live teachers from other counties and States are in attendance, and the regular recitations give both faculty and students an opportunity to be present and participate in the exercises. The large audience room of the Christian church was well filled yesterday, with an attentive and appreciative audience. The attention and general good conduct of the students is exceedingly creditable to themselves and to the Institution. There is a great deal going on that we have not the pleasure of hearing, as we are only a visitor and do not wish to intrude; but we think if more parents would visit the schools and see the good that is being done for their children, there would be less fault finding, for the instructors are doing their duty nobly. Now, good friends, let us do ours. Let each parent turn out and see what is being done. O. M.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Constanzer & Co. have no definite clue as to whom the rascals are that killed their cattle. As will be seen elsewhere, a reward of $300 is offered for the apprehension and conviction of the party, or parties. A party that would do, or cause to be done, such a cruel, low-lived, cowardly act upon a poor dumb brute is not fit for earth, Heaven, or hell, but should be treated like the party of olden times, be tied to a rack and a vulture eat his heart by daytime and it be allowed to grow to its normal condition during the night time and eat again the next day, and so on through eternity. If there is anything despicable, it is to show cruelty to dumb brutes. It is bad enough to try and injure a party, but this way is beyond conception of a man. As the reward is worth working for, no doubt the party will be found sooner or later. Then woe to him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Now is the day of exultation to the doctors, druggists, and tombstone men. Green corn, apples, and peaches line the fronts of our groceries. The small boy that water wouldn't drown, that lived after being kicked by a mule, that ice cream won't touch, that passed through the holidays of Christmas and glorified on the Fourth, that has passed through all the mishaps of winter, spring, and autumn, will pass quietly away within the next thirty days, and be gathered to the land of his forefathers. His friends will keep his memory green by the following epitaph upon the white and silent stone that marks his last resting place.

Here lies sweet little Willie, with red hair and a pug nose.

Poor little boy was very silly; he ate green apples and turned up his toes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

As the reporter was aching for a local Thursday, a great row was heard and Fred Krupp's mules were seen coming up 9th full tilt. They were headed off by the crowd on the corner, and no damage done. They were left standing as usual without being hitched, and all at once started out under the influence of the spirit. It is lucky they were headed off as they were or they might have torn wagon, harness, and themselves to pieces.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. William Hudson, wife and child, and Miss Addie Hudson, all of the thriving young city of Winfield, Kansas, were the guests of "Bud" Garber and wife last Wednesday, and favored the Democrat with a call. They were en route to Niagara Falls and Canada, on a protracted visit. Mr. Hudson is one of Winfield's businessmen, a jeweler. Petersburg, (Ill.), Democrat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The camp meeting is now in full blast, about five miles from town. It is under the auspices of the denomination known as Holiness. They make things whoop from the word go. We understand the road is very bad between here and the grounds. Though the word of God is in the camp, the devil is in the road.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Friday--Hot.

Saturday--Hotter.

Sunday--Hotterer.

Monday--Hottererer.

Tuesday--Hotterererer.

Pack us on ice and ship us north.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Arthur H. McMaster parted his hair in the middle, put on his dude coat, eye glass, and grip, and left Monday for a month's recreation at his old Indian home and in Chicago, Grand Rapids, and Muskegon and the Michigan pineries.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Nearly every town in southwestern Kansas is building new schoolhouses this summer. This speaks well for the growth of the country. This city will require several more teachers the coming year than were employed last term.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A subscription paper has been circulated and about three hundred dollars subscribed as a reward for the capture and conviction of the killer of Constanzer & Co.'s cattle Sunday night.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

It seems that the Indian scare originated with a man named Smith, who told a man named Jones, who told a Mr. Brown that the Indians were killing people down in Barbour County. Brown spread the news; hence a general scare all over the west. Perhaps Mr. Smith did not intend to create a sensation, but he can credit himself with getting up the biggest Indian scare of the age.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The boys had a drill Monday at the rink. It was pretty hot work, but they will find it hotter marching forty miles a day.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Billy Dawson shouldered his Saratoga, containing an old shirt and a pair of socks, and lit out for two days at Independence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Ed. P. Greer and Earnest Reynolds took a flying trip up to the K. C. & S. W. R. R. Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Judge H. T. Sumner came up from the Terminus yesterday.

OUR FROG POND.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Winfield is noted for the beauty of her streets. She has fifty miles of pavement that cannot be excelled anywhere. Thee is an air of cleanliness about this city, and a frog pond on South Main, where the melodious chuckle of the frogs and the curses of the neighbors intermingle. The merchants are not allowed to place their goods so as to obstruct the thoroughfare in the least, and there are piles of dirt and large stones on South Main. Some women will get smashed up on these rocks some time and the city will have to pay the damages. Mr. Officer, get a move on.

PHIL. SHERIDAN FORTY-FIVE MILES AWAY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

John C. Long came down on the Santa Fe this morning as far as Mulvane with Gen. Phil. Sheridan. He is on his way to the Cheyenne Agency, 120 miles south of Caldwell, to quell the Indian troubles down there. There are about 5,000 troops there. The Indians will be disarmed and brought under subjection. Mr. Long says Gen. Sheridan looks about the same as of old times, except some heavier. No doubt many of his old "vets" would like to shake hands with little Phil.

PROCEEDINGS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS MONDAY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

In the matter of A. Buzzi for vacation of county road, laid over until October session. The Board granted petition of for voting precinct in Windsor Township, to be located at Grand Summit. In the matter of J. F. Martin, the Board heard arguments of parties and took the matter under consideration. The Board was in session Tuesday.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official and Social Notes as Gathered by Our Regular Washington

Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

It would be a great good to the Capital city if the President would issue an executive order that the Government employees here be paid weekly hereafter instead of twice a month. The increased clerical force necessary to do this would not be felt as a burden to departments, while the influence of the change to increase thrift among the employees would be a lasting blessing to thousands. The more frequent payments would break up the habit of running bills and substitute therefore cash payments for current household expenses. The merchants would be greatly benefitted; and business could be conducted on a closer margin of profit and with less risk.

About $600,000 per month is paid out to Government employees in this city, exclusive of the District expenditures. Upon that wage fund almost every industry and enterprise rests. The distribution of it is a most important event that occurs in the life of the city. Should it be made to flow with greater rapidity, the richest as well as the poorest person in the District would feel its thrill and only one set of men in the city would be injuriously affected. They are the money lenders, called "10 per centers." Their occupation would soon be gone.

I hear that Gen. Sparks, Commissioner of the General Land Office, has had a complete list of all the cases where the public lands have been improperly fenced made out with a statement of the present status of affairs. In all these cases the parties have been notified to remove the fences. In some instances they had consulted attorneys, who have held that a reasonable number of openings in the fence are sufficient. In such cases the openings are graded, and to all intents and purposes fences still exist. The total amount of land that has been appropriated in this way is between one and two million acres.

A very common way of stealing the public lands is for some man to hunt out a good water hole or stream and to locate his pre-emption claim so as to take this in. He can fence this, and then he practically has all that joins it for many miles around, for the land in much of the western territory is worthless except where there is water.

The men who have done this illegal fencing in of the public domain have a side to their story which they try to tell with great force. They claim that the land is worthless except for the purposes of grazing, and that they, by taking possession of it and rearing large herds of cattle, are adding to the wealth of the country, doing something for themselves and for the people at large. It is a pity for them the department here does not accept this fallacious reasoning, but holds that the honest settler is driven away by the fences and that they must all be removed.

The penchant of many persons for writing anonymous letters to public officials here in Washington surpasses ordinary belief. There is scarcely a man in high public place who does not receive more or less anonymous letters in every mail delivered to him; and the higher his position, the more he is a target for the anonymous letter scribblers. Many of these effusions are palpably from cranks, while very many have the impress of minds that are ordinarily intelligent. During the pendency of Senator Bayard's resolution in the Senate condemning the assault of dynamiters upon public buildings in London, the Senators were fairly deluged with letters and postal cards--all without signatures--admonishing, warning, and beseeching them in regard to their vote upon that resolution.

There is not a member of the cabinet who does not receive anonymous letters, giving him advice, beseeching him for office or criticizing his course. Nor does the anonymous writer confine himself to the mails. He frequently resorts to the telegraph, and one of the most provoking experiences of a public official is to receive a telegram marked "collect," and after paying for it, to discover that it emanates from some crank of theorist who expresses his sentiments, but omits to sign his name. The President is also a shining mark for the effusion of anonymous scribblers.

The President is preparing to depart from Washington for a summer vacation. His plans have been arranged, and it is expected that he will be able to get away within a day or two. He will go to New York State and betake himself to the woods for a few weeks to get away from the worry and bother of the office seekers; and he will probably leave as soon as the settled time arrives, without making any previous announcements. The President wants a period of perfect rest, and does not propose to be followed into his retreat. The office seekers will wake up some morning very soon and find the White House deserted.

The summer exodus from Washington has begun, and the city is preparing for its long summer siesta. Things are already growing inanimate, and a languor has come over the bipeds who still remain in town, which makes them only care to sit still in the shade, holding on by a straw to something cool. L.

B. & L. ASSOCIATIONS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We clip the following from the Northwestern Lumberman, published in Chicago, showing what Building Associations have done for that city. "Building associations have proved a blessing to the people. Many a man in nearly every city and large village in the Union now owns his home, an ownership that is directly traceable to these associations. The problem has been solved that the earnings, if saved and well handled, of the majority of men who work for a salary, or even by the day, will, in a few years, secure them a home. Much of the residence building that is going on in every city is due to the fact that the builders have become members of an association, and are thereby enabled to erect a home of their own: a task that otherwise would have been impossible often. One association in this city has a capital of over $600,000, and the capital of many others is large and growing rapidly. There are at present more than one hundred associations in the city, and with rarely an exception, all are prospering. It is tough on the brokers and bankers, but the people seem to thrive on such co-operative banking decidedly well."

CLEAR THE CURBSTONES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Every town has its scoundrels, the most of which are the libels on manhood who sit around on the curbstones and endeavor to crucify pure, virtuous womanhood as it passes along the street. Squatted on any convenient boomer's resort, they make vile, loathsome remarks about ladies who meet their gaze, ladies whose lives are as much above those of these low scoundrels as an angel of heaven is above Satan. Such excrescences on humanity should be ridden on a rail. On a corner of our postoffice square just such a set of rapscallions was congregated Monday. It is a wonder that the devil himself don't rise up and kick them around four blocks. Be men, remember that your mothers and sisters are women and that you would be quick to resent any such insults to them.

GONE FAR ENOUGH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Discoursing on the celebration of the Fourth at Arkansas City, Saturday's Republican very truthfully remarks: "Drunks were quite frequent all day and by night were very numerous. The drug stores which sold whiskey that day so plentifully should receive attention. Their permits should be taken away from them. It is a disgrace to the town. The Republican has watched the course pursued by some of the drug men under the law. We have closed our eyes to some extent at their indiscretion. It has gone so far now we can't stand by as a champion of prohibition and not say anything. This wholesale way of having 5,000 to 6,000 people sick every month is outrageous. We give all a warning and if you don't want the Republican to fall on you a la Stafford style, stand from under."

MOWERS! MOWERS!!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

We will sell Mowing and Combined Machines, Cultivators, etc., cheaper than ever offered to the farmers. Brotherton Silver.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

BOOTS AND SHOES.

Having purchased Mr. Randolph's interest in the business, and in order to make

room for Fall Goods, I must

REDUCE MY STOCK.

In order to do so, I will make prices so everybody can have a new pair of

SHOES AT COST!

COME AND GET PRICES.

$1.00 SLIPPERS FOR 75 CENTS!

$1.50 SLIPPERS FOR $1.25!

$2.00 SLIPPERS FOR $1.40!

Men's Low Shoes at $1.00 Less than Market Price!

$2.00 BUYS A NOBBY BUTTON LOW SHOE.

Give me a call and I will convince you that I mean just what I say!

M. J. O'MEARA,

3 Doors North of Post Office.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

OUR NEW FEATURE--THE LATEST MARKETS.

Todays' Markets in Chicago and Kansas City.

By Special Telegraph To The Daily Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

CHICAGO, July 15, 2 p.m.

Wheat, cash: 88-1/2. Wheat, August: 89-5/8. Wheat, September: 92.

Corn, cash: 40-3/4. Corn, August: 46-5/8.

KANSAS CITY, July 15, 2 p.m.

Wheat, No. 2 red, cash: 78-1/2. Wheat, No. 2 red, August: 79-1/4.

Corn, cash: 37. Corn, August: 38-1/2.

Hogs: $4.10

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The big boom is commencing in the city of Winfield, though but just felt.

We are bound to have a wonderful boom in the next ninety days: Two railroads, a fool school, a college, a street railway. This must and will make business lively. We predict that the dullest season of the year usually, will be our boom. Let it come. We can fit anybody that comes here. We have business enterprises for the businessman. Educational advantages in the near future that no city in Kansas can surpass. We will have a school in a short time to accommodate anyone that may come among us and proves to be a fool. So mote it be.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Register Soward seems to be taken for a perambulating appraiser, who carries in the apple of his eye every piece of property in Cowley. A letter from Iowa says: "To the Recorder of Cowley County, Kansas. Dear Sir: Please inform us about what the following described property is worth: E ½ of S. W. ¼ 8-35-8 E."

It is situated way down in Cedar township; and the Recorder should not be expected to know anymore about its real value than the man in the moon. Its assessed valuation could be gleaned from the clerk's records, but then you wouldn't have any reliable information.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A number of Beaver township boys had a keg of liquid refreshments shipped in, and came to town yesterday and tapped it. Result: some very full boys and the arrest of Harry Crutcher by the Beaver authorities, and Harry and Rowe Lester, George Kimball, and W. C. Thorp, by this city. It will prove an expensive "bum." They were very thirsty and drank too much at one pull.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Anna Ryan, who has been visiting Mrs. Jas. Burnes for some weeks past, returned to her home in Chicago Monday very much improved in health. Mrs. Burnes and Miss Jennie Ireton will very much miss her, but rejoice at her return to her eastern friends from under the bonds of the illness that relaxed under Kansas' genial atmosphere.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

R. E. Brooking was down from Richland Monday. He will return to Winfield again September first. W. C. Root will fill the building now occupied by Cohn with a big stock of boots and shoes and R. E. will probably be his chief aid-of-camp. W. C., after many years rambling, is satisfied that Winfield is the place for him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The cases of J. C. Fuller against C. W. Izzard et al, to recover promissory note of $200; Leonard Farr vs. Archibald F. McClaren et ux, foreclosure of $3,500 mortgage, and Amos S. Allison, a $25 attachment suit, have been filed in the District Court. The docket already shows one hundred and thirty-seven civil cases. Criminal cases are few so far.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Marshal McFadden and Night Watchmen Glandon and Beck took in the town nocturnally Sunday, raking in six tramps at the S. F. depot and two at the S. K. Six of them were in horrible shape, nearly eaten up by disease and unable to work. They were turned out today and made to "git."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The following is the latest Indian news. It was picked up by George Ostrander, and speaks for itself: "July the 10: dear aunt--rites you A fu lines I got hear at rite peet is goin home in the mornin got skered about the Indins I gess this is al the old man is on the farm Good Bye."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Burden Base Ball Club has invited a number from here to attend its ball at that place Friday evening next. If it is a pleasant evening, a number of couples from here will likely drive over. Burden's hops always excel for true courtesy and enjoyment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The trial of the "Flying Dutchman" of the Commercial, Arthur Fresh, for his wrestle with Lum Callahan, of the Brettun, came off in police court Monday. He got $3 and costs, $11. He immediately made complaint before the County Attorney and had Lum "jerked" again.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Hattie Glotfelter, who took Miss Gary's place in the Register's office during the latter's eastern visit, returned to her home in the Terminus Saturday. She is an accomplished and very pleasant young lady and made friends of all she met while here.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Oxford bridge, which has been approachless and hanging fire for want of funds to repair it, will be put in good shape immediately, according to the Oxford Register. The County Commissioners of Sumner have ordered it done.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Tom Wright and Bob Fleming, a colored boy of eighteen, were brought before Judge Turner by Marshal McFadden and were assessed $7.75 each for pugilism. Tom put up, and the darkey is out of the "jug" on bond.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

W. G. Seaver, the faber propeller of the Dexter Eye, W. E. Meredith, and some other gentleman whose name has slipped through our memory, passed through Monday for Belle Plaine, on D., M. & A. business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Winfield has some very biblical colored folks--King Soloman, Joshua, Simon, and Timothy, and in the way of loyalty we have a George Washington and several Abraham Lincoln's.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

On the 8th of July, at 877 Washington Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois, a son was born to Dr. and Mrs. Byron W. Griffin, well known to the people of Tisdale township.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The townships of Hackney, Elm Grove, and Howard, in Labette County, voted bonds to the D., M. & A. the other day by big majorities.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Arkansas City's new steamer took an excursion party of one hundred and fifty, Thursday, down the river some miles, sailing along elegantly.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

B. F. Wood is on the sick roll.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Ed. Jarvis was at Douglass Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

J. C. Bell came in from Wichita Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

E. G. Roberts was down from Udall Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Harry Hill, of Arkansas City, was here Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

W. E. Phillips, Cherryvale, spent Sunday here.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

H. F. Hicks was over from Cambridge Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

W. H. Sweet was over from Wellington Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

George Bacastow was up from Creswell Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

John C. Long returned Tuesday from a trip to Kansas City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A. Q. Thompson and E. E. Myers were in from Rock Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Father Kelley's mother left for home in Massachusetts Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Ed A. Sackett, from the wicked city of Chicago, is at the Brettun.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mrs. D. A. Millington returned Tuesday from a week's visit in Newton.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Clara Davidson, of Wichita, is visiting with Mrs. A. B. Sykes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Hon. A. J. Pyburn and son, Walter, Arkansas City, visited the Metropolis Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Gussie Hilton, of Cincinnati, is visiting her aunt, Mrs. C. H. Greer.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Captain Nipp is out west looking after the red men and his Ashland interests.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

James Jordan has been on the sick list for several days, but is now improving.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mrs. J. W. Prather has been very sick for several days, but is now improving.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Ten teams passed through here yesterday to go to work on the D., M. & A. railroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. James Rothrock is expected home this week, and Jimmie will be happy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

G. L. Rinker and family left Monday for Lyons, Rice County, to visit relatives.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Freeland are again occupying their pleasant Davis street residence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

H. B. Schuler will commence the erection of the addition to the bank building next week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

W. A. Lee went over to Grenola last Monday for a day's look into his implement house there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Cal Swarts, of Arkansas City, was before the Commissioners Monday as attorney in a Bolton road case.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Misses Mary Bryant and Jennie Lowry returned Saturday from a very pleasant visit with relatives in Illinois.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The firm of O'Meara & Randolph has been dissolved, by mutual consent, Mr. O'Meara continuing the business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Dr. O'Connor farm, in eastern Cowley, 3,000 acres, has changed hands for $20,000: the biggest sale on record this year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

"Mark's" Hackney Happenings sparkle all over this time. As a vigorous, able, and newsy writer, Mark certain excels.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Abe Rosenfield, manager of Brunswick's Arcade Clothing House, Arkansas City, was in the city last Monday, returning from Wellington.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A. Higginbotham, H. J. Gochenor, F. M. Eckard are here. They are all friends of Dr. Wells, and are men of capital. The Doctor thinks they will locate with us.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Gene Wilber, of Rock, returned Monday from Indiana. He reports the crop prospect there was very good, wheat about the same as here. Corn is excellent. Oats and grass fine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Capt. Haight and his corps were surveying the site for the Imbecile Asylum Monday, making a profile of the grounds for architect Ropes. The plans indicate a very fine building.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Leonard Bellemard and Josephine Tessie, he from the Indian Territory and she a Cowley County belle, were granted a certificate on which to ascend the golden ladder of matrimony Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Kuhlman, of the State Normal, who gave an exhibition of Kindergarten work before our Normal Friday, left for Hutchinson Saturday. She was a guest of Miss Mary Berkey while in the city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Will C. Higgins, of the sparkling Udall Sentinel, was in the hub Monday and dropped into THE COURIER den. He is doing much for Udall, and, if his paper is an indication, the people are reciprocating finely.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mary Diehn has made final settlement with the Probate Court in the estate of Lewis Diehn, deceased, and discharged as administratrix. The demand of J. B. Lynn for $25.64 against estate of Jesse Hatfield was allowed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A. V. Wilkinson, the faber man of the Cambridge News, fell into our den Saturday, wearing that same omnibus smile and a dude straw hat. Al don't get into the metropolis often and the many changes and advances are forcibly noted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. J. W. Hall, late of Winfield, who has charge of the loan business of Jarvis, Conklin & Co. for this point, is a jolly good fellow, a good businessman, and our people will like him. We are glad to make his acquaintance. Howard Courant.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The supposition is that George Rembaugh sprained his neck stretching it in looking for H. G. Buford's return. This is what ails him instead of rheumatism. It is somewhat remarkable that this complaint came on about the time Mr. Buford pulled in.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Miss Julia Smith, Mrs. Anna Harter, Master Robert, and "the old man" of the Brettun left Monday for the west. Miss Julia goes to Salt Lake City to visit a brother, Mrs. Harter and son for two months in Manitou, Colorado, and Charley for a week at Dodge City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Col. J. C. McMullen and wife, he a well known banker and capitalist of Winfield, were in the city Saturday. The Colonel is largely interested in stock, and whether there has been great losses or not, he continues to wear a genial smile. Wellingtonian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Medicine Lodge Cresset says, "Frank K. Raymond, of Winfield, was among the 'attorneys' attending our District Court this week." The Cresset should wake up and catch onto the established fact that Frank is one of the leading stenographers of the State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

E. H. Nixon didn't get back from his Fourth at Winfield until Wednesday. His partner, Lou Zenor, recovered from his celebration in just twenty-four hours, and thinks the recuperative properties of our town are evidently superior to Winfield.

Medicine Lodge Cresset.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. R. B. Hanna, of Sheridan, has made glad the heart of THE COURIER with as fine a lot of peaches as were ever raised from the seed. They were Hale's early seedlings, as large as much budded fruit and very luscious. Mr. Hanna has a good orchard of various fruits.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Grant Stafford returned yesterday from Pittsburg, Kansas, where he has been "water bound" for several weeks. The delicate little queen to whom he does obeisance evidently delayed the reconstruction of the bridges. Grant has got a new name for Cupid's darts, "water bound." Webster should have had that.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mayor Schiffbauer, of the Terminus, received a dispatch the other day from U. S. Indian Agent Dyer, at Darlington, asking him to prohibit the merchants of Arkansas City from selling fire arms or ammunition to the Indians. There is a law making this prohibition, and the officers will enforce it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

County Commissioner Irwin left Friday to spend Sunday at home, to return Monday morning. The Board goes over the K. C. & S. W. line the first of the week to condemn the right of way, and with numerous other county business the Commissioners will be in session all this month.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Joel Stewart found a stool of rye upon his farm, says the Douglass Tribune, which produced no less than 111 good, perfect, well filled heads. He did not tell us how many grains the heads averaged, but it is fair to presume that the aggregate will run high up in the tens of thousands, all from one grain of seed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Thomas Cretser, a brother-in-law of J. F. Beck, died at the resident of Mr. Beck on South Manning street, Thursday morning. He had been sick for about one year with lung trouble. He came here last March from Ohio, and was thirty-three years old. The remains were interred Friday at 2 p.m.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mrs. Della Derusha has filed an action in the District Court against the city for $5,000 damages for injuries sustained in being thrown from Wickham's delivery wagon in crossing the deep ditch across Millington street, near J. S. Mann's. She presented her claim to the City Council and it was rejected. Dalton & Madden are her attorneys. She was seriously bruised about the head and shoulders, and claims that her mental faculties were injured.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings as Gisted by the Scribes of the Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

BAPTIST CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

There was a large attendance yesterday morning. The usual announcements for the week, after which the morning lesson from John vi:5 was read in concert. After this the pastor, Rev. J. H. Reider, preached a very able and eloquent discourse from the 54th and 55th verses of the same chapter. He mentioned the essentials of man's existence as meat and drink and spoke of the body and blood of Christ. "Whoso eateth my blood hath eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day, for my flesh is meat indeed and my blood is drink indeed." His application was most happy and the quotations well timed. The speaker impressed the congregation that they must act as well as talk; that gifts along were not sufficient, but the heart must be right and in unison with God. The great help of spiritual food was spoken of at length. How it strengthens us and pulls us through the troubles of life. The consolation of God's blessed word was referred to. At the close of the sermon, the Lord's supper was partaken of.

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

Elder Myer's morning sermon was based on the first clause of Deut. Vi:7: "And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children: Theme: "The Sunday school as a means of church work." The Sunday school is one of the strongest adjuncts to church work. It is the foundation of christianity--the starting of the young in the path of truth and religion. It is the planting of the seed that will develop into mighty men and women. Seed properly planted in the human mind can never be eradicated. The Sunday School is not above home teaching, but it brings about associations which embrace those whose homes are never entered by the light of the bible--where the name of God is never worshipfully mentioned. The responsibility of the church member in bringing in such is great. One-third of the children of Winfield, for all our Sunday schools are crowded, never attend. They must be brought in and taught the facts in God's word--the story of Christ, the right and wrong. The biblical ignorance of some church members is amazing. We want more study of the bible and less of Sunday school lesson leaves, with but a few verses of scripture on them. We want less indifference in our church members--less of the conquest of Satan's agents. Bring your bibles to Sunday school and have faith--faith in God, faith in the child, and faith in the fitness of christianity for the child. You thus assume and carry forward a grand work: one that will live on and on forever.

The pulpit of this church in the evening was filled by Rev. B. Kelly, of the M. E. church, who preached an eloquent and forcible sermon from Eph. iii:15.

THE A. M. E. CHURCH.

Our reporter dropped in on the A. M. E. church Sunday evening. Sunday was the occasion of the quarterly meeting, Presiding Elder B. F. Watson, of Leavenworth, conducting. He is a marked minister among his race, of fine physique, clear and voluminous voice, and great zeal. He shows a polish excelled by few of the Anglo race. He preached a very forcible sermon from the eleventh chapter of John. He doesn't believe in the christianity that is prompted only by a fear of hell. He has faith only in that religion whose fountain head is in the fact that God first loved us--that prompted by a love for the Divine and the elevation of humanity.

UNITED BRETHREN CHURCH.

The morning being somewhat disagreeable, prevented the attendance of a good many at the Sabbath School and other services; yet the day passed off pleasantly. The pastor announced the quarterly meeting for the coming Sabbath, preaching to begin Friday evening, Elder Parks presiding. Subject for the morning sermon, founded upon Rev. 19:10, was "The true object of worship." All mankind have ever believed in some object and form of worship. Man has been called a religious animal since the tendency to worship is the distinguishing trait separating man from the balance of animal creation around him. The worshiper assimilates with the character and likeness of the object he worships. This was shown by historical illusion to the nations worshiping Gods of cruelty and war, etc. That the God of the bible is the only true object of worship, was shown by many reasons. The christian is the highest type of manhood. Culture, civilization, virtue, and philanthropy belongs to the christian nation. The God of the bible is the only being whose character and government and laws command the love, admiration, and obedience of the highest intelligence. It is our duty to recognize God and give Him our worship. We are dependent upon Him. He calls for our worship. Our peace and safety are suspended upon obedience to His will. Our future salvation and well-being depend upon it. We can and should worship Him. By prayer for His guidance and protection; by accepting and clinging to His promises; by the careful study of His will as revealed in His word. The subject was illustrated with a view to fit it upon the mind and so produce a profitable hearing.

THE NORMAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Normal numbers one hundred and seventy-five Tuesday. Still they come and more to follow.

The city is full of school marms now, with their books under their arms. It reminds us forcibly of by-gone days when we were a school marm and used the rod. The Normal is progressing exceedingly well. The conductors and instructors are doing good work. Mr. Limerick, our efficient County Superintendent, understands his business fully, and Prof. Wilkinson, the conductor, stands high as an educator.

On account of legal business at the Court House, the Normal convened at the Christian Church. A general exercise was given. Prof. Wilkinson gave a very interesting and instructive lecture on the effects of Alcohol and Narcotics, after which the members adjourned to the class rooms in the Central school building, to recite on school organization and management. The late arrivals embrace quite a large number of experienced teachers, some of whom are recent arrivals from other states, who take this opportunity to acquaint themselves with Kansas school work and school workers.

ODD FELLOWS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The following are the officers installed by the District Deputy Grand Master, J. H. Vance, at the last meeting of the I. O. O. F., to serve for the ensuing term.

George D. Headrick, N. G.; Jos. O'Hare, V. G.; J. M. Reed, R. S.; J. P. Stewart, P. S.; S. J. Hepler, T.; W. H. Dawson, R. S. N. G.; A. Snowhill, L. S. N. G.; J. W. Chancey, W.; M. B. Shields, Con.; Samuel Dalton, C.; M. Hahn, L. S. S.; A. B. Taylor, R. S. V. G.; Walter Harris, L. S. V. G.; Wm. Palmer, L. G., H. C. Callison, O. G.

The Lodge is one of the best in the State, as is proven by its financial condition. The trustees have secured the upper story of the new Morehouse building for a term of five years, which will be fitted up especially for lodge purposes. Mr. J. H. Vance, the financial manager of the institution, is entitled to much credit for his management of the affairs of the Lodge.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Things are getting mighty sultry around the offices of the Wellington Press and Wellingtonian. Allison calls the Press "The Evening Diaper," and Stotler retorts by calling the Wellingtonian "The Abortion." Both should take a long, tearful sitting on the stool of repentance. It will never do to fire choel at each other like that. Bridge the bloody chasm; keep down thine ire! The weather itself is near enough like hades.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Elk Falls Tribune, voicing the disappointment of the Elk base ball club because it couldn't inflict the contest game between itself and our Cyclones with an unprincipled umpire, fires a half column of the thinnest gush at our boys. It is too thin for notice, a pack of lies formulated by disappointment at not scoring over our club as they did Burden's. They struck baseballists here that were eye openers to them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

E. A. Henthorn, Burden's elongated banker, was in the hub Saturday. He is shorn of his auburn tresses, his summer moustache is much more perceptible to the touch than the sight, and he carries around under his arm a ghostly aspect.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Blackberries and Cream at Tisdale July 21st. The ladies of the M. E. Church hold an Ice Cream and Blackberry Festival at Tisdale Tuesday evening at Bourdette's Hall. Come everybody and bring your folks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Cyclones have caught on to the inconsiderate "cuss" who plowed up their grounds. The party did it without knowledge of the consequences and is ready for compromise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

At a special meeting of the City Council, this afternoon, the twenty thousand dollars, voted by the city a few weeks ago, was subscribed to the capital stock of the D., M. & A.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. J. O. Taylor and son, George, after a month's absence in Kentucky, returned Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The cupola on the M. E. Church is up. A new bell will be put in as soon as completed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

You can buy a Brussels Carpet at fifty cents a yard at M. Hahn & Co.'s.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

P. H. Albright & Co. loan on farm property on 2, 3, 4, and 5 years' time, and on city property, 1, 2, and 3 years' time. They have $50,000 they would like to loan during the month of July.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Jim Hill is looking down in the mouth. Sad, sad! He says "the old man and the old woman and the kid have gone." Queer Jim, that.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Holiness folks hold a camp meeting at Oxford, beginning on the 29th inst. M. L. Haney will have charge.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

For loans on real estate at as low rates as can be had in the county, call at the Farmers' Bank.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The officers and surveying party of the Kansas City & S. W. R. R. are in and around town.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Perhaps everyone don't know it, but we have a menagerie in town, located on North Main next to the Lindell. A woman is running it. There is the boa-constrictor just getting ready to shed its skin. The lady handles this slimy monster with as much indifference as the reporter would a toothpick. She pets it and caresses it, while it keeps its forked tongue in constant motion. She has other animals, and take it all in all, it is worth seeing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Board of County Commissioners went up to Richland Tuesday to condemn the right of way for the Kansas City & Southwestern railroad. The road is graded to within four miles of Floral and camps of graders are scattered thick along the line. About fifty tents are pitched on M. C. Headrick's place. It looks like a small army encampment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A druggist of Anthony cow hided the editor of the Enterprise of that city the early part of the week. The druggist took exception to an article in said paper wherein the editor alleged that said druggist sold whiskey through his soda fountain. Our reporter is a perambulating arsenal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Lum Callahan has had Arthur Fresh, the "flying Dutchman," arrested for provoking him, by "words, signs, and gestures," to make an assault on the latter. The trial was set for today. Callahan, for mashing the flyer's face, the other night, plead guilty and paid $10.25.

OUR SCHOOL MA'AMS.

A Complete List of Those in Attendance to Date--About 150.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The attendance of the County Normal Institute has reached its zenith and below we present a complete list of those in attendance.

A. GRADE.

Bradshaw, J. C.; Caton, Julia L.; Fuller, Oliver P.; Haughey, F. E.; Littell, W. B.; Norton, H. G.; Norton, S. W.; Overman, S. F.; Owen, H. A.; Roberts, Chas. W.; Wallace, H. S.; Elder, Fred S.; Bliss, Celina.

B. GRADE.

Beach, Cora; Brengle, Jennie; Chapin, Mrs. Amy; Combs, Villa; Crane, Iva; Daniels, Hattie; Davenport, Clara; Hite, Lucy F.; Howland, Emma S.; Howard, Lida; Hutchison, Libbie; Kephart, Zoe; Kinney, Maggie; Kuhn, Anna; Mark, Anna; Manser, Mary; Martin, Kate A.; McKee, Erma L.; Miller, Mary E.; Pearson, Maud M.; Phelps, Laura; Plunket, Carrie A.; Randall, Mary; Robertson, Anna; Pixley, Josie; Smith, John R.; Stansbury, Maggie; Stark, E. W.; Strong, Lida; Taylor, Lida; Utley, Hattie; Warren, J. W.; Wheeler, Allie; Wrigle, W. F.; Wing, Alfred.

B. 2ND GRADE.

Augerman, W. E.; Baker, T. J.; Brown, Hattie; Campbell, Lizzie; Clover, W. P.; Craddock, W. F.; Cronk, M. A.; Dalgarn, Mollie; Davis, Mary E.; Garrett, E. M.; Garret, W. H.; Hensen, Nannie; Holland, Edith, Ireton, Jennie; King, Julia; Krow, Viola; Lycan, Emma; Olmstead, Bertha; Page, Belle; Reynolds, Eva; Rowe, J. F.; Stevenson, John; Taylor, Millie A.; Turner, Minnie F.; Whitson, Geo. C.; Wilkins, Lottie; Bryan, Harvey; Johnston, Ella; Maddox, P. E.; Mason, J. W.; Lyle, Lillie D.; Arnett, M. R.

C. GRADE.

Abrams, Sarepta; Anderson, E. M.; Anderson, Nettie; Badley, Ellen J.; Burger, John; Bertram, Belle; Bush, Belle; Baker, Annie; Barnell, Clara; Cochran, Jennie; Doty, Willis; Frederick, C. A.; George, Estella; Goodrich, Cora; Greer, Mary; Gant, Lizzie; Gillett, S. E.; Howland, John; Honnold, Geo.; Hunt, Marian; Honnold, Lena; Holland, W. B.; Hunt, Ida; Iry, Minnie; Ireton, Jennie; Jacobus, N. V.; Johnson, Henry; Kerr, Joseph; Kyger, Edgar; Myers, Aggie; McDorman, Fannie; Maddux, J. W.; Merydith, Metta; Mabee, Rosa; Mabee, Oscar; Miller, Alice; Nichols, Jessie; Nichols, Belle; O'Neil, Lizzie; Plank, Nettie; Provine, Jno. J.; Rittenhouse, Mattie; Robertson, Josie; Race, Etta; Roseberry, Carrie; Rice, Ettie; Robertson, J. E.; Rogers, Alma; Smith, Dora; Singleton, Joe; Stafford, M. S.; Sumpter, Flora; Stevenson, Ettie; Shephard, Julia; Stewart, J. W.; Taylor, Mary; Tinsley, Maud; Vanorsdol, Mattie; Victor, Mattie; Weimer, Anna; Walton, Lillie; Young, Effie.

THE BREAD RETURNS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

One cold night last winter John Wagoner and a fellow pilgrim pulled into the Brettun a "busted community" and sought the hospitality of landlord Hill. Jim took in the situation, his heart gave a great big beat for the unfortunates, and he gave them supper, bed, and breakfast, and started them off in the morning with a silver dollar. Having cast his bread upon the waters, he saw and thought of them no more until this afternoon, when a hardy looking toiler entered the Brettun and confronted him thusly: "Do you remember two fellows you gave a boost one night last winter?" Jim though a moment and said he believed he did. "Well, I have thought about your kindness many times. It was the first time I was ever clear down. I have prospered since, live in Cedarvale, and am here to reciprocate your kindness," and out came a ten dollar bill. It was John Wagoner, and it done one's soul good to see with what pleasure he showed his manliness and appreciation of a good turn. Jim only accepted the dollar in cash he had given them. This is a rare circumstance and shows that sometimes a very manly heart is found under a bundle of rags or in the neighborhood of an empty pocket.

THAT STEAMER AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

In mentioning the new steamer of the Arkansas River Navigation company, "Kansas Millers," the A. C. Republican says: "In traveling the steamer averages about seven miles per hour on the Arkansas. It has been practically demonstrated that small boats can run on the river to this point. We will now have a southern outlet. Barges will be built and the steamer will soon be towing great cargos of flour down to the "tooth-pick." For a time the steamer will be used as an excursion boat until the steel barges are built. Fred Barrett will be in command and Capt. Barnes will be the pilot. All the way up the river the "Kansas Millers" made the best time of any craft. Sand bars were no hindrance. Capt. Moorhead tells us that any sand bar he ran onto, he was able to go across or back off. It was impossible to stick the steel bottomed steamer. He was 20 days in traveling 1791 miles, the distance by river from St. Louis to Arkansas City."

[Note. I have many questions concerning the articles printed by the Arkansas City papers and the Winfield papers concerning this particular steamer and those who operated it. MAW]

1) "Kansas Millers" or "Kansas Miller"--I have seen both. When first written about, it was called "Kansas Millers" inasmuch as the millers of Winfield and Arkansas City gathered together to get it built. Therefore, I have tried to change this to "Kansas Millers" when I could.

2) I have seen Morehead, Moorhead, and Moorehead listed as the Captain. (I have no idea which of these spellings is correct.) I made no changes in spelling by individual newspapers.

3) I have seen "Clark" and "Clarke" listed as an engineer on boat. I am positive that "Clarke" is correct.

4) I have seen "V. M. Ayres" and "V. M. Ayers" used. I have changed all of these to "V. M. Ayres" as I believe that was the correct spelling of this flour miller in Arkansas City.

SUMMARY. I have been either consistently correct or incorrect in changes I made.

LET US EXCURT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

If the Arkansas River Navigation Company are good schemers and want to advertise themselves and Cowley County, they will get up an excursion down the Arkansas for the Cowley County editors and their wives and sweethearts. The cost would be small, the ride on the steamer, "Kansas Millers," very pleasant, and the newspaper men would all turn out, witness the practical test, and give the enterprise a big boom. Put in your oars, boys. The navigation company merely need the matter suggested to them. We are certain the invitation will be forthcoming. To properly write up such an enterprise, the reporter must be there, you know.

A QUEER RESULT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Uncle Johnny Roberts sowed nine acres of wheat and timothy last fall. A peck and a half of wheat was drilled to the acre and one peck of timothy. The latter was put in the timothy attachment of the drill and sowed in right after the wheat. This spring the timothy began to loom and killed the wheat entirely out, leaving only here and there a little cheat. Uncle Johnny's idea was that the timothy would just get a good start by harvest; he would then head the wheat and get later on a crop of timothy. The timothy made over two tons to the acre.

BIG FIRE AT MULVANE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Fred Blackman, electricity manipulator at the Santa Fe, pumps from the wire the fact that Mulvane had a big blaze Saturday night. It started in the back of a meat market, and having no facilities for extinguishment, consumed all the buildings adjoining each other in its vicinity--a furniture store, a dry goods store, two general merchandise stores, and other buildings. About half the business buildings of the place succumbed. The loss foots up largely.

SCOUNDRELLY DEVILS.

For Whom a Dose of Cowhide, Tar, and Feathers and Forty Miles on a Rail

Would Be a Slight Punishment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Every town has a few sneaking whelps, but to think that Winfield, the general character of whose people is the pride of every inhabitant, contained such low, despicable whelps as Sunday proved her to be, will be a matter of deep chagrin to all. Constanzer & Co., butchers, next to J. S. Mann's store, discovered this morning that some revengeful devil had driven three beeves, all S.& Co. had in their pen, into the "shute" early in the night, knocked them in the head, and left they lying where they fell. The beeves for Kraft & Dix, Whiting Bros., and Constanzer & Co. are all slaughtered at the same place, by John Cochrane. The other pens had cattle in them also, but were not disturbed. The slaughter house was broken into and the broad-ax, used by Cochrane for slaughtering, procured to do the deed with. Two of the animals were cows and one a young heifer, the three worth a hundred dollars. This trick is one of the most damnable, and could have been done by no one better than brutes. C. & Co., can trace no object but personal spleen. They advertised in Friday's DAILY to reduce beef steak to ten cents. Beeves on foot had fallen to $2.50 and $2.75 per cwt., and they could afford this. The tracks show two men, one with a long, slim shoe, and the other bare-footed. Sheriff McIntire has the matter in hand and will develop the villains if it can be done. No punishment would seem inadequate in such a case.

THE WHITE MURDER AGAIN.

A Preliminary Examination Fails to Develop Any New Facts.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

At first R. H. White, in the bastille charged with the brutal murder of his wife, Julia Ann, was undecided as to whether or not he would wave preliminary examination, and had the matter put off. When his brother came on, arrangements were made to get $600 for the defense. Then a preliminary hearing was instituted and began before Judge Snow yesterday, with County Attorney Asp prosecuting, and Jennings & Troup and McDermott & Johnson for the defense. No new facts have been introduced. The evidence is almost verbatim to that published from time to time in THE COURIER and which has become trite to the public. There was a difference in the testimony of Doctors Emerson and Graham, regarding the flat iron. Dr. Emerson thought the wound was undoubtedly produced by the iron, while Dr. Graham thought this very improbable. W. C. Allen, representative of Johnson County, who is visiting in this county, was introduced and testified as to the good character of White and his family when he knew them, a few years ago. The trial is still in progress and will not be decided before tomorrow. White waived the jury in his trial.

A CLOSE CALL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

J. W. Henthorn, of the Burden Eagle, came very near laying himself up on the "dead galley" the other day. Already feeling unwell, by sitting in the hot sun witnessing a base ball game, he became exhausted--got a slight sunstroke. Arriving home, he was full of pain and, unable to sleep, took a dose of morphine. He knew an eighth of a grain to be a dose, but thought to nearly double it, and poured out all there was in the paper, which proved to be about three grains. Sleep failed to come and he started for the office, but on the way the drug began to get in its terrible work and he fell into Dr. Newman's office, where antidotes were speedily applied. He was hauled into the Odd Fellows Hall, thumped, shook, talked to, horse-whipped, and drenched with strong coffee for five hours. Life was on a balance, and it appeared to all that the desire to sleep would overcome the effort to keep off the "grim monster." Relief finally came, and after being kept awake twenty hours longer, refreshing sleep enabled him to tell the story. It was an extremely close call to the land where "forms" are "justified" for the last time, where no "devil" yells for "copy," and no delinquent subscribers ever infringe their ghostly presence. With J. W., we rejoice that his "case" was "pied" and himself again "set" among the "live matter." He will do for many sparkling "issues" yet.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Reed & Robinson to E. H. Wilson, e ½, ne ¼ 2-33-4-e: $1,200

John E. Maybee et ux to Barney Shriver, lots 2, 3, and 4. 18-32-73-38e: $1,800

E. A. Johnson and husband, T. K. to Annette Beeney, tract in sec. 11-28-32-4e,8 acres: $1

Jno. G. Evans et ux to H. H. Hosmer, lots 10, 11, and 12, blk 18, H. P. ad to Winfield: $300

George Hoosick et ux to Wm. Dobbs, lots 3 ½ n ne, lot 4 nw, ¼, 31, 32, 4e-6 a: $50

David Mantz et ux to Emanuel Klauser, lots 7, 8, and 9, blk 230, Fullers ad. to Winfield: $750

John Wallace et ux to James W. Oliver, 18 ft of lot 6, blk 3, Dexter: $42

A. B. Taylor to Jno. G. Evans, lots 1, 2, 3, 10, 11, and 12, blk 18, H. P. addition to Winfield: $625

Albert A. Newman et ux to Chas. D. Burroughs, lots 27 and 28, blk 83, Arkansas City: $1,000

Henry G. Baily et ux to Newell Pond, lots 9 and 10, blk 146, Ark. City: $120

William L. Houghton et ux to Jas. C. Topliff, lots 17 and 18, blk 52, A. C.: $83

J. H. Hoffman et ux to Martha J. Hand, lots 11 and 12, blk 98, A. C.: $800

James Topliff to Chas. Murry, lot 3, blk 61, A. C.: $50

Saml Gohn et ux to R W Handy, e hf sw qr 5-33-4-e: $1,150

Thos D Lewis to B F Baldwin, pt 21, 32-4-e q c: $10

Hiram D. Kellogg to Wm. M. Sleeth, lots 21 and 22, blk 99, A. C., q c: $364

Emma Thomas and husband to Louisa Sebastian, lots 7 and 8, blk 134, A. C.: $650

Cyrus M Scott to Isaac W Stamper, lot 25, blk 133, A. C.: $30

A. D. Speed et ux to J C McMullen, lot 6 blk 128, Winfield: $4,000

Cambridge Town Co. to Elisha H Lane, pt of sw qr se qr 28-32-7e: $600

W R Rogers et ux to Martha Rogers, lots 7 and 8, blk 55, A. C.: $1,500

Lafayette McLaughlin et al to M M Cooper, lots 15 and 16, blk 29, A. C.: $30

Cambridge Town Co. to S. B. Sherman, pt of sw qr se qr and sec 28 and of nw qr ne qr 33-32-7e: $50

Nannie J Cease and husband to B W Matlack, ne qr 20-30-6e q-c: $500

Wm P Lanigor et ux to State of Kansas, pt 15-35-4 e: $1,400

Cambridge Town Co. to Mc D Stapleton, lot 6, blk 10, Cambridge: $25

Chas H Sweet et ux to Hannah E Canine, lot 3, blk 96, Winfield: $200

George M. Moore et ux to John A Moore, lot 4 and sw qr nw qr 2-38-4e, q c: $1

Elizabeth O'Connor to Byron R O'Connor w hf sec 28 and e hf and sw qr and e hf nw qr sec 29 and 27 lots in 39-32-8-e: $20,000

Myron M Mee et ux to George Mee, hf lots 24 and 25 10-30-8 e and lots 4, 5, 10, 11 19-30-8e: $2,000

Rufus L McDonald et ux to F S Jennings w hf lots 1, 2, and 3, blk 31, Udall: $1,600

Elias T Williams to Z T Whitson, 60 a off e s se qr 12-33-3e: $3,000

Norman Hall et ux to I H Larison, e hf sw qr 29-34-7e: $712

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. "MARK."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Three Kentucky friends of Zack Whitson's are making headquarters with him while they pursue their vocation of threshermen in this section.

The wheat crop, judging from harvesting machine evidence, will average from light to lighter, while the yield of cheat promises from good to better.

The writer trusts that "Peddle," of your e. c., will be able to make the riffle this time and once more plant his avoirdupois in some backwoods school room arm chair, as a target for paper wads and wry faces.

This locality is well represented at the Normal--so far as attendance is concerned--in the persons of Myron Cronk, Mrs. Amy Chapin, Mr. E. M. and Miss Nettie Anderson, Miss Edith and Bob Holland, and Miss Carrie Roseberry.

After a lapse of three weeks, "Mark" again finds time to take up the faber and chronicle some of the passing events of this vicinity. During this protracted silence he occupied a reserved seat on a Deering binder the greater portion of the time.

The senior editor will yet win laurels as a weather prognosticator. July, from present indications, bids fair to fulfill his predictions of some three weeks ago. We may be obliged to beg of him to cease his prophesying until after stacking time.

Friday night Miss Allie Harbaugh was taken down sick again with the second attack of her malady. She was just nicely recovering from a long and serious siege of illness and her many friends deeply sympathize with her and trust she may speedily recover.

With the exception of a few scattering patches of oats, harvesting in this section is completed. A soaking ran Saturday morning prevented the tying up of the remainder of the oat crop last week. There never was a heavier crop of this cereal raised in this section.

Yesterday Mr. Samuel Watt met with an accident that nearly proved fatal. In lowering his threshing machine, the binder attachment, weighing over four hundred pounds, fell on his back, disabling him completely. The strength of two men was required to lift him in a wagon in which he was taken home from the field of his neighbor, J. C. Snyder. At present he is in a precarious condition and suffering agonizing pain.

We were highly pleased with J. F. Martin's article "To the merchants" in a late issue of THE DAILY. It was a timely article on a very appropriate subject, and it is to be hoped that its publication will cause a reformation among merchants generally, that will redound to the benefit and comfort of their customers of the fair sex, and the masculine also. J. F. is a clear thinker and vigorous writer on whatever his pen traces. He might have suggested, by way of parenthesis, the erection of a few more suitable hitching racks, for the securing of teams. The "city dads" might immortalize themselves by repealing some of their pet ordinances and adopting more practical measures, which would have a more beneficent effect on public patronage that is so necessary to the city's prosperity.

The fact that the senior editor has recently been advocating the transformation of wheat to chess or cheat is enough to convince one that his powerful mental forces are certainly losing their equilibrium. No intelligent, sane person is these days of scientific research and demonstration will advocate such fogyistical doctrines of the dark ages. The astonishing prolificness of cheat makes it possible for a very small amount to abundantly seed a wheat field under favorable conditions: one grain producing from six hundred to a thousand and upwards. Of course, to those who disbelieve that cheat propagates itself from its own matured see, there is no reason in argument. The fact that cheat seed does germinate, grow, and mature seed, under favorable circumstances, precludes the necessity of a transformation of another grain for its appearance. If the cereal, wheat, has been brought to its present condition of perfection by a process of evolution, as claimed by some would-be philosophers, through subordinate stages of growth in the shape of cheat and other subdivisions of the grass family, why does not the seeding of cheat produce wheat as naturally as the latter reverts to the former?

While making a call one evening this week on our esteemed friend and neighbor, J. C. Snyder, your reporter enjoyed the pleasure of glancing through Mr. Snyder's scrap-book of poems, and noticed some selections from his pen when editor of the Illinois Kuozoman. J. C. is a graduate of Abingdon (Illinois) college, class of 1876, and is a thinker and writer of no inferior ability. The following stanzas on the "Dish-rag and the new Machine" is good enough to be reproduced for the edification of THE COURIER readers.

Put away the dish-rag, Lizzie, you need not use it more,

I've a new invented washer, outside the kitchen door.

While you've been washing dishes for years the same old way,

Some smarter person's studied up a new dish-washing tray.



Where'd I get it? That's like you, Liz, you know they have a store.

In the village where we trade the most, from here a mile or more,

Where all the new improvements, that are made to help along

The men folks and the women folks, are sold--yes, for a song.



Yes, bought it for you to try, Lizzie, and see if it would do,

So get the dishes ready and we'll pass the dishes through.

We'll see how 'twill work for us, and if it does things well,

It'll help along your work so much, and give you a resting spell.



Now pour the water in here, and put your dishes--so,

That's it. Just see how splendidly the new machines does go.

Oh, Lizzie! Ain't it glorious, just see what little slight

It takes to make the dishes come out so clean and white!



Why didn't someone years ago get up these cogs and chains?

Or didn't they have the energy--or did they lack the brains?

It's simple how it does its work, and how nicely it is made.

It will pay for itself in a little while, I ain't a bit afraid.



The world is growing wiser, Lizzie, while we grow old and gray;

And what we done by hand when young, machinery does today.

We're getting weak, and now we'll prize them in their teens,

For they're the ones that's doing good, by inventing "new machines."



The way we used to do the work, made the years go slowly by;

But now we have machinery, which causes time to fly.

We're nearing the Saturday night of life, and it somehow seems to me,

Those dishes on the table there, "ain't" as white as our robes will be.

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. Lewis Mantz is having a barn put up.

The prospects for corn at present is splendid.

Mrs. J. A. Rucker spent Thursday with Mrs. Fred Arnold.

A wagon load of young folks at B. D. Thomas' Sunday evening.

Miss Lucy Paugh has been visiting in this section for a week past.

Farmers will get their grain all stacked this week if the rains do not hinder.

Mr. and Mrs. Kadau, of Winfield, spent Sunday with Mrs. Kadau's brother, Mr. Wm. Schwantes.

Mr. Robert Weakly and daughter-in-law, and Mrs. Lon Bryant took tea with Mrs. J. A. Rucker, July 7.

Rev. Knight preached at Bethel Sunday evening. Not quite so many out as usual. Do better next time, friends.

Uncle Bob Weakly's boys are busy now plowing for wheat. The rest of the farmers must wait until their stacking is done.

Uncle Joe Harrell has put up several stacks of wheat and is not done yet. He is a boss stacker, and that is what every man is not. Frank and "Ize" Weakly think they are hard to beat.

ARKANSAS CITY. "FRITZ."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Bacon, of Wyandotte, are visiting relatives and friends in the city.

Arkansas City has the "boss" base ball club, but Winfield takes the cake for an umpire.

It cost Capt. Burrell nine dollars to get drunk and chop a man's nose off. It cost two boys six dollars each to toss a base ball two or three times. If consistency is a jewel, our police judge is a first water diamond.

On Sunday afternoon William Gray, who has for years been a victim of the dread disease, consumption, succumbed to the great destroyer. His funeral was preached from the Baptist pulpit at 10 o'clock Monday morning.

The new steamer made several trips up and down the river last Sunday, carrying crowds of excursionists. This desecration of the Sabbath was severely denounced from the pulpit Sunday morning by Rev. Fleming and should be frowned on and discouraged by everyone.

The ex-school master and noted politician of the fourth ward seems to be about as anxious to get rid of some of our city officers as he was to secure their election, if we may judge from the meeting he called for Friday evening. In this desire he is not alone, although there are some doubts as to the propriety of his giving the ball the first kick, and yet if the learned professor desires to leave the mug-wump ranks and identify himself with the interests of the city, it would be a shame to discourage him. And then he may want to become City Attorney, who knows? But let it begin when it may, there is the most urgent need of reform in our city government. There is hardly a day passes that some of our city ordinances are not openly and shamefully violated, and if perchance the offender is brought before the bar of justice (?) it is very often only to find that through the ignorance of our officers the ordinance is worthless.

We have as good a city marshal as there is in the State, but the ignorance and stupidity of the City Attorney and the Police Judge make justice a myth in our police court. Besides this, there are things that demand the attention of our county officers. No one with good horse sense believes that it is necessary for each one of six or seven drug stores to fill from 300 to 500 statements for intoxicating liquors each month in order to keep our people in a good state of health. If the druggists filling the number of statements don't believe it is actually necessary for them to do so, they ought to be "pulled" for the violation of the law, and if they do deem it necessary to dispense that much whiskey, they have not judgment enough to be trusted with the sale of the liquor, and Judge Gans should look after their permits. It is a sad fact that Arkansas City is fast losing her fair reputation, and yet her citizens sit quietly by and see these things go on and multiply under their very noses without so much as making an effort to suppress them. These evils should be crushed in their incipiency and not allowed to go unrestrained until they assume such proportions that it would be almost impossible to eradicate them.

STAR VALLEY. "DUFFY."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The corn is growing very rapidly. The frequent showers of late are bringing it out of the kinks.

Mr. Travis has a new windmill. That is right, Mr. Travis, give the gentle Kansas zephyrs something to do.

John Wilson would be a daisy wheat stacker if he did not run out of wheat before he got his stack finished.

Mahlon Fatout is stacking his wheat.

The harvesting is all done with the exception of a few pieces of oats.

Mahlon Fatout hauled the first load of new wheat out of the valley, for which he received 65 cents per bushel at Udall.

R. S. McGuire has a strong desire for "Merry Mattocks," judging from the way he went home from Sunday school last Sunday.

John Jones, who has been working for James Walker, has shaken the dust of Cowley from his pedals and departed for climes unknown.

Considerable wheat has been threshed here, which yielded from twelve to eighteen bushels per acre, where from twenty to twenty-five bushels was expected.

Joe Beaver, Ben Lane, Wooden Maddox, and Cora and Mattie Lane took a trip to the Arkansas river for plums last Saturday. The result was no plums, a good wetting, and muddy clothes.

Geo. Wilson and wife came in from Ashland last Friday to wait for the Indian scare to subside a little. Mrs. Wilson was not very badly frightened, but Geo. was so awfully scared that he came off without a coat.

The refugees from the Indian scare began to come in last week, with Mrs. C. H. Eagin in the lead, Charles coming two days later in company with Mr. and Mrs. George Wilson. Charles H. Eagin and family returned to their home in Pratt Center last Monday, while Mr. and Mrs. Wilson will remain a few days longer, visiting friends and relatives.

SPECIAL RATES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

D. L. Kretsinger, Secretary and General Manager of the Cowley County Fair; also Secretary of the Southern Kansas Fair Circuit, returned yesterday from a visit with the Santa Fe and Southern Kansas Railroad companies regarding special rates of passenger and freight fare for the fall meetings of the Circuit, embracing the counties of Cowley, Sumner, Harper, Kingman, and Sedgwick. We are glad to note the success of Mr. Kretsinger's visit. The Santa Fe makes one and one-third rate on passenger fare, good from Florence west, and Hutchinson east--including intermediate points to Caldwell and Arkansas City. For stock and articles for exhibition, full fare from any point on the line of road to place of exhibition, and return is free. The Southern Kansas makes one and one-third passenger rate, good from Cherryvale west to end of road, including all intermediate points. Stock and articles for exhibition, full fare from any point on line of road, and return free. The "Frisco Line" and Fort Scott & Wichita are yet to be seen; but of course will fall into line with the other roads. This is the first time our railroads have done anything for Southern Kansas Fairs and we know our people will feel grateful for this recognition. Krets is also entitled to the thanks of the Circuit for the determined and energetic way in which he has worked the matter up. Look out for big crowds for our Circuit Fair meetings this fall.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Eagle reporter, speaking of Gen. Phil. Sheridan, who came down the road yesterday, says: "He is yet hale and hearty, but his close-cropped hair is iron gray and his step has lost much of its wonted elasticity. Years are beginning to tell on the great raider."

Our Mrs. M. came down on the same train and had a better chance to observe the General than did the Eagle reporter. She says that he showed all the elasticity and vigor of motion of a man in the full meridian of his powers at forty-five, in good health and flesh, fairly rounded, smooth in face, and had no appearance of being more than forty-five except his iron gray moustache and short hair of same color. It will be some time yet before years begin to tell on him. May long life and high honors be the meed of the hero of the Shenandoah.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Senator Hackney left Monday for Erie, Neosho County, to defend Frankie Morris, the woman arrested here a few weeks ago charged with killing her mother for her life insurance. The trial begins tomorrow.

TRAVELERS' YARNS.

Twenty-two Years Wandering in African Wilds.

Skippers Who Have Been to the North Pole Without Seeing Ice.

Inventing a Tribe of Negroes and Making a Language for Them.

[Compiled from Various Sources.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A few months ago a gentleman who introduced himself as the Marchese Maurizlo de Buonfanti suddenly appeared in Brussels and announced that he had just returned from Africa, after making the longest and most remarkable journey on record. He asserted that for twenty-two years he had been wandering among the fanatical tribes of the Sahara Desert and through the populous negro countries south of it, and that in all his wanderings he had had no news from the civilized world and had not seen a single white man except his companion, an American named Dr. Van Flint, who had been with him throughout the journey. He said they left Tripoli on April 1st, 1861, and endeavored to explore Adamaua, but were frustrated by the same tribes that recently defeated the expedition of Flegel. They then ascended the middle course of the Niger about 1,000 miles to Timbuctoo, and concluded their many years of wandering by traveling through the kingdoms of Tombo, Mossi [?], and Bussango, south of the big bend of the Niger, where a great blank space still exists on our maps. The Marchese said they arrived at Lagos on the slave coast about March, 1884. It is now broadly hinted that the Marchese de Buonfanti's story is the last of the wonderful series of yarns that irresponsible travelers have been spinning for centuries about little known parts of the world.

No part of the earth's surface has been more lied about than the Arctic regions. The north pole has long been looked upon as a desirable object of attainment, and many skippers of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries asserted that they had reached the pole or sailed very near it. There is a scarce little book written two centuries ago by Joseph Moxon, "Hydrographer to the King," in which he relates the wonderful facts he had just learned while on a visit to Amsterdam about the summer voyage of the Dutch Greenland ship. He obtained most of his facts from the veracious steersman, who said they had sailed to the pole and two degrees beyond it. They had found no islands big or little near the pole, and had seen no ice, having been favored with weather as fine and warm as Amsterdam enjoys in summer. The "Hydrographer to the King" gave this story to the world as sober fact under the title of "A Brief Discourse of a Passage to the North Pole," and the yarn had a wide circulation and was generally credited.

While nearly all the early Arctic explorers were great romancers, the champion Munchausen of the polar regions was undoubtedly Dr. Martiniere, the historian of a Danish expedition in 1653. He spun his stories without the slightest regard to truth or probability. He peopled Spitsbergen with cheerful natives, though human beings had never lived there; discovered that Novaya Zemilla was inhabited by a peculiar tribe called the Zemillians, who have never been seen since; told wonderful stories of the Lapps, who were all magicians and could sell wind to the sailors in any quantity, from a zephyr to a tornado; pictured the walrus as a fish with a long horn projecting from his head, and made a minute study of the penguin, which he described as a native of Novaya Zemlia, though it happens to exist only in the south polar regions.

It is only about one hundred years ago that two Dutchmen asserted that they had penetrated as far North as 89 deg. north latitude, and there were many sailors in the latter part of the last century who said they had reached form 83 to 8 deg. north latitude in little sailing vessels, when, in fact, they had not gone much, if any, north of Spitsbergen.

Early in the century, a Frenchman named Douville imposed upon a number of geographers with his fabulous stories of African travel. It was finally shown that he was utterly characterless, and a rank imposter, but as late as 1850 some geographers gave considerable credence to his stories. He spent a year or two in Angola, and though he was never more than twenty or thirty miles inland, he asserted that he had penetrated Central Africa, and had visited the far-famed Muata Yanvo. He collected from the native agents who were sent into the interior to buy ivory the material for his remarkable fictions, but he showed little ingenuity in the use of the facts they gave him, and he didn't catch even a glimpse of the truth with regard to the countries and peoples he pretended to describe. He told with many details of towns and States that had no existence, and he invented a vocabulary of the Bomba language, in which he made all the words end in X or Z. This fraud was exposed by the English geographer, Cooley, a student of African languages, and soon after, M. Doubille's pretensions as an explorer were pretty thoroughly exploded.

All the early African explorers gave such exaggerated estimates of the distances they traveled as to hopelessly confuse African geography until a more reliable class of travelers arose. The Portuguese of the last century placed Pungo Andongo and Casange in Angola, in the middle of the continent, though in fact they were only 130 and 250 miles respectively from the Atlantic Ocean. According to one voluminous writer Casange was 1,660 miles inland, which is greater than the whole breadth of the continent in the latitude of Angola. The early geographers gave much credence to this sort of misinformation, and so perpetrated many errors that were not fully cleared away until the era began which Livingstone and Speke inaugurated.

Nearly five years ago Captain Butler of the English army made himself the talk of the continent for a day by a remarkable letter he wrote to the Pall Mall Gazette. General Skobeleff had just started on his campaign against the Tekke-Turcomans, and the news had come that morning that he was making a rapid march on Geok-Tepe. The year before Captain Butler had obtained a leave of absence, and spent some months traveling along the Persian frontier. He wrote to the Gazette that General Skobeleff would be a greatly surprised man when he got to Geok-Tepe. Butler said he had been to Geok-Tepe the year before. He had helped the Turcomans erect their fortifications: he had worked nearly night and day for weeks drilling their little army; he had mounted their canon on the walls of the forts, and had shown them how to handle the guns. The Turcomans would fight like tigers, he said, and in his humble opinion General Skobeleff was crossing the Kara Kum desert only to be wiped out.

The letter made a sensation in Russia, and was cited by the newspapers and the military party as an illustration of England's unfriendly feeling. It was asserted in several newspapers that the English Government dispatched Captain Butler on a secret mission to encourage and assist Russia's enemies. A few months later, however, it was conclusively shown that Butler had never been within 100 miles of Geok-Tepe, and that he knew no more about the situation there than anybody else. Captain Butler soon after left the army.

Mr. Boulger in his "History of Russia and England in Central Asia" tells an interesting story about an English Captain whom the fierce Turcomans made captive while he was traveling on the borders of Turkestan. The leader of the nomads told the prisoner that he would be shot at once, and asked him if he had any request to make. "I only ask," replied the brave Captain, "that I myself may signal my executioners to fire." The request was granted. The Captain, perfectly calm, sat on his horse, faced the executioners, and threw up his hat as the signal. The Turcomans were wonder struck. The man's coolness and bravery saved his life. The chief ordered his men to lower their guns, said he could not shoot so brave a man, gave him food, and sent him on his way.

The story was received with a general guffaw in the English army. The Captain's name was Butler, and everybody said the incident must be true, for Butler told it himself.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

While Frank Otteo, Minnie Colton, and two others were on the bay at Toronto, Ontario, the other evening in a sail boat, a strong wind blew up and drifted the boat out into the lake, where it upset, and the two named were drowned.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Two men were terribly scalded in Cleveland recently by the explosion of a dock engine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Marquis of Salisbury declared recently that Great Britain would not abandon Egypt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

It was thought in Paris that the outbreak in Annam against the French was more serious than at first reported.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Fire in Carson, Nevada, on the 5th, destroyed the greater part of the lower portion of that town, causing a loss estimated at $50,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The loss by fire for six months ended June 30 amounted to $50,750,000. The loss during June was $6,750,000, which was $250,000 above the estimated average.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Louis Zimmerman, a teamster for the Lake Shore Railroad, fell through the elevator hatchway at the Perkins-Powers block, Cleveland, Ohio, recently, and was killed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

At Viola, Wisconsin, recently, three young men, Eliza Shambaugh, aged fifteen, Levi McFarland, aged eighteen, and Henry Fisher, aged seventeen, were drowned while bathing in the Kickapoo River.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Anarchy was threatened in the City of Mexico, consequent upon the recent financial measures. The Government had arrested several editors and sent them to Yucatan, and had taken precautions against an outbreak.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A special of the 6th from Moncure, North Carolina, says: Edward French, aged seventy-five years, his sister, aged eighty years, both white, and a negro boy about fifteen years of age, were murdered near here Saturday night. The deed was the work of robbers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Earl of Carnavon, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, recently gave statistics of crime in Ireland in recent years, showing an enormous decrease since the passage of the crimes act. The Government, he said, under existing circumstances considered it inadvisable to renew the act.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Five hundred Legitimists had a meeting in Paris recently. They resolved to support the Comtesse De Chambord of the Faubourg St. Germain in organizing a pilgrimage to Gratz, where Don Juan, father of Don Carlos, is staying. The Legitimists hail Don Juan as King and denounce the Orleanists.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

One of the most disastrous fires which ever occurred in that section took place at Stoughton, near Madison, Wisconsin, recently, burning ten out of thirteen large tobacco warehouses, the St. Paul depot, and about twenty freight cars loaded with wheat and other merchandise, and causing a loss estimated at from $500,000 to $1,000,000. Insurance not stated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Governor of Idaho, William M. Bunn, has sent his resignation to the President.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

An outbreak was reported imminent in the City of Mexico, and the city was under martial law.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The President has accepted the resignation of P. B. S. Pinchback as Surveyor of Customs at New Orleans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

T. D. Keller, of Albany, N. Y., has been appointed Distributing Clerk of the Treasury for the Sixth Auditor's Office at Washington.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Five sailors of the bark Gettysburg mutinied in the Lower St. Lawrence recently. On their arrival at Montreal, they were arrested and remanded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Rev. Joseph Cook is superintending the Cook farm of 500 acres at Ticonderoga. Words never fail him when he wants to hurry up the hands who are hustling in the hay.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Nannie Fellers, aged eighteen, committed suicide in Kansas City recently. She had been arrested for frequenting a beer garden, and in her despondency over her condition, took poison.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

George H. Chase, a heavy New York broker, was arrested recently for alleged fraud in regard to stock and other transactions on the affidavit of M. Shaunessy. The amount involved was $103,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Berlin bankers condemn the issue of Prussian bonds bearing only three and one-half percent interest. They say that no loan at less than four percent can succeed in the present state of the money market.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The societies represented in the National Saengerfest, in session in Williamsburg, N. Y., paraded through the principal streets of Brooklyn on the 8th, and were received by Mayor Lowe, the Board of Aldermen, and other officials.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Secretary of the Navy has appointed a board to examine the present force of navy yard shops and applicants for such positions with a view to determining the efficiency of the incumbents and making changes where it is necessary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Harriet Moore, a middle aged widow, has commenced a breach of promise suit for $225,000 at San Francisco against Moses Hopkins, aged seventy. The defendant is a brother of the late Mark Hopkins, the railroad magnate, from whom he inherited an estate estimated at $6,000,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Dr. Hamilton, Surgeon General of the Marine Hospital Service, has been advised of what is regarded as a sporadic case of yellow fever at New Orleans. He does not think that this should cause alarm. The case was effectually quarantined at the earliest stage, and it was not expected that the fever would spread from it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

John Morgan, the agent of the Queen Crescent route at Millets' Landing, Alabama, has been arrested. He was charged with embezzling $112,700 of the company's funds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The rail feeders of the Ohio Valley, in convention at Bellaire, made a formal application for re-admission to the Amalgamated Association. The feeders number about 2,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A rocket struck into the loading department of the Remington armory at Utica, N. Y., the other night and destroyed that structure. The fire extended to the main house, damaging it to the extent of $75,000. Insured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Advices from Port Stanley, Falkland Islands, say wreckage has been washed ashore which indicates the loss with her crew of the British ship Yarra-Yarra, Captain Earl, which left Portland, Oregon, February 2 for Queenstown.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

By directions of the Secretary of the Treasury, orders were sent to the Architect of the Treasury building at Washington, instructing him to cut from the roof of the Treasury building all telephone and telegraph lines.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Williams and McChristian in August last killed a peddler near Grenada, Mississippi. They concealed his body in the woods and his remains were found this spring. After Williams had been sentenced for life a few days ago, a mob took him and his companion and hung them both.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Recent news from Madagascar was of the most serious nature. Admiral Miot, wanting reinforcements, was obliged to act strictly on the defensive. Twelve thousand Hovas besieged the French, occupying the Mazanga fort. The besieged were able to communicate with Admiral Miot only by sea.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A long standing feud between two factions known as the "Owls" and the "Vigilantes" in Estrella Plains, California, culminated the other day in a conflict in which rifles were freely used. A report states that E. D. Brooks and E. Stewell were killed and Steve Moody, H. Huster, John McAdams, and William Popper mortally wounded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

An election in County Down, Ireland, resulted in further Conservative gains, Lord Hill being re-elected by a majority of 401.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Vulcan Steel Works at St. Louis have been leased to a syndicate of capitalists for six years at an annual rental of $50,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Mrs. Bayard, wife of the Secretary of State, was pronounced in a very critical condition at Wilmington, Delaware, on the 9th, and her recovery was almost hopeless.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Apaches were reported raiding Northwestern Sonora. Strong expressions were made in military circles against the United States troops for crossing the border.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

General C. C. Augur, Commander of the Department of the Missouri, was retired on the 10th. It was thought Colonel John A. Gibbon would be appointed to the vacancy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

Lloyds' agent at St. Thomas received information from Venezuela July 3 that a revolution had broken out in that country. The Government troops at Carupano had pronounced in favor of the revolution.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Cherokee Strip embargo on Texas cattle was reported getting still more serious. Texas cattlemen, in a recent communication to Commissioner Colman, asked his aid in getting through the Strip.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

The Indiana Farmer recently estimated the wheat crop in Indiana at sixty-four percent, of an average; in Illinois, as forty percent; and in Ohio, at fifty-eight percent. The prospects for corn, oats, and hay in the three States reported were excellent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A mysterious looking package was left at the house of George Kremetz, a prominent jeweler of Newark, N. J., recently. On opening it a pistol concealed in it was discharged, and a Mr. Multhrop was struck by a bullet, but was not seriously injured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 16, 1885.

A dispatch from Paris states that the French Government has authorized General De Courcey to depose the present King of Annam if he refuses to submit to French authority, and to place on the throne in his stead the head of another branch of the reigning family.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JULY 23, 1885.

THE JUDGESHIP IN SUMNER COUNTY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

There seems to be a great deal of bitterness exhibited in the newspapers of Wellington in regard to the judgeship of the 19th Judicial District. And it seems, from the following interview had with Judge Torrance on his return from Wellington Saturday, that the bitterness does not arise from any lack of qualifications in either of the aspirants for the position, but is to be attributed to other causes.

Reporter: "Well, Judge, where have you been?"

Judge: "At Wellington."

Reporter: "Is the newspaper war over the judgeship still raging?"

Judge: "Yes, only more so."

Reporter: "What do you think of it?"

Judge: "Well, that is the way they do things over there this year."

Reporter: "What is the cause of the bitter personal fight over the candidates?"

Judge: "Some of the Wellington people don't like Gov. Martin for appointing Judge Ray, and they want to down the Governor by downing Ray."

Reporter: "What do you think of Judge Ray?"

Judge: "He is a good lawyer, an exemplary man, and will make an excellent judge if selected."

Reporter: "How about Mr. Reed?"

Judge: "He is a good lawyer and will make a good judge, and the contest ought to be conducted solely on the merits of the respective candidates."

Reporter: "Which one is the best qualified for Judge?"

Judge: "Well, I do not care to discuss that question; either one is well qualified to discharge the duties of the office, and the friends of both parties, will at the end, regret that personalities have been resorted to."

DIPHTHERIA AND CROUP CURE.

Details of a Dangerous Case. Some Things Which are Worth Trying.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

In a report of a French Academy of Medicine, Dr. Delthell stated that the vapors of liquid tar and turpentine would dissolve the fibrinous exhalation which choke up the throat and diphtheria. He describes the process thus.

"Take equal parts (say two tablespoonfuls of turpentine and liquid tar, put them into a tin pan or cup and set fire to the mixture, taking care to have a large pan under it as safeguard against fire. A dense resinous smoke arises, making the room dark. The patient immediately seems to experience relief; the choking and the rattle stop; the patient falls into a slumber and seems to inhale the smoke with pleasure. The fibrinous membrane soon become detached, and the patient coughs up microbledes. These when caught in a glass may be seen to dissolve in the smoke. In the course of three or four days, the patient entirely recovers."

The above information has been quite largely copied into the papers, and with it the relief and cure of Ruth Lockwood, a 9-year-old child, who was dangerously sick with diphtheria; but the disease readily yielded to the above mode of treatment, and the child was cured. A case occurring in Boston recently is worthy of note at this particular time, when the two forms of the disease are quite prevalent. The facts in the case, in brief, are as follows.

"Jennie Brown, a child of some 5 years of age, was dangerously sick with diphtheria; her attending physician had no hopes of her recovery. He declared to a person that out of the many cases under his treatment, three were beyond cure, and little Jennie was one of the number. The father of the child had read of the above treatment, and, on his own responsibility--and that, too, without consultation with the attending physician--obtained the mixture, taking two tablespoonfuls of each, but he now considers that one of each would have been sufficient, and there would have been less danger of burning the carpet, etc. The child was in bed, breathing so loud that it could be heard all over the house; but as soon as the tar and turpentine began to burn, she was relieved and breathed quite freely, and soon commenced to cough and raise; and to the father's surprise and delight, she commenced to gain from that moment. He followed up this treatment for three nights, the attending physician approving it, and the child today is well. The other two children alluded to above did not have this form of treatment, and they are numbered with the dead."

This remedy may not be an infallible cure in all cases, and with all persons, but surely it could do no harm in cases that have been given up as incurable by the medicine men. The father said that he would advise the removal from the apartment where this treatment is to be applied of all articles that would be likely to be injured by the smoke of the ingredients, before setting fire to the mixture. St. Louis Globe Democrat.

POSTAGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Wellingtonian says:

"With the reduction in domestic letter postage from three cents to two cents a half ounce, the difference in rate between ordinary letters and drop letters was obliterated. When the question of reducing the rate from two cents a half ounce to two cents an ounce was before the last Congress, an effort was made to revive the old distinction between general and local, or drop letters, by providing that the latter should be carried for one cent an ounce. This amendment failed to become a law, so that all sealed letters mailed within the United States to any address within the United States must be paid for at the rate of two cents for each ounce or fraction thereof. Whether the distance to be traveled by the letter is across the street or across the continent, the cost to the sender is just the same."

The Wellingtonian is mistaken. The first reduction of three cents to two cents per half ounce or fraction thereof on letters to be transported through the mails or by letter carriers, left the rate on drop letters one cent per half ounce or fraction thereof, and since July 1st of this year the difference in the rate between ordinary letters and drop letters remains the same. Some people do not yet understand that the rates of postage on letters have not been reduced one half or from two cents to one cent per half ounce. The fact is that there is no change or reduction from last year on the great bulk of the letters mailed, letters weighing not exceeding a half ounce. On all these including drop letters the rates remain the same as before. The only change is on letters weighing more than a half ounce. The rates now are, on ordinary letters, to be carried by mail or letter carrier, two cents per ounce or fraction thereof, and on drop letters to be delivered at the post office where deposited, one cent per ounce or fraction thereof. Please brush away the cobwebs from your eyes that you may see the point clearly.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Lincoln, Nebraska, Journal, in view of the fact that the citizens of Arizona are pleading with the President to remove the Apaches from that territory, suggests Cape Cod as a suitable place for a reservation for them. The suggestion is a strong one.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Judge McDonald is getting to be quite a horseman. He now has $8,000 in horse flesh. He has some good ones.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Capt. Couch, chief of the Oklahoma boomers, was here Friday to join Colonel Crocker in consultation with Judge McDonald, attorney of the Colony.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

It is now widower Arrowsmith, and that chronic smile has nearly disappeared. Mrs. Arrowsmith accompanied Mrs. Braucher, who has been visiting her for some weeks, to Humboldt, Friday, for a vacation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

It is almost marvelous that mothers, who have been young once, who have married, loved and been loved, should lose sight of the fact that their own daughters will be likely to fall into the same state if opportunity offers. It is just a matter of duty for a parent to look after the associations which surround her daughter from 15 to 20 as it is that she should attend to the frills of infancy and the flounces of girlhood. A man who is morally unfitted to become the husband of her child should not be her companion to the picnic or her moonlight escort to the fete. Exchange.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

This is the cruelest thrust of all--not in the item itself, but in the fact that brother Higgins, a married man these many years, should be fooling around the "family circle" of our mother-in-law, is awful and should receive prompt attention. We take this means of notifying his wife.

"It is reported that Frank Greer, of the WINFIELD COURIER, blackened his immense mustache with a lead comb, and then took his girl out for a moonlight stroll. When the fair one appeared in the bright light of the family circle a couple of hours later, her face looked like a railroad map."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

L. P. Gould was up from the miasma city Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Joe Schaffer, a colored lad of eighteen, and second cook at the Central, has got himself in a box. He passed an order on Johnnie Willis at Smith & Zook's, for a pair of six dollar shoes. Johnnie had taken orders from Mr. Crampton several times and this was on a Central Hotel note head, and looked all right. He called Frank's attention to it when he went to supper and learned the forgery. The boy got the shoes just before the S. K, train time, and left. Constable T. H. Harrod found that he would likely go to Cherryvale, telegraphed, and had him taken in. Tom went over after the youthful forger Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A lady complains at this office that her neighbor's chickens insist in coming into her yard without leave and roosting on her door step, and asks what she shall do about it. That question is easy to solve. If the lady and her husband are fond of fried chicken, or chicken stews, or chicken pie, why . But the lady will understand the gentle hint here given, and if she will govern herself accordingly, the chickens will soon cease to be an annoyance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Two of our citizens, one of them recently from the east, where the festive chigger groweth not, were conversing the other day. "Ain't the chiggers fearful this year?" said one. "Why, they never bother me. I haven't see one since I've been here. But there is some kind of a little red thing that makes my life a burden and my slumbers a farce," said the new-comer. It ought not to take much experience like that to acquaint him with the devilish chigger.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

And now it's Will Wilson that needs caging. His exuberance is equal to the small boy with his first red wagon. His face is a sunbeam of smiles, and yet there is a modesty there that denotes youthfulness in such glee. The first pretext for the echo of "papa!" is the explanation. It's a plump, fine-looking boy: a nine pounder, born Friday. We smoke to his presidential prospects.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Give us some more, Mr. Harper Graphic. We rather like it, as showing the ego possessing some poor fellows who hope to upset the whole earth with their "very, very fertile cranium." Be philanthropic, dear brother. "Cast your bread upon the waters and it will return to you after many days."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

"Where do you go this summer?" asks an editorial in the Philadelphia Press. Ordinarily we might be inclined to tell the Press it's none of its business, but we don't mind telling the editor if it will conduce in the least degree to his happiness. We have already been over to Burden. We think of taking a run up to Atlanta to see the boys, and we may go east--to Torrance and Cambridge. It is barely possible also that we shall take in Arkansas City and Geuda Springs, as well as Udall and other points. If this information is not satisfactory, the Press will please let us know at its earliest convenience.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A tall young man from ruraldom tremblingly entered the portals of the county clerk's office Thursday, and confronting Capt. Sinnott, said: "Is this the supreme judge's office?" "No, that is at Topeka," replied the Captain. "The circuit judge stays here then, don't he?" "No." "W-e-l-l, ma-maybe it's the probate judge I want." The Captain caught on to the far away matrimonial expression of the young man and directed him to the knot-tying mercies of Judge Gans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Arkansas City bounced her city attorney and police judge Monday night. The city council had endured their duplicity and disregard of duty as long as it could. After a petition had been numerously signed asking these officers to resign, they sternly refused, and Stafford said that if the council put him out, no other man should rise up on his ashes. But the council did it "all same." The mayor has not yet appointed his successor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

This is a field day for a census increase. If Winfield keeps on at this rate, Wichita will soon be compelled to cover up her head. Mr. C. A. Harris, the baggageman at the S. K. Depot, is among the "dads," and steps high and elevates his chin as much as any of them. He thinks it far ahead of any baggage he has yet received--a lovely little daughter. We are all smokers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

We are in receipt of the Premium List and Rules and Regulations of the Caldwell Driving Park and Agricultural association, John W. Nyce, Secretary. Its exhibition this year comes off on August 27, 28, and 29. The premium list indicates a healthy association, and a successful exhibition.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The city is full of strangers, and you hear exclamations on every side thus: "Finest country I ever saw," "Everything looks prosperous here," By thunder, they are the most enterprising people I ever saw," "I'll go back and prepare to move, this is good enough for me."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

It makes us tired of life when we hear some great important image of the great Creator saying, "We told you so," "I thought so all the time," "I just knew it." Why, of course nobody doubts such smart Alecks, but they don't always recollect just when "I told you so."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Wellington appears to need some of Arkansas City's "medicine." The Press publishes a half column of invalids, in one issue, and a dozen or two every day. Winfield's sickness isn't a drop in the bucket in comparison.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Up at Atchison Thursday the mercury was up to 103; at Wichita, the sun was so hot that it melted crowbars, while down here it melted Cyclones right down, and it wasn't very warm either. But a chilly day is coming.

COMMUNICATION OF FIRE TAX.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

It is estimated that the fire tax of this country is $400,000,000. This is an enormous destruction and a positive loss to the wealth of the country. Of this amount $100,000,000 worth is due to the burning of buildings with the property in them. Statistics show that ninety-nine out of every hundred dollars worth lost in this way is the result of carelessness and stupidity. This is a heavy price to pay for folly. Certain it is right to seek every protection possible for life and property, but it costs the nation more than double the above sum for strong drink. $900,000,000 is the lowest estimate that can be made as the cost to the nation for that which is far worse than fire. It is a liquid fire which burns to the lowest hell. Besides the actual cost, it is worse than fire because of the evils which are constantly resulting from the juries inflicted upon innocent wives and mothers and helpless children. A man has an invalid wife. He refuses to care for her, "in sickness and in health"--he violates his marriage contract. The vow he took before God and chosen witnesses is wholly forgotten. When this fire-fiend has possession of this man, his wife and children are usually the first to suffer. Concerning his own sufferings, we have not, it may be, the real depth of sympathy which we ought to have. We are apt to say: "He deserves all he suffers." But the innocent wife and children, what have they done? It is all well enough to try to arouse the public mind upon the subject of the enormity of the tax. It is perfectly right to arouse the careless, and too often incompetent boards to a sense of duty upon the sanitary precautions necessary to guard against the approach of the dreadful scourge Cholera, but more to be dreaded than either, or both combined, is the fire tax of strong drink. Very few lives comparatively are lost by fire; but upon the lowest calculation, possibly 70,000 to 100,000 every year fall under the fire of strong drink. Ring all the bells of the land. Let the steam whistles sound the alarm. Let all the gongs and trumpets rattle and blow until the dead are aroused. Let statues of brass and marble speak, and let all the inhabitants of the earth cry: "Fire! Fire!!Fire!!! No insurance. Loss entire; for all time; for all eternity. 'No drunkard shall inherit the Kingdom of God.'

Dear reader, will the drink demon shut you out of Heaven? R. Winfield, July 18.

R. H. WHITE TALKS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

In answer to the many questions of my friends here and elsewhere as to what I am going to do and where I am going from here, I would say that if work in my line of business livens up more than it is at present, I shall remain here until late in the fall, and work, after which I shall go back to Johnson County, Illinois, where I expect to spend the remainder of my days to help to raise and educate my children. It is the desire of my father-in-law and others that I should go back and stay with them. And as my wife's father and mother are getting old, I shall spend my days with them and endeavor to contribute all that I can, in the way of tender care and kindness, to make their declining years happy. I am under many obligations to my friends here for the kindness they have manifested and the interest they have taken in caring for my children and wife, and in her burial. I can truly say that Winfield has many noble hearts. At any time in the future if any person has any communication for me (if I am away from here) or desire to know my whereabouts, this can always be ascertained by addressing me or D. H. or A. P. Rendleman, Goreville, Johnson County, Illinois (my wife's father and brother); there will never be a time in my life but what they can tell my exact whereabouts.

R. H. WHITE.

A BAD MIXTURE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The city of canal "miasma" and terrible "sickness" is in a muddle over its city officers. A meeting was held in the Fourth Ward the other night demanding the resignation of its councilmen: Messrs. Bailey and Davis. The former is claimed ineligible because of service in the confederate army and the latter owing to want of real estate ownership. Bailey "kicked" hard, the law was examined, and he proved to be eligible, having served a short time with the confederates, when a mere boy, and then found his way to the north and took his oath of allegiance. Mr. Davis claimed to be paying $175 taxes yearly on $8,000 worth of property, in his wife's name, and didn't propose to be kicked out of the council by jealous rivals. At the last meeting of the city council, it demanded the resignation of the city attorney, police judge, and street commissioner, all being declared n. g.--regular farces. Regular hades was to pay, these officers being present to fire venom in their own defense. They at first sternly refused to resign, but will probably do so before the next meeting of the council.

THE NORMAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

We visited Prof. Wilkinson's room Friday morning and heard a lesson on the subject of Didactics, or methods. The subject is one of great importance and should be studied by all. The inductive method is based upon the process of deriving general principles from an observation and comparison of individual facts. Things that have occurred are very distinct in our minds. Means of mental training are means of instruction--remembering dates, etc. The memory depends on distinctness of impression; distinctness of impression depends on the attention given to the object. Readiness in recalling objects by memory depends very largely upon association of ideas. Its cardinal principle: The pupil is thus rendered his own teacher; his self-activity should be fostered first, last, and all the time.

BASE BALLISTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Our Cyclones are in excellent spirits, and enjoy listening to the comments of some persons whose livers are on a strike. Their first game with A. C. was a victory of 46 to 19. They won the next, and fearing that the Borders would die if beaten again, our boys gave them a game. The Cyclones don't want to kill anybody. The Arkansas City Borders are composed of Frank Perryman, captain; Joe and George Wilson, Chas. and Frank Knight, Chas. Hilliard, J. and E. Roach, Frank Godfrey, S. Geary, Ery Miller, and L. V. Coombs, and are all fine-looking, muscular fellows, enured to the sun and toil. A. C. Roach, of A. C., who umpired yesterday's base ball game, gave splendid satisfaction. His decisions were fair and impartial.

A BIG YIELD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Uncle Billy Moore threshed his forty acres of Fultz wheat, just over the river, Thursday. It made twenty-six bushels to the acre and is plump and solid--as good as any ever produced in Cowley. Uncle Billy is certainly in luck--far ahead of his neighbors, who will smile at an average of twenty bushels to the acre, and many farmers in the county will have expectation satisfied at fifteen. But wheat will generally exceed what was earlier expected.

UNCLE SAM'S COLD GRIP.

Col. Crocker, Editor of the Oklahoma War-Chief,

In Cowley's Bastille. 136 Oklahoma Warrants.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Deputy U. S. Marshal O. S. Rarick brought in Col. Samuel Crocker this morning and lodged him in our bastille. Capt. Rarick arrested the Colonel at Caldwell, where the War-Chief is published, last Friday, on indictments by the Topeka U. S. Grand Jury, in May. The indictment, dated May 10th, is for "Inciting Insurrection and Rebellion against the U. S. government." The Captain was put in possession of 136 warrants for the arrest of boomers under these same grand jury indictments. He ran in about twenty of them at Caldwell. They at first held a caucus and decided to all go to jail. But, in consultation with the attorney for the colony, Judge J. Wade McDonald, of our city, the twenty gave bond. Colonel Crocker declared that the prosecution was false and malicious, and refused to give bond--preferred to stick it out behind the iron bars, a martyr to the cause. Our reporter had an interview with the Colonel at the jail this morning. We found him writing the particulars of the arrest and charge to General Ben Butler, who is now in Kansas City on legal business, and whom the colonel has secured as counsel. The trial is set for Oct. 12th, before the U. S. court at Leavenworth. Col. Crocker was for years editor of The Columbus Junction, Iowa, Herald, a warm Democratic sheet, but of latter years fell into the labor and anti-monopoly party and stumped Iowa for Ben Butler. He is president of the Butler National Lecture Bureau. He also supported Gen. Weaver during his presidential campaign. He was chairman of the committee of boomers who, at Arkansas City in April, passed resolutions to abide by President Cleveland's Oklahoma proclamation and aid the administration, since when no attempt has been made to enter the Territory. But he has zealously advocated through his paper the Oklahoma cause, and says that if the Democratic government allows this malicious prosecution of the boomers, he means to turn loose on them with a withering pen. He will edit his paper from his cell here unless the government shuts him off, in which event he will employ an able editor. He will probably try a habeas corpus as a means of release, which will have to go before a U. S. Judge and will take some time. He is a fine looking, rotund gentleman of thirty-five or forty years of age, and converses very fluently. He knows the Oklahoma business from top to bottom. He says that the 3,000,000 acres of Oklahoma land has been treated for, paid for, and surveyed by the United States government, and is as lawfully open for settlement as any land Uncle Sam ever had, and he proposes to see it settled by honest, worthy people if it takes his wool off. He says it is now occupied by cattle men who lease, in direct violation of the law, from the Indians, who commit a penitentiary offense by leasing lands they have no ownership of whatever.

A. C. GETS THERE!

The Borders Save Their "Rep." and put $120 in Their Pockets.

Easily Explained.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Our Cyclones got slightly scooped by the Border base ball club of Arkansas City, Thursday. They had beaten the Borders twice and were desirous of giving them one show--just one. So when the A. C. club sent in its challenge for a $100 contest, our boys accepted, and, in addition, conceded half the gate receipts. The Borders knew they were to be arranged against a white elephant and went out every afternoon for two weeks to spend a few hours in the scalding sun priming for the onslaught. Our boys were willing to give A. C. this game anyhow. The Borders were nice fellows and felt so discouraged over past defeats that it drew all the sympathy of which a Cyclone is capable. Our boys didn't practice at all--didn't touch a bat after the Fourth of July contest. They stayed in offices and stores, from under the sun's scalding rays, with their Piccadilly collars and boiled shirts on. Clear through the game yesterday a "don't-care-a-darn" move was maintained--a getting around as though their calves might get hurt or their joints come apart. Compared to their former brilliant playing, it was child's play--a complete give-away to the Arkansas City fellows, for which they certainly ought to feel grateful. If our boys had left their study nooks, shed their "biled" shirts, and got out on their muscle for practice, as the A. C. boys did, they could have won the victory just as easily as "falling off a log." It was amusing to see how the Borders did get down on their bats. They worked just as though it was a sure enough contest in which they might get beaten. The Cyclones take this seeming defeat in as good grace as expected. The only fellows mad are those whose pockets were singed. Good enough. They knew it was wicked to bet, and shouldn't have done it. Our boys, now that they have so handsomely squared accounts with the Borders, will tear off their shirts and beat anything that comes along. Now, we expect Arkansas City will come up with a $5,000 challenge. A score of 34 to 11 certainly ought to be a little encouragement.

GRANT'S PERSONAL MEMOIRS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. S. S. Holloway has the agency of Winfield and Arkansas City for the "Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant." The Memoirs embrace two volumes of five hundred pages each, and should be in every American's hands. They are embellished with live steel portraits by Marshall and by Ritchie; two etchings, numerous maps, plans, and facsimiles of handwriting. The typography is clear and beautiful, and the bindings durable and artistic. These Memoirs consist largely of the inside facts of the late war, known only to the commander of the armies, or at least better by him than by any other persons, together with anecdotes and personal reminiscences, all written by the old soldier himself. The work is one which every American home should contain. Gen. Grant is not the property of any political party. He belongs to the whole country. Democrats and Republicans alike respect and revere the man who has done more than any other to bring honor to our country among the nations of the earth, and who is now lying at the point of death at Mt. McGregor. The volumes are dedicated to the American soldier and sailor, and each copy contains this dedication in a facsimile of the general's own handwriting. The bulk of the profits arising from the sale of the "Memoirs," we understand, go to Gen. Grant, and his family. The book is guaranteed to be sold only on subscription. Mr. Holloway will call on you soon.

NORMAL LEADERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Prof. Wilkinson's lecture at the Baptist church Thursday night was well attended. The theme was "Fiction," and its effect on the mind as an educator. He spoke of the benefits to be derived from reading of different kinds, and likened books and authors to the three great schools of medicine, claiming that some authors were like the Allopathic school, as they gave large doses of unpalatable facts, while others were like the Homeopathic and gave us nothing but sugar coated fiction; then others supplied us with a diversity which he would call a wise eclecticism. After speaking of the good done by some of the solid facts as given by Bacon and others of the Old World writers, he mentioned the work done by Don Quixote in his effort to overthrow the foolish actions of chivalry and the useless shedding of blood in the settlement of feuds and gaining the esteem of some famous beauty. Dickens was a representative of the other class. He mixed facts and fiction in his war against the social and educational wrongs of his time. The Professor did not confine himself to the authors of the Old World in demonstrating this class, but paid high tribute to our own Harriet Beecher Stowe, with her "Uncle Tom's Cabin," and the good done by that in furnishing an incentive to Bible research in France and giving birth to the grand old party which put down the rebellion and gave freedom to American slaves. He cited the beauty of fiction as found in history, clothing the facts in a most pleasant and interesting garb. One instance of this kind was the history of the Mexican war at the time of the attack on the City of Mexico, where the author spoke of the advance, repulse, and final capture and fall, and of the beautiful twilight scenes passing before the vision of the observer, when it is a known fact that in that locality there is no twilight. On the whole the lecture was good, bringing forth the use of good language. In construction it was fine, but the Professor is not an orator and his delivery was somewhat faulty.

THE MINISTERS AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Atchison Champion comes up with this consolation: "The Winfield DAILY COURIER says: "We publish today only such notices as the ministers handed in. We are tired of running our legs off in obtaining these notices for our Saturday evening issued."

"It is, we will say to THE COURIER, only a matter of education. Years ago The Champion determined that if anybody's legs came off, it should be the preachers'. The rule was adopted of publishing no notices not handed in fresh every Saturday by the clergymen themselves or some authorized party. In time, this came to be the understanding and Atchison now possesses the best drilled body of ministers in the west. They not only bring in the notices on time, but furnish The Champion a great deal of good society, for this office has no better posted, more cheerful, or more agreeable visitors than those who come in on Saturday afternoon, put their notices in the copy box, and then sit down to talk over the world generally, from Greenland's icy mountain to India's coral strand."

JUST WHAT IS NEEDED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The County Commissioners granted the J. F. Martin county road Thursday, running from Vernon through the West Side Town Company, across the Walnut, and joining with the west end of Ninth Avenue. The damages claimed were $1,250, but after a thorough canvass of the matter, considering the great benefit of the road to property owners along it, but $600 was awarded, $400 to Capt. Lowry and $200 to the West Side Town Company, the county not to be held liable for the payment until Vernon township, or it and Winfield jointly, construct across the Walnut a substantial and capable iron bridge. The opening of this road is certainly a very beneficial move for both the citizens of Vernon and those of Winfield. A straight and convenient outlet west has been our great need. The park bridge is a weak concern, having been built on skimpy funds, and has been continually out of repair. The bridge on this new road will be one of the very best--one that will last and always be safe.

KILLED BY HIS FATHER FOR A THIEF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

From S. E. Watson we learn the particulars of the sad killing of Arthur Smith, a boy 10 years old, by his father, W. S. Smith, near the 76 ranch, Monday night. It seems after the rain had ceased, Arthur got up and went outdoors without speaking to or waking the balance of the family, a very unusual thing for him to do; and in returning, he had some difficulty in opening the door, and made several attempts to open it, which awoke his father, who, thinking it was a burglar, caught up his gun, a 50 calibre Sharpe's rifle, which was in reach, and fired at the sound at the door. The ball passed through the door and struck the boy in the right breast, passing clear through him. The poor boy screamed and the father realized the terrible mistake he had made. Dr. Parks went out early Tuesday to see the little sufferer, but could afford no relief, and he died between two and three o'clock Tuesday evening.

Clark County Clipper.

GO IN PEACE!

Robert H. White, Charged With The Murder of His Wife, Bids the Bastille Adieu.

NO CONVICTING EVIDENCE.

Judge Snow's Decision in Full, With Other Facts of the Preliminary.

THE DESPICABLE TRAGEDY ENDS IN DARKNESS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

What seems to be the last chapter in the deepest and most damnable murder that ever stained the history of any community closed Thursday. Robert H. White, charged with the awful crime of having crushed in the skull of his wife with a flat iron or other instrument, languished in the county jail until ten days ago, undecided as to whether he would waive preliminary examination or not. His brother came out from Illinois and proffered $250 or more to his brother's defense. Jennings & Troup and McDermott & Johnson were secured as counsel and Tuesday afternoon the preliminary trial began. County Attorney Asp conducted the prosecution and Senator Jennings and A. P. Johnson the defense. The evidence presented was a repetition of that given at the coroner's inquest, which appeared in full in THE COURIER, and is perfectly known to all. The only new witnesses of importance were W. C. Allen, legislative representative of Johnson County, Illinois, who has been visiting friends in this county. He knew White and his family in Illinois, and testified to their good character. The evidence of J. H. Rendleman, father of Mrs. White, corroborated the statements as to the perfect felicity always existing between White and wife, and that White always had a terror for storms. He said that, on his place in Illinois, White had a cave where he always went in times of storm. His wife seldom went with him. Doctors Graham, Emerson, and Marsh differed as to the flat iron being the instrument of murder. Dr. Graham claimed it very improbable that the iron made the wound, while Doctors Emerson and Marsh were positive that it was used. Witnesses were also introduced to show that the blood on the victim's shoes was caused by one of the children's straw hats being picked up from the pool of blood at the head of the bed and thrown back under the table, lodging on the shoes. But Sheriff McIntire, Dr. Marsh, and others who examined the shoes the morning of the murder still maintained that the blood on the heel of each shoe was the print of a hand. The evidence clear through was the same as before, when summed up, and so well known that a resume is unnecessary. County Attorney Asp's opening and closing arguments occupied an hour and showed a careful study of the case. Every bearing was dwelt upon with ability and zeal. A. P. Johnson's speech occupied forty minutes and Senator Jennings spoke an hour and ten minutes. He brought out the theory that the simple lunatic who was found in that neighborhood a day or so afterward was the murderer. His own vicious habits had made him an imbecile and the likelihood of an attempt at outrage by him, as he passed by the door coming from the woods, was shown probable. But County Attorney Asp, in his closing argument, showed by the evidence of the shoe tracks around the house and the fact that no clue was found on her person by the physicians that would lead to the belief that any outrage had been attempted, was uncircumstantial. At the conclusion of Mr. Asp's closing argument, the court proceeded to sum up the case and render his judgment, as follows.

JUDGE SNOW'S DECISION.

"This case, which has taken so long to investigate, has undoubtedly caused more interest than any other ever tried in Cowley County, at least since I have been a resident of Winfield, as is shown by the crowds who have attended this examination. Murder is defined as the unlawful killing of one human being by another and is always more or less revolting in its details, but this particular case is especially so. Indeed, the testimony as given by the witnesses has been of such a character as to cause everyone who has heard it to be horrified. The public have discussed it in all its features, and different opinions have been expressed. But with public opinion I, as an officer of this county under my oath, have nothing to do. I have only my duty to perform. That Julia Ann White, wife of the defendant, was, on or about the 9th day of June, 1885, foully murdered, there can be no doubt. With the question as to who committed this deed I have nothing to do, unless I believe from the evidence the defendant did the deed. The evidence in this case has all been circumstantial; this class of evidence is considered the very strongest from the fact that circumstances are usually unerring and point directly to the guilty party with perhaps more certainty than that which is usually called positive evidence. Circumstances seldom mislead; but in order to make circumstantial evidence conclusive, I believe the correct rule is to the effect that the chain of circumstances should be unbroken--or at least if broken--it should be shown that the missing link cannot be supplied upon any other theory than that the defendant is guilty. The officers of the law, as shown by the evidence, have only done their duty. The county attorney has prosecuted this case with his usual zeal, but I am fully justified that he has only done his duty, as under his oath he is bound to do. The sheriff has only resorted to the usual methods of securing the conviction of the person in his custody charged with committing a crime against the laws of the land, and should not be blamed. As I have before remarked, I believe that no sane man or woman ever committed the crime of murder without a reason or a supposed reason. I only have to find that there are reasonable grounds to believe the defendant guilty as charged in the complaint, and not, as some suppose, to find him guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. I have examined this case with much care and attempted to bring every particle of evidence to bear upon the case in its proper light and it would be useless at this time for me to go through with a rehearsal of the testimony. If then it be true that no sane man would commit murder without some cause, it would devolve upon the state to show in this case some incentive. Has it been done? The previous good character of the defendant may count nothing, for a man may have always borne a good reputation, and fall at last, and that may have been his first wrongful act so far as the world may know. The theory that this deed may have been done by a tramp or a lunatic, I think, amounts to nothing. I cannot go outside of the evidence to find a basis for my judgment, but must be confined strictly to what has been proven in the case. I do not believe the evidence warrants me in holding the defendant to answer this charge. It is therefore the judgment of the court that the defendant, Robt. H. White, be, and is hereby, discharged and permitted to go hence without delay."

THE CLOSE.

White sat, almost expressionless, until the decision in his favor. His face was then like a sunbeam, and the audience gave slight applause. After some congratulations, White accompanied his brother to the residence of A. White, a distant relative, where they are now boarding. White was around on the streets Thursday, talking to different parties he met, apparently perfectly free and unembarrassed.

HOW IT IS TAKEN.

Of course, public opinion is yet greatly divided as to the innocence or guilt of White. Many aver that their mind can never be ridded of its belief in his guilt until someone else is proven to be the murderer, while others as strenuously declare his innocence. But all concede the righteousness of Judge Snow's decision. There were a great many inconsistencies in White's story. But there was no positive evidence or clue to a cause which could ever have convicted him. The deed was done in the dark, with no human eye but the perpetrator to tell the tale, and it will remain sealed. That such a heinous crime should go unpunished is a terrible thing, but it would be equally terrible to punish an innocent man. Our officials have done all in their power to work this case to a convicting point. No clue, other than the one seeming to be presented in White, has ever presented itself. Many have been sprung, but when run down, dwindled into the thin air. The story that a darkey came home at twelve o'clock on the night of the murder, covered with blood, and told his wife he had combat with a certain white man, is now being worked on. It is said that this darkey left suddenly the day the victim's eye was photographed. People generally seem to think this story a ruse. The death bed of the murderer will likely give up the secret. The present certainty indicates a blank.

THE NORMAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Thursday's session commended with roll call. We first visited in Prof. Gridley's room. The class was reciting a lesson on government, law-making--first process; action in Congress; delivery to executive; signatures; veto; method of voting; effect of neglect; orders; resolutions, etc. The recitations in Miss Kelly's room evinced good teaching and were characterized by great promptness and independence of thought. The subject was drawing and an unusual interest was awakened. Miss Kelly has made this subject a specialty for some time and has a thorough and comprehensive acquaintance with its principles. Mr. Barnes gives daily lessons in Arithmetic and analysis. We were pleased and interested with all we saw and heard. The instructors are too widely known as faithful and skillful drillers of classes to need our recommendation. But the value of a Normal Institute depends largely upon the facilities afforded for a review of the common branches and for acquiring a knowledge of teaching. We hadn't time to hear Prof. Wilkinson's class, much to our disappointment. We have no doubt but what his work was well done, as the whole Institute is a complete success.

O. M.

PREPARE TO DIE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Hand us our brace of six-shooters and our dirk knife, please. We are forgiving and can stand an ordinary insult, but when it comes to such a despicable libel as this, from the Wellingtonian, nothing but the b-l-o-o-d of the author can atone. Our determination is as clear and justifiable as the noon-day sun. The author places his neck in the noose, and, by heavens! We'll cut his wind--and every girl in town will uphold us. The old adage of "association makes the man," might be an alleviator to his terrible doom. But we are mad! mad!! Mad!!! Prepare to die! Here is the instigator of this terrible murder: "It is said that a Winfield girl's feet are so large that they can't sleep in the same room with her; she pokes them through a hole in the wall and lays them gently to rest in the spare bed in the next room. Jerusalem crickets! Wonder whose sweetheart she is?"

FIRE AT NEW SALEM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

New Salem had a blaze Wednesday at eleven o'clock. It destroyed Dr. Crabtree's store building and drug stock and the entire postoffice fixtures, books, etc., in the back part of the store. There was $1,000 insurance on the store and stock, which were worth $1,600. The fire is supposed to have caught from a lamp explosion, though nothing definite is known. A lighted lamp had been left on the counter when the store was closed. Salem is temporarily without a postoffice. Dr. Irwin is postmaster, but has been in California for some time, leaving the office in charge of his deputy, W. H. Lucas.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings, and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

M. Ford was over from Burden Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Wood were over from Wellington Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

John J. Clark and C. H. Holloway were up from the steamboat city last Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mrs. Henry E. Asp came in Thursday from a week at Ashland, and Henry is again happy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Abe Carson, of Dexter township, was brought in Thursday, charged with complicity in the Stout horse stealing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The case of Henry Goldsmith against Jerome E. Beck, foreclosure of $337 mortgage, has been filed in the District Court.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

R. G. Johnson, Arkansas City, was up Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Miss Jennie Mattison, of Emporia, is visiting the Misses Nellie and Kate Rodgers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

N. A. Haight brought into our sanctum, Friday afternoon, some very fine peaches, grown by him in town. The Captain has our thanks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Frank Godfrey, one of the Border base ballists, was badly ruptured while making a run Thursday. He had to lay up and will probably carry the injury for life.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

W. J. Kimmel, William Price, Sam Graham, Dr. Mitchell, and W. B. Thomas were among our Arkansas City visitors Thursday--to their benefit socially and financially.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

George Wright, Ed Pentecost, and Joe Finkleberg, three of the Terminus' jolliest boys, were among the witnesses of the ball game Thursday, and lost their hats in the sky.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

C. C. Doane, formerly with J. C. Long and the Hoosier grocery folks, is in from Anthony, for his family. He and Alex. Cochran are doing well with their Anthony grocery business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Smedley & Gest are starting a fence factory in the old bank building on North Main. Mr. Smedley has lived on east 9th avenue for some time. Mr. Gest is just in from Chicago.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Misses Maggie Bedilion and Margaret Spotswood left Wednesday for a week or more with Mrs. W. G. N. Garvey, Topeka. They spend a vacation every summer in the state capital.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

P. C. Kirkland, Oxford's banker, was over Friday night, accompanied by his brother, W. D., visiting him from Council Bluffs, Iowa, and to whom he wanted to show the Queen City of Southern Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

And now it is Mr. F. E. Houghton that steps high. He took a lady boarder Thursday. She is not old enough to attend Normal this year. Weight, 11 lbs. All parties concerned are doing well, Cigars, Fred.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. A. P. Boyers and family arrived Thursday from Cynthiana, Kentucky, and have quarters at the Central. Mr. Boyers was here a month ago and determined to make this his home. He will invest in farm property.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

C. C. Wolf has filed his fifth annual account with the Probate Court as guardian of John and Louise Bahara, minors. Mary Thomas has filed her first annual statement as guardian of Minnie and Jennie Armstrong.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Miss Mary Bryant entertained the W. C. T. U. Tuesday afternoon. Apples, peaches, and pears, grown in the grounds of Capt. Lowry, were passed around. The Captain is making a big horticultural showing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

J. F. McMullen, S. G. Crawford, Dick Silvers, A. B. Snow, Dave Dix, W. L. Pridgeon, J. E. Snow, and Tom Harris went to Dexter Thursday to do some special work in the A. O. U. W. There will be a street parade and an installation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

F. T. Sallade, proprietor of the Grand Central Hotel, Geuda, was over Thursday and hollowed for our boys like a good fellow until the twelve talley inning for Arkansas City, when his heart went down in his boots.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

D. McDowell, F. W. Farrar, A. D. Hawk, J. R. L. Adams, W. H. Nelson, W. Morey, H. C. Deets, Frank J. Hess, L. Coburn, and F. H. Grosscup were up from the Terminus by Thursday's base ball contest.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The many friends of Mrs. Dobson, sister of Mrs. G. H. Buckman, and well known here in years gone by as Miss Lutie Newman, will rejoice with her in the advent, in her home at Cherryvale, of a fine little daughter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Senator Hackney is home from Neosho County, where he went to defend Frankie Morris, arrested here some time ago, charged with the murder of her mother for $15,000 insurance. The State wasn't ready and the case was set for August 3rd.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Tom Hook, the carpenter, 905 east 6th avenue, is now highly tickled and worthy of the solicitous care of all his friends to keep him from jumping to the moon. It's a bouncing boy and Dr. Park is responsible for this item. We are ready to smoke.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

County Superintendent Limerick spent Friday visiting the Sumner County Normal Institute and inaugurated a joint picnic of the Sumner and Cowley Normals in our Riverside Park Saturday. Sumner's Normal is behind ours in attendance, having but 125.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mrs. Eliza Peabody, of Champaign, Illinois, mother of Mrs. S. H. Jennings, and Mr. C. W. Knapp, of Normal, Illinois, a brother-in-law, arrived Friday. Mrs. Peabody will remain for some time. Mr. Knapp will go out to the wild west to enter his old vocation, real estate and loans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Judge Torrance was over from Winfield Wednesday, and put in the major portion of his time talking to old friends and acquaintances. Our late Judge has a very graceful way of wiping off the perspiration from his alabaster brow, and the warm weather of Wednesday gave him a good chance to show off his accomplishment. Wellingtonian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. J. O'Meara sold out to W. C. Root Thursday. Mr. Root is an old business man of Winfield and has a host of warm friends, and the people will be glad to welcome him. Mr. O'Meara has done a good business here and stands high as a businessman. We hope he will still continue with us. We would be sorry to lose him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

M. L. Robinson has completed changed his personal appearance. Some days ago he mowed his head, so as to have the advantage in family broils. This not being sufficient, he now has his heavy beard cut off. The next move will be an eye glass and a case. He now resembles E. D. Seward or Bob Ingersoll so closely that they might be easily taken for brothers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Agent Kennedy of the Santa Fe wears a grin from ear to ear Thursday. He is the happy "daddy" of a fine boy of the regulation size. He has a freight car full of cigars at the depot. Drop in, boys. Mr. Kennedy is doing as well as might be expected under the circumstances. We wish him joy; that he may not have to walk the floor in the wee sma' hours of the night and administer soothing syrup. We hope the little fellow may be a source of increasing joy from the cradle to the grave, and may Mr. Kennedy be presented with such thorough express often.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Father J. F. Kelly and sister, Miss Sarah, leave this week to reside at Wellington. This will be regretted by all. During Father Kelly's pastorate of our Catholic church, he has made a host of warm friends, while Miss Sarah is highly esteemed by our young folks. Wellington is fortunate. Father Kelly goes to Wellington because of its better facilities for a good Catholic school. An accomplished teacher of Leavenworth has been secured, and a better school is promised than was maintained here. Father Dougan, who was with our Catholic church for a time several years ago, will take Father Kelly's place here.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. J. E. Conklin has just adorned the grounds of Mr. N. B. Powers' handsome residence, corner of 8th avenue and Millington street, with several hundred feet of as fine flagging walk as we have ever seen. It was done by Mr. Conklin's contractor, Nick Sandner, and the stone came from Mr. Conklin's quarry, just east of the Platter farm. It is symmetrical and smooth as a floor, and will last forever. Nothing could give residence grounds better adornment, and the magnificence and convenience of our stone puts it in the reach of all. Mr. Powers is making a complete residence. The finishing touch should be given by cutting out half the trees that obstruct the public view.

A PLUCKY GIRL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Winfield has one plucky girl, whose example should be imitated by the entire female population. Two sisters, one of whom we will call, for luck, Miss F. H., were at home, on east 8th avenue, alone Friday. About ten o'clock two men came prowling around the open window of the young ladies' bedroom. They listened and heard them talking low to each other, when Miss F. got her pistol, which was handy, and going to the kitchen door where good range could be obtained, threw the door open and sent a bullet in the direction of the nocturnal prowlers. She prepared immediately for another shot, but it wasn't needed. With an alacrity that would do credit to a deer, the tramps got up and got--clearing a five foot hedge like a flash and allowing no grass to grow under their feet until out of range. And the young lady meant business. She had handled a pistol before and understood it. This is the proper thing, and THE COURIER would rejoice to chronicle many more such exhibitions of pluck. These sneaking tramps who prowl around the houses of the city in the stilly hours of the night often frightening women nearly to death are only fit for cold lead receptacles, and if a little more of it was administered by the "ladies" instead of locking themselves in their closets, the tramps would keep exceedingly "scarce."

THE EXTERMINATORS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Now the Cyclones will be wiped up, sure! An institution with such a name would drive even New York to the wall. Encouraged by recent developments, a base ball nine was organized today, under the horrid title of "Exterminators," to wipe up our Cyclones. It is composed as follows: M. N. Sinnott, Captain; Joseph O'Hare, Arthur Bangs, James McLain, A. B. Taylor, W. H. Dawson, Tom Eaton, Ray Oliver, E. S. Bedilion, and E. C. Seward. Dave Harter is substitute for fat man Seward when he is laid up in the shade for repairs. Their first game will come off at the fair grounds Saturday at six o'clock, when the Cyclones will be completely exterminated. The game opens at 6 and the losing nine will pay the back fare for its opponent. The Exterminators will start off easy like, with but five innings, but will soon clean out anything with a round of nine.

ASP'S GRAND JURY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

County Attorney Asp and Judge Gans, with Miss Eva Dodds, stenographic reporter for Hackney & Asp, went up to Burden Friday to have a sitting of the County Attorney's grand jury provided for in the late liquor law. A number of witnesses were examined and Burden's drug record thoroughly examined into. Mr. Asp returned Saturday and will have some more witnesses subpoenaed to appear before him here before he gets through. This move created some talk at Burden. Many discussed and some "cussed."

AN OASIS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

There are oasis in the desert of even the knights of the faber. Mr. G. W. Robertson laid upon our table Saturday morning as beautiful a cake as was ever turned from the gentle hand of woman. It was a remembrance from the ladies of Excelsior, two and a half miles south, who gave one of their enjoyable and always successful Sunday School socials the other evening. The writer shot almost his first ideas and paper wads within the walls of Excelsior schoolhouse, and any token from that district always gets his warmest appreciation.

A JOINT NORMAL PICNIC.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

County Superintendent Limerick spent Friday visiting Sumner County's Normal Institute, and arranged for a joint picnic of the Sumner and Cowley Normals at Oxford next Saturday. Oxford has a very good grove, and a grant time is anticipated. The trains run very conveniently for our folks, going over at 10 and returning at 5:30. Wellington will drive over. The Professor says Sumner has a good Normal, with 130 in attendance. Dr. Williams, of the State Normal, who conducted our Normal a few years ago, is in charge.

THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDINGS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The School Board, at its last meeting discussed the feasibility of tearing away the old stone building just north of the new wing of the Central schoolhouse, to join the new building, for which $8,000 has just been voted, to the south wing. That old building is a perfect shell. By putting this new wing on its site, a fine tower can be built in the center and a bell put in, which the city needs badly. Then some style could be given the structure, with four additional rooms.

COWLEY HERALDINGS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Curns & Manser are out with another of their real estate bulletins. It is a large eight column paper, a beauty typographically and for elaborate description of Cowley's grand resources is certainly perfect. Every phase is truthfully and tersely touched. Cuts of Winfield's churches and several of her prominent residences are presented. As an advertiser its benefits to Cowley will be great. It exhibits much enterprise on the part of Messrs. Curns & Manser.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

On the 26th of June, says the Lincoln Register, George Grider and Jno. Bowers were digging a well for Mr. Bradderstein, twelve miles northeast of Lincoln, on Dry creek. When they were forty feet below the surface, they drilled down and a very strong current of air rushed up, throwing up the sand. They at first thought it very pure, bracing air. They said it strengthened them and laughed and worked on. When the men had left the well for dinner. Walter Sumniers went down to see the wonder and sank in great distress. George Grider then went down, but fell, and is supposed to have broken his neck. The men were taken out dead some hours after. The well still continues a wonder, boiling up so angry that you can hear it two hundred feet away.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. D. Taylor, East Ninth avenue, has left THE COURIER agricultural department another stalk of his immense corn, raised on his farm three miles up the Walnut. It is over fourteen feet tall, has a stalk like a large log, and would be a load for a yolk of oxen. But, without jest, it is mammoth, and draws exclamations of surprise from all newcomers. The "oldest inhabitant," however, merely looks upon it as another proof of the fact that for prolific prolificness, Cowley County downs the world! Mr. Taylor has a large field of corn like this, and it looks like a big forest.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Cambridge News thinks "a man who won't fall in love with a charming school-dame is a fit subject for transportation to the cholera -infected districts of Spain," and declares our Normal Institute capable of laying successful siege to every young masculine heart in Winfield. Correct, Brother Wilkinson. And they have done it. But the coquettish damsels only do it to go back to their more substantial gallants, the country young men, leaving the city dudes to commit suicide, or throw themselves in the path of the howling Cheyennes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A man in Lyon County, Kansas, fourteen years ago married a widow with a little daughter by a former husband. After twelve years he obtained a divorce from his wife and soon after married her daughter. The most novel feature of the matter is the fact that the divorced wife, now his mother-in-law, lives with her daughter and husband, and all are happy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

An exchange contains an article entitled "How to Breathe." We did not suppose there was so much ignorance in the world. When a man doesn't know how to breathe, the best health resort for him is a lot in the cemetery. He would spoil if kept many days above ground.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

George McIntire returned from Elk Falls Saturday with the colored boy who forged an order on Smith & Zook, some time ago. The boy presented an order to Mr. Smith, apparently signed by Frank Crampton, for a pair of shoes. The boy will plead guilty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Capt. J. B. Nipp, S. H. Rodgers, and James H. Bullen, all of Winfield, have spent most of the past week in the city. They all express themselves agreeably surprised at the rapid substantial growth of Ashland. Clipper.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Elk Falls boys sent a challenge to the Cyclones to come over and play them for $100 and bring their own umpire. This means business. Now, boys, is the time to get there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The S. K. repair and construction force of thirty-two men, which has been here two weeks putting in additional side-track, went to Independence Friday.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

ADVERTISING FRAUDS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

There is a very low code of morals existing among publishers in regard to advertisements. Some, and we may say many, seem to hold that it is moral and proper for them to get what pay they can for advertising without regard to the morality of the business or thing advertised.

Some of the most specious and fraudulent advertising of a certain very noted lottery establishment appears regularly in the columns of our leading and influential newspapers, published by men whom in other respects we highly respect. They doubtless get high prices for this kind of advertising and this seems to be the temptation which blinds them to the immorality of the thing. One of the dodges resorted to by these advertisers is to publish little stories about this, that, or the other poor man in this, that, or other distant locality who has just had the fortune to be raised from penury to opulence by drawing a prize in the said lottery. These are inserted in the reading columns disguised as ordinary news items. Of course, they are mostly lies and wholly frauds concocted to fire the hearts of the great numbers of the people who believe in luck. Sometimes these papers publish boldly, open and undisguised advertisements of this and similar institutions. Now, we are not a christian nor do we make any pretensions to strictly moral life or habits, but there are some immoral things which we will not be hired to do and one of these is to advertise this monstrous fraud in any other way than to warn people against it. We have been offered extra pay for inserting these advertisements, but have invariably refused. THE COURIER is not for hire to help others to rob the community. It will rob only for itself and not for another.

The institution referred to is run by some of the most noted scoundrels of the age. It is making money by the hundreds of thousands and millions. It is as much worse than Ward, Fisk, and other bank wreckers as they are worse than the man who robs your hen roost. They receive contributions, obtained by false pretenses and advertising, from all over the country, mainly from poor and ignorant people, and they never give out any return except by way of an additional advertisement. The State which will permit such a gigantic fraud to exist within its borders is a disgrace to the civilization of the age; the government which will carry its advertisements through the mails, needs revolutionizing, and the man or woman who sends money to these frauds is a fool. And yet thousands and thousands all over the country are making their regular contributions to these frauds, and hoping for returns which they will never realize.

The Postoffice Department has long ago placed this robbers' nest in the list of frauds and ordered that registered letters should not be delivered to its agents but returned, and that money orders sent to it should not be paid. But it dodges these orders by subsidizing a national bank to receive its remittances and the new postal note system is available to them because the notes are payable to bearer.

The U. S. law needs amendment. It should prescribe a high fine and imprisonment on every man who shall mail circulars advertising lotteries and similar frauds; it should in the same manner punish newspaper publishers for mailing newspapers containing lottery advertisements, either open or disguised, and should punish postmasters for knowingly forwarding or delivering papers containing such advertisements. Perhaps it is not practicable to punish men and women for being fools, but they ought to be punished for remitting money for building up and supporting such frauds.

PROGRESS OF PROHIBITION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The situation in Ohio this year forbids the hope that anything can be done towards raising that state out of its present condition of free whiskey and free trade in intoxicating drinks. The Democratic party is for the continuance of the present condition of things, while the Republican party demands in its platform that the traffic be taxed, restricted, and limited, all that can be done under the present constitution. The ultra prohibitionists will accept nothing short of absolute prohibition and will therefore vote against the Republican party and thus continue the Democratic rule.

We think the true policy of the prohibitionists of that state is to make no political nominations but to support the party and candidates which will do the most towards controlling and limiting the rum traffic, and to discriminate in favor of candidates who will vote to submit a prohibitory amendment of the constitution untrammeled by any other issue or amendment submitted at the same time. This policy would compel at least one of the two great parties to nominate candidates for representatives and senators in prohibition districts, who would vote for such submission, and it is possible that in that way a sufficient number of such could be elected to submit the amendment in the way proposed; but if the prohibitionists put up third party candidates, the only possible effect will be to divide the prohibition vote, secure the election of anti-prohibition candidates, and insure the defeat of the submission of the amendment. There never was a prohibition amendment submitted or carried, or a prohibitory law enacted, by any other course or policy, and it is safe to say that there never will be. The great mass of prohibition voters have other important interests which they want to see promoted, and will not abandon these and their party affiliations and associations for this single cause, at least, so long as all that has ever been done outside of political prohibition parties, and all that such parties have ever accomplished, has been to secure the election of the worst enemies of prohibition and to set back the progress of the cause. All that a prohibitionist who places that idea above all else can do is to vote for the candidate of the two parties who will do the most toward prohibition; to vote for the man who is in favor of taxing and regulating as against the man who is for free trade in intoxicants. If one cannot secure all he wants, he had better secure what little he can and hold it until he can do better. If the course we propose for Ohio prohibitionists should succeed in the submission of the constitution amendment, and should the amendment be carried, then the prohibitionists should vote for the men and party who will do most toward enforcing the amendment. If they are unable to control one of the two great parties in this regard, it is utterly useless for them to undertake to control both and all by dividing the prohibition forces.

But in case they should fail to carry the amendment in this way, it is simply because the majority is opposed to so sweeping a measure. Then it will be the duty of the prohibitionists to accept of the next best thing attainable: local option, high license with prohibition of sales at certain times and to certain classes, or even low license with fewer restrictions. This latter would be a step in the direction of prohibition from which another step could be taken.

Abstractly speaking, it is true that any kind of license is all wrong, that any compromise between free trade in intoxicants and absolute prohibition is a compromise with evil, but we are obliged to compromise with evils constantly in order to attain any good. Poverty is an evil and abundance is a good, yet we would not refuse the one thousand dollars we can get because it is not the hundred thousand which we want or because the thousand is a compromise with poverty. It is only a crank who would do so and they are only cranks who, as ultra prohibitionists, prefer free trade in intoxicants to any restrictions and regulations on the traffic short of absolute prohibition. And it is this sort of crank who are the most reliable allies of free whiskey. Such are St. John, Finch, and Baine, and such are not such real, earnest, and sensible prohibitionists as Kelly, Campbell, Griffin, Krohn, and Jetmore, or nearly all the 150,000 prohibitionists of Kansas who gave only 5,000 votes to St. John, or the 4,000 prohibitionists of Cowley County who gave only 56 votes to St. John.

PROGRESSIVE PROHIBITION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Supplementary to our article of yesterday headed, "The Progress of Prohibition," we would say something more in the same general direction, that of the necessity of accomplishing reforms by progressive steps.

The anti-prohibitionists and saloon men of Dubuque, Iowa, desire that the Democrats of that state shall adopt a plank in their state platform demanding the repeal of the prohibition laws and the substitution of a license law fixing the annual license tax at $500, prohibiting the sale to minors and drunkards, and prohibiting sales on Sundays, legal holidays, and election days; with suitable bonds and penalties. Of course they would not demand such a law except as a substitute for full prohibition and the fact that they do ask for it is evidence that they believe the prohibition laws are or will be effective, and that the law proposed as a substitute would be a gain to them. If the people of Iowa should accede to their demands, it would be evidence that they believed that the prohibitory laws could not be enforced in that state and that partial prohibition would be better enforced and with better results. In that case these same saloonists or anti-prohibitionists would clamor for another change with a small license tax and less restrictions. Having accomplished this, they would again clamor for free whiskey and free trade in intoxicants with no other restrictions than are placed upon the trade in sugar and coffee, and this we would call progressive free whiskey. That accomplished, Iowa would be in the same condition that Ohio now is. Thus we see that the whiskey dealers recognize the fact that people and states do not change suddenly from one extreme to the other and that to accomplish their purpose they must do it by progressive steps. The same thing appears everywhere. In each state whatever the law is in relation to the sale of intoxicants short of free trade, the saloon men clamor for a change in the direction of less restrictions, less prohibition. On the other hand, the sensible prohibitionists are in favor of just as much prohibition as can be practically enforced. In Ohio a low license with other restrictions would be a step in advance toward prohibition. It would prohibit to a considerable extent and be an assertion of the constitutional right to prohibit. Such a law could not be strictly enforced in Ohio anymore than full prohibition can be strictly enforced in Iowa and Kansas. The history of all kinds of liquor laws proves that none of them have ever been better enforced than are now the prohibitory laws of Kansas. If Ohio carries the measures laid down in the Republican platform this year, she will make a long stride toward prohibition. It is possible that she could do more if she undertook it, possible that she might accomplish such a law as is conceded by the anti-prohibitionists of Iowa and Kansas, or even full prohibition at one stride, but it is more probable that by attempting to take too high a stride at once she would fail altogether and land lower down if possible than she is now. It is safer at least to attempt only a moderate stride to start with and get a good footing on the first step upward, from which to raise to the next, rather than to attempt to reach the upper floor at one stride without touching a single stair. In Kansas our old dram shop act was one of the best license laws ever enacted, a stair pretty high up, and it was not so very high a step from it to full prohibition. It was so near to prohibition that Kansas has been able to enforce prohibition about as well as she was ever able to enforce the dram shop act. But Ohio is much lower down, several steps below where Kansas was under the dram shop act and it is not so likely that her attempt to straddle from free whiskey over the intermediate steps, including low license, medium license, high license, dram shop act, and local option to full prohibition would succeed as well as the shorter stride Kansas made from the high position of the dram shop act. So we say that prohibitionists in Ohio should take hold with the Republican party and help take the first step upward and then another, until full prohibition is reached.

But there are a lot of impracticable people in Ohio as there are in other states, who insist upon attempting to rise from the lower floor to the upper at one step, and who refuse to touch any of the intermediate stairs on the ground that these stairs are not high enough and should be repudiated as a compromise with evil, a legal recognition of the right to be below the upper floor, and that neither of these steps are free from the evils, misery, and crime of the lower floor. Therefore when a state would take a step upward they "belt" it back with a club and say, "Go the hole hog or none."

In Kansas we are a full prohibitionist and demand that the prohibition laws shall be strictly enforced, and amended when needed to make them more effective. In Ohio we should still be a prohibitionist, taking all we could get in that direction, though that little was only license with restrictions. This attained, we would try to reach higher license, more restrictions, and local option, as further stages on the road to prohibition, and finally would be sure to reach prohibition. We would readily take any step in that direction which could be taken and would try to hold the ground gained until we could get higher. That is the only way to get ahead, the only way to reform the world. States and communities never change from very bad to very good in a moment or in a year. It takes time.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Albert Griffin, in speaking of the independent candidacy of I. O. Pickering for judge in the Olathe district, gives this bit of history. "Last fall there was a bargain made in Olathe between some of St. John's men and certain Democrats, that the latter would vote for St. John for President (thus making it appear that he was popular at home), and the former would vote for the Democratic nominees for county offices. Under this arrangement, the whiskey candidate for county attorney, whose majority was less than a dozen, was re-elected by those who claimed to be the only genuine prohibitionists in Johnson County--St. John himself being one of the number who voted for him; and, if we have not been misinformed, Mr. Pickering did the same thing."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Judge J. Wade McDonald left last Sunday for Washington, D. C., on business before the Presidential Executive relating to the recent arrest of the Oklahoma boomers and the Oklahoma question generally. He will be gone several weeks.

REFORMERS AND BLACKMAILERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Pall Mall Gazette, having its attention called by the proceedings in a single criminal case to a certain line of criminal facts, proceeded, without any preliminary flourish or announcement, to "work up" the case. Having accumulated a large amount of evidence going to show a disgustingly rotten condition of morals in what is termed the "upper walks" of London society, it published its discoveries to the world. While much is suggested rather than told, and while there is little or no mention of supposed to be respectable people by name, it may be supposed that the Pall Mall Gazette really had a good motive in its publication, though unquestionably it was not unmindful of the gorgeous advertisement and the plentiful harvest of pounds, shillings, and pence which has followed its action.

The outcome, it is believed, will be good. A sort of "revival" has sprung up in London, and steps are talked of which may lead to the better legal protection of female virtue. There is great satisfaction felt that the aristocracy have been shown up in all their vileness, though the English people seem to comprehend that the exposures reflect on the lower, middle, and all classes as well. For what is to be said of the common people who suffered their daughters to be lured away, kidnaped, and ruined by scores and hundreds, and who never, as it would appear, in any police station or court in the United Kingdom, raised their voices for assistance or redress, or made an attempt to save from deepest shame their own children?

The success of the Pall Mall Gazette as a well-paid exposer and reformer has had with all its good, one bad effect. It has brought to the front the newspaper Pharisees, with their trumpets, filled to the muzzle with cant concerning the office of the press as the unsparing scourge of vice, and the perpetual day of judgment of the wicked. The editor is depicted as seated in his imperial chair, "unawed by influence and unbribed by gain," insensible to fear, impervious to corruption, incapable of weak pity, relentless justice personified, fearlessly unmasking hidden guilt regardless of consequences. The press is represented as an aggregation of such "journalists," and as a great moral force irresistible in its power of exposure and punishment; the purifier and judge of the earth.

In the midst of this noise there may be those, not connected with the "profession of journalism," and not acquainted with the nature and origin of the racket, who may become confused, and lose sight of the fact that among newspaper people, as among other classes of men, there are good and bad, honest and dishonest, reformers and blackmailers.

There is no reason to suppose that the men who run newspapers are any better than other men of similar standing in society. The come in with the average. Thy are no braver, or purer, or more sincere than merchants or mechanics, or lawyers or doctors. The average editor is no more ready to suffer the loss of life, body, or goods for a principle than any other man. Even the Pall Mall Gazette editor has run no risk and suffered no loss. When it comes, then, to these claims of superior holiness and moral courage, this posing in the character of immaculate and god-like judge, it seems, to the initiated, at least, a piece of very shallow and silly pretense.

While the newspaper men, publishers, editors, reporters, and so on, may be said to average fairly, it is an undeniable fact that, in this glorious "profession," there are a considerable number of men, who, so far from being fit judges of the sins of society or individuals, have no moral sense themselves; men whom it would be the extreme of recklessness to trust with the custody of a woman, a bottle of whiskey, or even a valuable dog which the owner desired returned to him. It is frequently the case that these very men are the loudest in this, in them, basely hypocritical assertion of the supreme virtue of the "journalist," and they deceive the ignorant and unthinking and sometimes awe a whole community into seeming acquiescence in their pretensions.

To those accustomed to reading newspapers, there is little danger of deception. A pretender or a blackmailer may easily be known by his tactics. A real reformer seeing a wrong, attacks it and has done with it. A hypocritical blackmailer always blows his horn in advance. When one sees in a newspaper, "Certain facts have come to our knowledge concerning certain parties which, when published, as they may in a few days, will cover them with shame," or, "If a certain party living in the south part of town does not desist from his course, we shall be obliged," etc., it means, in nine cases out of ten, blackmail. All these premonitory notices and warnings mean money. If these notices are accompanied by vast pretensions to incorruptibility and fearlessness, and anxious concern for the morals of the community, they are as certain indications of a blackmailer as the hiss or rattle is of the proximity of a snake.

There have been men who have conducted newspapers for the sole end of advocating what they believed to be the truth, and in doing so have encountered poverty, ostracism, insult, bodily injury, and even death itself, but the company of such is by no means innumerable. Beside these, there have been many thousands who edited newspapers with as much reference to the dictates of honor and conscience, and with as much moral courage as is displayed by the average civilized human being; only that and nothing more. But with these there have always been mixed up men, full of moral pretense, who use the power which they fancy comes with the control of a press to bully the weak and extort money from those who are not only criminal but weak; who rejoice over the fall of men and women; insult the helpless, and fawn upon the fools who buy their praise. As our Mohammedan brethren remark: "God is great," but it is questioned if He could make anything meaner. Champion.

THE CAMP MEETING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

We took in the camp meeting Sunday afternoon. The grounds are not in a good condition. There is one large tent for services, and some half a dozen small ones where families are camped. There is one well on the ground and one spring. The well is very poor. We would suggest that the Holiness people club together and fix up their grounds. By a small outlay it could be made a very pleasant camp ground. The services were chiefly experience confessions, intermingled with songs and prayers. Services closed about 4:30 p.m., when Bro. Kenney baptized three in the creek adjoining. Mr. Tidd runs a lunch stand on the ground. The encampment are very strict with him, not allowing him to sell a cigar or any ice cream, and all not very willing he should sell lemonade. They object to this on the ground of it being a luxury. We suppose they think that while serving God, it is fit that we should starve the body. It is a big place to go to and not spend much money. You can't treat your girl to ice cream. All you can do is to drive your girl down to water. This probably accounts for the scarcity in numbers of ice cream girls. The religious spirit is as strong as usual at camp meetings. We understand it will close this week.

A LOW SLING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

We can hardly attribute such a low, dirty sling as this to the Arkansas City Republican, but we must. In mentioning the victory of the Borders over our Cyclones, it says: "The man who tended gate announced only $40.45 receipts. There were fully 600 persons present. 25 cents was the admission price. There is something 'rotten in Denmark' and we trust the Cyclones will blow the matter straight." Dick Howard wasn't present and got this lie from someone who was. Mr. I. Martin is Treasurer of the Cyclones, kept the gates, divided the total receipts, fairly and squarely, with A. C., and they know it. None but a low scoundrel would make such report to Dick Howard and we hope Dick will "climb" him for it. Our boys treated the Borders well in every respect, and such a sling is contemptible.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings as Gisted by the Scribes of the Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Had the usual services Sunday. Elder Myers' morning theme was, "Burying of the talent, based on Math. Xxv:25. "And I was afraid, and went and hid thy talent in the earth." The Lord has a right to demand of us what he pleases. We are his servants. The same fidelity, according to ability, is required of all. If humanity had made this parable, it would have made the slothful servant the one of five talents, to make the lesson more striking. But in religion it is the ones with one talent who are most apt to hide it under a stone. Many are not cut out for any great thing, and when they learn that they can't be a preacher, an elder, or a deacon, sit down and do nothing--bury their one talent. Those who are most successful in spiritual and worldly walks are those who do that nearest their hands--anything that offers itself. Christ spent thirty years in almost obscurity before coming out to be widely known. We are commanded to use what talents we have. There are many latent talents in this church. How many come to prayer meeting with an excuse from reading, singing, praying, or exhorting? If you can't do this, what under heaven can you do, as christians? Fellowship with God means a partnership, and no partnership can exist without work. If you, as members of a church, are not resolved to obey the command to work, developing and broadening your talents as you do so for the advance of christianity and the salvation of humanity, better tear the church down. Not as much is expected of one as another. If you haven't but the one talent, your work and faith is as earnestly demanded. Let each so labor--so improve his talents and better Christ's cause as to receive the blessing, "Well done, good and faithful servant, thou hast been faithful over a few things, I will make thee ruler over many things; May none have the laggard's sentence. Cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness; there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth." The reward is the same to the faithful with five talents as to him with ten. Use what you have, is the imperative demand.

BAPTIST CHURCH.

Our Baptist reporter failed to "turn out" Sunday morning, but was properly on deck in the evening. Rev. Reider's subject was "Keeping the Heart." Prov. iv:23. "Keep my heart with all diligence; for out of it are the issues of life." The life of Soloman impresses us with the weakness of humanity. The strong are often very weak. We are apt to think ourselves incapable to do the things the Lord commands us to do. He asks nothing we can't do, through His assistance. We belong to Him. We live by Him. We have no right to excuse ourselves from His service. He is not an excusing God, as the judgment say will prove. We must keep up a continual war against temptation. We can never find ground uncontested. Satan counterfeits all good, sometimes so cleverly that we can hardly detect the deception. To overcome the effect of Satan's constant agencies, it takes a centralization of all our attributes. We must get on our knees. And it is the undisguised enemy--profanity, drink, and evil thoughts that are most disastrous. It takes earnest attention--all the powers of humanity, assisted by God, to overcome them. Nothing is gained in this world without labor, and how can we expect the glories of heaven unless we strive to enter in. Never say, as I have heard of a Christian family in this city saying, at the evening prayer hour, "I'm too tired," and in the morning, "I haven't time." Our hearts are bent to backslide. Satan goes about as a roaring lion. Don't be deceived by appearances. Watch the small things. The smallest breach in a bank often makes the biggest "run," a little leaven will leaven a whole loaf. Worship is a mockery if our hearts are not right. By our fruits shall the judgment day determine our recompense. Watch carefully the heart; be diligent, faithful, and humble and the prize shall be yours.

UNITED BRETHREN.

There was not as large a congregation as would have been there if the notice had been in Saturday's COURIER. The notice was brought in, but was left out by mistake. Rev. R. W. Parks, the presiding elder, preached an able discourse from John xix:30. The theme was "The Atonement." He first said that whatever attests Christ as a revelation, attests the plan of redemption as a revelation. No religion except Christianity has evidences founded on the veracity of a sinless character. No religion has evidences founded on the historic proof of such a miracle as the resurrection. No religion has evidences founded on a plan of salvation from sin and the guilt of sin. His references were numerous and well chosen. In conclusion, he made comparisons with other religions and the inability to satisfy the needs of man which the Christian religion supplies. The usual announcements for the week were made and the communion administered. Rev. Kelly and many of his congregation were there, as there were no services at the M. E. Church.

THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

Dr. Kirkwood announced the meeting of the Missionary society at Mr. J. W. Curns' Friday at 4 o'clock, and the businessmen's tea of the Baptist ladies at the church, Thursday evening, refreshments of various kinds. The Doctor preached from Math. Vi:33. "Seek first the Kingdom of God, and His righteousness and all other things shall be added unto you." It is generally supposed that the best preachers draw the largest crowds to listen to their words; this greatest of preachers, when thousands had gathered to hear Him, He withdrew Himself a little space, where his disciples come unto Him, when He opened his mouth and taught His sermon on the mount, teaching as they were in need of and such as is needed by the disciples of Christ in all ages of the world. The disciples were men like as we are and would naturally raise the same kind of arguments when He tells them first to seek the kingdom. "Why, Lord, shall we not prepare food and raiment for tomorrow, and lay in store something for old age?" To which He answers, "Is not your life more than meat and your body more than raiment. Behold the birds of the air and the lilies of the valley; they are fed and clothed in their beauty. Are you not of more value than they?" Yet with all these assuring promises that if ye would seek first to do my will that your wants shall be supplied, men turn aside and consume the time, set apart by God for His service, in building railroads, accumulating bank stock and all the business of life, giving yourselves no rest in your care-worn anxiety to make a living and lay up for old age when you know not but you may be called for by the angel of death before old age comes, and He may find you stealing God's time in your service of mammon, laboring for the things that perish and are of little value and refusing that which may be had through the virtue of accepting; of being willing to obey; of taking heed to the commands given by One who has a right to command; and so we are cheated by the spirit of deceit that is in us and made to forfeit that which is most valuable: the salvation of our souls. For that there is nothing worth the things of time.

BIG FIRE AT A. C.

Ten Frame Buildings Go Up in Smoke.

Total Loss, Above Insurance, $20,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Arkansas City had a big blaze Monday--a wicked blaze that put her water works to shame. It broke out about eleven o'clock. Through Dick Howard, of the Republican, and our courteous telephone manager, Mrs. Bishop, we "caught on" to the particulars. The rear of the St. Louis restaurant was the starting point, caught through some irregularity in the kitchen. This is in the first business block on the right going into Arkansas City from the north. Ten frame buildings joined it, on either side, and they burned like tinder. The whole ten were consumed in a remarkably short space of time. Arkansas City's petty fire department was used for all it was worth, but it only urged the fire on. Some proposed to run a car up for our fire companies, but the fire had too much headway for this. Scarcely any contents were saved. The buildings were all small, there being but two two-story ones, and had an aggregate of $6,500 insurance. The stocks were nearly all insured. The total loss, over insurance, will reach $20,000. The heaviest losers were Chas. Burnett, St. Louis restaurant, $2,700, with $1,500 insurance; Lang, N. Y. restaurant, $2,000, insurance $500; Kroenert & Austin, groceries, $2,000, insurance $1,000, A. G. Heitkam clothing, $1,600, half insured.

The buildings were owned by James and William Benedict, Kroenert & Austin, Dr. Shepard, and one or two others. Besides those named, there were burned: D. L. Means' implement house, loss $3,000; Grimes & Son, drug store, loss about $1,000; Bundrem's meat shop; Gibson and Perryman, barbers; and coal office of Ivan Robinson. If a breeze had been going, it is thought the fire would have doubled in disaster. While a loss to the occupants, there is no doubt that the burning of these old rookeries will be a blessing to the Terminus. Good brick or stone buildings will not go up, an honor to the town.

TERRIBLE ACCIDENT.

Six Souls Go Down To a Watery Grave.

Four Women and Two Men.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Yesterday morning at 8 o'clock one of the most terrible catastrophes that ever occurred on Cowley's fair domain took place at Dawson ford, fourteen miles up the Walnut, just below the mouth of Rock creek, in which six human lives and a fine team were swallowed by the waves. Mr. and Mrs. Yanson Carman and their son, Jay, and his wife and Mrs. Jim Carman, residing on Rock creek, hitched up early Sunday morning and started to spend the day gathering wild plums on the Arkansas River. They drove a very fine large bay team to a farm wagon. Passing by the home of William Cates, a mile below Carman's, they stopped, told Cates where they were going, and asked he and his wife to go along. They agreed and Cates hitched his team to the spring wagon, and started. Jay Carman and his wife got out to occupy the back seat of the spring wagon, and Mr. Yanson Carman, wife, and Mrs. Jim Carman drove on. Cates followed up some quarter of a mile behind. The old gentleman went on down to the Dawson ford. Though living only a few miles from this ford, he hadn't crossed it for two years. There was no guide board and he noticed nothing wrong, besides he knew that Mr. S. C. Cunningham, living near Seeley, had crossed there the evening before on his way to visit his brother-in-law, John Stalter. But there had been a rain up the river, making a raise of four feet. The horses had hardly touched the water before they were swimming. The swift current whirled them down stream. The wagon box floated off with the women in it. Mr. Carman held the lines and got out on the horses, in hopes of extricating them, but one whirled over the other, and all went down. About this time the wagon box struck the current, tipped over, and sank. Mr. Carman saw the women but once--women, team, wagon, and wagon-box went as completely out of sight as though a hundred miles away, and Mr. Carman floating down the river with but little hope of ever getting out. He finally drifted into a clump of willows, and getting a death-grip, held himself up until help came. He was eighty rods below the ford, and in the excitement forgot of the others of the party, but the spring wagon seats and cushions floating down the current soon told their fate. Cates and wife and Jay Carman and wife had followed up, came to the river, noticed where the old gentleman had driven in, and seeing nothing of the head party, supposed they had crossed over. Not a riffle of suspicion could be seen. A young man named Johnson, working for Mr. Sheets, twenty rods from the ford, ran out to tell Cates he couldn't cross, but he was too late. Johnson said he didn't see the first team pass. Running after Cates as fast as he could, he reached the ford approach just in time to see the spring wagon and party go under. The harness were farm harness with steel tug butts, and the tugs, when slackened, slipped right off the single trees, let the horses loose, and they swam across and got out. Johnson threw off his coat, sprang in, and grabbed Mrs. Carman; but she had already gone under three or four times, and the current was so swift that he got ashore a half mile below, almost dead himself, and Mrs. Carman entirely gone. He tried to resuscitate her, but life had gone. Johnson says the last he saw of Cates and Jay Carman they were trying to save Mrs. Cates. She was a very heavy woman and it is supposed that she drowned both Cates and Carman. The terrible screaming brought Messrs. Sheets and Starling, each living twenty rods away, one on one side of the river and one on the other, but scarcely a riffle told them of the terrible disaster when they got there five or ten minutes after they heard the screaming. Yanson Carman soon let them know, by his screams, where he was, and ropes were thrown out and he was brought ashore. The alarm was soon spread and hundreds of people flocked to the scene; and the search for the bodies began. Mr. Carman and wife were about sixty years old, and he was frantic with grief over the awful calamity. Jay Carman was thirty-five and Cates about forty. Sunday the body of the old lady was found and Monday Jay's was recovered. The others were not found at last reports. The bodies found had drifted down the stream nearly half a mile. The teams and wagons were also dragged out. The three bodies were buried Monday. The Carman's came into that neighborhood two years ago. There were six or seven voters among them, all men of means and influence. One is a partner in the sheep business with John Stalter. Mr. Cates was formerly proprietor of the Douglass Hotel, which he traded four years ago for J. W. Medder's farm on Rock, where he has since lived. All the unfortunates were highly esteemed and their sad ending has cast a terrible gloom over the entire neighborhood. There will now be a big clamor for a bridge across the Walnut up thee. There isn't a bridge between Douglass and Winfield. The Dawson ford is a specially mean one. Three or four teams and several lives have been lost there before. Mr. S. C. Cunningham, who assisted all day Sunday in recovering the bodies, had to come clear down to Winfield, twelve miles around, to get home, near Seeley. He was at Carman's Saturday evening, just having crossed this ford, and they told him of their intended Sunday trip.

AN EXCURSION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A number of our people, ladies and gentlemen, young and old, are very desirous of an excursion down the "Ragin' Arkansaw" on the "Kansas Millers." County Commissioner Walton has consulted with Captain T. S. Morehead and has the promise of the boat for Thursday. Mr. Walton is also trying to arrange an excursion train down in the morning, but Mr. Ingersoll, of the Santa Fe depot, at the Terminus, is uncertain whether this can be done. A train to return at night is assured and the crowd can go down at noon. One hundred can be comfortably seated on the boat and one hundred and thirty is the limit. It would be a delightful, charming trip. The boat fare, just enough to pay expenses, will be 50 cents per capita, and the whole trip will not cost over $1.50 apiece. Mr. Walton will complete arrangements in time to duly advertise it in THE DAILY.

TALLY ONE FOR WINFIELD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

City Marshal Fisher, of Wellington, came over here Saturday. Being a little belated, he attempted to go back on the special carrying the soldiers west, but he only got as far as the water tank, when he was bounced. Our city marshal, McFadden, who is always upon the alert to take in any straggler, came across Marshal Fisher and took him in notwithstanding Fisher's explanations, but after showing up his credentials he was let go. Hereafter Marshal Fisher will look out how he is fooling around in the "rhubarbs."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Ed. Bedilion is always happy to catch an immigrant--especially one promising a first class citizen. One arrived Sunday, and, for a wonder, no other real estate men fooled around him--just gave him entirely over to Ed. The stranger was in bad shape to appear in our arena, in an entirely nude condition, and after skirmishing through all the drawers in the house, Ed. finally found some clothes to donate to him. After being fixed up in a new suit, he was as fine a looking fellow as you ever saw, and Ed. danced all around over his good luck. The stranger weighs nine pounds, and has come to stay with Mr. and Mrs. Bedilion, who treat him just like one of the family--if not more so.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Udall Sentinel puts in its oar for an excursion of several days on the "Kansas Millers," for the Cowley County editors and their wives and sweethearts. It is certainly a grand trip and would furnish fine recreation for the tired knights of the faber and be of great benefit to the Navigation Company and the county generally. The company is favorable to it, and it will probably be arranged soon. The editors of the county, with their wives, would make a big crowd when gathered together--one to be proud of.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

One of our citizens, of portly frame and sweet, gentle voice, is a daisy in downing the festive-tramp. One tackled him in front of Myton's block the other evening with, "Please sir, will you give a hungry fellow a dime?" With a withering stare the portly man said, "What in the h l are you doing on this side of the street? I'm working this side myself." The tramp vamoosed with the parting words, "You go to h l, d n you."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Hazelton, Barbour County, Express is jubilant over the fact that next week will witness the completion of the S. K. railroad to that place, and says their celebration committee have secured an excursion train from Winfield west along the line to that place at two-thirds one-way fare for the round trip, making the fare but $1.70 out and back. A big free dinner, speeches, music, etc., are on the program.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

What a lovely climate this. No matter how warm it gets during the day, the nights are always cool, so that a man like our old sinner--who has a clear conscience and an empty purse, can enjoy a night's rest.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers, filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Mary J Swarts and husband to Eliza J Weir, lots 9 and 10, blk 192, A. C.: $19

Mary J Swarts and husband to G. E. Herbert, lots 21, 22, and 23, blk 198, Swarts' ad to A. C.: $45

M L Robinson et ux to Joseph Al , lot 4 blk 14, Grand Summit: $100.

George D Headrick to Hattie P Dresser, lots 4, 5, and 6, blk 267, Fuller's ad to Winfield: $500

Henry C. Miller et ux to John Cox, w hf sw qr 36-31-5e, 80 acres, and pt sw qr nw qr 36-31-5e: $3,000

Adain B. Glass & husband to B W Matlack se ¼ 20-6e-36 qc $375

Sam'l M Bastin et ux to Benj L Wilson, se ¼ 12-30-5e: $2,000

Brentess M. Mellen to John W Irons, one-tenth of s ½ se ¼ sec 5 and n ½ ne ¼ 8-35-5e: $250

Chas F Allison et ux to Jas England, nw ¼ sw ¼ sec 24 and ne ¼ se ¼ 28-33-7e, 80 acres: $1,000

William W Ward et ux to Jacob Smith, lot 5-6-35 and lots 30, 31, 31-34-8e, 135 acres: $600

John Moses et ux to John J. Moore, the se ¼ of the sw ¼ of the se ¼ of sec 1, and ne ¼ of nw ¼ and the nw ¼ of the ne ¼ of sec 12-30-e: $640

George W. Drum et ux to Honor Bennett, the n ½ of sec 22-31-8e: $1,500

Robert C. Smith to S Smith, the n ½ of nw ¼ and ne ¼ sec 17-35-s5e: $2,500

Milton Zimmerman et ux to A. J. Zimmerman, lots 9, blk 248, Buller's addition to Winfield: $900

Albert A. Newman and Tyler H. McLaughlin et ux to John W. Reynolds, lots 27, 28, 29, 30, blk 12, lots 9, 10, blk 38, Ark City: $500

Emma McCarter to Annie S. Rarick, lot 28, blk 99, Ark City: $25

Byron R O'Connor et ux to Elizabeth O'Connor, w ½ sec 28 and e ½ of sw ¼ and e ½ nw ¼ sec 29 and 27 lots in 30-32-8-e, 2002 acres: $20,600

Harriet H. Chamberlin to James C. Topliff, lot 6, blk 71, lot 8, blk 52, lot 24, blk 65, lots 10 and 11, blk 157, Ark City, qc and w: $100

B. B. Breebe et ux to B W Matlack, lot 20, blk 146, A. C.: $25

Albert G Heitkam, lots 9 and 10, blk 120, Arkansas City: $200

Albert Roberts et ux to Ella E Fleming, lot 7, blk 271, Winfield: $825

Burden Town Co to J H Morgan, lot 19, blk , $40

Lizzie B Greer and husband to Lenore Snyder, lots 23, 24, and 25, blk 93, Arkansas City, q c: $1

J C Fuller et ux to P Duncan, lot 4, blk 271, Fuller ad to Winfield: $40

Nathan W Dressie et ux to Homer Bennet, lots 5 and 6, blk 208, Fuller ad to Winfield: $1,000

James R. Larimer et ux to Joseph H Larimer, n ½ ne ¼ 22-31-4e, qc: $1

J W C Miller to Henry W Gamier, e ½ nw ¼ & w ½ ne ¼ 22-30-6e: $3,000

Chas Bassett et ux to Alexander Crinkshank, lots 6, 10, 11, and 12, 7-33-8e: $325

George B. Darlington to William H Day, e hf sw qr sec 25 and ne qr nw qr 25-30-6e: $2,400

Wm. H. Gilliard et ux to Wm. H. Day, e hf se qr 27-30-6e and w hf nw qr 26-30-6e: $3,200

J A Rinker and husband to John A Hutto, lot 6, blk 246, Citizens' ad to Winfield: $150

Jacob Ualdschmidt to Chuslin Ualdschmidt, ne third se qr 12-3s-5e: $1,313

Alfred D. Hawk et al to Adelia P Baird, lot 23 and pt lot 24, blk 47: $125

J L Henry et ux to Adelia P Baird, lots 21-22, blk 47, Ark City, qc: $1

Albert A Newman to Fed A Pearl, lots 11-12, blk 28, A. C.: $100

Julia E. McLaury and husband to Snyder & Hutchison, lots 26 and 27, blk 140, A. C.: $160

Mary C Hemenway to William E Brown, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 20, block 26, town of Lazette: $250

Thompson Hemenway to William E Brown, lots 4 and 5, blk 12 and 15, blk 27, Lazette: $15 [This entry was really messed up by newspaper.]

Frank J Hess et ux to Mary E Ford, lot 1, blk 48, A. C.: $140

Albert A Newman et ux to Mary E Ford, lot 2, blk 48, A. C.: $125

Joseph T Crow to Mary E Van Scaik, ne qr nw qr 30-3e-7-e: $250

Susan F Godfrey and husband to James W Popham, lots 12 and 13, blk 182, A C: $250

AN INTERESTING CASE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

John A. and Chas. A. Riehl, minor sons of Mrs. Eliza Riehl, have filed in the District Court, by their guardian, Daniel Mater, suit against Joseph Likowski, for $5,000 damages, charging him with causing the death of their father, Jacob Riehl, whom they claim died on July 22nd, 1877, from liquors obtained and drank in Likowski's saloon in this city. Attachment and garnishee are field with the case, attaching Joe's property next to Curns & Manser's real estate office, and garnisheing money belonging to Joe, in the hands of Eliza Riehl, G. H. Buckman, and E. J. Crary. Mrs. Riehl, it will be remembered, litigated with Likowski for years over the latter's west Main property. It was decided a few months ago, in the Supreme Court of the State, Likowski gaining the suit on the grounds of the Riehl deed being only in trust, a contract to which effect Joe held. In this damage suit, A. B. Jetmore & Son, of Topeka, and Jennings & Troup, of our city, are attorneys for the plaintiffs.

SOME IMPROVEMENTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Methodists are getting their church spire well under way and it adds greatly to the building's appearance--is the finishing touch that has so long been needed. John McAlister and Mr. Armstrong are constructing it. The new pews have been put in, the choir stand raised even with the pulpit, and the church's interior is now very complete, convenient, and comfortable. The church will re reopened August 2nd, by Bishop Ninde.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The G. A. R. now meets on the second and fourth Mondays of each month, instead of Wednesdays, as heretofore.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

[Skipped Local Market Report.]

OUR NEW FEATURE. THE LATEST MARKETS.

Todays' Markets in Chicago and Kansas City By Special Telegraph

To The Daily Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

CHICAGO, July 22, 2 p.m.

Wheat, cash: 87-3/4. Wheat, August: 88-1/2. Wheat, September: 90-3/4.

Corn, cash: 46. Corn, August: 45-1/2.

KANSAS CITY, July 22, 2 p.m.

Wheat, No. 2 red, cash: 7-1/8. Wheat, No. 2 red, August: 79.

Corn, cash: 34-3/4. Corn, August: 34-3/4.

Hogs: $4.30.

OUR COUNTY POOR FARM.

One of Cowley County's Praise Worthy Institutions.

"Blessed are the Poor."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Board of County Commissioners drove out Monday afternoon to view the poor house. Through their courtesy our reporter was taken along. No doubt most of the citizens of this county are aware that we have one of the best locations and buildings for the purpose of caring for the destitute, if not the best, of any county in Kansas. Somewhat over one year ago the County Commissioners purchased the Joe Mack farm two miles southeast of this city, containing one hundred and fifty acres, at fifty dollars per acre. This is a number one piece of land. There is plenty of good water and some timber. This spring the contract was let for a building suitable for the poor. This building occupies a shady grove about the center of the farm, east and west. It stands upon a site from which the surrounding country can plainly be seen and the city of Winfield. The building is 30 x 50; facing north and south, built of stone, the front pitch faced rouge work, the rest of the building rubble work. It is three stories high including a basement. The basement consists of a dining room and kitchen, side by side. North of this is a large room unfinished, which will be used for a cellar and store room. Two short flights of stairs lead out of the dining room and kitchen to the second story. Here a hall runs the full length of the building. At the north end of the hall is the sitting room, a pleasant and commodious room. Opposite this is a room for the sick, or it may be used for a second sitting room. Along each side of the hall are bedrooms of ample size. On the second floor are eight rooms. An easy flight of stairs ascends to the third story. This is not finished yet on account of a lack of funds. When the third story is finished, the house will contain twenty rooms. It struck us at once upon viewing this pleasant place that old age could here while away the most pleasant hours of their existence, away from the bustle of a noisy life. The infirm, the crippled, and the forsaken, the young, the old, and the middle aged can find a home here if they deserve it, and the pleasant surroundings will dispel the cutting thoughts of what might have been. Cowley County has been badly in need of an institution of this kind for some time. The building costs about $3,100, the land $7,500. This more than exhausts the fund of $10,000 appropriated for this purpose. We don't believe the county could duplicate it today for $12,000. This farm should be more than self-sustaining, and under the able supervision of our "County Dads," will be so. Our Commissioners have shown excellent judgment in selecting this site and in the management all the way through. The work is all first class. J. B. Stannard is the architect and superintendent, and has shown his ability in this line. Conner & Sons did the stone work in their usual workmanship like manner. Armstrong & Reeves were the carpenters, and did it well. Harvey and Frazier were the plasterers and made a very fine job. Shaw and Barnes executed the painting in a first-class manner. Take it all in all, it is a public institution we can well be proud of.

THE DROWNING FINAL.

The Bodies All Found and Other Particulars of the Catastrophe.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Dr. W. B. Blackstone and Mr. H. B. Ross returned Tuesday from the scene of the terrible Carman-Cates drowning. The Doctor and Mr. Ross are from the old home of the Carman's, Hebron, Indiana, and knew them well. Two of the bodies were recovered Sunday and the other three Monday, the last at 6 o'clock, a mile and a half below the ford. Four of the bodies were buried Monday and the other two, Mrs. Jay and Mrs. Jim Carman, are being kept, on ice, awaiting the arrival of their relatives from Indiana, who were expected today. The body of Mrs. Jim Carman, she having no children or relatives here, will likely be sent to Indiana for interment. William Cates and wife leave five children, from seven to nineteen. Mr. and Mrs. Jay Carman leave but one child, a girl of twelve. Further particulars develop the fact that there was some uncertainty as to the condition of the river, in the mind of the old lady Carman. She wanted to wait till Cates came. Anson Carman got out, saw tracks where a wagon had crossed the evening before, and concluding that all was well, drove in. The horses went clear under almost before the wagon was in the water, and all whirled down stream. The wagon soon upset and, with a woman clinging to each arm, Mr. Carman was thrown into the stream. He had never swam a rod in his life and was taken under several times, when he came up under an overhanging willow and grabbed it. He doesn't know how the women's hold on him was relinquished. Neither Cates or Jay Carman could swim a lick. No one knows the thoughts of Cates as he drove in--all was closed by the waters. Dr. Blackstone says the whole neighborhood, for miles around, is torn up over this awful accident, and the banks of the river, for a mile down, were black with people, anxious to aid in the search. Both families were prominent in Rock township, of considerable means and influence.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Go to H. D. McCormick's great Public sale six miles south of Winfield, next Tuesday, wit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Miss Maggie Limbocker spent Sunday with her sister, Mrs. John Davis, at New Salem.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

J. H. Fazel, the shorthand man, Sundayed, as usual, at his home in Cambridge.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Chas. C. Black left Saturday evening for St. Joe on D. M. & A. business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

E. A. Millard spent Sunday with his folks at Burden.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Al. Carr left on the S. F. Monday afternoon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Rev. S. B. Fleming and T. V. McConn were up from Arkansas City Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Robert Drake and Henry Estes were over from Burden Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

D. J. Buckley and daughter were up from the Terminus for Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Will Harlow and Scott Weaverling were over from Burden Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire was taken with a congestive chill Sunday, and is seriously laid up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Father Kelly went to Wellington Monday to make preparations in regard to moving there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

W. V. Raymond and Andy Delzell were up from Arkansas City Monday, returning Tuesday morning. It was a fair attraction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mrs. S. A. White, after a very pleasant visit of four weeks with her son, Clarence Murdock, left this afternoon for her home in Urbana, Illinois.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

James Lorton spent Sunday in Wellington, with his cousin, W. C. Galbreth, and--well, we promised to keep still. Sweet young lady, you know.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Capt. Rarick brought up Dick O'Dell Saturday from Arkansas City--one of the Oklahoma laymen, who refused to give bond, preferring to go to jail, a martyr.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. N. R. Wilson has broken the ground for a handsome and commodious residence on East Eleventh avenue. It will contain ten rooms, and is of latest design.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Capt. Huffman returned Sunday from a few days at Ponca agency. He witnessed a big Indian war dance and "caught on" to many characteristics of the noble Red Skins.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Frank K. Raymond was over from Winfield Saturday, and seemed to take great interest in listening to the several stories connected with the judgeship contest. Wellingtonian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

James S. Rothrock's days of widowerhood vicissitudes are ended and he is happy. His wife and family have returned from a delightful two month's visit in the Keystone state.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Miss Fannie Headrick retires from the Dollar Store Saturday. Her services have been faithful and efficient and she will be missed. She goes to Illinois soon for a two months' visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mary Gassaway, the frail female who has had quarters at the Hotel de Finch for a month or more, was released by the County Commissioners Monday and told to go her way and sin no more.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Samuel Munch and Margaret Offen, she of Cowley and he of Chautauqua, received the document Tuesday to join "two souls with but a single thought, two hearts that beat as one.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Wm. H. Snyder, of the Territory, and Josie Shockley, of this county, are the latest matrimonial victims, having secured the blissful instrument of Judge Gans Friday, that will make them double.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Jno. D. Pryor and family, and the Misses Haidie, Ida, and Ella Trezise, spent Sunday with the latter's parents, seven miles south on the Walnut, and took in the Holiness camp meeting by way of diversity.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Miss Nona Calhoun, of Maysville, Kentucky, a cousin of Miss Bert Morford, is visiting in the home of Chas. F. Bahntge. She is a distant relative of the famous John C. Calhoun and a highly accomplished young lady.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

S. Hamilton, from Alleghany City, Pennsylvania, dropped in Monday. He is a brother of John Hamilton, of Richland township. Mr. Hamilton has not seen his brother since 1863 when they were soldiering together.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

M. C. Cavenaugh, the same happy "Mike" who used to handle the electricity at the S. K. depot here, spent Sunday with his Winfield friends. Mike is agent of the S. K. at Elk Falls and doing well, as he deserves.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Rev. and Mrs. M. L. Gates came down from Wichita Tuesday. Rev. Gates is presiding Elder of the Kingman district of the M. E. Church, has bought property here, and will soon make this his home headquarters.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. Benj. Dix, father of David and John, was taken dangerously ill, with flux, at the Holiness camp meeting Sunday, and was brought home in a very critical condition. It is feared the old gentleman cannot recover.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Hoosier grocery has a twig of an apple tree two feet long, which has thirty large, well formed apples upon it. This grew on J. D. Cochran's farm, two miles northeast of this city. Cowley grows big things, even to apples.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

J. F. Witheron and John Tully were before the Police Court Tuesday, to the usual tune, for quarreling. Henry Mont was also up for taking an overdose of liquid refreshment. He blamed it on his forefathers, from whom he says he inherited the appetite.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The cases of James S. Sterrett against Joseph W. Colom, et al, appeal from Buckman's court to recover $324 on promissory note, and Mary H. Buck vs. Whitfield D. Mathews, foreclosure of $3,400 mortgage, were filed yesterday in the District Court.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Rev. F. A. Brady was down from Udall Tuesday. He fell into our den looking weary. He grabbed a pencil and tablet and proceeded to let off his rankled feelings from the faber's end. He had fallen into a chigger's nest. Result elsewhere. Read and laugh.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

G. W. Williams and Mary D. Cox were united in the bonds which can only be severed by a divorce court, at New Salem Sunday. They are possessed of qualities that promise much. We hope they will go through on the slow freight of safety and happiness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Chas. Elendon [Elenwood], charged with stealing Stout's horse at Burden, was brought before Judge Buckman Tuesday, waived preliminary hearing, and was bound over with bond of $500. He found the horse tied to a hitching post, rode him down here, and sold him. He can't give bail.

["Elenwood" name given in prior article. "Elendon was given in above article.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

John Wilson is home from his Michigan trip and again at his tonsorial chair, the same happy John as ever, only more so, over the elegant trip he had. He took in Ann Arbor, Grand Rapids, Chicago, and other noted places, returning better satisfied than ever. John, like everybody else, thinks Chicago can't hold a candle to Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mr. J. S. Jennings, of the Wichita Republic, was in the city Saturday and dropped in on THE COURIER. He was returning from a visit with S. M. Fall, in the Grouse Valley. He was accompanied by a sack of fine apples raised by Mr. Fall--taking them up to show poor old Sedgwick County some of the superior glories of Cowley.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

D. T. Parker, Superintendent of the Southwestern division of the Wells, Fargo Express, and T. X. Donahue, Fargo route agent of the S. K., spent Sunday with C. W. Taylor, agent of the Fargo here. Mr. Parker is the new superintendent and makes the trip over the line to get acquainted with the different agents.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Jailor Finch has had the county guests exercising on the courthouse grounds, behind a lawn mower until a lovelier view was never presented. The trees have been spaded around and are growing luxuriantly, and the grass is a perfect mat. A very few years will give us the finest courthouse grounds in the land: lovely shade and as neat all around as a blooming maiden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Capt. H. P. Barnes and Samuel Clarke, pilot and engineer of the "Kansas Millers," came up from Arkansas City Monday. Capt. Barnes came up to see his old friend. Capt. John Lowry, with whom he steam-boated years ago on the Illinois river. Great stories are always insured when two old steamboat captains meet for the first time in fourteen years or more.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The night blooming Cereus of Mr. Ira Kyger drew a large number of admiring spectators Saturday night. At eight o'clock it began to spread its lovely petals. They were as white as wax and peeped out from the bell-shaped bud with beauty exquisite. It continued to bloom until twelve o'clock, when its bud closed over it, to open no more till next year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Judge Gans got an injury returning from Burden the other night, that is making his days miserable. He was sitting in a chair in the caboose of the night freight. At New Salem the train was signaled, when it was nearly passed, and the straight air was thrown on the breaks, bringing things to a halt as quick as lightning. The Judge's back had a close commune with the corner of the train box and laid him out for a few seconds. It gave his back and shoulders a very bad wrench.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

M. C. Klingman sends us the Meriden Report, Jefferson County, a paper he has just started with the appendage "please ex." You bet we will. "Mac" is one of the old COURIER boys, one of Cowley's pioneers--one who grew up and got his "larning" on her soil, and we are glad to note his advance. Mac and the writer shot ideas and paper wads together at the first term taught in the first country schoolhouse built in this county, Excelsior, whose first school was held in 1870.

OBEDIENCE TO LAW.

A Grand Lecture on the Foundation Principles of Our Government.

Delivered Last Night by Dr. Kirkwood

Before the Normal Students and Our Citizens.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The lecture of Dr. W. R. Kirkwood, our Presbyterian pastor, before a congregation of Normal students and citizens at the Presbyterian church Tuesday night should be indelibly impressed upon every mind. It was on "Obedience to Law," and went down to the bottom of the great principles upon which our Republic stands. Ministers speak of law, said the Doctor, meaning thereby a principle of nature, and an enunciation of a principal of moral conduct, contained in the Bible. The law is supposed to have an author, God; to have a sanction, or an evil, attached to it as a penalty for disobedience; that God, as judge, passes judgment and sees to it that the penalty is inflicted for disobedience. A great lawyer, a Christian at least in theory, lays down the principle that this law, written in nature and its features brought out distinctly in the Bible, lies at the basis of all our most advanced national statutory provisions; and, in the less advanced, that the natural principle alone is the basis of such provisions. The astronomer proclaims the existence of law governing the universe in its great combinations. The chemist proclaims the existence of law governing the universe of matter in its molecular combinations. The evolutionist proclaims law, in still higher range, bridging the chasm between the non-living and the living, between death and life, between matter and thought; and that this law, for all that he can see, is self-executing if not self-originated or eternal. At any rate, he gets back only to an eternal, immutable, immanent, persistent, everywhere present force, which he does not and cannot know. Of this class, a portion turns with scorn from the idea of a God who is the personal creator, law giver, judge, and executor of law. They mock at those who find a law of conduct in nature, which law is based on an eternal difference between right and wrong. Hence it has come to pass that, in jurisprudence, the idea of this high original source of law is excluded by many, and the whole system is based on the matter of command, without regard to the law of nature or to God. There must somewhere be an immutable standard of justice and equity. Otherwise, law may be anything that the "superior human power" may choose "to impose on the inferior human power," and all will rest on the principle that "might makes right." Do the people exist for the benefit of the rulers, or the rulers and government for the benefit of the people? I assume, without argument, that an American audience will accept as truth the answer which I make that rulers and governments exist for the benefit of the people. We have prescriptive laws--laws which prescribe certain duties for the people; the law requiring allegiance to the Government; the law prescribing the right and duty of the people to cast their ballots at certain times, in certain ways, for certain officers, or for the adoption of certain principles of Government; the law prescribing the right and duty of the people to pay taxes for the maintenance of the machinery of Government. Then we have a law prohibiting treason to the Government; a law prohibiting murder, another prohibiting theft in all its forms, another prohibiting arson, another prohibiting adultery and bigamy, and, in Kansas, another prohibiting the traffic in intoxicating beverages. Besides our statutory provisions for regulating affairs, we have inherited, through Great Britain, from the old Roman Government, what is known as Common Law, the principles of which prevail in our courts, when there is no statutory provision covering the case.

These laws have their origin, some in the National Government; some in the State Governments; and others in City Governments. They have their sanctions, or penalties, attached to each. And courts and executive officers are provided for the careful administration of law and justice. The injured have only to appeal to the great Caesar through the courts to have all wrongs righted, and all rights made sure. This is the theory of our Government, and, as a theory, it is immeasurably the best on earth, so far as I am able to judge. Being so good in its character, there arises the obligation to obey law, on the part of all the citizens. The people should obey the laws in letter and in spirit. They should do what the law requires them to do. They should abstain from doing what the law forbids. All the people should be thus obedient. No man is above the law. The lawmaker is bound to obey the law he helps to make, with the same docility as the private citizen. The judge upon the bench should see to it that he does not violate the law whose majesty he is exalted to the bench to uphold. The executive officer should see to it that, while he requires others to obey the law, he obeys it himself. More still, by statute the duties of the various officers are settled, fixed; and these officers are solemnly sworn to perform their duties faithfully; so that a double obligation rests upon officials to keep--to obey--the laws--all laws--in both letter and spirit. But this sworn obligation to perform the duties of his office binds the executive officer to arrest the violator of law. A common plea for neglect is that the officer is not bound to arrest until complaint is made. But now suppose a police officer sees a party of cracksmen, at midnight, working on the door or window of a store or dwelling; must he wait until complaint is made by the owner after the store is broken and the goods gone? Does he not feel bound to make the arrest at once? And if so in the case of one law, so also in the case of all laws. But suppose the law is not popular with a minority, large or small; shall, then, that law be also enforced by the officers of the law? Well, why not? Is it not in the statute book? Is it not there through the agency of the law-making power? And if so, is not the official sworn to execute it, whether he wear the policeman's star or club, or the judge's ermine? By the law creating his office and prescribing its duties, and by the oath he takes when he enters upon the duties of that office, each official is bound to render obedience to the law which is his master, and so obeying law to arrest and punish those who disobey, according to the letter and spirit of the law they violate. It makes no difference that the official, or some of his friends, do not like the law. It is the voice of government. It is the command of power, of authority, to the officer and to the people alike; and that officer is false to his government, false to law, false to public interest, false to himself, and false to God, who shrinks the execution of the law, because he, or his friends, do not like it.

This brings me to notice that the people who merely observe the law themselves, but who wink at violation of it by others, do not fully obey the law. The principle of obedience requires that he who sees another violating the law, shall furnish evidence to the authorities that the violation may be stopped, the disobedience punished. This principle is recognized in the case of murder, of arson, of theft. But it is not recognized in the case of certain other offenses against law. Why? Because the witness or some of his friends, or a minority of the people, dislike the law. But neither he, nor his friends, nor the minority made the law. It was legitimately made. It is on the statute book. It is the command of authority. And as a witness of a murder or a burglary is bound to report to the authorities such violations, so is he bound to report any other violations of law. Failing to do so, he makes himself a hedge to screen criminals, and so becomes a partaker of their crime.

These same principles obtain in the case of beneficent societies, of schools, colleges, and families. The laws in all these demand enforcement and obedience just as truly as in political affairs. I say political affairs, for, properly speaking, politics is the science and practice of government--the State. Of the advantages arising from obedience to the laws, I may not now speak. Besides, they are plain to everybody who will take the trouble to do even a little thinking. If all would obey the laws, the enjoyment of life, property, and character in security would be assured, and the sum total of human happiness would be greatly increased. I pass to note the evils of disobedience to law. Disobedience to law cannot be practiced without working injury, not merely to one individual, but to all the body politic. The man who commits a murder does not injure only the murdered man. Were that all, great as the injury is, it would not be of such vast import to the state. The injury is beyond the murdered man, against his family, wife, children, brothers, sisters, parents. The whole family suffers an irreparable injury. The community is injured by taking away often a valuable member. The state is injured in the same way. Besides the injury in this point of view, i. e., loss, there is another and probably a graver injury to the community and the state. When a man lifts his hand and murders his fellow, he strikes a direct blow against the law, and thereby against the state, at its very life, and thereby at the security of every life in the community and in the state. In their different lines, the same is true of many other grave crimes--confessedly true, on the part of all. But here comes another class of offenses against law, viz.: those in which a large portion of the people dislike the law. When such a law is on the statute book, it is very apt, under our government, to be an element in our election platforms and campaigns for office. In consequence, it is apt to worry the official soul very much as the devil worried Saul, or that poor fellow among the tombs. The minority who dislike the law are prone to violate it. That minority is apt to be divided between the two G. O. P.'s. It may hold the balance of power. The officials may dread to enforce the law by punishing offenders, lest they be left out in the cold at the next election. Or it may be that one party favors the law and the other opposes it, not from any particular merits or demerits in the law itself, or the principle underlying it, but because of the advantages which it seems to offer on either side, as an instrument to favor the election of the one set of candidates and the defeat of the other. Or again, both parties may heartily wish such law with its underlying principle were buried out of sight forever because it threatens evil to both. Such a case was presented in the old slavery days. Such a case is presented now, in the case of the drink traffic. We have it prohibited in Kansas. But with many it is unpopular. Many openly ridicule it, pronounce it a failure, give their influence to make it a failure. They violate it themselves, and encourage others to violate it. Bearing in mind that seven-tenths of the other crimes committed rise out of this traffic; bearing in mind that, under the license system, it has grown to gigantic proportions; and bearing in mind that three of the most powerful governments of the world are today seeking for means to destroy or mitigate its evils, to check its growing power, to destroy the political bribery and corruption to which it has so largely ministered--evils which the license theory and practice have failed to prevent or arrest--bearing all this in mind, you will see that this is not a problem to be sneered at, nor is any law which aims at a mitigation of the evils arising from such traffic to be lightly tramped under foot.

But it is on the statute book. It can work no real evil to anyone to enforce it. It is on the book, the command of power, of lawful authority. Whatever any man may think of the Kansas legislature, the law is there with the authority of the State behind it. He who smites the law smites the State a blow in the face, as truly as if he committed a murder. He who encourages another to despise and trample on this law, teaches him to despise and trample on the majesty of the State, just as truly as if the encouragement were given to commit murder. The man who wantonly violates one law, has and cherishes the spirit which will lead him, under changed circumstances, to violate another law--any other law. The case of attempted murder at Springvale, in Maine, is an illustration. The officer who fails to perform his sworn duty according to the letter of the law in such case and for such reasons is guilty of breach of his oath, and shames the State of which he is an official. He is a traitor to the State, who sells out her dignity and honor for "thirty pieces of silver." But if one law may be condemned, despised, so may another be. If one is trampled on, so will another be. If office and money can be procured in one line, it can in another. And it comes to pass that disorder, crime, insecurity of life and property, corruption and bribery, take the places of order, obedience, safety, purity, and integrity. Government is perverted, polluted, evil runs riot, revolutions and overthrows follow, and anarchy comes after them, until out of the ruins rises an autocrat at the head of an army and makes the land his spoil. It was so with Rome. It was so with France. Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon, and wore the imperial purple. Napoleon grasped the sword, and by its means won to himself the crown, the scepter, and the throne of empire. The same principle of disobedience to law in beneficent societies, in schools, in churches, and in families works the same ruin.

You who are gathered here tonight are specially interested in the matter of schools, and school government. You hold a high and honorable position as teachers. Your calling is one of the noblest. The country owes to you and your co-laborers a debt it can never pay. But what is your work? Is it merely to teach pupils so much arithmetic, grammar, geography, and other common school or high school branches? That, to my mind, is the smallest part of your work. Behind all these studies lies the principle of persistent application, behind them lies the principle of self-control, and behind them lies the art of thinking. And behind all these lies the principle of obedience to law--and your work is to develop the pupils under your care along all these lines. That you may do so you are clothed with authority. In your work obedience is a prime necessity. You cannot do the best work unless you can enforce obedience. Enforced obedience, whether it be by one means or another, trains the pupil to self-control. By the combination of these two, you secure application, more and more complete until it becomes a fixed habit. And through the practical application of these principles, the pupil grows into the habit of study, and step by step, acquires the art of thinking, not merely for a minute or two, nor on a pleasant subject, but consecutively, earnestly, patiently, until he masters the difficulty. And so through all this varied and intricate process you train these pupils to be strong, to become conquerors--conquerors of self, and then conquerors of the difficulties which lie in their way. So trained, these pupils become fit for citizenship. They learn under your government that law is to be reverenced and obeyed. They learn that only so can order be maintained, individual rights guarded, prosperity promoted, and success, in the better sense of the word, attained. Largely on the shoulders of you, teachers, rests the character of the next generation of American citizens. You who faithfully and diligently do your work, are doing a work which will help in great measure to make that generation wise, thoughtful, earnest, noble men and women, worthy to be citizens of the great Republic, and to hand it down to posterity a nobler legacy than it was when they received it at our hands.

The lecture consumed over an hour, and was listened to with marked attention. We have given above little more than a gist of it.

FLORAL HAPPY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.



Floral has secured a station of the K. C. & S. W. railroad, and her people are rejoicing. The principal owners will form a town company immediately, plat the town, and put numerous lots on sale. The location of this place is admirable, being ten miles from Winfield, a good distance from competing points, surrounded by a splendid farming section and enterprising people. It will soon make a good town. Side track and all shipping facilities are given it.

PICNIC AT OXFORD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Sumner County Normal and the Cowley County Normal will meet Saturday at Oxford and have a big picnic. All teachers, school officers, and everyone are cordially invited to come and have a big time.

EYE AND EAR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Dr. Brandom or Hays of Twin Brothers Infirmary, Wichita, will visit Winfield every first and third Monday and Tuesday of each month. Measures eyes for compound spectacles.

FOUND.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A new pair of pants and a handkerchief, bought of J. J. Carson & Co. Owner can have same by calling at this office, proving property, and paying charges of this notice.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A basket meeting will be held at the Prairie Ridge schoolhouse, 6 miles west of Dexter, on Sunday, August 2nd. Services will be conducted by Rev. T. W. Woodrow, Universalist minister, of Hutchinson.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Dr. Judd & Smith's Electric Belt for sale by Quincy A. Glass, agents for Cowley County.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. "OLIVIA."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Corn is looking splendid at present, and some of it is silking out.

Miss Rowe, of Winfield, is the guest of Miss Fannie Saunders this week.

Mr. Starr will go back to his claim as soon as he finishes his work here.

Messrs. Crawford and Geo. Rowe were guests at Mr. Hoyland's, Sr., lately.

Miss Cassell, of Winfield, visited the Misses Jackson and Saunders lately.

Miss Mary Dalgarn was home on Saturday for a short visit from the Normal.

Mrs. Lucas, Sr., made a visit to the McMillen and Hoyland families this week.

I'll tell about the wedding in my next that is on the programme for this week. Guess.

The elder and deacons of the Presbyterian church were ordained on Sunday the 12th.

Mrs. Bovee spent almost a week with the Gilmore family, and they report a good visit.

Mrs. Carter has recovered from her recent illness. Mr. Carter spent a day in Moline this week.

Mrs. Pixley is all smiles over the addition to their household furniture, viz., a nice, new gasoline stove.

Rev. Bicknell and family now reside in the new parsonage. The children and Miss Bicknell are much better.

Mr. Fitzgerald, of Dodge City, Kansas, was a welcome guest in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hoyland, recently.

Mrs. Lucas and daughters have returned from their Franklin County visit and express themselves highly entertained.

Stacking grain is the chief occupation of the farmers at present, and Mr. J. D. Dalgarn is counted one of the best Salem stackers.

Mr. Miller, owner of the Douglass farm, is havin a serious time with one of his eyes. He has gone to St. Joe to consult an oculist.

Roasting ears of sweet corn variety is on the bill of fare; also the "deadly cucumber" and a few early cabbages that did not fall victims to the ravages of the web worm.

Miss Limbocker, of Winfield, is a Salem guest and her smiling face illuminated Olivia's home the first of the week with Mr. and Mrs. Davis, Mr. Zyke, and Miss Dolly Gilmore with her.

Mr. Joe McMillen was made happy by a visit from his uncle, Mr. Mahany, of Labette County, recently. Two gentlemen friends from there also made Mr. and Mrs. McMillen a pleasant call on Thursday.

Mr. "Coot" Miller sold his farm to Mr. Eli Reid, and Mr. John Cox traded his store, etc., to Mr. Reid for the farm. Mr. Miller and family will leave their pretty Salem home for one in some of the western counties.

Mr. and Mrs. John Chase have assumed the dignity of papa and mamma, and little Master Chase will soon be old enough to go over to Tisdale and visit his grandpa. We congratulate them on their fine boy.

Mr. Ford is abroad in our pretty country with his steam thresher, and its toot breaks in upon our reveries. Mr. Ford is an excellent performer at the ringing anvil and the farmers will miss the gay village blacksmith while he is threshing.

Every bachelor in our vicinity cannot have a princess for a wife, but Mr. Samuel May succeeded in carrying off Miss Princess Walker on Sunday, the 12th inst. We trust the sunshine of May will always illumine the pathway of the trusting wife. Happiness true and lasting is my wish for their voyages on the ocean of life.

The Salemites were dreadfully alarmed on Wednesday night by seeing a building on fire in the village. Some thought the Indians were on hand and a little of every kind of fright was freely indulged in. It was the drug store of Dr. Crabtree, and contained the postoffice also. The loss is quite heavy and although the insurance covers considerable, it will not make the loss of many things good. How the fire originated is not known. Dr. Crabtree was in Burden at the time it happened, and only got home in time to see the smoking ruins. Such is life. We are sorry indeed for such happenings, and the nice little office will be missed until a better one fills its place.

SILVERDALE, NO. 28. "GOSSIP."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Farmers busy plowing for wheat.

Women folks busy canning blackberries.

There has been no rain for a week and the "weather wise" are prophesying a drouth and no corn. "Oh, ye of little faith," etc.

Some sickness in the neighborhood, among whom are Miss C. Eaton, Mr. Gilstrap's little girl, and Mr. Steiver's little daughter.

Mrs. E. Thurman returned to her home in Lamar, Missouri, after three months pleasant visit with friends and relatives in this vicinity.

Mr. Longshore, our "road boss," has been having the roads repaired. Something that was badly needed, for roads were nearly impassable in places.

Preaching at the schoolhouse Tuesday night by Rev. Mr. Walker, of Arkansas City. We understand that Mr. Harris will address the people at this place next Sunday.

Jerry Weakly's team ran away last Friday, at the road working--a smashed up wagon and a lame horse are the results. Some of the hands thought it fun to see Jerry fall in the creek, but he failed to see the joke.

MAPLE GROVE. "TYPO."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

It is needless for one to say it is warm weather.

Mr. Robert Frazer and family, of Ottawa, Kansas, made a short visit to his brother, Alex, last week.

The Sunday school at this place is in a flourishing condition under the able leadership of Alex Frazier.

Miss Jennie Negley and Miss Lillie Whitridge, of Winfield, made a flying visit in this neighborhood Sunday.

Owing to the shortage of corn last year and the prevailing high price of that article last spring, the number of hogs in this vicinity is much less than for several years.

The oat crop was never better here and millet ditto. The corn will not be over a week later than usual, if it is that, and with but few exceptions as good as could be wished for.

Considerable fear is manifested by the farmers here that the web worms will soon make their appearance again. Myriads of the millers are to be seen everywhere and it is thought they are making their deposits of eggs. This is a wide field for scientists and if anyone who understands the nature of this pest would explain the matter, it would be a considerable relief to the rural reading public.

It is currently rumored that some persons, and among them a fair damsel of this vicinity, are likely to lose their accumulated real estate in the "wild west" owing to irregularities in proving up. Sad, sad, but someone will undoubtedly be poorer and wiser.

The early peaches are just commencing to ripen. but it has not been the fortune of ye reporter to find one that did not have a worm coiled up in the most tempting part of it. Those who have trees old enough are enjoying the luxury of early apples. Blackberries are also just commencing to ripen and were never known to be larger or finer.

The wheat will not average as much as was expected two or three weeks before harvest, owing to the tremendous attack made upon it by the chinch bug the last seven or eight days before ripening, causing the grain to shrink considerably. But looking at the matter from a practicable standpoint, the farmers have very good reason to be elated over the prospect of having enough and to spare.

Uncle Johnnie Roberts says the theory that tame grass (especially timothy), is not a success in this country, is exploded, and is jubilant over the prospect of having enough timothy hay to feed him through till the next crop comes on. The writer has seen several excellent pieces of this grass growing in the neighborhood which attests Uncle Johnnie's idea. Fall sowing seems to be the most successful.

HACKNEY SCRAPINGS. "TYPO."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Corn never looked better nor grew faster.

"Hot, hotter, hottest," is the people's declension of the weather now.

Sam Watt is steadily getting better, although still in a precarious condition.

Several of the farmers have been threshing, and are being disappointed in the turnout.

The camp meeting at Melville's grove was well attended by the young people of our neighborhood.

Allie Harbaugh is again able to sit up, after a relapse of serious illness. It was thought Monday she would not live.

Mr. Fisher came to the front with the first tomatoes of the season. And, boys, remember, he bids fair to have the first "waterwilliams," too.

Frank Brown has, this year, already realized the wonderous results of a small patch of ground in fruit trees. He has just disposed of some very fine peaches at premium prices. He also has an abundance of grapes coming to maturity.

Everybody, don't forget, and come to the social at the Methodist church the coming Friday evening. The Grangers also give an initiation supper to Ed. Watt next Saturday evening.

In connection with last Sunday's Sabbath school came the funeral sermon of the late Julius E. Muret. It was delivered in a concise and heart-consoling way by our pastor, Rev. P. B. Lee.

The tramp question is one that should interest all. Monday morning, the writer, with others, found four safely stowed away in our little box of a railway station. They are a dangerous article to lay around so loose.

TORRANCE ETCHINGS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Miss Laura Elliott is taking music lessons in Burden.

Mrs. Elliott and Alta spent Saturday visiting in Dexter.

Mr. Mart Branson and wife, of Eureka, are visiting his brother, Henry.

Miss Sallie Haygood has been quite sick the last week. She is better now.

Mrs. Crawford and her son, from Burden, spent Sunday afternoon at Capital Hill.

Misses Lou and Mable Wilson attended the dance at Burden Friday night. They report a splendid time.

Fred and Kate, from Burden, drove through our city again Sunday. I wonder why they don't stop and see Lou?

Our base ball boys played the Tisdale club Saturday. From the amount of noise they made coming home, I think they came out ahead.

The ladies missionary society of this place will give an ice cream social at the Torrance schoolhouse on Wednesday night, July 29th. Everybody is invited.

Mr. Will Higbee arrived home from Schell City last week, packed his household goods and kitchen furniture, and will start back this week to make this his future home. Will and his wife have many friends here and will be sadly missed.

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mrs. Alex Shelton is having poor health this summer.

John Anderson is putting up a good crop of timothy hay.

Mr. Fred Arnold and wife went to the Holiness meeting last Sunday.

Wm. Schwantes sold some of his hogs to J. R. Pugh for $3.75 per hundred.

Mr. George Brown's house presents a fine appearance since it was finished.

No threshing done in these parts yet, but several would like to have some oats threshed.

Mr. Alex Shelton expects to work a few days at Mr. Mentch's nursery, this week. He seems to keep himself busy.

No rain in this section for a week; yet there must have been an abundance north, for the Walnut river seems to be on a "big high."

A gentleman passing through these parts, the other day, said he would like to own a farm in Cowley, as he likes it better than any county he has seen.

Mr. Henry Weakly and Miss Capitola Linn, Mr. Joe Wilson, Miss Eva Anderson, and Laura Hanna went to the Holiness camp meeting Sunday. All seemed to enjoy themselves.

"Old Tom" starts out a little ahead. Now, as he has said some of the neighbors set a cold dinner for the harvesters, will he please name the one? or we will think he just made it up.

If "Old Sledge" wants to give a premium to the owner of the banner field of cockleburrs, let him give it to G. A. R.; but remember, he has only had charge of his farm a year, and soon the burr will be no more for I presume G. A. R. is a very stirring farmer.

HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. "MARK."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Mrs. Art Holland, from Grouse valley, is visiting relatives in this vicinity.

Our invalids, Miss Allie Harbaugh and Mr. Sam Watt, are slowly convalescing. Miss Allie's host of friends do not forget to make frequent calls.

Next Friday evening the Pleasant Valley M. E. folks will give an ice cream festival. The proceeds to be applied toward the liquidation of some church incumbrance.

Tell the Cyclones to come down and practice awhile with our Hackney Scrubs. Of course the Scrubs would lay it across them, but the drill might to them good and save them money.

The Breden Brothers, recently from Kentucky and friends of the Whitson boys, are running a steam thresher in this neighborhood. Wheat is only making about half the average yield that was anticipated.

Ike Ruth seemingly cannot forego the pleasure of catching his hand in the binder each succeeding harvest. The needle took another stitch in his hand this year. It does not scare him as much as it used to, as he is getting familiar with it now.

Our usually genial and jolly P. M. lost his equilibrium a few evenings ago over an innocent joke. Some eminent philosopher has said: "He who conquers his temper is mightier than he who wins a battle." Self-control indicates a high order of intellect.

Rev. P. B. Lee, D. D., preached Mr. Julius Muret's funeral sermon last Sabbath at Irwin. Text, Psalms xix:12. "Teach me to number my days with wisdom." The Chapel was well filled and the audience seemed much edified with the discourse.

The writer enjoyed the pleasure of feasting the "inner man" in Hon. Henry Harbaugh's splendid orchard Sunday evening. His peach trees are overloaded and some breaking down with their burden of luscious fruit. His apple trees are also bearing liberally. Mr. Harbaugh has the neatest, prettiest, and best bearing orchard in this township and adds much to the picturesqueness of his farm.

"Mark," in enumerating the Normalites in attendance at the Institute from this locality, did not desire to pass judgment on their ability, but preferred that the board of examiners should decide this question at the close of Normal. Therefore, "Neppie" (of the Telegram) reserve thy wrath until after the examination. You may need it for withering the examining board. It does us good to know that this section is represented by at least one orator at the Normal. It is a mighty still day when "Neppie" cannot raise sufficient wind to shake the persimmons.

THE CHIGGER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

This friendly little creature is among the best known and highly regarded of the insect family of Kansas. Its many talents and varied gifts challenge the attention and command the admiration of all acquainted with its habits and characteristics. These gifts offer the philosopher and student a rich field for meditation. Two thoughts strike dispassionate minds with some force. One the oft repeated and much neglected truism is: "Don't despise the day of small things." Surely if there ever was a small, insignificant creature 'tis this playful, innocent animal. He has no commanding, awe-inspiring presence to aid him. His bodily presence is contemptible. Yet he is not cast down by the fact nor does he give way to useless regrets. Small as he is, he insists upon making himself felt in the world, and none make a larger mark in life than he. What food have we here for reflection! Let the small in life overcome the temptation of complaining. There is a future before those who shall say that insignificant things may exert a wide-felt influence in the world. Second. Let us notice again: The power of silent influence. While the vast herd of buzzing insects dream vain things to attract attention by their noises, the sagacious chigger remains quiet, despising the loud, blatant methods of the wasp and the less inharmonious mosquito, who by his warning voice often fails to reach the object aimed at. The chigger, on the contrary, cannot be induced to utter one note. No allurement affects him. With his lips sealed he patiently waits 'neath the shade of the prairie grass for the coming of the calves, which he has the wisdom to remain quiet till they come. Children's calves, Indians' ankles, aye, even the pedal extremities of the aged, are all so pleasant in his eyes. What sweet morsels he will roll under his tongue--that silent, golden tongue. Those limbs appear to him like ministering angels coming to his support. Quietly he leaves his mossy shade, takes up his position in that region where he can make the best impression, and then he gets down to business, so absorbed in this one great idea of his life that he has buried himself before his presence is made known. Usually his friends realize he is around, and find to their immense joy that he is an investigator and an anatomist. He creates quite pleasurable sensations and is rewarded by heavy benedictions on his devoted head by those whom his kindness has sought out. His wants are little here below nor wants he that little long, but just about long enough to give those angry the pleasure of his acquaintance--an opportunity to reflect upon the value of silent influence.

OUR ROADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

All interior towns like Winfield depend on their trade and consequent prosperity upon the products of the soil, and the more accessible we as a city make ourselves, the more prosperous we will be as a community. It should be our aim to aid the farmer in hauling to our city the largest amount of his various products, with the least amount of labor and time. And in this question of good roads and bridges, every businessman in the community is equally interested with the farmer. In the various pressing needs of a new and growing community, roads and bridges for reason of lack of money are neglected; but with us that time is now past, and if we expect to keep our trade and secure new, we have got to cooperate with adjacent townships and make better roads. I do not expect that Winfield should do it all; but I do expect that we as interested parties shall do our part. Our city has made many complaints about Vernon's neglect to keep the west bridge in repair. It would have been good business on our part if, instead of foisting upon her a burden she did not want, we would have shown a willingness to share the expense of such burden. The people of that township would have felt more kindly to us, and there would have been no broken limbs and losses of property. A community is made up of individuals, and bulldozing tactics do not succeed with the farmer any better than the latter--particularly where you are obliged to live as neighbors, and future favors are expected. An excellent move has been made on securing the J. F. Martin road through Vernon, and the $600 may be thought by many to be excessive; but when it is recollected that the consideration is a new double track bridge across the Walnut, it will be readily recognized that the amount is not excessive. This bridge and road should have been built years ago, and at 7th avenue instead of 9th, as now proposed. The further north we make this bridge, the more territory from that direction we secure for our trade. If, when the old Bliss bridge went out, a new and better one had been built, there today would be no Kellogg, with its fine roller flour mill and its opposition stores. This is an illustration of where our "save at the spigot" policy has lost us a fine trade for all time.

In conclusion, I want to particularly call the attention of our businessmen to the condition of the Dexter road. This is a township road with Winfield and Walnut on the north and Pleasant Valley on the south; and it is one of the most important roads that leads into the city. Over it comes all the trade from Dexter, Otto, and Maple City, and I do not exaggerate when I say that for months past the condition of this road would have been a disgrace to Arkansas. There is about one hundred yards between Mr. Eddie's and Mrs. Platter's farms that for weeks have been simply impassable. Farmers have been obliged to go north to the Tisdale road, or make a long detour south; and now after eight days of dry weather, a load can be hauled through it by doubling teams. I have tried various ways to get this road worked, and for the reason that I had from six to twenty men at work in my quarries on the land east of Mr. Eddie's; and in my failure to do so, I have been subjected to additional expense and loss, and was obliged to discharge several men who would have had a steady job with good roads. I first saw the Justice, J. C. Roberts, and he said no tax was levied by Walnut and he had no money to do it with. If road tax had been levied, the Southern Kansas alone would have been obliged to pay $200 of it. My next move was by subscription, and parties answered they would not give from their private means for a public purpose where all were equally interested. I next hired two men and teams and tried to ditch it, but only succeeded in partially carrying off the water. To repair this road, I will furnish at the quarry all the broken stone necessary, and less than a hundred dollars would ditch it and give a macadamized road over the worst places. As I said at first, we are all interested in good roads leading to our city; and if I have in this article succeeded in making our businessmen feel their responsibility, it will not be long until such a road as I have described will be an impossibility in this section. J. E. CONKLIN.

NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

I am under many obligations to Mr. H. N. Chancy for withdrawing from my bond as Justice of the Peace of Silverdale township, as I do not need him or want him on that document. R. C. SMITH.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Winfield Fence Works

-OF-

SMEDLEY & GEST.

Farm, Garden, and Ornamental Fencing.

The Best, Cheapest, and Most Durable Fence Made.

FARMERS. ATTENTION!

We will furnish you with posts and fencing at the lowest possible price, and on your own terms. Will guarantee it the cheapest and best fence made. Why stay out in the cold? Fence in hour farms and get the greater profit from well-fenced lands. We came hee to stay with you. Come and see us.

SMEDLEY & GEST.

Main and 7th, Winfield, Kansas.

THE "ROSE FEVER."

A Peculiar Malady Brought on by Flower Poison.

[Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

"Doctor, I thought you would never come. I can't stand it much longer," said a young man to a Cincinnati doctor. "I've got such a pain in my head. First it was a headache, then my head got cold and the pain concentrated between my eyes. When I breathe through my nose, it feels as if my brains were being pulled out."

"Humph!" said the doctor, "been to the flower-show, have you?"

"Yes," said the young man in surprise. "I've been there two or three times."

"Well, you've got rose fever. Sometimes it's called hay fever. Some flower has poisoned you. Had a lot of patients like you this week."

When the patient had been prescribed for and had departed, the writer, who had been somewhat surprised at the diagnosis given, remarked:

"Were you jesting about that man's complaint?"

"No, certainly not. I have had a number of patients this week who have had the same trouble. Some of them have not had as severe an attack as this man has, but complain of unusual pains in the head which they cannot account for. It is a queer disease, and yet it is perfectly explainable on a natural and reasonable basis. Plants and flowers possess in nearly every instance some good or bad property. A child at play in the garden may take a fancy to eat the leaves or the seeds of a pumpkin and no harm results. The next minute or two the little thing changes its food to jimson seeds and then there is a funeral. In some cases, it is the root only of the plant which is poisonous or beneficial, and it may have to be treated in a complicated way before its qualities can be extracted. In other plants it is the leaves alone which contain the properties, and then again in many other instances they are contained in the flower. It is not, perhaps, the whole flower which is of use. It may be the corolla, or the calyx, or the stamens, or the pistils, or the petals which are charged with good or evil. And then too, as you have often heard, no doubt, the same flower or some other vegetable matter does not affect all people alike. Hay and rag weed are the best known causes of this species of catarrh, and its name, 'hay fever,' has been given to it on that account.

"There is no determining what flowers have and have not this influence. Some people are affected by tuberoses, others by lilies of various kinds. I know a big, strong man who is thrown into perfect agony by the slightest smell of flax-seed when prepared for a poultice. Another man of my acquaintance would be made violently ill if buckwheat flour is cooked in a building where he is. All these things are perfectly explainable on scientific grounds, which I don't propose to enter into now; but if you will inquire among the people who have been to the flower show, I am sure you will find many who have had sudden headache and trouble with catarrh after leaving the flowers."

GETTING OFF A FLYING TRAIN.

A Question in Physics Which the Train Boy Solved by Experiment.

[Chicago Herald.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

"Practice makes perfect," observed the train boy as he folded and smoothed the newspapers he had gathered from the seats, getting them ready to be sold again.

"Practice makes perfect. If a railroad man jumps from a train when it is making twenty miles an hour, he does pretty well if he keeps his feet, but I used to jump off the limited express on the New York Central when it was making fifty miles an hour. Did this time and again, and often with a basket of peanuts in my hands, never spilling a peanut."

"Go and tell that to some greenhorn," remarked the brakeman, as he sneaked an orange into his overcoat pocket. "Don't tell me any such lies. I know better."

"But it's the honest truth," insisted the train boy, "and I'll tell you how I did it. You are not too old to learn a thing or two, and now just keep your mouth shut and your ears open. I had a run on a special Chicago express. Every Saturday night I wanted to stop off at the town where my girl lived, but the special made no stop there. So I had to go up the road to Syracuse and there take a local train back. One day it occurred to me that by a little strategy I might get off the limited at the station and save all that time. I had noticed that just before we got to the station where my girl lived we always passed a local train, running in the same direction we were, and on the track next to us. Usually our train was going just a little faster than the local. So one day I locked up my box, put some candy in my pocket, and got down on the lower step. Just as we caught up with the rear end of the local, I stepped across to the lower step of the last car of the other train. It was just as easy as stepping from one freight car to another in the same train, even if we were making fifty miles an hour. In five minutes the local slacked up and stopped at the station, and there I was. Think about that a minute or two, you thick-headed stove-stoker, and don't be so keen about telling your betters that they lie. Ten cents or that orange, please."

A BAD CONTRETEMPS.

The Unfortunate Predicament of a British Clergyman.

[Liverpool Courier.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A minister in one of our orthodox churches, while on his way to preach a funeral sermon in the country, called to see one of his members, an old lady, who had just been making sausages, and as she felt very proud of them, insisted on the minister taking some of the links home to his family. After wrapping the sausages in a cloth, the minister carefully placed the bundle in the pocket of his great coat. Thus equipped, he started for the funeral. While attending the solemn ceremonies of the grave, some hungry dogs scented the sausages, and were not long in tracking them to the pocket of the good old man's overcoat. Of course, this was a great annoyance, and he was several times under the necessity of kicking the whelps away. The obsequies of the grave completed, the minister and the congregation repaired to the church, where the funeral discourse was to be preached. After the sermon was finished, the minister halted to make some remarks to his congregation, when a brother, who wished to have an appointment given out, ascended the stairs of the pulpit, and gave the minister's coat a hitch to get his attention. The divine, thinking it a dog having designs upon his pocket, raised his foot, gave a sudden kick, and sent the good brother sprawling down the stairs.

"You will excuse me, brethren and sisters," said the minister confusedly, and without looking at the work he had just done, "for I could not avoid it. I have sausages in my pocket, and that dog has been trying to grab them ever since he came upon the premises!"

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

John Morgan, the agent of the Queen Crescent route at Millets' Landing, Alabama, has been arrested. He was charged with embezzling $119,700 of the company's funds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The rail feeders of the Ohio Valley, in convention at Bellaire, made a formal application for re-admission to the Amalgamated Association. The feeders number about 2,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A rocket struck into the loading department of the Remington armory at Utica, N. Y., the other night, and destroyed that structure. The fire extended to the main house, damaging it to the extent of $75,000. Insured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Advices from Port Stanley, Falkland Islands, say wreckage has been washed ashore which indicates the loss with her crew of the British ship Yarra-Yarra, Captain Earl, which left Portland, Oregon, Feb. 2 for Queenstown.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

By directions of the Secretary of the Treasury, orders were sent to the Architect of the Treasury building at Washington, instructing him to cut from the roof of the Treasury building all telephone and telegraph wires.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Williams and McChristian in August last killed a peddler near Grenada, Mississippi. The concealed his body in the woods and his remains were found this spring. After Williams had been sentenced for life a few days ago, a mob took him and his companion and hung them both.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Recent news from Madagascar was of the most serious nature. Admiral Miet, wanting reinforcements, was obliged to act strictly on the defensive. Twelve thousand Hovas besieged the French, occupying the Mazanga fort. The besieged were able to communicate with Admiral Miet only by sea.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Missouri Board of Prison Inspectors decided at Jefferson City, on the 13th, to locate the branch penitentiary at Kansas City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The official report (July 13) showed that 30,000 cases of cholera had occurred in Spain since the inception of the scourge and that there had been 13,000 deaths.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Lieutenant Commander W. H. Webb, connected with the Alert on the Asiatic station, has been tried by court martial on the charge of drunkenness and found guilty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Chinese recently ordered the expulsion of the English traveler Dagleish from Yarkand. The Governor having acted hesitatingly in the execution of the order has been punished.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Fong Ah You, a Chinaman, was arrested at Montreal recently for the murder of Sing Lee at Rome, N. Y. A dagger in Fong Ah You's possession was similar to the one with which the deed was done.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Considerable excitement was created at Sheridan, Lebanon County, Pa., by receipt of news from South Mountain, three miles distant, that a mine of mica had been discovered on the Joel Trexler tract.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

In accordance with a recent act of the Legislature, Governor Oglesby issued a proclamation on the 13th recalling all existing orders against the importation of cattle into Illinois from certain localities in other States scheduled as containing pleuro-pneumonia.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Six men while running Calf Rapids, four miles from Ottawa, Canada, recently, were upset. Four of them clung to the boat and the other two swam ashore. The four on the boat floated down to the Demichuge Rapids, a half mile below, and were washed off the boat and drowned.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Key City Democratic Club, of Dubuque, Iowa, has adopted a resolution in favor of having the State Democratic convention adopt a plank declaring for a repeal of prohibition and adoption in its stead of a license law of $500, with proper bond and restrictions, similar to the Nebraska law.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A recent Durango (Col.) Special says: Buckskin Charley, son of Chief Ignacio, shot and killed Casimir, a prominent Indian of the same tribe. The trouble grew out of a trivial matter of trespass. As soon as Casimir's friends heard of the tragedy, they burned Charley's house, barns, and fences, and killed his horses. Charley fled.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

During a drunken row at Waterford, Ireland, on the 12th, between Welsh soldiers and citizens, a soldier stabbed with his bayonet one of his opponents to death. The populace became infuriated and attacked the barracks, but being threatened with powder and ball, they contented themselves with breaking windows.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The long-continued drouth in the southern provinces of Russia was reported to have completely ruined the crops in that section.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The ninety-sixth anniversary of the fall of the Bastile was celebrated in France and by French citizens in the United States very extensively on the 14th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Within four days eleven Chicago boys died of lockjaw from wounds received on the hands while exploding caps on toy pistols on the Fourth of July.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

It was denied at Washington that the President had issued an order to heads of departments that dismissals and appointments to fill places not vacant must stop.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Union of Hebrew Charities met at St. Louis on the 14th and unanimously adopted the name agreed upon for their new society, viz.: The Associated Hebrew Charities of the United States.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Munster Bank of Dublin, Ireland, closed its doors the other morning. The liabilities amounted to $850,000. The directors expressed confidence in their ability to meet the indebtedness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Louis J. Jennings, formerly editor of the New York Times, has consented to contest one of the parliamentary districts of Stockport, in Cheshire, in the Tory interest in the coming English general elections.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The report of the Illinois Department of Agriculture for July concerning the prospects for the winter wheat crop confirmed the gloomy reports issued during the season and left no hope for a yield of over 10,000,000 bushels of wheat in the State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

By the falling in of the boiler house of the Star Cloth Mill in Philadelphia the other afternoon, five men, Patrick Burris, William Ryan, August Rollander, William Linsey, and Robert Gilson were seriously and four others slightly injured. They were all taken to a hospital where Ryan died.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Pacific Mail [?Mall] Steamship Company intend to withdraw their steamers from the line between San Francisco and Australia November 1, according to a statement published in the Call. The Australian colonies declare they will not pay the steamship company a subsidy unless the United States will agree to pay a portion of it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A ranchman named Malone brought in news to Eagle Pass, Texas, recently of an Indian raid in which fifteen Mexicans were killed about forty miles above Eagle Pass on the Rio Grande. It was believed by many, however, that the Mexicans killed were slain by other Mexicans from across the Rio Grande and not by Indians.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The coasting steamer Perkiomen, of Philadelphia, was sunk in seven fathoms of water the other night by the collision off Polock Rip with the schooner Abbie C. Stubbs, which was also badly damaged.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A dispatch from Cairo of the 16th says: The Arabs of the upper classes declare El Mahdi is dead. Lupton, with his garrison, has arrived at Senaar. The famine in Kordofan has become terrible and has extended to Khartoum.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The extensive buildings of the rubber works on South street, above Twenty-fourth, Philadelphia, were completely destroyed by fire the other morning. The loss on building, stock, and machinery was estimated at $50,000. Insured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The St. Louis Globe-Democrat stated recently that there was no foundation whatever for the rumor that the Missouri Pacific and Wabash Railroads were negotiating with the Government for a fast mail service west of the Mississippi River.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The grand jury at Philadelphia found three true bills against Joseph F. Cottringer, ex-Treasurer of the Central Transportation Company, one charging him with the embezzlement of $147,500, and the others, with forging the stock of the company and uttering the same.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A special from Reno, I. T., says that while a party of cowboys, returning from a drive to the railroad, were encamped night before last on Six Mile Creek near Reno, one Harvey Lucas was shot through the head while asleep by another cowboy named Brown. The murderer escaped.



Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Congressman Holman, of the Committee to Investigate Indian Affairs, said recently that it was proposed, if possible, to concentrate the unsettled portions of the Sioux, Crows, and other tribes of Dakota in the Indian Territory, where they could be better taken care of and educated and civilized than on scattered reservations.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Judge Thacher, of the commission appointed by the United States Government to visit South America with a view to the promotion of commerce with the United States, and Mr. Curtis, Secretary of the Commission, who were saved from the wreck of the British steamer Guadiana, off the Abrolhos Basin, on June 2, while en route to New York, arrived at London on the 16th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The clearing house returns for week ended July 11 showed a small increase compared with the corresponding week of last year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Three convicts escaped from the penitentiary at Richmond, Virginia, recently, but were recaptured, two of them receiving a few buckshot before they surrendered.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

A young man named Mead, of Cincinnati, jumped overboard from the steamer Quebec the other day, near New Liverpool, Canada, and was drowned. He was suffering from aberration, caused by over study.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Discouraging reports were received recently of the progress of German colonization in the Cameroons. There were continued quarrels between the natives and officers, and the colonists were suffering greatly from fever.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

The Pioneer Press of Fort Benton states that smallpox prevails among the Indians at Poplar River. The red people were perfectly frantic and fleeing in every direction. Fears were expressed that the fugitives will carry the disease to Indian tribes west of Poplar River.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Senor Becerra, the Columbian Minister at Washington, received a telegram from Bogota recently, announcing that the rebels at Barranquilla, persisting in their determination to ascend the Magdalena River, had been completely routed at Calarnar.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

While Emperor William was taking a drive at Ems on the 12th a miserably dressed man threw a flower pot at his carriage, exclaiming: "Thus will the Empire break." No damage was done. The man was arrested. He was supposed to be insane.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Admiral Jonett has been ordered north with the Tennessee and Yantie, the two remaining vessels of the North Atlantic squadron which were sent to the Isthmus of Panama at the beginning of the recent troubles there. Considerable sickness existed on the vessel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

General Sheridan said in a recent interview that in his opinion the Arapaho tribe was peaceably inclined, that the Cheyennes alone were likely to rise, and that the occasion of the whole disturbances was the encroachments of the cattlemen and colonists on the Indian possessions.

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Sheriff's Sale. Recap. R. R. Conklin, Plaintiff, vs. Ira D. Black, Lydia C. Black, and L. D. Putnam, Defendants. Sheriff G. H. McIntire sold real estate August 3, 1885, to satisfy District Court decision against defendants.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

R. L. Walker, Register, Land Office at Wichita, gave notice that a settler was making final proof in support of his claim. Settler: William A. Watkins. Notary Public at Winfield: Grant Stafford. Witnesses: S. P. Bishop, S. F. Beck, Henry Denning, and George Heineker, all of Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Recap divorce proceedings: Mary B. Seabridge, Plaintiff, against Levi Seabridge, Defendant. Action to be taken on or before August 20, 1885. She asked for care and custody of children. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for Plaintiff.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Sheriff's Sale. Recap. M. L. Read and M. L. Robinson, Plaintiffs, vs. The Winfield Creamery, Defendant. Sheriff G. H. McIntire to sell real estate on August 3, 1885, to satisfy claim of plaintiffs. Property was appraised at $1,600. Property: Lots 8, 9, 10, block 15, in Robinson's addition to the City of Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Recap divorce proceedings: H. C. Stivers, Plaintiff, against Mary N. S. Stivers. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for Plaintiff.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 23, 1885.

Recap. R. L. Walker, Register, James L. Dyer, Receiver, Land Office at Wichita, Kansas, May 22, 1885. United States vs. Heirs of Dionis Capretz. Involved tract. Deadline: August 12, 1885, for evidence that tract belonged to heirs.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JULY 30, 1885.

DEATH OF GRANT.

The General Passes Quietly Away, Surrounded by His Family and Physicians.

He was Unconscious at the Last. The Grief of Mrs. Grant and Children.

Thought Probable that He will be Buried at the Soldiers' Home at Washington.

The President Sends His Condolences. His Proclamation.

Governor Hill Also Issues a Proclamation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

MT. McGREGOR, July 23, 8:08 a.m.--General Grant died at 8:08 a.m., surrounded by all his family. He passed out of life peacefully and without evident pain. Before his death he left the choice of a burial spot to Colonel Fred K. Grant.

THE WAY HE DIED.

MT. McGREGOR, July 23.--Shortly before eight o'clock this morning, while the family were preparing for breakfast and the doctors were discussing the patient's chances on the piazza of the cottage, Henry, the nurse, who was with the General, stepped hurriedly out of the sick room, and going to where the doctors were, informed them that he thought the end was near. The doctors hastily went to the room. At a glance they took in the situation. They quietly ordered the nurse to summon the family at once. Mrs. Grant, Jesse Grant and wife, U. S. Grant, Jr., and wife, and Mrs. Colonel Grant instantly answered the summons. Mrs. Sartoris, noticing the doctors hurriedly going to the room, followed them, and was the first member of the family present. Colonel Fred was now the only member of the family absent, having strolled around the grounds.

The servants were sent in search of him but he entered the sick room before anyone succeeded in bringing him the news of his father's approaching dissolution. Colonel Grant took a seat at the right side of the bed, placing his left arm on the pillow above his father's head. Close by the bedside sat Mrs. Grant, intensely agitated, but bravely suppressing her emotions and striving to be calm. She leaned upon the bed with her elbow, and gazed with eyes blinded with tears into the General's face. There was, however, no sign of recognition on his pallid face. He was breathing fast with slight gasping respirations. Mrs. Sartoris leaned on the shoulder of her mother and witnessed with pent-up emotion the ebb of life in which she had constituted the element of pride. The scene was a quiet one, and the General passed peacefully, painlessly into another world. A little distance behind Mrs. Grant and Mrs. Sartoris stood the three physicians, Douglas, Shrady, and Sands, silent spectators of the scene which but for their efforts would doubtless have occurred months ago. Jesse Grant and U. S. Grant, Jr., stood opposite their mother at the other side of the bed, near the foot of the cot. Close by Jesse was N. E. Dawson, the General's confidential secretary and stenographer. At the foot of the bed stood Mrs. U. S. Grant, Jr., by her side was Mrs. Colonel Fred Grant and Mrs. Jesse Grant. These three gazed down into the face of the General, while their eyes became suffused with tears. Thus surrounded died the hero.

HIS LAST WORDS.

MOUNT McGREGOR, July 23.--As far as is known, the last words uttered by the General were a request for a glass of water at three o'clock.

ARRANGING FOR THE FUNERAL.

MT. McGREGOR, July 23.--Grant's remains will be removed to New York after being embalmed. When the body reaches that city, the family will decide as to whether a post mortem examination will be made. The family is desirous that the funeral should take place in Washington, but it is not yet decided upon. The General before his death named three places, at any one of which he would like to be buried. He however concluded to leave the choice of the burial spot to Colonel Fred Grant, with the proviso that the place selected be such a place as will permit the burial of Mrs. Grant by his side. The local undertaker will have charge of the immediate details of the funeral until the remains have been shipped to New York.

HIS PROBABLE SEPULTURE.

MT. McGREGOR, July 23.--The cottage where the last few days of the country's hero, General Grant, have been passed, is surrounded with dense crowds, most of whom have come from miles about to see the body of him, whom they worshiped as a hero during his life time. Colonel Fred Grant, Drs. Shrady, Douglas, and Sands have been in consultation this morning as to the best place of burial. It is now believed that the little mound on the ground of the Soldiers' Home, near Washington, will be selected. The body of the dead General will be taken to New York and will lie in state there.

CLEVELAND'S CONDOLENCE.

WASHINGTON, July 23.--The following telegram was sent early this morning.

WASHINGTON, July 23.--To Mrs. U. S. Grant, Mt. McGregor: Accept this expression of my heartfelt sympathy at this hour of your great affliction. The people of the nation mourn with you, and would reach if they could, with kindly comfort, the depths of sorrow which is yours alone, and which only the pity of God alone can heal.

[Signed] GROVER CLEVELAND.

PRESIDENT'S PROCLAMATION.

WASHINGTON, July 23.--The President, a few minutes past eleven o'clock this morning, issued the following proclamation.

By the President of the United States. A proclamation: The President of the United States has just received the sad tidings of the death of that illustrious citizen and ex-President of the United States, General Ulysses S. Grant, at Mt. McGregor, in New York, to which place he had lately been removed in an endeavor to prolong his life. In making this announcement to the people of the United States, the President is impressed with that magnitude of the public loss of the great public leader who was in the hour of victory magnanimous, amid disaster serene and self-sustained, and who in every station, whether as soldier or chief magistrate, twice called to power by his fellow countrymen, trod unswervingly the pathway of duty undeterred by doubts.

The country has witnessed with deep emotion his prolonged and patient struggle with a painful disease, and has watched by his couch of suffering with tearful sympathy. The destined end has come at last. His spirit has retired to the Creator who sent it forth. The great heart of the Nation that followed him, when living, with love and pride, bows now in sorrow above him dead, tenderly mindful of his virtues and great patriotic services. In testimony of respect to the memory of Grant, it is ordered that the Executive Mansion and departments at Washington be draped in mourning for a period of thirty days, and all public business shall on the day of his funeral be suspended. The Secretary of War and Navy will cause orders to be issued for appropriate military services at his funeral.

GROVER CLEVELAND.

T. F. BAYARD, Secretary of State.

GOVERNOR HILL'S PROCLAMATION.

ALBANY, N. Y., July 23.--Governor Hill has just issued the following proclamation.

"By the Governor of the State of New York, executive chamber: Ulysses S. Grant, twice elected President of the United States, the defender of the Union, the victorious leader of soldiers and General on the retired list of the army, is dead. To the last he was a true soldier, strong in spirit, patient in suffering and brave in death. His warfare is ended. After the close of his official life and following that notable journey around the world, when tributes of esteem from all nations were paid him, he chose his home among the citizens of our State, and died upon our soil in the county of Saratoga, overlooking the scenes made glorious by revolutionary memories. It is fitting that the State which he chose as his home should especially honor his memory. The words of grief and tokens of sorrow by which we mark his death shall do honor to the offices which he held and proclaim that praise which shall ever be accorded those who serve the Republic." In conclusion he requested all business houses to close on the day of Grant's funeral.

THE NEWS IN WASHINGTON.

WASHINGTON, July 23.--The news of General Grant's death has cast a gloom over the entire community. At a Cabinet Council it was decided to order all departments closed on Grant's burial day. All flags are at half mast, and the Capitol building is being draped in mourning. Letters of condolence were sent to the family today by the President, Secretary of War Endicott, and Postmaster General Vilas.

[PHOTO OF U. S. GRANT.]

Ulysses Simpson Grant was born at Point Pleasant, O., April 27, 1822. His ancestors were Scotch. His parents in 1823 removed to the village of Georgetown, O., where his boyhood was passed.

At the age of seventeen General Grant entered the Military Academy at West Point. He had been christened Hiram Ulysses, but the Congressman who procured his appointment, by mistake, wrote him down as Ulysses S. Grant. The authorities at West Point and the Secretary of War were petitioned by the young cadet to correct the blunder, but no notice was taken of the request. Ulysses S. Grant had been recorded and Ulysses S. Grant he remained. The study in which he showed the most proficiency was mathematics. He graduated in 1843, twenty-first in a class of thirty-nine, and was commissioned Brevet Second Lieutenant, and assigned to the Fourth Infantry.

In the summer of 1845 the regiment was ordered to Texas to join the army of General Taylor. He was commissioned Lieutenant September 30. His first battle was at Palo Alto, May 8, 1846, and he subsequently took part also in the battles of Resaca de la Palma and Monterey, and the siege of Vera Cruz. In April, 1847, he was made Quartermaster of his regiment, and after the battle of Molina del Rey, September 8, 1847, he was appointed on the field First Lieutenant for his gallantry. He was specially mentioned in Colonel Garland's report of the battle of Chapultepec, and was breveted captain, his commission dating from that battle. After the capture of the City of Mexico, Grant returned with his regiment and was first stationed at Detroit and afterwards at Sackets Harbor.

In 1848 he married Miss Julia T. Dent, daughter of a merchant in St. Louis and the sister of one of his classmates. In 1852 he accompanied his regiment to California and Oregon, and in 1852 was commissioned Captain. In 1854 he resigned his commission in the army and removed to Gravois [?] near St. Louis, where he opened a farm. There his daughter, Nellie, now Mrs. Sartoris, was born. In 1859 he removed to Galena, Illinois, and engaged in the leather trade with his father and brother, Orville.

On the 13th of April, 1861, Fort Sumter fell. On the 15th President Lincoln made his call for troops, and on the 19th Grant was drilling a company of volunteers in Galena. Four days later he took it to Springfield. From there he wrote to the Adjutant-General of the army, offering his services to the Government in any capacity in which it cared to make use of him. Grant remained at Springfield and helped to organize the volunteer troops of the State. After five weeks of this work, which his military education had specially fitted him for, Governor Yates offered him the Twenty-first Regiment of Illinois infantry.

He took command of his regiment early in June and marched to Missouri. Reporting to Brigadier General Pope, he was stationed at Mexico, about fifty miles north of the Missouri River. On August 23 he was commissioned Brigadier-General of Volunteers, his commission being dated back to May 17. His first military achievement was the seizure of Paducah, Kentucky, which commanded the navigation of both the Tennessee and the Ohio. At the battle of Belmont, November 7, Grant commanded in person and had a horse shot under him. February 6, 1862, he captured Fort Henry, and ten days later Fort Donelson surrendered to him. His reply to the Confederate General Buckner, in command of Fort Donelson, who sent to him asking terms of capitulation, was eminently characteristic of the great soldier: "No terms except unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works." The terms were complied with, and the Stars and Stripes soon fluttered over Fort Donelson.

General Grant was at once promoted to be Major General, and appointed Commander of the District of West Tennessee. Immediately after the capture of Fort Donelson, Grant fell under General Halleck's displeasure, and was removed, but in about a week was ordered to resume his command. The great battle of Shiloh was fought on Sunday and Monday, the 6th and 7th of April, 1862, and resulted in a victory for the Union Soldiers. It was in this engagement that the Confederate General Albert Sidney Johnston was killed. At the siege of Corinth, Grant was second in command to General Halleck; and when the latter was called to Washington, Grant was appointed to the command of the Army of the Tennessee. He captured Vicksburg July 4, 1863, and defeated Bragg at Chattanooga in November following. In March, 1864, President Lincoln appointed Grant Commander-in-Chief of the armies in the field, with the rank of Lieutenant-General. On the 17th of that month Grant issued his first general order assuming command of the armies of the United States, and announced that headquarters would be "in the field, and, until further orders, with the Army of the Potomac." At midnight, May 3, Grant began the movement against Richmond, which, after a series of hard-fought battles, resulted in the capture of the Confederate Capital, April 3, 1865. On the 9th of the same month General Lee and his entire command surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Court House, Virginia.

In July, 1866, General Grant was commissioned General of the Army, a grade especially provided for him by act of Congress. August 12, 1887, President Johnson suspended Secretary Stanton from office, and appointed General Grant Secretary of War, ad interim. This office Grant held until January 14, 1868, when he returned it to Mr. Stanton, whose removal the United States Senate had refused to sanction.

At the Republican National Convention held in Chicago May 1, 1868, General Grant was nominated on the first ballot for President. He was elected in the fall, with the late Hon. Schuyler Colfax as Vice-President. In the Republican National Convention held in Philadelphia June 5, 1872, Grant was renominated by acclamation. Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts, being nominated for Vice President. He received a popular majority of nearly 800,000 votes over Horace Greeley, the Democratic nominee.

Shortly after the expiration of his term in 1877, the General and Mrs. Grant made a tour around the world, landing at San Francisco in September of that year. He was received everywhere with the highest consideration, the Governments and peoples of the Old World vying with each other in doing honor to the American soldier and patriot.

General Grant was a very prominent candidate before the Chicago National Republican Convention in 1880, for the nomination for President for a third term, but did not succeed in getting the nomination. Since then he has lived in New York. His financial troubles are too recent to need mention in this connection. In the last hours of the recent Congress, a bill was passed placing the old hero on the retired list of the army, with the rank and pay of General.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Here is a sensible item: "Somebody says it is worry more than work that kills men. So it is with horses. If you work your horses and bring them in to a tasty meal in a clean, cool stable, free from the flies, they are thrifty and healthy, but if you take your hard worked horses into a hot, dirty stable with myriads of flies to bother the life out of them when they are tired and hungry, that worry is harder than work. Reader, if you value your horses and their comfort, put up the nettings to keep out the flies and keep your stables clean and cool."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

One of our young men has just given us an awful scare. He sends us word that if he sees his name in the paper he will come up to the office with an elm club. Take him off! Seriously, we don't know what he has done that he is so afraid we will come out, but we give him fair warning that if we do "catch on" after that threat, we'll give him the benefit of a "send-off."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Now is the time to cut prairie hay. Don't wait till the nutriment is all burned up and dried out by the hot sun and wind. Cattle will do better on hay alone which was cut in July than with September hay and plenty of corn.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The COURIER had a reporter, Thursday, who couldn't tell a-p-p-l-e from p-e-a-c-h. He is dead now--killed in desperation by our horticultural editor.

A COMPLETE CAPTURE.

Dr. W. R. Kirkwood and Lady Return From Prayer Meeting

To Find Their House in the Hands of Captors.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The surprise given Dr. and Mrs. W. R. Kirkwood Thursday at their home by the young ladies of his Sunday school class and the members of the W. C. T. U., was without doubt one of the happiest occurrences of the season. The saying that "girls cannot keep a secret" must forever pass into the unknown, as was proven on this occasion. When the Rev. gentleman and wife returned from prayer meeting they "found" their home in possession of others. The yard was brilliantly lighted with Chinese lanterns, while indoors all was bright and sparkling with happy faces and beautiful flowers. What were the thoughts of the Doctor and his estimable lady as they came near, we cannot tell; but from the expression on their faces as they entered, we should judge 'twas something very sweet and pleasant. The young ladies escorted their teacher, Dr. Kirkwood, to a beautiful willow chair, which was presented with a nicely bound album containing pictures of most of the class and some other friends. Mrs. Greer then stepped forward and, on behalf of the W. C. T. U., said: "DR. AND MRS. KIRKWOOD.--I am requested by the ladies of the Woman's Christian Union to present you these volumes of Joseph Cook's lectures, knowing you will appreciate them because of the merited renown of the author; and as a token of regard for you, and the value we place upon your labors with us in the glorious cause of prohibition. We feel sure that our loss will be great gain to the state of your adoption. We hope that when your labor there has been crowned with success and the leaven has reached the halls of congress, sending forth law to emancipate our beloved country from the thraldom of strong drink, that you will accept from us tonight a standing invitation to visit Kansas and join with us in the grandest jubilee that ever fell from the lips of any people. May the blessing of God that maketh rich and addeth no sorrow go with you and your children to many generations is our wish." Dr. Kirkwood, always equal to any emergency, responded in touching and feeling remarks. The evening, until a late hour, was spent in a very enjoyable and social way, the elegant refreshments adding not a little to the delight of the evening.

BURDEN EAGLE CLIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Big, warm hearted Capt. H. H. Siverd writes us: "Accept my warm congratulations upon your recovery. Kindly yours, H. H. Siverd." The Captain, though always busy, always finds time to think of his friends.

We neglected last week to mention the visit of Miss May Berkey to her numerous friends in Burden, an occurrence that is always a real 4th of July time to our young people, with whom she is a favorite.

The Wichita Eagle tells of a colt only ten weeks old that weighed 350 pounds. R. F. Burden owns a colt that when lacking three days of ten weeks old, weighed 390 pounds. Come again, dear namesake.

R. F. Burden shipped two car loads of steers last Thursday. They were graded stock, thirty-four in number, and averaged 1,549 pounds each. This was undoubtedly the best shipment of cattle ever made from this station.

POLICE DOING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Dr. H. J. Downey's trial before Judge Turner Wednesday, on charge of intoxication, resulted in his acquittal. He brought witnesses to prove that he visited the house of the "females" mentioned, professionally, one of them being very sick. He threatens to make things very warm for Marshal McFadden for this "malicious arrest." The Marshal presented some pretty good evidence yesterday to prove his charge, and is taking the matter very easy without much fear of the law's cold grip on himself. Our Marshal done nothing more than what he considered his duty--what his oath binds him to do. The women in the case are also threatening our Marshal with a damage suit for bringing "slander" on their household, by the Doctor's arrest in their house. It is all wind, of course.

THE K. N. G.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Board of Directors of the K. N. G. association met Tuesday evening and completed their arrangements and are now ready to receive subscriptions to the capital stock of the association. The gentlemen composing this corporation are connected with the military of our city, and are responsible men with a determined purpose in view. They will erect a building at least forty by one hundred feet and two stories high. The two companies will use the first floor for an armory and drill purposes; on the second floor will be the finest hall in the city. Twenty-five hundred dollars has already been subscribed and the scheme is an assured success. Anyone can see with half an eye that one hundred dollars invested in this enterprise will double itself in a short time.

NORMAL POINTERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

We attended the Normal Wednesday and were much pleased with a recitation in orthography, or teaching the word method. We have not space to describe the manner in which these different recitations were conducted. The class was conducted by Prof. Gridley, who certainly understands his vocation. We have heard recitations in all branches and know that there is not a particle of sham in the composition of this Institute. It is something more than a parrot repetition of words. Everything that we saw indicated success. The prominence given to the discussion of practical questions is a very gratifying feature. O. M.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

To newspaper men, it is amusing to frequently witness the squirming induced by the publication of a plain, unvarnished statement necessary in mere local news. The party imagining himself aggrieved rushes at the man of pen, shears, and paste pot with blood in his eyes and thunder between his teeth, notwithstanding the well known fact that the reporter has no bias either way and merely acted by his capacity as a vendor of news. An exchange states the situation exactly when it says that those who do the least for a paper, and who affect to ignore or despise its influence, are the first ones to set up a howl if the paper inadvertently mentions them in a manner they consider derogatory to their well being or interest.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

"What makes a popular girl?" queries an exchange. A variety of gifts may contribute to this desideratum. In Wichita the girls must be "fly," give pointers on the winning race and be exceedingly partial to bald-headed men; in Wellington they must have feet as big as a ham and lips as thick as their gallants' heads; in El Dorado abjure ice cream, with the thermometer 120 in the shade; in Arkansas City, Miss Dudes, and use a "which" with a "ness" attached; in Burden, chew gum and make garden; in Winfield, she must have beauty, brains, taste, and general winsomeness--requisites freely possessed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A rattle snake bit an old soaker in Chautauqua County one day last week and died inside of a minute, while the man went about his business as serene as an infant angel. Either the rattle snakes of Chautauqua County are a tender lot of reptiles or the whiskey is terribly bad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Clark County Clipper chronicles the first marriage in that county, L. A. Cross and Dora Alice Reynolds. This will be a historical couple.

ANOTHER QUEER RESULT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

J. W. Cottingham, of Richland, comes up with a timothy record that takes the belt so far as heard from. Last fall, while drilling a five acre field in wheat, he sowed timothy broadcast before the drill, expecting, as did Uncle Johnny Roberts, that the wheat would mature and be harvested before the timothy made much of a start, and by this scheme he would get two crops. Most of the wheat froze out in winter and what little was left stood no show in competition with its rival. The timothy made four tons to the acre; the wheat nothing. It was on bottom land.

A $4,000 TWO PER CENT HORSE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

P. H. Albright drives a $4000 horse. This is pretty steep for a Kansas man. Mr. Albright figures it this way. The horse belongs to Col. F. M. Hill, of Cedarvale. He was offered $1,100 for this animal eleven years ago. P. H., with his mathematical turn of mind for figuring up interest, estimates that if Mr. Hill had taken the $1,100 and loaned it at two per cent a month, it would have netted him $4,000. No doubt Mr. Hill feels like kicking himself when he thinks what might have been, and is not.

THE SALEM P. O. IRREGULARITY.

Dr. Crabtree Takes His Arrest Calmly and Gives Bond.

Sympathy Largely in his Favor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Marshal McFadden, with a U. S. warrant in his garments for the arrest of Dr. Crabtree, charged with burning the New Salem Postoffice, went to Salem on the S. K. train Thursday and took the Doctor in custody. Dr. Crabtree was a little nervous when the warrant was read to him, but as the arrest became noised around and his friends crowded around in large numbers, his deep concern took a much lighter turn. The bond required was $2,000, and the Doctor, though a number at New Salem offered to go on his bond, got in a buggy with the Marshal and went to Burden, where he was formerly in business. The news of the intended arrest had preceded them in THE DAILY COURIER, and when they reached Burden, the buggy was soon surrounded by sympathizing friends. Sim S. Moore was secured as bondsman and at 10 o'clock the three came to Winfield, the bond was accepted, and spending the night at the hotel, the Doctor and Mr. Moore returned this morning. Sympathy sees to be very largely in favor of the Doctor. His friends strongly protest his innocence, claiming that he was at Burden attending Lodge, leaving Burden too late to get home by the time the fire caught. Several parties, however, say they will swear to having seen him enter the building but a short time before the fire. The agent of the insurance company was looking the matter up also. The arrest will, of course, stop the payment of insurance till after the case is settled. The interest in the case among the Doctor's acquaintances is very warm. His examination is set for next Tuesday before U. S. Commissioner Webb.

A FLOURY TRIP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A party of our young folks, composed of Misses Leota Gary, Ida Johnston, Jennie Maxon, Nellie and Katie Rodgers, and Ida McDonald, and Messrs. A. F. Hopkins and Charley Dever, were chaperoned Wednesday by Mr. W. W. Jones for a trip among the mazes of the Winfield Roller Mills. Mr. Jones is a former employee of the mill, knows all about flour, and his genial courtesy made the visit very pleasant and profitable. Of course, the young ladies were familiar with dough and bread, but that the grains of wheat traveled hundreds of miles on elevators and through "mashers," "refiners," "graders," etc.,--intricacies sufficient to stump many a philosopher--before reaching its flour state had hardly occurred to them. Then the new Corliss engine, with its immense drive wheel of 26,000 pounds weight and three huge boilers, was another feature for feminine wonder. From the fourth story of the mill opportunity was given for lovely telescopic views: stretching miles down the winding Walnut. When the young ladies emerged from the mill, they were as beautifully powdered as the most fastidious admirer of cosmetics could desire.

UNCLE SAM'S GRIP.

Dr. Crabtree Arrested for Burning the New Salem Post Office.

Crookedness Unearthed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Major John M. Crowell, U. S. postoffice inspector, has been at New Salem several days examining into the late postoffice burning at that place. He found sufficient evidence to warrant the arrest of Dr. Crabtree, deputy postmaster and owner of the building, for firing the building and postoffice property. Deputy U. S. Marshal Rarick couldn't be reached and the U. S. warrant was put in Marshal McFadden's hands; and he went over Thursday to serve it. Crabtree had just put $1,500 insurance on the building and stock, and it is supposable that he burned the building for this insurance, thereby laying himself liable to feel Uncle Sam's iron grip for destroying U. S. mail and property.

CHURCH PLEASANTRIES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The ladies of the Baptist church are always successful with their entertainments, and the one at the church Thursday was no exception. A throng of jolly folks mingled in genuine sociability, and indulged in various delicacies: ice cream, blackberries, etc. The four tables were crowded from early evening till almost the celebrated "wee sma' hours." They were presided over by Mrs. O. Branham, Mrs. Samuel Dalton, and Mrs. S. L. Gilbert; Mrs. A. F. Hartwell, Miss Lola Silliman, and Miss Maggie Herpich; Mrs. Ed. Nelson, Mrs. H. N. Zimmerman, and Mrs. E. D. Taylor. Sam Gilbert, Democratic Sam, sat as collector of customs--raking in the sheckles with his broad smile and usual agility. It was certainly a very enjoyable entertainment. The pretty church lawn was as full of pretty young ladies as the young ladies were "full" of nice ice cream.

NOT ALL GAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Wellingtonian says C. E. Peck, of Kansas City, solicitor of the United Telephone Company, is now at work securing subscriptions to a circuit from Wichita to Wellington and Winfield, via Oxford. The subscriptions mean the contracting for so many tickets, at a reduction of twenty percent. The reduction will cease when the amount of business necessary to be guaranteed to secure the line is subscribed. Mr. Peck met with liberal encouragement in Wichita. The benefits of this telephone circuit are readily appreciated. We are glad, after so much gas, to see the thing materializing.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Kansas National Guards Association, of Winfield, has bought the northwest corner of 10th avenue and Millington, the Mrs. Parker place, for armory and hall purposes. The hall will cover the whole lot, 50 x 140 feet. The books are now open at T. J. Harris' office, who is treasurer of the Association. The certificate of one hundred dollars will be paid as follows: Ten percent, when issued, and 20 percent in ninety days. The Association assures this as a good investment, as not more than sixty percent of the shares will be required to complete it, and which will in a few years be worth their full face value.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The case of N. G. Bailey against the Farmers' Bank was before Judge Snow Wednesday, and contains a decision of importance. A had money deposited in the bank and B garnisheed it for debt, but, without knowledge of the garnishee, A gave C a check to the bank, which on presentation was refused, owing to the garnishee. Then Bailey sued the bank for the money, claiming it to be his, after the checks were drawn, and not A's. One check was dated before and one after the garnishee. The Judge decided in favor of the bank, it having had no knowledge of the checks being out, when the garnishee was made.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Howard Courant, with its experienced eye, observes: "The Winfield DAILY COURIER is the neatest, newsiest little daily we ever saw published from a city the size of Winfield. It is neatly printed, ably edited, and is mechanically a daisy. They won't exchange with us, however, and we are indebted to J. M. Lambert for all we see of them." Should we discriminate at all, brother Reynolds, the Courant would certainly get an "ex," but we have adopted the plan of squaring weekly accounts with our WEEKLY and daily accounts with our DAILY, the only method conducive to a plethoric pocket.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

It is now full moon and the Indians will commence their deviltry if they have any intention. The moon is the commander-in-chief of the red devils. It would be a good thing for the country if a chunk large enough to cover the Territory would drop out of the moon, and crush every worthless savage back to his native element--dust. "And still the dirty work goes on."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Harper Sentinel remarks: "The people east and west, as a rule, feel satisfied and confident that the Indian business is finally settled, or soon will be. Sheridan is here, the troops are on hand in good numbers, the Indians will be disarmed and will then be harmless. The war department gets the glory and the great state of Kansas prospers as never before."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Men who come west with industrious habits rapidly grow rich. One man who started in Harper County eight years ago with nothing but a wife and a stand of bees now has a house with a splendid mortgage on it, a gate with two hinges, and two daughters who swing on the gate and are called honey. His wife, who was an industrious creature, has secured a divorce. This is but one of many instances.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

ITCH and Kansas Scratches cured in 30 minutes by Woodford's Sanitary Lotion, warranted by Ed. G. Cole, druggist. Winfield, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Thee is said to be one lawyer in heaven. How he got there is not positively known, but it is conjectured that he passed himself off for an editor and slipped in unsuspected. When his dodge was discovered, they searched the realms of felicity in all their length and breadth for another lawyer to draw up the papers for his ejectment, but they couldn't find one, and of course he held the fort.

KEEPING CHILDREN AFTER SCHOOL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

I have been requested to put this question before the Institute: Is it right to keep children after school hours? The father and mother of a child wish to see him at home as soon as he is dismissed from the school. He is safer they think when they see him there and they know he does not loiter. But apart from this consideration there is a reason for an early dismissal found in the teacher's own comfort. It is unjust to compel him to stay an hour in the school room after he is already weary and tired with his labor, fretful and impatient, perhaps, when the care of his pupil is, for the time, relinquished. The pupil who remains is also tired and uncomfortable. He has probably done as well as he could, considering his feelings, which are more subject to change than older peoples'. It is unjust, he thinks, to compel him to stay, and, indeed, were the teacher to act according to his better feelings, as he experienced them when he entered school in the morning, fresh and ready for labor, he might not be so severe in requiring atonement for indolence in the pupil. But both tired, both ready to relinquish labor, little after all is accomplished in the time by one in study and by the other in compelling study.

What shall be done? Thee is a very practical way of disposing of the matter. Observing tutors soon see that length of study is not a proportionate benefit. Let the time for the pupils remaining there be made as short as possible. For a light punishment, as for a little disorder in the behavior of a pupil, tell him to remain two minutes before departing for home. One minute will always do, if he is required to watch the clock himself and depart "on time." For the purpose of study give him just time enough to thoroughly finish what he has left undone. A good teacher will not assign the finishing of work which requires long tasks of a pupil after school. If the time necessary be over five or ten minutes studying then let him go, if he will agree to study faithfully before he returns, a certain time, or until he finishes a certain amount of work, which the teacher in his judgment assigns him. The pupil has a right to play after work. He has a right to be busy constantly in laboring hours. He should be taught every day to finish up the work of that day, and should be made to lose and feel the loss of it, too, the result of any delay in performing his task. I have only to add that the experiment has been tried and the consequence has been that staying after school was an event of comparatively rare occurrence, and then not an unpleasant undertaking to either teacher or pupil.

MRS. OLIVER McGUIRE.

A QUERY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

EDITOR COURIER: I believe you are rated as one learned in the ways of the City Fathers. THE DAILY COURIER Wednesday reports the Council as prohibiting the two new railroads from crossing any street or alley in the city. The city proposition to the K. C. & S. W. binds them to erect a depot within the city limits, and three-quarters of a mile from the crossing of Main and Ninth avenue. Will you please inform an anxious and suffering public how the railroad can put a depot in the city limits without crossing a street or alleys.

CITIZEN.

[Note: The editor did not reply to the above query.]

JUDGE GANS' BUDGET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Joseph A. Emerson and Florence Hughes are the latest matrimonial victims: the only oasis in the present Probate desert for several days. R. L. Ward, administrator, has filed sale bill showing sale of personal property of Levi M. Brown, deceased. George A. Williams has been appointed administrator of the estate of William Kaates, deceased. Kaates was one of the victims of the Dawson ford drowning.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official and Social Notes as Gathered by Our Regular

Washington Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The opinion of the Attorney General in the case of the Dolphin is likely to be a surprise to the country, and will be little less than a thunderbolt, not only to Mr. Roach, but to all government contractors. We may expect to see the opinion vigorously combated, and, until Mr. Roach has a chance to reply to Gen. Garland with regard to the legal aspects of the case, it may not be becoming in laymen to prejudge the merits of the controversy. It will occur to most people, however, to ask what security a contractor has under existing usages that his work will finally be accepted by the Government. The opinion will certain make contractors more cautious in the future, and will have a tendency, as has already been illustrated on a recent occasion, to keep them from bidding for government work. In almost all large jobs the work is passed upon by a subordinate officer or board, and partial payments made to the contractor, if the work is deemed satisfactory by the authorized inspector. A new and perplexing element is introduced, if we are now to understand that these under-officers have no authority to represent the government or construe an act of Congress, and that the contractor at any stage of the work is liable to have his work rejected and to be used by the government for the money paid him in installments by the Treasury by the authority of the board of review.

Of course, if it can be shown that there was a conspiracy to defraud the government, to which the contractor, the board of review, and the Secretary of the Navy were parties, then there would be no difficulty in bringing the action, but in the present case no such charge is made, although it seems to be part of the creed of good Democrats that all the navy dealings with John Roach are steeped in corruption. Probably this conviction has had its influence in the present attitude of the administration. No doubt we shall all be sufficiently enlightened on the law and equity of the matter as the opinion opens the way to extended and expensive litigation.

The rules in regard to annual leaves of absence in the Interior department have not been changed, and the same rules are in force that prevailed last year. The First Assistant Secretary, Mr. Muldrow, said yesterday that the subject of changes in the rules had not been taken under consideration.

The commissioner of the general land office has affirmed the right of entry under the land laws and decisions of the Supreme Court, of lands heretofore withdrawn by voluntary action of the general land office, for railroad indemnity purposes, where no requirements of law are existing for making such withdrawals. The effect of this decision, if sustained by the Secretary of the Interior, will be to restore to entry under the homestead and other laws many million acres of public land which have been kept out of market for many years because claimed by railroad corporations.

The successor of Mr. Foster as minister to Spain has not yet been decided upon. When Mr. Foster left here for Spain to negotiate a second treaty, the appointment was postponed until his return. The report that he will shortly be here has renewed the hopes of persons anxious to secure a snug foreign berth. The Spanish mission is considered one of the most desirable, and there are now more applications on file in the State department for it than there were for any other office.

The special delivery postal system provided for by the last Congress will be put in operation in the course of a month or two at about a dozen of the principal postoffices of the country, including New York, Boston, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Chicago, and Washington. The details of the system are now being formulated at the Postoffice Department. The law provides that the attachment to a letter bearing the legal postage of a special stamp of the denomination of ten cents shall entitle the letter to immediate delivery at free delivery postoffices to be designated by the Postmaster General. It is believed that fifty messenger boys will be required at the New York Postoffice and twenty-five at each of the large stations in the city. While no doubt is entertained that the system will pay its expenses in the end, it is feared that a year or more may elapse before the public will avail itself of the advantages of the new system to an extent that will adequately compensate the messengers employed.

LOVE'S ROUGH DREAM.

A Cowley County Marriage With a Modern Romance. The License Lost.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

That "the course of true love never runs smoothly" is being daily evidenced. Two "souls with but a single thought," and that bent on matrimony, dispatched a bosom friend from Floral yesterday afternoon to seek the presence of the Probate Judge for a marriage document, to return on the evening train, when, as the evening twilight came o'er the earth, the words of double blessedness would be pronounced. The hours flew by, twilight, darkness, midnight, and morning came, and yet no man with the document of blissful authority. The preacher was on hand, as per agreement, the relatives and friends were there with happy smiles, high expectancy, and wedding cake. The young man got nervous, and fell into the arms of his mother-in-law exhausted with disappointment, while the sweetly costumed bride said, "Ain't it awful! What in the world can be the matter!!" But the moments only grew heavier and the guests retired, without any wedding cake under their pillows. The "happy couple" were excited--the young lady shocked, and the young man mad. This morning they determined to ferret out the mystery and boarded a wagon to run down the marriage license. Arriving here, the search began. The agent had come to town, swallowed some doctor's prescriptions and druggists' statements and ran pell mell into Marshal McFadden's arms and the bastille, during which time the license, early procured, was lost. What a dilemma! The anxious couple were now thoroughly imbued with the belief that their friends, the world, and the devil were bound to head them off, and accordingly hied themselves into the presence of Judge Gans, with heavy countenances and far-away look, and importuned him as to what to do. The Judge arranged matters for the ceremony and the young folks' faces beamed great beams of sunshine. Then in stepped a man with document in hand--a stranger who had found the license. The ceremony was pronounced and the queerest little romance of the age had its sequel. The New Salem preacher possibly sees the really dark side of it.

THE SOCIAL CIRCLE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Miss Anna Hunt opened her pleasant home Thursday to our young society people. The occasion was most enjoyable, distinguishing Miss Anna as a successful entertainer. She was very agreeably assisted by Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Hunt in doing the honors of the evening. Those present were Dr. and Mrs. Emerson, Mr. and Mrs. O. Branham, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Oliver, Dr. and Mrs. J. G. Evans, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hosmer, Mrs. Frank Balliet; Misses Bertha Williamson, of Cincinnati; Clara Lynch, of Wichita; Corinne Cryler, of Parsons; Edith Hall, of Burlington, Iowa; Nona Calhoun, of Maysville, Kentucky; Mollie Brooks, Sarah Bass, Sarah Gay, Bert Morford, Jessie Millington, Nellie Cole, Mary Randall, Lizzie McDonald, Maggie Harper, Ida Johnston, and May Hodges; Messrs. R. B. Norton, of Arkansas City; M. J. O'Meara, T. J. Eaton, M. H. Ewart, Lacey Tomlin, S. D. Harper, J. R. Brooks, Chas. Dever, Addison Brown, Everett and George Schuler, James Lorton, Chas. Hodges, and Frank H. Greer. With a bright moon, balmy atmosphere, and vivacious young folks, the lawn, adorned with Chinese lanterns, was indeed a lovely scene. Restraint was completely banished by the charming entertainment. Social promenade, music, a banquet of choice delicacies consisting of ices, cake, etc., the "light fantastic," with cribbage and other games made the evening fly very happily, to remain among the pleasant memories of the participants.

GRANT'S DEATH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

News of the death of General Grant was received with deep feelings of regret by Winfield people. A number of stores and other buildings were draped in mourning. Larger display will likely be made with memorial services. The death of the old hero is the absorbing topic in the home and on the street, and old soldiers bring out their reminiscences. But, buried down deep in every man's heart, is an appreciation of this great character that will last for life.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

If the people in the east, who are sweltering with the heat up in the nineties, could breathe in Kansas the pure air from our prairies, they would not inquire: "Is life worth living?"

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Will someone rise and explain why the stone on 9th avenue, north of the courthouse, are allowed to remain stretched across the street, leaving only room for one team to go through. They were evidently put there for a purpose, but for whose particular benefit we have been unable to discover.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The directors of the Farmers' Co-operative Milling Exchange have asked Arkansas City's city council to give them a lift by donating the sum of $10,000 to their enterprise. The council have the matter under consideration, and the Democrat says the majority of them are in favor of making the donation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Wellingtonian remarks: "A young gentleman quite well known in this city, and now attending the Institute, told a reporter yesterday that he had never attended an Institute where there were so many good looking and intelligent young ladies, who seemed to care nothing whatever for ice cream. If the young man is correct, it is certainly a great compliment to the young ladies, but fearfully harder on the young man.

Poor, deluded "cuss." He's from Arkansas, where the young ladies are refined and pretty on the Jumbo order. We'll bet our last year's ice cream wealth that for intelligence, beauty, taste, and general comeliness, Sumner County's Normal would compare with ours as a mud fence would compare with the pearly gates. Send your young men over, Wellingtonian. A peep at our Normal would surprise them beyond measure--give them a lesson in womanly accomplishments. Our girls, however, are very girly girls and have a failing for ice cream--their only failing.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

D. D. Kellogg was down from Udall Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

T. S. McLean was down from Burden Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

John Ledlie and wife were down from Burden Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

J. B. Story, of Lynn & French, carries his arm in a sling, caused by an enormous boil.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

E. A. Henthorn, Burden's handsome and corpulent banker, was in the hub Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

D. Gramm had some fine cooking apples in town Friday. They were raised on his farm near town.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Jesse, 3 months old son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Sheets, of this city, died Wednesday, of cholera infantum.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Col. McMullen and family left Friday for Portland, Maine, to take in the pleasures of the sea shore for a month.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Mrs. John Hendrickson died Wednesday at her home, in Rock township, of consumption. She was thirty-seven years old.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

And now Al. Taylor has turned to a "horny handed son of toil," but he needs lessons badly. He was spading around his Highland Park trees Thursday evening with a crow-bar.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Abe Carson's preliminary hearing in Judge Snow's court, charged with complicity with Chas. Elenwood in stealing Stout's horse in Burden, resulted in binding him over with $500 bond.

[Note: I give up on the proper spelling of the horse thief. Newspaper had "Elendon," "Elenwood," and in the above article, "Ellendow." I stuck to "Elenwood." MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Our county officials are all ardent Grant admirers, evidence of which they have shown in mourning decoration. The old war hero's portrait, bust size, is hung over the north entrance, tastefully draped.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

George Kimball's name should not have appeared in the Beaver liquid refreshment matter of two weeks ago. He proves himself to have been entirely exempt, and THE COURIER don't want to do wrong fully makes anybody full.

[Above does not make much sense to me.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Information has been received here that Ed. Millard has been appointed postmaster at Burden, vice J. W. Henthorn, resigned. Millard is a Democrat. Still, the brethren do not appear to be perfectly happy. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

If our young folks want to test a little genuine enjoyment, let them get in a boat at Riverside Park, with an expert, manly arm to man the oars, under the soft rays of the silvery moon. Such pastime has a peculiar charm. It would indeed be hard to find a lovelier boating course.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A. H. Green and D. F. Best are at it again. Thursday Best got out of Green's building, taking with him its tail end, a little shed, which he said he owned. Green has sued him for "maliciously and feloniously" moving property off his (Green's) premises.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

W. W. Jones left Thursday for his old home, Northumberland, Pa. His stay here was abridged by the appearance of the terrible Bright's disease. He lost thirty-five pounds of flesh in five months. He is a bright and jovial young man and all regret his return home, and hope the usual fatality of his disease may miss him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

George Rembaugh has got out his old spelling book and gone to seclusion, with his Democratic assistant, to get ready to manipulate the "post offiz." Those desiring to congratulate him will have to be patient till he comes out--spelling C-l-e-v-e-l-a-n-d with great big caps and broad smiles.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A majority of the city council, of Arkansas City, asked City Attorney Stafford to resign. He refused. At the last meeting of the fathers, a resolution was adopted removing him for incompetency. Yet Mr. Stafford says he will swing to the office. This is adamantine cheek "that would put the government mule to shame."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The managers of the old soldiers' reunion to be held at Topeka the last of September have offered four prizes for brass bands, ranging from $100 to $200 and a gold medal. This is an opportunity that Winfield's Courier Cornet Band will likely take in. It certainly has the superior in the State, and could easily carry away the top prize.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Friday the President appointed Geo. C. Rembaugh postmaster at Winfield, Kansas, vice D. A. Millington, resigned. The resignation was voluntary and was sent in by J. Wade McDonald, who left Winfield for Washington last Sunday evening. He would not have presented the resignation to the President unless assured that Mr. Rembaugh would be appointed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Smedley & Gest, the new fence manufacturers on North Main, are piling in the material to make a number one fence. They now have sufficient goods to fill a contract twenty miles, and more coming. They will have fifty cars of fence slats here in a few days and they are going to make things hum. They will use the Everett fence weaver, the latest patent machine out.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Charlie Hilliard received a letter from the Wichita club Wednesday replying to the request of the Borders for a game. The Wichitas make some very fair propositions and the probability is that a game between the two clubs will be arranged for a purse of $150; the winning club to receive two-thirds the gate money. A. C. Democrat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Mr. Saviers, our fellow townsman, had the pleasure last week of meeting with one of his old-time friends in the person of Capt. Siverd, of Winfield, who was at one time during the war Lieutenant of the regiment to which Mr. Saviers belonged. They had not seen each other for a number of years, and their meeting at this place was both a surprise and pleasure to both of them. Udall Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Judge Gans' boat is not sailing so matrimonially as usual. Cupid has either taken a vacation or is very dry. But it can't be expected that folks will keep right on getting married just the same as in January when a man can't hardly get quite enough to keep warm. All a fellow needs to keep him comfortable these nights is to be wrapped in a dreamless sleep, a clear conscience, and a draft of fresh air.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Mrs. Capt. Lowry graced THE COURIER table, Thursday, with as fine a lot of apples as any county of Cowley's age ever produced. They were grown in the grounds of the Lowry residence, and embraced eight or ten varieties, many of them capable of filling a quart measure, and smooth and luscious. Capt. Lowry has a very fine orchard, of large and small fruits--one which fully exhibits Cowley's adaptation to all branches of horticulture.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

H. T. Bayless, of Beaver, left a nest of "bull" snake eggs at Taylor & Cooper's Thursday. He plowed them up. All were joined together, like a clump of potatoes. They were as large as pullet eggs, with a white, India rubber-like shell; and when broken open, revealed miniature reptiles. These eggs are considered a luxury by some Indian tribes, and are devoured with a relish. No, thank you, we don't care for any in our repast.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

C. H. Carman and W. C. Nichols called Thursday with their old friend, Dr. Blackstone. Mr. Carman is a brother of the Carman's of the fearful Dawson ford drowning; and Mr. Nichols is a brother of Mrs. Jay Carman. He came from Hebron, Indiana, to see his sister before she was laid in the grave. The intention of shipping the body back home was abandoned and yesterday it, with that of Mrs. Jim Carman, which was also saved for the arrival of friends, were buried.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The entire first page of the Harper Daily Graphic is taken up with the "ad" of one of the enterprising business firms of that city, says the Wellington Press. This is the kind of business grit that is calculated to pull a man through the hard times. When business languishes, many grow despondent, and instead of pushing their business forward with redoubled energy, they sit down and wait for times to get better, when their business would flourish anyhow and then they begin to advertise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

E. E. Peck, of Kansas City, general solicitor of the United Telephone company, is in the city looking up the prospects for selling $800 or $1,000 worth of tickets toward the construction of a telephone line from here to Wellington. This is a scheme of vast benefit to Winfield, and our businessmen should take hold of it with a vim. The tickets, while bought as a matter of aid, can be used on any of the company's lines, and the investment will be no loss, individually, while publicly it will be of big convenience and profit.

DR. FRANK MANNY AGAIN.

He Files a Second Petition For a Permit to Manufacture "Medicine" and Again

Gets Left.--The Reasons.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Last Monday Frank Manny filed a second petition with the Probate Judge to obtain a permit to manufacture beer for medicinal, mechanical, and scientific purposes, accompanied by a bond of equal proportions to the first one. With it he left the request that the Probate Judge and County Attorney, if the petition was rejected, file a written record of their reasons for so doing. Of course, Frank has no more reason to expect a permit on this second petition than on the first. His object in getting this record is no doubt to enable him to produce before the Supreme Court evidence that he has complied with the law in trying to obtain a permit, and on this, ask a mandamus compelling Judge Gans to grant the permit. County Attorney Asp winds Dr. Manny up with neatness and dispatch. In refusing Frank's petition, Judge Gans recorded the reasons as follows.

"Whereas, on the 20th day of July, 1885, Frank Manny filed a petition, together with his bond, to obtain a manufacturer's permit, which petition and bond were this day referred to the County Attorney for his advice and instruction in reference thereto. And now, on this 23rd day of July, 1885, the County Attorney having returned such petition and bond, accompanied with his endorsement, in substance following: 'The petition and bond of Mr. Manny are in compliance with the provisions of law, and, in my judgment, are sufficient in every respect. That since the Prohibitory Liquor Law went into effect in May, 1881, Mr. Manny has been one of its most bitter opponents and on the 11th day of July, 1881, he pleaded guilty before Justice Tansey, of this city, to keeping a nuisance under this law, and at the same time several cases for illegal sales against him were dismissed at his costs. On the 24th day of May, 1884, the applicant was convicted in the District Court of this county upon a trial by a jury on the 1st, 6th, 7th, 9th, and 10th counts of the information of County Attorney containing ten counts for illegal sales of intoxicating liquor. A motion for a new trial was overruled by the Court and Manny was sentenced to pay a fine of $100 on each of five counts and sentenced to 30 days imprisonment in the county jail on the other count. From these convictions, however, Manny was pardoned by His Excellency, Gov. Glick. I am satisfied that Mr. Manny has not since his conviction in 1884 been manufacturing or selling liquor at his brewery, and while personally I would like to see Mr. Manny have the privilege of utilizing his property built before the enactment of this law, I cannot, with a proper respect for the law, as a public officer, recommend that the prayer of the petition be granted. And the matter being now fully considered, I find that said petitioner, during the time from 1881 to 1885, never applied for or obtained a manufacturer's permit as provided by law, for all of which reasons I fully concur with the opinion of the county attorney, and notwithstanding the sufficiency of his bond and petition, the petitioner cannot now be considered a suitable person to be entrusted with a permit to manufacture intoxicating liquors and will therefore be refused." H. D. GANS, Probate Judge.

In the above matter and at the request of Mr. Manny and in his behalf, explanatory of the reason why he had not applied for a permit to manufacture intoxicating liquors, he was during the years 1881 to 1885 a resident of Walnut township and in which township he could not obtain a sufficient bond.

THE ART PRESERVATIVE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The tired Wellingtonian man, with his collar off and his hair sticking skyward over a wrinkled and careworn brow, let this drop from his emaciated faber: "As the lights burn low Friday, we sit at our table and wonder if the rest of the world is sleeping or engaged in some duty so irksome as ours. Yet we wonder again if we are not to blame in complaining of the work we have to do, without blaming someone else. Did you ever think that it took the work of a writer, compositor, and pressman to give you every printed word you read. Did you ever think that the many articles you read in print were set up letter and space at a time by some intelligent man whom it is probable you would not speak to on the streets. Quit right here, and think about what we have said above. It is a better doctrine than you ever listened to before, probably, but it is only one request that the follower of an 'art preservative of all arts' asks of people who follow the different trades and professions."

THE NORMAL LECTURE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Prof. Jay, of Wellington, delivered a lecture Friday to the Normal at McDougal's Hall. The subject was "Our Boys." It was in a humorous vein and full of good hits. The speaker referred to the different kinds of small boys, and their various propensities. It was plainly to be seen that the Professor knew the nature of a small boy thoroughly. The teachers' attitude toward the small boys was shown; their proper course to pursue, and the true teacher's kingdom, how, no matter what the surroundings were, the true teacher can bring light out of darkness. After the lecture a good time was enjoyed in a social.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A delegate convention of the Republicans of Cowley County will be held at the opera house in Winfield, on SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19TH, 1885, at 11 o'clock a.m., to select candidates to be supported by the Republican party for county officers, namely: Sheriff, Treasurer, Register of Deeds, County Clerk, Coroner, and Surveyor; also, to elect a County Central Committee for the coming year and to transact any other business that may be deemed necessary. The several townships and wards will be entitled to representation as follows: Beaver, 4; Bolton, 7; Cedar, 5; Cresswell, 21; Arkansas City, 21; Dexter, 7; Fairview, 4; Harvey, 4; Liberty, 4; Maple, 4; Ninnescah, 5; Omnia, 2; Otter, 4; Pleasant Valley, 4; Richland, 5; Rock, 5; Sheridan, 4; Silver Creek, 8; Silverdale, 5; Spring Creek, 4; Tisdale, 5; Vernon, 6; Walnut, 7; Windsor, 7; Winfield (1st ward), 10½ ; Winfield (2nd ward), 7½.

It is recommended that the Republican voters of the several townships meet at their usual places for holding elections, or at some central place, on Saturday, September 12, 1885, at 2 p.m., to select delegates to this convention and transact other business; and that Arkansas City and Cresswell township meet in joint primary to select delegates; also, in the city of Winfield, what is now the 1st and 2nd wards elect delegates for the 1st ward in the call, and the 3rd and 4th wards for 2nd ward in call--they having changed their boundaries since election of last fall. By order of the Republican County Central Committee.

W. J. WILSON, Chairman.

E. A. HENTHORN, Secretary.

THE WAR ON AMERICAN INDUSTRIES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

There has always been a party or faction in this country who have labored to promote the interests of English factories and to give them the monopoly of the manufacturing business. These have, therefore, always fought against American manufacturing industries and have never missed an opportunity to strike a blow which would cripple them or some one of them. This faction consists of the free traders and is led by men though Americans, seeming to be the paid agents of the Cobden club and the English monopolists who flood our country with the most specious free trade documents with which to gull the ignorant and unwary.

The Laird Brothers and other British monopolists have had the main business of ship building for the world, but in the last twenty-five years John Roach has built up in America on the banks of the Delaware a rival ship building interest. The work done at this establishment has been the best and has gradually won its way to the front until the wonderful energy, ability, and success of the ship building interests of John Roach has very materially reduced the business and profits of the British ship builders, and it became a matter of moment to the latter that John Roach should be "squelched." The opportunity has now arrived, the agent for the job has been found, and he has done his work effectively. John Roach has been forced to make an assignment. The British ship builders have recovered their monopoly and now there will be an advance in the price of ships and ship building.

John Roach had too many resources to be headed off by any ordinary means. Nothing short of the weight of the government of the United States seems to have been sufficient. The opportunity came and the government in the person of the Secretary of the Navy, Whitney, has been made the agent of the British ship builders and has done up the job.

John Roach had a contract with the United States government to build four steel clad steam vessels under plans and specifications as to form, model, material, and everything else, furnished by the department, which also voted that their plans would furnish a speed of fifteen miles an hour against the wind in a storm. John Roach proceeded with his contract and invested about twenty millions of dollars on the faith that the government would do as it had agreed. He had run deeply in debt to raise the means to invest so much in the government contract, but expected on the completion of one vessel to get his pay for it as per contract. The first completed was the Dolphin. It was examined and tested in all its parts and proved to be according to contract and specifications in every particular, and there was not the slightest excuse for rejecting it. But the test showed that the department had been mistaken in its opinion that such a vessel would make fifteen miles an hour against a storm. Here was a pretext, and it was readily seized. It was claimed that the opinion which had been expressed by a vote, that it would make fifteen miles an hour against a storm, was a part of the contract, which part had not been fulfilled; and therefore, the secretary, supported by the opinion of the attorney general, whose opinion was of course what the secretary desired, has rejected the Dolphin.

Of course the other three vessels, if completed, would come under the same rule, for a test had proved that a vessel constructed according to the plan of the contract, could not do what the secretary demanded. John Roach had no other alternative than to fail, with the government owing him nearly twenty millions, which he could not get. It was a glorious triumph for free trade and British monopolies. It throws thousands of men out of employment or compels them to compete in other branches of labor. It cheapens labor generally and brings suffering and distress upon many. John Roach may stand it to be sacrificed, but will the American people stand it to be sacrificed also?

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Troy Chief: One of the most annoying newspaper beats, because on such a small scale, is the specimen copy beat, who thinks he may subscribe or advertise. A man wants to procure a copy of a paper, and to avoid paying five cents for it, he asks for it as a specimen. We have often had them send to us for a particular issue as a specimen--that issue containing something that they particularly wanted. Not one person that sends for a specimen copy has any thought of subscribing or advertising.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Mr. Cleveland and his cabinet have found that they have an elephant on their hands. The gold in the treasury is going out and but little of it is coming back, and a scheme is on foot to borrow money of the New York bankers to keep the government machinery in motion. It will be a sorry day for the people when the government is compelled to borrow or buy gold to meet current expenses.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The massive machinery in the great workshops of John Roach & Son was idle, Monday, amid deserted rooms, for the first time in eighteen years. The men in Mr. Roach's employ speak very kindly of him. He is always liberal to them. There was no dispute in his shops about wages, or other labor issues. Mr. Roach was honest in his theory of upholding the wages of labor as the true source of business prosperity.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A burglar in a Chicago court on Wednesday as a wonderful escapist has a record to compare with that of the famous Baron Trenck. Sometimes he has left his place of confinement by way of the chimney; again he has sawed his way out with a red hot poker; and lastly he escaped by placing a pan of coals upon the stone floor of his cell and reducing the stone to lime.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

In a dispute regarding his residence, the Plain Dealer asserts that "the stingiest man in America lives in Cleveland. He is the man who hails the newsboy, takes a paper from his hands, looks it carefully through, keeping the boy waiting, and, after gleaning what he wants from the paper, says: "Here, sonny, is your paper. Don't want it; nothing in it."

THE NATION'S LOSS.

The Greatest and Noblest of Them All.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The following estimate of the character of the man whose untimely death the Nation now mourns is from the pen of the editor of the Kansas City Journal.

It is a partial hand that writes this tribute, a friendly heart that dictates it, but it requires both to fitly describe the great character, whose career has closed. Criticism is said to be the business of small minds, and more has been written about the spots on the sun than is devoted to the great orb itself. It requires both friendship and admiration to say it, but it is none the less true for all that, that Ulysses S. Grant is in all that goes to round up a perfect character, the greatest man America has ever produced. In the term great is included everything in the field of action and accomplishment. He was publicly great solely in this respect. He had none of the advantages of birth, wealth, family, or ancestry. His descent was entirely from the common people, from both father and mother--all were and all are farmers and mechanics--nor did he get prestige of either by marriage. What he has, he owed to himself.

At the beginning of the war of the rebellion, there was in all the vast array of patriotic volunteers no more humbler or obscure man than Grant. But from the day he entered on duty to the surrender of Appomattox, he did what he was assigned to do better than was expected of him, or of any man that might have been ordered to the same duty. There was ever about him a reserved force that made more of circumstances than counsels of war anticipated. It is not the purpose here to speak of his campaigns, but of the man. His career cannot be understood without this knowledge of the individual. As a personality he was as exceptional as were his achievements. There was this contrast between Grant and all other generals of the war. Able as were his contemporaries, they were always as great in the bulletins and in the press as in the field. But Grant's modesty, reticence, self-poise, and self-abnegation were such that even after his magnificent career, there was an uncertainty as to whether his successes were due to a genius of war or to a fortuitous combination of circumstances. And just here was the key of his greatness. He was too large in nature to court attention or seek reputation save by deeds performed. His self-reliance was so perfect that it often laid him open to the criticism of indifference. But after the war was over long enough to be looked at in the perspective of a general plan and the movements of the million men divided into half a dozen armies, covering a line of battle more than a thousand miles in length, involving several separate campaigns, but all influential upon the vital point of the military objective, the world could no longer withhold the meed of merit to his matchless genius, and the wonderful resources of a mind that stamped its mastery on the history of the greatest war in the annals of firearms. There is no longer any dispute among military men as to who stands first in the list of great captains; but by common consent, the laurel rests on the brow of Grant. And happily for his fame, for his country, and for posterity, this great preeminence is unmarred by a single personal vice, a single weakness of character, or a solitary alloy of temperament. As is the sphinx among sculptors, so is Grant among historic men, unequaled in magnitude and unmatched in simplicity.

There was one thing about Grant that is one of the highest tests of greatness: those nearest him always esteemed him most. Greatness is often more a thing of perspective than of fact, and out of this has grown the adage, "That no man is great to his valet." The very reverse of this is true as to Grant--those who doubted his greatness were always those who did not know him, while those who estimated him most highly were those nearest to and intimate with him. The truest estimate of his personal character I have yet seen is from one who knew him as intimately as any living man. "His three most prominent and admirable traits were guilelessness of character, even temperament, and great magnanimity." And this same friend says: "That in fifteen years of the closest and most intimate friendship and association, in all my companionship with him, at home and abroad, I never heard Gen. Grant make a remark that could not be repeated with propriety before a room full of ladies."

As another instance of his amiability and consideration, the following is in print. "It may by some be considered a little thing, but it is just in these little things that true nobility of character crops out. Gen. Beale, at whose house Gen. Grant always made his unofficial home in Washington says: 'Often when we would return at night from some reception, tired and sleepy, on his table would be piles of autograph albums a foot or two high, left by children with requests for his autograph. Mrs. Beale would say: 'Come, General, it is time to retire. You are tired and need rest. Don't stop to write in those books tonight, but wait until morning.' 'No,' Gen. Grant would reply, 'I'll do it tonight. These books belong to little children and they will stop for them in the morning and I don't want to disappoint them.' And he would write in every one."

"I will give one more illustration of the personal traits of this illustrious man," says Gen. Beale. "I saw him once while at a white heat of vexation in the library of the White House, put personal prejudices and wishes aside, and do his duty without question. He had been abused and slandered by a certain person to such an extent that he could only recognize him as a personal and bitter enemy. The question arose whether that person should be nominated to the Senate or not for a position. I knew all the circumstances and said to General Grant: 'What are you going to do about it?' 'Do about it?' he repeated. 'I will send his name to the Senate. He has deserved his appointment by his services to his country and no personal ill-feeling on my part shall prevent his obtaining what he deserves.' He sat down, signed the nomination, and it was sent to the Senate at once."

These elements of character index true greatness. Gen. Grant was naturally great, and it was so natural to him that he was not aware of it. The true test of mental power is in execution, and Grant commanded more men, planned greater campaigns, fought more great battles successfully, and accomplished larger results than any man in modern history. Surely these tests are ample to justify the claim made for him, as the foremost man of modern times. He was quiet, reticent, and a man of few words; but there are more of his terse sentences that have passed into proverbial use than any other man in history. He wrote rapidly, clearly, and comprehensively, and his short speeches made during his remarkable journey round the world are models of good sense, terse expression, and comprehensive wisdom. In domestic life he was a model husband and father; and in personal friendship, he was true as truth itself. All his so-called mistakes and his misfortunes came from the abuse of this virtue by others--and constitutes not the least claim upon the admiration of his countrymen. He was, too, every fiber of his being, an American, and love of country was to him a religion. It is an honor that will gain in richness as the years come to have enjoyed the friendship of Grant, and there are many who in declining years of life will cherish the recollection of the friendship and confidence of the greatest of all Americans.

THE THEORY OF PUNISHMENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Mary Kleeman was tried in Chicago, charged with making two attempts to kill her sister and family by putting arsenic in their soup. The proof was such as to place her guilt beyond doubt and she was convicted and sentenced to prison one year. The whole family were poisoned twice. The first time the family suffered great distress for three or four days but recovered, the dose being too light; the next time the dose was abundantly sufficient, but when they began to feel the effects, their suspicions caused them to call medical aid at once and the poison was ejected or neutralized, and no one died.

Another woman in a fit of despair or despondency administers arsenic to her husband and herself; the husband dies and she recovers, is tried, convicted, and sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty-five years. She is guilty of murder under the law and deserves the greatest punishment known to the law, while Mrs. Kleeman is not guilty of murder but only of an attempt which failed; therefore, her punishment is light. The real fact is that she is the very worst kind of a murderer and deserves the greatest punishment known to the law, while the other woman is not a murderer at heart and should only be placed under such restraint as would prevent her doing hurt until her condition could be so much improved as to cure her malady.

The general theory of punishment is all wrong and needs a radical change and reform. It is the duty of a government to protect the people from violence and crime, but it has no right to punish, simply as punishment. The doctrine of "an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth," is a barbarism that ought to be entirely discarded. If a man has actually committed a murder, it is simply evidence that he is a dangerous man, too dangerous to be allowed to run at large. It simply proves that he is a murderer and government should restrain him in the most humane manner which would be amply sufficient to protect the people from all danger from him. If that is death, then let death be administered. But the man who has attempted murder and failed is no less dangerous and should be restrained in the same manner as though he had succeeded. If a man attempts to commit any crime, it makes no difference whether he succeeds or not, he is a dangerous man and the government should restrain him. He should be tried, not for the crime or attempted crime, but on the charge of being dangerous to the safety and well being of society or persons or property. The verdict should specify the danger, or catalogue the dangers as near as practicable, and the sentence should be such as would be most humane and reformatory, consistent with the most perfect protection of the community against him within the bounds of reason and circumstances. A person who commits or attempts to commit a minor crime against society and the laws, though he would not have attempted a more heinous crime, is dangerous, because in most cases his first attempt is the commencement of a career of crime, and if he is not early restrained, is likely to become so dangerous as to require the most severe restraints to protect society from him.

If in the commission of a crime, a man should become so disabled that it would be impossible for him to commit a crime again or attempt it, there would be no reason for restraining him by imprisonment or otherwise, and if that fact should appear on his trial, he should be acquitted; but if a man is prosecuted because he has committed larceny and it should be proved on his trial that he is such a person that there is danger that he would commit murder, he should be restrained in the same manner as though he had actually committed a murder.

Every person should be impressed with the idea that he has no right to revenge on or to punish anyone, but has a right to protect himself, his property, family, friends, and the community, within the bounds of reason and law, to the extent necessary for the time being until it can be placed in the hands of the law, but not longer; and that it is the duty of the government to protect, rather than punish.

We expect it will be a long time before the people and governments shall fully adopt this theory, but it ought to be done as rapidly as possible.

REPUBLICAN CENTRAL COMMITTEE.

It Calls the Nominating Convention, Fixes the Basis of Representation and Passes

Grant Resolution.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

At a meeting of the Republican Central Committee of Cowley County held at the office of W. J. Wilson, in Winfield, on Saturday, July 24th, there were present J. R. Sumpter, J. B. Graves, W. J. Wilson, A. B. Harold, L. E. Wooden, J. H. Curfman, E. A. Henthorn, J. G. Shreves, J. Mentch, C. A. Peabody, G. H. Buckman, Wm. Wise, H. F. Hornaday, D. C. Stephens, and S. G. Carter. The meeting was called to order by W. J. Wilson, chairman of the Central Committee. The secretary being absent, E. A. Henthorn was elected to take his place. J. R. Sumpter moved to call the County Convention on the last Saturday in August. E. A. Henthorn moved to amend by calling the convention for September the 19th, which motion was adopted. The basis for representation was fixed as follows: One delegate for every thirty votes cast for B. W. Perkins in 1884 for congressman, and one for every fraction of fifteen votes and one at large for each township and incorporated city, making the representation as follows: Beaver, 4; Bolton 7; Cedar, 5; Cresswell, 21; Dexter, 7; Fairview, 4; Harvey, 4; Liberty, 4; Maple, 4; Ninnescah, 5; Omnia, 3; Otter, 4; Pleasant Valley, 4; Richland, 6; Rock, 5; Sheridan, 4; Silver Creek, 8; Silverdale, 5; Spring Creek, 4; Tisdale, 5; Vernon, 6; Walnut 7; Windsor, 7; Winfield, 18. It was recommended that the primaries be held on Saturday, September 12th, at the usual voting places in the several townships. The following resolutions were unanimously adopted.

WHEREAS, The United States of America has so recently been called upon to mourn the loss of one of her greatest statesmen, patriots, and heroes, in the person of General U. S. Grant, Therefore, be it

Resolved, By the Republican Central Committee of Cowley County, Kansas, in convention assembled--

1st. That we most deeply mourn the loss of our great commander, and we tender to his wife and family our most profound sympathy in their bereavement, and assure them that we believe that every patriotic heart in our country mourns with them in their loss.

2nd. That we feel proud as American citizens of the fact that we know that as long as history lives, so long will the fame and glory of General U. S. Grant live in the hearts and memory of his country.

3rd. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to Mrs. Grant, and that copies be furnished the papers of Cowley County for publication.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

There is one happiness reserved for the unsuccessful scrambler after office which does not fall to the lot of the appointee--his picture is not printed in the daily papers. Some wood cuts of famous men could not be recognized by their nearest relatives if the corpse had only been in the water one hour.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Judge J. Wade McDonald, of Winfield, will be surprised to hear that he is a possible candidate for Judge of the 19th District. We had always supposed that Winfield was in the 13th, until the Harper County Times informed us better. Wellingtonian.

THAT LITTLE CHIGGER.

Our Poet Laureate Again Turned Loose on a Suffering Public.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I stretched me, weak and weary,

On my pallet, hard and heavy, just within the chamber door.

Suddenly there came a nipping, nipping, nipping, nipping, nipping,

And a soft insidious slipping o'er my body tired and sore;

"'Tis some straggling fly," I muttered, "found his way within the door,

Only this and nothing more."



Changing, fretful, my position, fain to better my condition,

Soon again I felt that nipping, somewhat fiercer than before;

But I closed my eyes, and seeming to be softly, sweetly dreaming,

Tried this pesky interference with my slumbers to ignore;

But the nipping went on bravely and more furious than before,

Never ceasing, oh, be sure!



Then into the darkness peering, at the bed I'd left, and fearing

That I'd made a bad exchanging to this spot upon the floor,

Soon I gathered up my bedding and the midnight found me treading,

Soft and stealthy, like a craven, back my way across the floor,

To the bed, where I'd been sleeping for so many nights before,

Dreaming sweetly, evermore.



Back into my bed returning, all my blood within me burning,

Soon again I felt the nipping ten times fiercer, than before;

But I simply turned me over, and pulled up an extra cover.

Feigning sleep, like tired Rover, and essaying loud to snore;

But no Morpheus came to bug me through this imitated snore;

Nary a Morpheus, nevermore.



All at once ten thousand chiggers, with their whetted, sharpened diggers,

Went to work in right good earnest, gnawing in at every pore;

And the torture I did suffer, might be guessed but never uttered,

As I raved, and fumed, and spluttered, while they nipped me all the more.

Burrowing deep into my carcass, crawling in at every pore.

And my body, oh, how sore.



Then I vowed that not a finger on each hand should ever linger,

'Till I'd scratched them, all disabled, from their swelling nest of gore;

Then began that constant scratching, never ceasing, constant scratching.

Faithful hunting, never catching, for the chigger small and poor.

And I vainly asked this question, "Will this scratching ne'er give o'er?"

Quoth the chigger, "nevermore."



How I wished my hands were grab hooks, grappling irons, talons, fish hooks,

How I writhed and rubbed and fretted, how my very flesh I tore!

But the chiggers kept on nipping, just as coolly as before,

And my wrath grew stronger, stronger, I could stand this thing no longer,

And in maddening frenzy rushed me out the chamber door.

How I raved and ripped and tore.



And we here record this promise, that so long as compos mentis,

Finds a lodgment in our noodle, just the same as heretofore,

We will never go to ramble, through the Walnut's brush and bramble,

Seeking pleasure and adventure, as we used to do of yore,

For the chigger reigns supremely, as he never did before,

And will nip you, certain, sure.

SWEET SERENADERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The man in the moon, as he looked down on his big and varied domain, last night, cast a beaming smile on one party he saw--sweet serenaders who sent out on the balmy air music whose charm is inexpressible. The writer, lying dreamily on his couch wrapped in tranquility and a cool breeze, heard sweet strains floating in at the open windows. At first he made not a stir. He thought the long-hoped for heavenly transition had been made; but on gazing from the northeast corner of his left eye, he beheld not an angel. Then Old Morpheus relinquished himself, and in the gauzy, ghostly habiliments of stilly night we noiselessly stole down the stairs and out to the musical origin. The serenaders thought it Hamlet's ghost, at first, but as the apparition approached nearer, all fear was blighted. The party was composed of Will Ferguson and Fred Ballein, guitars, and George Nelson and Will Schell, violins, with O. J. Daugherty, bells, and Harry Sickafoose and I. Martin, manipulators of the vocal organ. They were chaperoned by Steve Parris, with his hack and mules. Their music was grand: as soft and low as that of the Aeolian harp and brought out many appreciative responses at different houses. They were out till two o'clock.

COLLEGE TRUSTEES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The trustees of the new M. E. College met, Tuesday, at the Methodist parsonage in this city. There were present: Revs. C. A. King, Wichita; B. C. Swarts, Kingman; M. L. Gates, Winfield; Thos. Audas, Wichita; D. J. Chatfield, Wichita; J. D. Botkin, McPherson; B. Kelly, Winfield. At the meeting yesterday evening the deed and subscriptions of the College Hill Company and the subscription of the Highland Park Company were accepted, and the deed is now filed for record. The Highland Park Company deed will stand in reserve till the college is completed. At the meeting today the plans and bids of various architects and superintendents were being examined and discussed, and the contract will likely be let this evening when work will commence in August. Everything between the trustees and our citizens is perfectly harmonious, and the selection of the site seems to be taken with even more ardor than at first, and the gentlemen see more of our city and people.

NORMAL NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Mr. Kelly was unable to do anything with the negative taken yesterday, owing to the influences of the sun on the faces and the size of the crowd, and was obliged to return today and take them by divisions. Good pictures are anticipated this time, and we presume can be had at very reasonable rates.

The object lesson today under Prof. Wilkinson was the dissection and the study of the structure of a clam. The lesson appeared to be very interesting and instructive, but when the idea of eating this bivalve mollusk was presented, many of them claimed to have lost their appetite for dinner, forgetting their predacious habits on the near relative, the oyster.

Owing to the court now being held in the Court House, the Normal meets as usual, with an infringement on the good nature of the Christian Church people. A.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The following charters were filed in the Secretary of State's office yesterday.

The Forest Chapel M. E. church, place of business, Richland township, Cowley County; trustees, A. H. Smith, T. T. Stevenson, John Clintwood, J. E. White, and R. Tweedle, of Cowley County, and Lewis Thomas and David Kinsey, of Butler County.

The Wilmot Town Company, place of business, Winfield; trustees, Samuel Phoenix, Adam Stuber, Thos. R. Carson, Edwin P. Greer, and Henry E. Asp. Capital stock, $25,000.

The Floral Improvement Company, place of business, Winfield; directors, Lewis Stevens, Joel R. Cole, and Wm. H. Hornady, of Floral, and James N. Young and Henry E. Asp, of Winfield. Capital stock, $30,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

An exchange had an editorial headed "Boys will be Boys." This information takes the keen edge off our sorrow, and the future opens bright before us. It has always been a source of dread and uneasiness to reflect that the tender youth of whom we are so fond might develop into his grandmother, but the assurance that boys will be boys in the future, as they have been in the past, takes away the dull foreboding. It would be unpleasant to find the boys we cherish suddenly commence to hunt around for bustles and redingotes, and it is to be hoped that the prediction of the exchange referred to will be verified, and that boys will continue to do business at the old stand.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Winfield Courier says: "Newspapers are now used to make bustles of."

Heavens! What's the world coming to? To think that a man's best journalistic efforts should be thus sat upon. It crushes all the glory out of the profession and were it not that an editor can feel that he has not only brightened a woman's mind, but improved (?) her shape, he might well throw up the sponge in disgust and retire from a world of bustle and deception. And while the subject is before us, allows us to say that plenty of papers, suitable for making bustles, can be had at this office for five cents per dozen. Belle Plaine News.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

And now come the ladies of the Christian church and with malice aforethought and the thermometer at one hundred, propose an ice cream social for Thursday evening. Verily, verily, the miseries of the young men are now complete.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The Leavenworth Catholic says: "Corn twelve feet tall is not an uncommon sight in Cowley County."

No, you bet it isn't! Corn fourteen feet tall is scarcely worthy of special note.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

A U. S. Government surveying party of seven, with pack animals, wagons, etc., passed through the city Monday taking a sketch of our rivers and streams.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The K. C. & S. W. surveyors are running a line south from the ford just below the S. F. bridge along west of D. S. Sherrard's.

WINFIELD TO THE FRONT AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

Lieut. J. E. Snow, drum major of the Courier Cornet Band, informs us that in accordance with an order recently issued by Gov. Martin to the different regimental commanders throughout the state, Col. L. N. Woodcock, of Wichita, has designated this band as the regimental band of the Second Regiment Kansas National Guards, embracing six or eight adjoining counties. Captain C. E. Steuven, of Co. C., Second Regiment, has received a special order to muster the band into the service if they accept the position, which we are very confident they will do. This is a well deserved compliment to the Courier Band, and one which was unsought. It is not only a compliment to the band, but a compliment to our city and county. Col. Woodcock had within his district several good bands from which to make his selection. Our people are becoming educated to the style and quality of music now rendered by this organization, and begin to appreciate it as they should. Strangers have also come to know its merits, as this appointment evidences. Mr. George Crippen, its leader and musical director, has been untiring in giving the band its present prestige, which enterprise on his part is worthy the warm appreciation of our people. The band is now composed as followed, every member being a thorough musician: Geo. H. Crippen, director; Charles Roberts, J. S. R. Bates, A. R. Harvey, Fred Bates, G. H. Buckman, C. A. Shaw, Clarence Roberts, J. W. Holliday, Frank Spiney, F. J. Newton, A. T. Roberts, W. I. Warner, Albert Roberts, D. T. Armstrong, Fidler, J. E. Snow, drum major.

THE CENTRAL VS. THE EXTERMINATORS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The base ball rage is still at fever heat. Friday afternoon there was a lively game at the park between a picked nine from the Central and a picked nine around town. The Central nine were: Frank Crampton, Levi Crampton, Will Russell, Harry Holbrook, Will McKay, Frank Lowe, Wardie Lee, Hathaway, and McClelland. Frank Crampton, captain; McClellan, catcher; and Harry Holbrook, pitcher. The Exterminators were: Lum Callahan, Arthur Bangs, John Crane, Jim Vance, A. Snowhill, Cap. Whiting, Tom Eaton, D. L. Kretsinger, and Jim McClain. The Exterminators were excellent batters but lacked skill as fielders. They also had no good catcher. If they had had a good catcher, they would have made it very warm for the Central. Arthur Bangs sent the balls in like a bullet. Lum Callahan was the only one in full uniform. He had borrowed the suit of some clown of a yellow shade. The first lick he made in this suit, he split it, but Lum showed himself equal to the emergency by stepping aside and turning his garments front for back. This gave Lum a presentable appearance, and things went on all right. The last half of the ninth inning was not played by the Centrals. The score stood 27 to 37 in favor of the Centrals.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, July 30, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

William Bliss to Laura A. Smith, s hf nw qr 25-34-5 e, 80 acres: $300

C L Butts to John M Proctor, lot 2, blk 48, Williams addition to Udall: $250

J S Crabtree et ux to Nancy Staten, lots 8 and 9, blk 41, Burden: $250

Edward C Gage to Warren L Powell, lots 9, 10, and 11, blk 39, A. C.: $325

W N Bangs et ux to David R Beatty, lot 13, blk 51, A C: $150

Rally S McArb to John H McArb, lots 7 an