THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, AUGUST 6, 1885.

THE METHODIST COLLEGE.

Some Sickening Emetic for the Wichita Kicker.

His Lies Hurled Back.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

"The strange, sad rumor reaches us that our dear but over-ambitious friends at Winfield, in the matter of the Methodist college business, bit off more than they can chew. It was awful funny to sail in and outbid the biggest town in the state, but it wasn't business, all the same. Wichita talked business, Winfield highfly. Highfly caught the impracticable, vain-glorious preacher's committee, but the trustees seem to be insisting upon business, a kind of talk that Winfield is not well up in, apparently. At least so unsatisfactory has their talk and action become that one of the trustees has resigned and another threatens to. A portion of the preacher committee accepted, with ill-grace, the assertion made before them by the editor of this paper, that from the absence of business sense and business action their college would fail, we citing the failures of Blue Mount College and the Baker University of this state, both Methodist institutions, one of which the church presented to the state, and which is now the State Agricultural college. Wichita don't want the college now, nor did she ever particularly hanker after it. It would be better to be a college town than to be nothing, and we hope Winfield will brace up to the demand that she make good her promise. That this hope is sincere, we have only to say that Wichita has had two college propositions of late, either of them more favorable than the Methodist proposition. And we don't think that the trustees, either, should weaken so easily, but brace up also and make the best of a bad bargain.

Wichita Eagle.

The over-anxiety manifested in the above article only evidences the deep and bitter disappointment still rankling in the breast of the Eagle man on account of Wichita's defeat and humiliation in a contest for the College in which they had put their job up and in which they were sure they had a clean walk-away. It's sore, isn't it? Poor Marsh! Winfield is sorry that you will persist in parading the soreness left by your blasted hopes. You shouldn't have gone into the College business. You are evidently not adapted to such work; you are better fitted as a base bulldozer to control the rabble and things of your commercially thrifty town, rather than to dictate to a committee of level headed, competent preachers. It brings the blush to the face of every intelligent reader of your paper who knows you when you parade what you told the preacher committee, and, we will add, you said many other equally foolish and prejudiced things that had as well not be repeated. Your story of having two other propositions offered you sounds thin and boyish on the heels of your M. E. College and Reformatory School efforts. You needn't be so apprehensive about the trustees and Winfield failing of their duty in this college matter, as they will live up fully to the letter and spirit of the bid from Winfield that secured the location of the College--the result so mourned--and this is what makes the Eagle man so strangely sad and jealous. Wichita's member of the board of trustees, it is true, did resign, but it came about in this way: At the first meeting of the board, this same gentleman offered a resolution to postpone action until the next meeting of the conference. His motion did not receive a second, yet the worthy president of the board ruled that he would entertain the motion without a second. The animus of the motion, on reflection, became so apparent that its author withdrew it with an apology. This same member was elected treasurer of the board, by the way--a fine scheme to have the treasurer of the Winfield College a resident of Wichita; but while this job was being put up in the interests of Wichita down here the officers of the law were levying attachments on the would-be treasurer's goods in Wichita. So at the next meeting of the board, a by-law was adopted that the treasurer should be a layman, not a member of the board of trustees. The Wichita treasurer at once appeared upon the scene and tendered his resignation as trustee, but he was promptly informed that unless his resignation of treasurer was also tendered, his resignation as trustee would not be accepted, so the only thing left for him to do was to resign both positions. And it occurs to us, for the credit of the Eagle's position, the less said about this College business, the better.

Now as to the facts:

The board of M. E. College trustees closed a three days' meeting in this city Thursday, and returned to their homes. It was the most important and satisfactory they have yet held. The warranty deeds to the two beautiful and valuable tracts of land, forty acres, donated by the College Hill Town Company and the Highland Park Town Company and the twenty thousand dollar subscriptions of these companies were accepted and the deeds placed on record. Various plans were examined and discussed, and the board adjourned to meet August 19th, to give the contractors time to mature and complete their bids, when the contract for the building will be closed and the work of construction commenced. In the meantime several model college buildings will be visited and carefully studied by a committee from the trustees for the purpose of confirming their judgment as to the very best plans. The trustees are availing themselves of the results as to plans and furniture of some of the best institutions of the kind in the land, and the ability and patience they are putting into the work assures for Winfield a University second to none in the west.

Will the Wichita Eagle please copy?

ACTION TELLS.

Work Commenced on the D. M. & A.

To Be Pushed Right Through.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

THE COURIER has numerously chronicled the fact that work on the S., M. & A. "would soon commence," etc., but now that it has commenced is a settled fact. Walter G. Seaver, the Dexter Eye optician, came in Saturday from Belle Plaine and reports that grading is progressing right along, and that all the men and teams that can be secured will be put on Monday. The contractors have finished all delaying preliminaries and mean to boom the work from this time on. They have two large engines, flat cars, and all necessaries for operations. The grading will come this way from Belle Plaine, to connect the Santa Fe for a supply route. This is business, and with the arrival of the K. C. & S. W., must be followed with a boom. Let 'em come. We will open our arms with affection.

A WONDERFUL BUSTLE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

And still the demand for agricultural products widens. A late industry, which promises wonders, to squash raising. The girls now use them for bustles. A young lady was passing along Main Street Friday, when something fell--a medium sized round Hubbard squash. Of course, those who saw the mishap recognized where it came from, and have made oath to the fact that it fell from its state of bustle. In the center of the squash is a hole for the fastener, which broke. As a bustle it certainly must be a big success, and is on exhibition in this office, where any lady wishing to consult the latest styles can examine it. President Martin will likely introduce this new squash field before the Horticultural Society at its next meeting, and urge the raising of a greater supply. This story looks thin, but we've got the proof. Squash bustles, however, must be securely fastened.

COMMUNICATED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

American christians waste $5,000,000 per year for tobacco, and give $1,000,000 for the evangelization of heathens. In other words, tobacco, in their estimation, is worth five times as much as immortal souls. How many Kansas christians will have to meet that or even a heavier charge at the judgment seat? We wish the answer might be none, but alas, we know of many who are squandering many times more money for tobacco than they are giving to save lost souls. My dear reader, are you guilty? It will be an easy thing for you to turn a deaf ear to this statement now, but forget not the solemn truth, "for all these things you must render an account." What will be your excuse for non-attendance upon the services of God's house tomorrow? Take your excuse to God first ere you act upon it. R.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

E. M. Reynolds hands us his home paper, the Nora Springs, Iowa, Advertiser, containing this unique personal. The parties are probably well known here and their foreign rambles will be noted with interest: "Mr. Q. Cumber and his sister, Mrs. Belle Ache, have been guests of ye editor the greater part of the week, and all discrepancies which occur in this paper may be laid to their protracted and unwelcome visit."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Tell a man during the spell of weather to keep cool and he feels insulted, grows hotter than ever. We proffer no such advice. We simply say ditto to Irving. Teach yourself to be easily pleased. The best way to keep cool and serene is not by putting a cabbage leaf in one's hat, is not by putting ice water in one's stomach, nor yet by tarrying long at the straw that leads to mixed drinks. Such devices are not to be despised, but the most effective weapon with which to ward off the heat is the fine art of being easily pleased. The man who is easily pleased is a man who can rely upon his digestion, and digestion, as everybody knows, is half the battle of life even when the mercury is standing at a harrowing height. Thrice happy is he who has learned to be easily pleased--to take the world as it comes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Our Cyclones went up to Udall Friday afternoon for a little exercise with the Udall "Dudes." They crossed hats for five innings, showing a little score of thirty-three for the Cyclones and twelve for the Dudes. The boys returned on the evening freight, having had a few hours acceptable recreation. The Udall boys received our club very agreeably. Met them with the band set up, the lemonade, etc. The "Dudes" pitcher got a bad hit on the forehead with a ball, and was spitting blood all night, supposed concussion of the brain.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The "Rough on Rats" base ball nine, of the Terminus, have challenged our "Exterminators" for a battle at that place on August 5th, next Wednesday, for the championship of the State. The A. C. nine are certainly unaware of the real exterminating qualities of our nine or they would never offer to sacrifice themselves. But let the E's. blot them out and regain our "rep.," lost so ignominiously by the Cyclones. The R. O. R. are composed of staunch businessmen who can make such a visit immense.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The man who builds a good comfortable home for himself; beautifies and ornaments his grounds with trees, shrubs, and flowers, is a public benefactor and assists largely in the growth of the town. You may not be able to build a brick block, but you can brush up around your door-yard, and clear off the rubbish from the back alley. Let each one do what he can to add to the beauty of the town.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

There has been quite a sensation worked out during the past week implicating some of our most prominent citizens. We are requested by friends to withhold names for the present. It is quite rich and racy, and those who are not posted will no doubt be anxious to learn the particulars. We hope things may be straightened around without a tragedy, for we do not wish to chronicle such an act.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The regular quarterly meeting of the Free Baptists will convene at Liberty schoolhouse in Liberty township, on Friday, the 7th of August, holding over Sunday. The place is 11 miles Southeast of Winfield and one mile east of the Magnolia farm. There will be a basket dinner on Sunday. A cordial invitation is extended for everybody to attend.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The large, branching elms next to Baden's Headquarters have been trimmed. They almost hid the building and made air very sultry in their neighborhood.

NORMAL INSTITUTE RESOLUTIONS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

WHEREAS, We, the members of the Cowley County Normal Institute, being about to separate for the work of the year after a pleasant session whose good results it is impossible to estimate, and whose influence must be felt in every school district in Cowley County, do realize our indebtedness to the people of Winfield for their aid and sympathy, and to the County Superintendent, the conductor and his assistant instructors, for their unremitting labors in our behalf, and

WHEREAS, We recognize and appreciate the high value of the mental training afforded us during the past weeks, the ideal of teachers, and teaching that has been kept before us, and are grateful for the acquaintance and leadership of persons possessing that best product of modern education--a well rounded christian character, therefore be it

Resolved, That we extend to Superintendent Limerick our hearty thanks for his patient and untiring efforts to promote our welfare, secure our comfort, and disseminate a spirit of good will among us.

Resolved, That we hereby tender Prof. Wilkinson, his assistants, Profs. Gridley, Barnes, and Miss Kelly, our heartfelt thanks for the noble work they have wrought among us. We are grateful for the stimulus to higher attainments which their presence and influence has afforded us. May Heaven's blessing attend them through life's school, whether in the shadow of the valley of examination or on the delectable mountains of a Normal social.

Resolved, That our sincere thanks are due the Winfield churches for the use of their buildings; especially do we appreciate the kindness of the elders of the Christian church in throwing open to us the church for our afternoon sessions.

Resolved, That to Prof. Merriman for the kindness in directing the singing; to Dr. States for his work before the physiology class; to Profs. Jay and Wilkinson and Dr. Kirkwood for their interesting and valuable lectures delivered before the Normal, and to the people of Winfield for the interest manifested, the thanks of the Institute are unanimously expressed.

Resolved, That we, the teachers of Cowley County, do go from this Institute fully determined to make this year's work the best of our lives, and to this end we ask the aid and support of every friend and patron of the common school, and,

Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the Winfield papers.

By order of the committee. H. G. Norton, chairman. A. J. McClelland, secretary.

GETTING OLD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Saturday was the 100th number of THE DAILY COURIER. For a hundred day old youngster, it is lusty and healthy. Its circulation reaches into almost every home in the city, with not a single "delinquent." Its advertising patronage is excellent and steadily growing. Words of the heartiest commendation come to it from all directions, coupled with new subscribers and hard cash. It now employs thirteen men and nine carrier boys and its weekly payroll averages one hundred and sixty dollars. Sixty persons are supported from its salary list. And while the profit account is yet exceedingly light, the items of receipt even up those for expenditure. This is the direct result of publishing a first-class paper. After the first few issues, many citizens said, "You can't keep up such a paper," but the public have kept it up and made it a credit to the town, a permanent fixture. As its circulation and patronage increase with the age and growth of the city, new improvements will be added. THE DAILY COURIER will be up with the times and fully abreast of the progress and life of the "Queen City." When it can't do this, it will "turn up its toes to the daisies." It will never inflict on a suffering public the burden of supporting a concern that does not return value received in a measure full and running over.

CARELESS DEEDS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The oldest deed given in Cowley was filed with Register Soward Friday. It was made, if it don't lie, in 1865, when this country was a howling wilderness. It conveys a lot in Arkansas City from A. G. Lowe to Fannie Eckert. As it wasn't acknowledged and the other day it would appear that the man who drew it had been partaking excessively of "medicine," a failing common at the Terminus. Of course, the deed is worthless with such a mistake. A deed was also filed Friday conveying property from A. F. Smith to E. P. Brooks, without a sign on the deed, farther than personal knowledge of the persons, to show in what place are lots 6 and 7, block 5. It is on the records, worthless. The parties live in Burden. Examine your deed with a keen eye, if you want no trouble.

CITY TEACHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The school board has employed the full corps of city teachers, excepting those for the new Central school building, which will not be finished before September 18th, as follows: A. Gridley, Principal, $125 per month; Prof. W. N. Rice, High School, $60; Miss Louise S. Gregg, $50; Miss Lois Williams, $45; Miss Sada Davis, $45; Miss Maude M. Pearson, $40; Miss Iva Crane, $40; Miss Lucretia Davis, $40; Miss Mary Berkey, $40; Miss Alice E. Dickie, $50; Miss Mattie Gibson, $45; Miss Mary E. Hamill, $45; Miss Mary Bryant, $50; Miss Florence Campbell, $50; Miss Clara Davenport, $40; Miss Jessie Stretch, $50; Miss Fannie Stretch, $45.

DOWN THE "RAGIN' RACKENSACK."

Our F. M. on the "Kansas Millers."

Sights and Incidents of the Winfield Steamboat Exercise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Through the courtesy of Messrs. Bliss & Wood, our fat man procured a "dead head" ticket and joined the excursion down the muddy Arkansas last Tuesday. We left Winfield on the regular passenger train going south; our hearts were filled with gladness and our baskets filled with eatables that made the reporter drop all thoughts of trouble and feel like a school boy. We numbered ninety-five souls besides several children. We reached Arkansas City with care. Here the cars were run down to the second crossing below the depot, where we expected conveyances would be in waiting to take us to the river, but "nary one" was there, and half a mile of dusty road ahead that insured our landing on the "Kansas Millers," but equal to the occasion, we took our lunch baskets in our hands and faced all difficulties by starting for the bridge east of town across the Walnut, where the "Kansas Millers" was tied up tight and fast. Vast volumes of smoke could be seen issuing from the smoke stack. Like all such picnics, each and everyone ran, of the notion that hurrying was the thing or we would get left. We soon reached the bank and viewed the Kansas wonder. As it has been described heretofore in this paper, it will not be necessary now. Getting on board about 1 p.m., we were joined by some twenty from the Terminus. We now numbered 120. Now commenced our troubles. The drinking water failed to come and, of course, after walking through the hot sun and sand, we felt a "leetle" like imbibing. However, all we could do was to smack our lips and imagine there was a dozen cases of beer on deck, instead of water. About 2 p.m., the water came, and we sailed out of harbor at once, and down the stream so merrily. Everything went all right going down. The reporter's soul felt such joy as he has been a stranger to for a long while. We ran down at the rate of about twelve miles per hour, running twenty-five miles down the stream. We had been looking for some time for a landing place close to some shady nook, where we could land and go ashore and explore the mysteries of our lunch baskets. Some of us had been in such a hurry upon leaving home that our stomachs had been strangers to food since early in the morning. The reporter especially longed for the good time to come when some worthy individual would tap him on the shoulder and say lobsters, spring chicken, ice cream and cake, come along! And we wondered if the party would be scared to see how quick we would come. Finding no suitable place to land, we unfurled the table cloths and napkins and went to work. We partook of the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Parmer, Miss Rena Crampton, and Mrs. F. P. Nichols, four dinners in all, for which we are under many obligations. There was plenty to eat but little to drink. To be sure, the waters of the "Arkansaw" lapped the sides of our boat, and though water was all around us, we were perishing with thirst. Two or three ate this water--they parted it with a knife and swallowed without tasting. They reported some hours afterward a depressed, heavy feeling, like unto being weighted down by sand. About this time we struck for shore and quite a number landed in a shady place. It was found well stocked with the festive chigger and they (the excursionists), soon struck a B line for the boat, except one dude. We had fairly pulled out into the channel when we heard a piteous wail from the bank, and lo and behold, the dude was standing on the shore with a wild and haunted look on his countenance. We had to pull back and take him in, and this is where we got stuck--on a sand bar. Now our sticking troubles began and lasted off and on during the night. There was a colored deck hand, of the genuine southern type, that proved very handy. When we got stuck he would step off with a pole and wade around up and down the river for some distance. He did this probably to assure the passengers there was no danger of them getting into deep water and sinking. At least, we all felt that we were stuck safe and sure every time the "coon" took one of these walks. The capstan was in constant use with the trees along the shore. Several sand bars were torn up by the roots and were reported striking for the Missouri when last seen. If there had been any accommodations for sleeping, we could have got along first rate. As it was, we had to sit bolt upright all night, or stretch ourselves out on a board, and there was not much chance to sleep then, with the talking and laughing going on; and having no water made it worse, though water was found about 3 a.m., which alleviated our condition to a great extent. We reached the starting point at 5 a.m., Wednesday morning, and had to walk to the depot. We felt pretty well tuckered out, you can guess. The Winfield Juvenile band was along and discoursed sweet music. We had an organ aboard and had some good vocal music by E. F. Blair, A. F. Hopkins, Louie Brown, Mrs. Allen Ayres, Mrs. Cunningham, Mrs. Campbell, Mrs. C. A. Bliss, and Miss Lola Silliman, organist. The mills of Arkansas City were represented by the proprietors themselves. These gentlemen did everything they could, taking a hand at the capstan and working like truck horses. The Kansas Millers has made several trips when the river was much lower than now, and came up all right. We attribute the trouble to new officers. There was a new outfit in command, and, no matter how competent, necessarily they would have to have some experience with the channel of the river before running successfully. Again, we were too heavily ladened. No doubt this boat will run all right with the proper load. She has done it, and will right along. Though it was very hard to sit up all night, the jovial company caused the hours to pass away. The owners of the Kansas Millers made it as agreeable as possible to all on board. Though there were several things which were not in the programme, yet this was not the fault of the owners. The scenery as far as we went is only ordinary. Though the day was very hot, when the boat was in motion we got a good breeze. We don't feel this morning as if we wished to excurt again for two or three days.

NOTELETS.

We walked to the--

The stream was very muddy.

We got stuck on a sand bar coming up.

There were too many captains aboard.

We want to go again as soon as we get well.

The band boys took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Goodrich.

Ed. Pentecost dispensed ice cream and lemonade until it ran out.

Five ministers and the reporter were aboard--this was the trouble.

We advise the Wichita party to bring along some of "Adam's ale."

We were to be back to Arkansas City at 10 p.m., and take the train at 10:30.

The fat, heavy weights aboard are supposed to be the ones that stuck the boat.

Conductor Myers watched for our return until 1 a.m., and went home disgusted.

During the water famine Dr. Park was seen to step outside and drink a bottle of eye-water.

We had lots of good things to eat, but the water was some distance from shore that was fit to drink.

The ladies' white dresses were spotted with black from the smoke stack, as well as the gentlemen's clothes.

There was some talk of a moonlight dance, but the presence of five ministers and the fat man put a damper on it.

There was a mistake made in not having a sufficient supply of water put aboard when the boat left Arkansas City.

During the scarcity of water, some salt ice, left in the cooler, was found and devoured instantly. The cooler was not touched.

Joe Maus, of the Winfield Roller mills, showed the reporter many favors, as well as to others. Joe is a good man to have along.

The officers of the boat were: Alton, captain; Barnes, pilot; Clarke, engineer. Robinson Crusoe was aboard, but had no dog or gun.

Judge Gans sat in the center of the boat and held on to a rope during the entire trip. Since the Judge's Chicago experience, he don't believe in immersion.

THE SALEM P. O. BURNING SEQUEL.

Dr. Crabtree, Charged With the Deed, Is Discharged After Two Days Examination.

How It is Taken.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The examination of Dr. J. S. Crabtree, late assistant P. M. at New Salem, charged with burning the Salem postoffice, fixtures, mail, etc., found its sequel Wednesday in the discharge of the Doctor. The case was before U. S. Commissioner, L. H. Webb, for two days, and was one of intense interest. Almost the whole population of New Salem, with many from Burden, were present, and six witnesses for the prosecution and twenty for the defense were examined. Dr. L. S. Downs and W. H. Lucas were the principal prosecuting witnesses, Dr. Downs having made the complaint. The case was ably conducted by U. S. District Attorney, W. C. Perry, for the prosecution, and Senator F. S. Jennings for Crabtree. P. O. Inspector Maj. J. M. Crowell, who worked up the case, assisted Perry with the evidence and Deputy U. S. Marshal O. S. Rarick was the attending marshal. Lucas, Crabtree's assistant in the drug store and postoffice, which were both in the same building, swore that he locked the store up and went home at 10 o'clock, leaving the light burning on the counter. After the fire he found the remains of the lamp and coal oil can some feet from where he had left them, and he was satisfied that someone had moved them. Dr. Downs swore positively that, at about 11 o'clock, sitting in the door of his house, one hundred feet across the street, he saw Dr. Crabtree unlock the door, enter the building, lock the door behind him, and carry the lighted lamp behind the prescription case. He saw nothing more until the alarm of fire. Shortly after he reached the spot, Dr. Crabtree came driving up, calling "fire!" A dozen or more witnesses swore that Crabtree didn't leave the Burden I. O. O. F. Lodge until about 10:30. The distance to Salem is eight miles, a good hour's drive, showing it very improbable for Crabtree to reach Salem before the fire broke out. Crabtree swore that he first saw the fire when a mile from it, and didn't know it was a building until very near the town, and that it was his building till he was in town. Crabtree's previous good character was established, and it was shown that in case the $1,200 insurance was paid, he would still be the loser seven hundred dollars or more. No possible motive was shown for the crime. Commissioner Webb's grounds of discharge were that while Downs was probably honest in his statements, and thought he saw Crabtree enter the building, and very likely did see someone enter, yet his distance away made it possible for him to be mistaken as to the person he saw, and when considered with the testimony of Crabtree's whereabouts, made that possibility almost an absolute certainty. That the fire was incendiary, there is no doubt from the evidence, but who did it can't be established in law. Sympathy has been very largely with Crabtree from the first, and all familiar with the case are happy at his discharge. The general impression is that the prosecution was prompted by professional jealousy, and much unsavory criticism is given Downs. All are satisfied that Crabtree is without a stain in the matter.

GIVE US HELL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The revisers of the old testament must have lived in a cool climate and a continual state of tranquility or they never would have changed "hell" to "sheol." It will never work. After chasing an item this afternoon five miles over our parching sidewalks, with the mercury hugging 110, and then only run down three lines, we are ready to banish "sheol" for "hell." It may do for history, but as a means of expressing this weather, it's nowhere. Accosting a fellow sufferer a thousand times a day with "Ain't this hottern' sheol," would be entirely too lamb-like--too inexpressive, and the man with no more enthusiastic disgust ought to go to the regular old orthodox "hell" with a loud thud. Give us hell and take your gehenna and your sheol.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

One of the young bloods of this city was placed in a most trying position the other evening. He took his best girl to Sam's ice cream parlor and ordered two dishes with the usual confectionery accompaniment. The little feast proceeded in the usual merry way and at the end the pair arose, but, O horror! The young man discovered that his purse was somewhere else. What to do he knew not. He requested his fair companion to remain as security until he could go out and hunt up the needful; but to use a society expression, she kicked, and refused to be pawned. This broke him all up, and some say he left his hat and rushed up town bare-headed, but it is more likely that Sam, though a stranger to the young man, took pity upon him and allowed him to depart. Such an incident is likely to burst the cords of love, and this is written as a solemn warning to young men never to forget their purses when they go out with their girls.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Courier Cornet Band has been mustered by Captain C. E. Steuven, as the Regimental Band of the 2nd regiment K. N. G., the particulars of which we chronicled the other day. The band now has seventeen members. This is a big feather in the cap of our band. Their triumph was scored over the Wichita, Emporia, Independence, Wellington, and a number of others in this district. But four bands in the State have received this distinction, there being but four regiments K. N. G. It shows the splendid reputation of the Courier Cornet Band away from home. Col. Woodcock, who made the appointment, is a Wichita man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Wichitas will play the Border base ball club of Arkansas City a return game on September 6th. The Emporia club will also play A. C. soon. The Wichitas won the contest, Tuesday, with the Borders only by a scratch. The Wichitas ran their score up with a rush to the fifth inning. On the sixth, seventh, and eighth, the Borders whitewashed them, and if it hadn't been for one reckless play by the Border first baseman, would have won the game. The Wichitas were uncourteous in allowing the Borders to pay for their own entertainment, when the Wichitas had the $100 purse and numerous wagers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The first number of the Caney Chronicle, a new Chautauqua paper, has fallen into our paws. Its salutatory says, "a newspaper cannot live on wind," which will probably be a stunning revelation to many sheets that have stuck it out on this diet for ages, and are not very hungry either. The Chronicle is a neat paper and we hope its wind will blow up a big drift of filthy lucre.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Wellington girls are getting too nice to walk anywhere any more. A young lady promised to go to a party with a gentleman, and when he went after her, she peeped out of the window, and seeing no buggy, asked him how he was going. "Afoot, of course." And she said in a high, cracked voice: "Faix and thin ye can go that way and Oi will go wid me brother."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ottawa's proposition to give $5,000 and 100 acres of land to secure the locating of the State Orphan Asylum, has been favorably considered. The State Board of Charities was there on Monday, in a formal visit of inspection, and individually expressed themselves as much pleased with the surroundings. A decision will be arrived at in a day or two.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Arkansas City's Border base ball club walked clear over the forms of the Wellington "Scrubs" Wednesday--24 to 3. This is about the worst "do up" that has yet been recorded. Wellington seems to have a very appropriate name for its club, this time. The Arkansas City boys are getting famous. Cowley always walks arm in arm with the celebrated "get there Eli."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Floral, since becoming a railroad station, is getting muscular and begins to move things. Harry Zimmerman let the contract Thursday for a good hotel building and Capt. Stevens the contract for a roomy and substantial business building, while numerous others are doing likewise, and Floral will soon be a city indeed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Descendants of the slick fellow who first caused woman and then man to fall--the old original serpent--are said to be more numerous this summer in yards about town, than usual. The crop of hop toads is also large. This is a great country for live stock.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Fire Department, while out for practice Wednesday, turned the hose loose on the courthouse lawn, making it look as fresh as a blooming maiden. The 600 feet of hose stretched nearly all over the grounds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Normal Institute closed Friday after a four weeks session unexcelled in the history of Cowley County.

THE COLLEGE FUNDS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The following notice made to our local college committee has the true business ring and betokens progress. All should read it and comply with the request of the Board of Trustees as to putting all matters pertaining to the college in an acceptable business shape. The Trustees are working with zeal and ability and what started in hesitancy and doubt is now assuming shape that will gratify the most enthusiastic and sanguine. Now let all come up to their part of the work and our hopes of a great university on College Hill will be fully realized. The following is the notice: "Winfield, Kansas, July 30th, 1885. To W. G. Graham, T. H. Soward, W. P. Hackney, B. Kelly, and M. L. Robinson. Gentlemen: Having accepted the deeds from the College Hill Association and the Highland Park Association, and having made the necessary arrangements to begin at an early day the construction of our college building, we hereby give you notice that we desire the payment to the treasurer of the Southwest Kansas Conference College, M. L. Read, within sixty days, the one-third of the $40,000 as mentioned in your proposition to the committee of location. We also request that you put the remaining two-thirds of the $20,000 of subscription in the shape of acceptable obligations according to contract. B. C. SWARTS, Prs. Protem. J. D. BOTKIN, Sec'y, Board."

ANOTHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Prof. J. A. Wood, brother of our B. F., will open on September 7th, a Normal and Commercial College in the McDougal Hall and rooms adjacent. He will be assisted by Prof. I. N. Inskeep, just retired from the principalship of the Titusville, Pennsylvania, commercial college. Prof. Wood was for eight years just past superintendent of the Salem, Indiana, public schools, and is an educator of large ability and experience. He starts this college as a permanency. A corps of first-class assistants have been procured and the institution will be an honor to the city. Prof. Inskeep is at the head of the profession in penmanship, bookkeeping, and drawing. Everything pertaining to a thorough normal and commercial education will be taught, and the tuition will come within the reach of all. A night school will accommodate all unable to attend during the day, and will likely be attended by many of our ambitious young men.

TAKE ONE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

If you want to invest, take a share in the National Guards Association, and have a say so in the building that is to be erected. It is the intention now to sell all the shares and then call a meeting of the stockholders and decide whether or not to build an opera house. Would this not be a good move? Will this city not support a first class opera house? It can be done and now is the time to do it. Twenty-five hundred dollars having already been subscribed insures the purchase price of the ground. Ten dollars cash will secure a share. Fall in and take a share and get fifty percent on the investment.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Watson Titus is somewhat exercised over his being fined a few days ago for injuring a tree, and makes the statement as follows: He lives in a house for which D. C. Beach is agent. Some days ago, while mowing his yard, he accidently cut off a little tree, fourteen inches high, which was hidden in the weeds. Although on the lot he had rented, a neighbor complained of him and the cost and fine is $7.25. He is a poor man and can illy afford the luxury of a fine for something that was purely accidental.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Udall Sentinel says: "Albert Roberts, of Winfield, is the new proprietor of the City Meat Market. He brings his family here and will at once become a citizen." Wonder if this can be our musical Al? Hope not.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

In the last issue of the Telegram, the editor, alias "linked sweetness long drawn out," makes the charge that our fat man was threatened with being lynched while the "Kansas Millers" was aground, the passengers having the erroneous idea that the avoirdupois of the F. M. sunk the boat. One thing; the spiritual shadow of the Telegram can congratulate himself on never being threatened with such a thing as sinking a feather. It is rumored around town that George has had the colic since the Fourth and he is not certain as yet whether it is the colic or the backache. If George is ever threatened with being lynched, it will be for pulling a hen roost, but never for sinking anything.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We visited today one of the, at first, unnoticed institutions of Winfield, but which, on examination, becomes one of the important ones. We speak of the planing mill of the Warner Bros. Here, in one half day, work can be done by the applicable machinery that would take the work of two carpenters a week to accomplish by hand. In speaking of the other important institutions of Winfield, let us not forget this one.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Woman's Christian Temperance Union, at its last meeting, elected the following officers for the ensuing six months: Mrs. C. H. Greer, president; Mrs. E. D. Garlick, Mrs. G. E. Raymond, Mrs. Albright and Mrs. C. Strong, vice-presidents; Mrs. F. W. Finch, secretary; Mrs. W. B. Caton, corresponding secretary; Mrs. J. C. McMullen, treasurer; Mrs. J. W. Curns, superintendent of literature.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The malady among the hogs in this vicinity has become very serious, says the Burden Enterprise. Quite a number have lost from half to all of their hogs. Judge Walton has lost five out of seven of his Poland Chinas and half of his others. He tells us that it is nothing like hog cholera, but entirely a lung disease--proven by a post mortem examination.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Some rapscallion relieved Mr. G. L. Gale's barn, east 10th Avenue, of a good set of single harness Thursday. He could have helped himself to the horse and buggy just as well. It was evidently some fellow with a horse and buggy who merely borrowed the harness--to be returned when he gets ready.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The sportive propensities of Wellington are now being soothed by walking matches. L. H. Logan and Grant Hughes walked, in the rink, about twenty two miles in four hours, in a sweat bath and loud cheers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Another metropolitan air has struck us: a hand organ with a monkey attachment. The monkey is attired in female style, and is the wonder of the small boy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Floral is to be incorporated and have a paper styled "The Floral Daisy." Smart town that, with a depot prospect.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Wichita has closed all her beer "joints" and the town is experiencing a drouth.

THE NORMAL INSTITUTE AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The success of this meeting is largely due to County Superintendent Limerick, whose efforts to make the exercises both interesting and profitable, have been unrelenting. The teachers and citizens of Winfield have left nothing undone necessary to promote the happiness and comfort of the teachers in attendance. The arrangements for supplying ladies accommodations in the homes of citizens are admirable. We also consider this city highly honored by the presence of so large a number of that class to whose efforts society is so deeply indebted. We honor teachers, not simply for their individual attainments, but for the sake of their calling. I honor them as I do the minister of the gospel. I cannot know or judge how much goodness each member of that sacred profession may have, but his sacred calling demands my personal respect. So with the teacher. I cannot judge of his or her attainments in natural science, but I honor them for their profession, and for this they command my utmost respect. I look upon teachers as I do upon ministers of the gospel and members of the medical profession, all following in honorable aims. They are associated in my mind alike in the places they hold in the community and the learned professions. I think in this point of view they may claim precedence over all other pursuits in the world. They are engaged in a work which requires a great amount of personal sacrifice and labor in order to accomplish a great amount of good. In this connection I would grant teachers the first place if not the highest. Regarding these three professions, connected together as they are by unity of purpose and aims, the teacher's work is the first and most important. The teacher, it is said, has charge of the minds of the community; the physician their bodies; and the minister their souls. But without the teacher and his work, the other two professions would be lame and crippled in their influence for good. It is said to be easier to conquer disease than to overcome ignorance. It is the able, earnest, faithful teacher who lays the foundation for the others to base their work upon; and, therefore, I think the teacher commands our highest esteem, for without the teacher we could not get along at all. O. M.

SCHOOL MA'AM SOCIAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The pretty school ma'ams held another of their lively socials in the McDougal hall Thursday. They were out in full force, with many of our citizens, arrayed in their brightest smiles and jolliest spirits. Besides the excellent music, led by Prof. Merriman, some appropriate toasts were given. "Our State Educational Institutions--Their Place and Power," was responded to by Prof. Wilkinson in a very neat speech. The Professor has taken part in Kansas educational matters for some time, and is thoroughly conversant with them and their great civilizing power, as his talk on this occasion evidenced. The pithy toast, "Our State Normal School--Its Attractions, Its Usefulness, and Its Successful Graduates," was thrown at Prof. Gridley. It was one nearest the Professor's heart, and he did it full justice. He is one of the first graduates of the State Normal School, has attended nearly all of its alumni meetings, and his speech was very happy and profitable. Alfred Wing, of Arkansas City, responded to "Our Common Schools, the Headlight of the Nation"--a subject as truthful, deep, and broad as the nation itself. Mr. Craddock, of Tannehill, did justice to "The Recruits of our Educational Army." These applicable toasts gave spice and instruction to the occasion and were happily received.

THE EIGHTH KANSAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Headquarters Eighth Kansas. Atchison, Kansas, June, 1885. Dear Comrades: Twenty years ago the Eighth Kansas disbanded as a military organization. About eight years ago a few members met at Leavenworth and organized a Regimental Society, with at that time but few names on our Roster--and your Secretary is pleased to report that the Roster now contains of Co. A, 17; B, 30; C, 37; D, 41; E, 33; F, 34; G, 25; H, 27; 1, 27; and K, 3. Total: 274 names and addresses. There are many names yet to be added, and it is especially requested that all members having the report of our reunion held at Leavenworth two years ago, will examine the list of names and report all names known to them not on the list, giving company, and address to the Secretary. I take great pleasure in informing you that the Eighth Kansas will hold a Regimental Reunion at Topeka, Kansas, September 29th, 30th, and October 1st, 1885, during the general soldier's reunion, and you are earnestly requested to attend, with your families and comrades, and make this reunion a grand success. You can obtain all necessary information in due time, as to railway rates, time of departure of trains, etc., from your G. A. R. Post, or the railroad agent of your town. Fraternally Yours, JOHN A. MARTIN, President, C. W. RUST, Secretary. Kansas papers please copy.

A GIVE AWAY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Wellingtonian, among all the gush about Wellington's greatness, gets in a little truth occasionally. It says: "The weeds have been allowed to grow up in Wellington in wild and picturesque confusion. Let us chop them down and cover up the dirty business and make the place look a little less like a candidate for the poor house." Poor Wellington! The cows are very likely pasturing on Washington Avenue, the main street of the town. There hasn't been any industrious feet tramping over that desert for many suns. Remember, brother Allison, that "git up and git" towns don't give the weeds a chance to grow. In Winfield, a weed hardly peeps up before a hoof, at a 2:40 gait, bent on "biz," comes down with a thud, and the weed is a corpse. Only deserted villages have weeds growing up among the cobble stones of the street. Don't give yourself away, Wellingtonian. It makes us sad.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ed. Gray was up from the Terminus again Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge McDonald returned from Washington, D. C., Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rev. N. S. Buckner and son, Harry, were up from A. C. Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

H. G. Buford is erecting a roomy and valuable residence on east 7th Avenue.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Frank Dale has been appointed to succeed Dick Walker in the Wichita U. S. Land Office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Miss Maggie Taylor went over to New Salem Wednesday for a day or so among friends there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

T. M. Hicks and J. M. Hinegardener were over from Cambridge Friday. Mr. Hicks is one of Cambridge's merchants.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

L. C. Fleming has made his first annual settlement with the Probate Judge as administrator of the estate of Alfred E. Huff, deceased.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

M. Hahn, of the Bee Hive, left Thursday afternoon for New York City, Boston, and other great trade centers, to lay in a full stock for the Hive.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mrs. Billy Hand and family are off for a visit with relatives at Ellinwood, Kansas, and Billy is bracing for various single vicissitudes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

W. G. Seaver and Major Fanning, chief D., M. & A. engineer, passed through Friday, from Dexter, on their way to Belle Plaine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

U. S. District Attorney Perry, who conducted Uncle Sam's side of the Crabtree case, left Thursday for his home, Fort Scott, via Topeka.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

C. A. Shaw is painting a picture of a dude. Mr. Shaw has great artistic ability. Some of our clothing men should get hold of this picture.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Drs. W. T. Wright and C. E. Pugh left. They go to remedy a throat trouble on Thursday for a week in Cincinnati that has afflicted Dr. Wright greatly of late.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

John Cairns was down from his Omnia township stock farm Thursday, the first time in many days. He is the same John as of yore: jolly and energetic.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Capt. And Mrs. J. S. Hunt returned Friday from three weeks in Muskegon, Grand Rapids, Detroit, and other places in Michigan. Their vacation was very delightful.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

W. L. Moorehouse has nearly completed the forty foot extension to the Spotswood grocery. This building is now roomy and imposing--a splendid adornment to West 10th Avenue.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Heat or no heat, they will get married--get shot with Cupid's dart and a matrimonial certificate. Ottis McClain and Harriet Covert are the latest victims, having procured the document last Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Capt. Gardener and family, of Norwich, Connecticut, who purchased the T. B. Ware farm, in Vernon township, arrived Friday, and have taken possession of the place. They are a family of means and refinement, and a splendid acquisition to Vernon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Arthur H. McMaster returned, Friday, from a month's rambles on the northern lakes and among the Michigan pineries. His divorce from his wife, O. J. D., of coal notoriety, wouldn't hold, and he comes back femaleless. This is as it should be.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

S. B. Hunt, of Pleasant Valley, has left in THE COURIER agricultural department, a bunch of millet that is simply immense--as big as any producer, even in prolific Cowley, can show up. It is seven feet tall, with heads nearly a foot long, with heavy stalk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Aus F. Hopkins is acting suspiciously. He has bought lots in College Hill and Highland Park. The next thing will be a little brown front and--well, we promised to not give away the feminine part of it. He wants to live where he can educate his children conveniently, you know.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Capt. Nipp and James Cooper got in Thursday from a month in the western counties. They have now taken another world to conquer--started a new town in the Bear Creek Valley, old Stanton County. The town is called "Veteran," is a new-born babe, but yells lustily and will grow like blazes if enterprising men and good location count for anything.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Geo. L. Gale is not alone in the harness steal. Mr. Gale was speaking to his neighbor, J. P. Stewart, about the theft, when Mr. Stewart remarked that the thief could have got a new set by coming to his (Stewart's) barn. Mr. Stewart, going to his barn shortly afterward, found that the thief had acted upon his suggestion. His bran new harness were gone. Misery loves company.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge Gans filed his appointment at the schoolhouse last Sunday, morning and evening. The house was crowded to its utmost capacity, and some went home who could not conveniently get in. His sermon was full of straight forward, practical truths, and held the closest attention of the large audience. He will preach here again on the fourth Sunday in August. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

"It is so hot in Atchison," says a local paper, "that a load of apples exposed to the sun Thursday were baked brown and done, as though cooked in an oven." Another paper vouches for the truth of this lie by declaring that the tires of the wagon got so hot that they set fire to the wheels and burned the wagon up, the apple man barely escaping with his life. No wonder John J. Ingalls is talking of moving to Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mr. J. L. Kennedy and Miss Lizzie Moore, of Arkansas City, were united in the bonds of Cupid's weld by Rev. H. D. Gans, in the Central Hotel parlors, Wednesday. They are both splendid young people, not of flourish and trumpet, but a substantial, will-do-to-tie couple who will live a happy, useful life here and end up with honored gray hairs and Heaven. We throw our old shoe after them for good luck, as the cigar that is beyond our temptation is passed to the fat man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We learn that John McCoy and Clara Garner, of Barton County, Missouri, were married at Winfield last Saturday, remarks the Udall Sentinel. It was the same old story of undying love. Objection by the old man, who stood the lover off with a double-barrel bull dog, a vicious shot gun, and a No. 12 boot. The lovers met by stealth; dark night and rope ladder; a swift and dangerous ride to the nearest station. They separate to meet in "Sunny Kansas." Are wed. Go back to meet angry father and ask his forgiveness. Ground work for exciting book on romance. We congratulate.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mr. G. C. Wallace has bought the interest of A. T. Spotswood in the grocery of Spotswood and Wallace. Mr. Wallace, during his year's residence here, has shown himself to be a thorough businessman, of large means, pleasant and reliable--one who is fast winning public favor. Mr. Spotswood is one of Winfield's pioneer merchants and has always commanded a patronage and esteem to be proud of. His enterprise and energy have shown themselves in everything for the interests of our city. Of course, he expects to remain in Winfield and will soon branch out in some new direction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Dr. Emerson and O. M. Seward went out Friday and spent the night with Ezra Meech. The Doctor says Ez. has been entirely unconscious ever since the accident. He only exhibits restlessness occasionally. The Doctor says the blow that caused the concussion was received on and just above the temple. His long unconsciousness, without a rally, makes his recovery very improbable. His father, in answer to a telegram, said he would start from Michigan immediately, and will probably arrive Sunday. Of course, it is impossible to remove Ez. from Dr. Emerson's ranch, but he is receiving all the attention the people of that neighborhood and friends from here can give.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Oliver McRoberts, aged fifteen years, and Ed Cooper, aged eight years, engaged in a street fight Thursday. Ed's older brother came on the scene and soon had Oliver down with a club flourishing over his head. Oliver's father made complaint against Cooper before Judge Snow and after a trial Cooper paid a fine of $5.00 and costs. Cooper then made a complaint against Oliver, and Friday a trial was had before Judge Snow with a jury, who brought in a verdict of guilty. Oliver was fined $5.00 and costs, but could not raise the money and is now in jail. There are several other boys in town that need a small dose of this same medicine, and it is only a question of time when they will get it.

THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Our school board has been busy at their regular and adjourned meetings for the past few months, endeavoring to select or contrive a plan for the proposed addition of four school rooms to the Central school building, that will meet the wants in regard to capacity necessary, and at the same time make a building that will be in good style and proportion. Sketches were submitted to them at their meeting two weeks ago, which provided for the addition of two rooms on each floor, adjoining the building on the north, and was thought first to be the correct idea, but upon close study and examination it was readily seen that it would make an inconvenient plan, because of having two separate halls and stairs, with no communication with each other except by passing through one of the school rooms, and would also make as ugly and unsightly a building as the old barracks building or some old-styled asylum. At this meeting Architect Willis Ritchie, who came here from Ohio to do the work on Mr. Eaton's residence and bank building, was called in to see if he could suggest to them some plan which would fill the bill. Ritchie's first suggestion, which, though it would make the best appearing and most convenient building, was decided as impracticable because it would give only two additional rooms and would not accommodate the number of pupils we have. He then gave them the idea which they have adopted and are having plans prepared for. This plan will build the new addition on the south end of the building, which will be the same size of the new part of the present building, with the main entrance, with tower for bell above, fronting south on 9th Avenue. The building will be built after the same design as the present one up to the top of the stone walls of building; there a stone cornice about four feet high will be built on, and a modern Gothic roof put on the entire new parts of the building. This will make the finest looking school building in this part of the state out of what is now one of the most ordinary looking buildings, and will not only be a credit to our city, but will make one public building that our citizens can take some pride in pointing out to strangers. Mr. Ritchie will also prepare a set of elevations for the same floor plans, which will provide for no change in the roof of the present new part of the building, and for a roof of same style on the proposed building. They will receive bids on both propositions, and the board can then let the contract for the latter building in case the proposed plan is too costly for the fund appropriated.

EZRA MEECH DANGEROUSLY HURT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ezra Meech, Jr., met with a very bad accident yesterday morning at Dr. Emerson's ranch on Silver creek. He intended to start to Michigan Friday, to a family reunion, taking along a number of horses. He was rounding the animals up in a rough pasture, assisted by a small boy, both mounted. Ez. sent the boy around a steeply inclined mound, while he went straight over. Both were at full tilt and collided at the other side, knocking both horses down and throwing Ez. to the ground on his head, it is supposed. He was unconscious, and the boy brought in assistance, had Ez. taken to a house on a stretcher, and a physician from Burden summoned. Dr. Emerson was also sent for. He went out Thursday afternoon and returned late last night, reporting Ez. still unconscious and almost motionless. The Doctor thinks it either very serious brain concussion or nerve paralysis, more probably the latter. No scars were visible. The case is undoubtedly very dangerous. Dr. Emerson went out again Friday.

THE CHRISTIAN SOCIAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The ladies of the Christian church were very successful with their ice cream social at the red front building Thursday. These ladies, with their numerous successes in social giving, have won a reputation that always insures large attendance, pleasure, and profit. The room was filled chock-full all evening of youth and beauty, young and old. The young ladies of Winfield are famous for their ice cream eating propensities; and long before all were supplied, the cream ran out, though an astonishing amount was consumed. The ladies took in over seventy-five dollars. The ladies kept bobbing around at such a rapid rate that our reporter was stumped in an effort to get the names of those presiding over the six or eight tables.

BICYCLE THIEF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Willie Doane's fine new bicycle was taken from the barn Sunday and ridden off. A few days ago a young man supposed to be one Alfred Brown was trying Willie's wheel and asking if it could be bought. There has been a second hand wheel at Adam's express office for three weeks consigned to Alfred Brown, from the east, which has never been called for, and this is supposed to be the fellow who got away with Willie's bicycle. He probably couldn't raise the charges on his own. He was tracked west and Sheriff McIntire is after him. Brown is a good rider and will probably be headed only by wire or letter. Willie was getting very proficient on his wheel and this mishap can't be taken with easy grace.

GREEN AND BEST AGAIN. BEST ON TOP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Some time ago Best rented from Green a lot on Main street, and for his own convenience moved on to the lot a small building, which he placed on loose stones. Green recently notified him not to remove it. Best consulted his attorney, who advised him to pay no attention to the notice, and at the end of his tenancy, he removed the building. Green at once caused his arrest for severing the building from the freehold and removing it. The evidence was heard on Monday before Justice Snow who, this morning, rendered his decision of "not guilty," as Best had a right to remove the building. Judge Snow further found that the prosecution was without probable cause, and adjudged that Green pay the cost.

ANOTHER FATALITY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Thursday was a hot one. A crowd of forty-five, coming from Tisdale, just as they reached the edge of town, keeled over from the heat of the sun, dead. No means could bring them to. They were in an open wagon, and no one of the party gave any signal of distress before it happened. The driver alone was saved. They all were young, and if they had only lived, might have reached a mature old age and graced the table of THE COURIER. So it is, the young will be cut down when they are least expecting it, and the old ones will be left. McGuire Bros.' are minus forty-five chickens, victims of the sun's fierce rays.

BEFORE HIZZONER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Police Court drouth had a refreshing sprinkle Thursday. L. Wise, charged with unnecessarily blocking Millington Street, plead guilty and got $7.25. He unhitched his team to feed them from his wagon in front of Dr. Mendenhall's house, and the Doctor kicked: didn't like a barn yard under his door sill. Wilson Titus dropped $7.25 for killing a tree, by stock, for D. C. Beach. Peter McCush was another $7.25 man, having partaken too freely of liquid refreshments.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Father J. F. Kelly and sister, Miss Sarah, got off Friday for a permanent residence in Wellington. This is a loss keenly felt by their many friends here, and Wellington can certainly congratulate herself on her good luck. As we have said before, Father Kelly goes to Wellington because of the better advantages offered for a good Catholic school, for which an experienced educator from Leavenworth has been secured. Father Duggan, who takes Father Kelly's place here, has arrived. He was in charge of the church here for a time before, is a zealous and influential priest, and will doubtless soon win the good graces of our people.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Protection, Comanche County, Echo says: "For the past four months we have been sending THE WINFIELD COURIER an exchange, but it has been impossible to get THE COURIER in return. We hear of it in an indirect way, however. We notice articles, going through the patent sides, credited to THE COURIER."

All innocence on our part, Echo. We have been resting easily in the belief that you were getting a weekly literary feast at our board. We hear thy echo and shall happily respond.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The town of Wilmot, in Richland township, is one of the booming new villages of Cowley. The stone is on the ground for the foundations of several new business buildings.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Emporia is discussing the question of discontinuing the Sunday evening services during the remainder of the heated term.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

ANNOUNCEMENTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We are authorized to announce J. B. Nipp as a candidate for re-election to the office of County Treasurer, subject to the action of the Republican county convention.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We are authorized to announce J. S. Hunt as a candidate for re-election to the office of County Clerk, subject to the action of the Republican county convention.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We are authorized to announce T. H. Soward as a candidate for re-election to the office of Register of Deeds, subject to the decision of the Republican convention of Cowley County, Kansas.

WHAT KIND OF OFFENSIVE PARTISANS!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Among the list of postmasters suspended yesterday, we find the name of our friend, A. D. Brown, of Burlington, Kansas. We suppose he is an offensive partisan as a Republican, but there are lots of that kind of postmasters in Kansas, who have had no intimation that their resignations would be accepted, so that does not explain. We suspect that Miss Cleveland had a hand in this business for she is a prohibitionist and Postmaster Brown has been exceedingly offensive to the prohibitionists as an anti-prohibition partisan. Perhaps Shelton, of El Dorado, was a prohibition victim also. If is the true solution of the matter, Murdock, of Wichita, Ashbaugh, of Newton, and several others we could name, had better be packing their carpet bags, and Father Baker might as well prepare some other than a forest shade this hot weather. Now do not come back to us about the prohibition postmaster at Winfield. He had no intimation that his resignation would be acceptable, but felt slighted that he was not considered an "offensive partisan," and so resigned.

A GOOD JOKE ON J. WADE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We find the following in the Washington correspondence of the Kansas City Journal of the 29th.

"J. Wade McDonald, of Winfield, Kansas, disappointed aspirant for the postoffice at that place, is still here and his signature has been sought by several Kansans among their endorsers for place."

We saw a statement in the same paper, and probably by the same correspondent, when J. W. McDonald first arrived at Washington, that he was an aspirant for the Winfield postoffice. Now we understand that he went to Washington on legal business for the Oklahoma boomers, whose counsel he is, and that just before he started, Geo. C. Rembaugh employed him to secure his (Rembaugh's) appointment as postmaster. Now how did the K. C. J. correspondent find out that J. Wade "went back on George" and "put in" for himself, is what we want to know. How did George get the appointment against the only Kansas politician in Washington at the time? But there is another suspicious circumstance about it. We have heard of nothing from J. Wade to George or anybody else about the glorious victory of pulling George through against the combined fight of Buford, Glick, the whole Kentucky delegation, and other great influences thrown in, no congratulations, nothing about his great influence with the president, as is the regulation way. What is the matter, J. Wade? Have you lost your grip on politics?

LITERARY NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Susan Coolidge contributes to the very beautiful midsummer Wide Awake a long ballad based on the traditions of the famous "Luck of Edenhall." The ballad has four full-page illustrations by E. H. Garrett.

"How the Boojums went Down the Crater," by Ton of the Boojums, is the singular title of a story of adventure in the superb midsummer Wide Awake.

Success, is the captivating title of a book intended to furnish useful hints to young people as to the best ways of getting on in the world. Its author, who is to be congratulated on having made a book at once so interesting and instructive, is O. A. Kingsbury, and the publishers D. Lothrop & Co. (12 mo. $1.25.)

Mrs. Elizabeth A. Thurston, who will be pleasantly remembered as the editor of that delightful book of selections, "Mosaics of Life," has edited a new and even more valuable and pleasing book of similar character, entitled, "Echoes of Many Voices," which will shortly appear in D. Lothrop & Co.'s popular "Spare Minute Series."

A Commonplace Day is the latest of the bright and breezy books which no author so well as Pansy knows how to prepare. D. Lothrop & Co., publishers.

Tent V. Chautauqua, is the title of a fresh, bright story of Chautauqua, by a new author, which gives an agreeable impression of life at that resort and is sure to interest a wide range of readers.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge Aldrich, of Boston, Mass., while recently trying some liquor cases, said to the jury:

"When we are dealing with these cases, we are dealing with the very head-spring of the current of crime which is constantly flowing onward deeper and deeper. Four-fifths of the crimes are the direct result of the use of intoxicating liquors. If the traffic in intoxicating liquor and the use of it should cease, the business of this court would in a very short time be so inconsiderable that the juries would have to stay only one or two weeks to dispose of the cases presented to them. If the juries' experience should be what mine has been, they will observe during the next three weeks of their continuance in court how many crimes are ascribed to the use of liquor. They will hear the young man who comes before the court charged with larceny saying, 'I was intoxicated.' When the man charged with assault and battery on his wife is brought forward, he will say, 'I had been drinking.'"

If the taxpayers want the taxes lessened, let them dry up the very "head-spring of the current of crime." The saloons more than double the expenses of every city and county in the State. Remove them and the heaviest burden upon American industry will be removed. The liquor traffic and prosperity never go together. The one is a cancer which eats the life out of the other. The only remedy is removal.

MORE WHEAT CHESS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

"Rural" has an article in our e. c. in which he attempted to instruct the editor of the COURIER in relation to chess in wheat, by repeating a part of the same matter which the COURIER gave, in relation to the classification of these grasses by botanists, and their opinions expressed in past years in favor of the theory better expressed by the writer in the Dep. Agricultural report of 1884, that, "under no known circumstances can wheat change into chess," and then concludes with: "but what we want are cold, cold facts by persons who have sown absolutely clean wheat in exposed places, on ground known to be clear of foul seed for several years in succession."

This is the true doctrine. A single fact of this kind, proved beyond question, is worth more than all the theories of all the scientific men that ever lived. All men fall into errors and mistakes of facts, whether scientific or otherwise. A scientist is one who has made some branch of natural history a study and is supposed to be better acquainted with that branch than most people. Such men collect such facts as they can, and from the facts, reason and formulate laws, make classifications, and compile works and text books on the special branch which they have studied. Their conclusions are accepted as science without question and would undoubtedly be true science were they in possession of all the facts. But unfortunately, man is not omniscient or immutable. New researches are continually being made and facts, unknown before, are continually being discovered. These newly discovered facts are continually refuting old and established theories, making new classifications necessary, causing the adoption of new ideas of natural laws, and the steady advance in science.

But we scarcely expect any new facts in regard to wheat turning to chess. There are plenty of facts reported. Almost every wheat grower of the present and past generations has observed facts tending to confirm the idea that wheat may produce chess. Thousands of statements are made and undisputed, like the following: One farmer says he sowed wheat which he believed to be clean, and if there was chess in it, he could not discover it; sowed it on new ground, prairie newly broken, knew of no means by which chess could get in, but the crop was mainly chess. The weather had been unfavorable to the production of wheat. Another says he sowed clean wheat in a large field, a small portion of which was afterward pastured down close. In that part which was thus pastured down, the crop was mainly chess, while in the balance of the field the wheat crop was excellent and practically clear of chess. These statements with variations could be collected by the thousands. Such circumstances have been known in all ages and in all wheat growing countries; and the natural conclusion has always been that chess came from the wheat seed. But the botanists had formulated a law for the growth of plants, which was substantially that plants of varieties as wide apart as what they had denominated species could not amalgamate to produce hybrids and could not produce each other; no species could advance to a higher species by any kind of culture and improvement nor deteriorate into a lower species by any kind of unfavorable environment. This law had been enacted by Frederic Cuvier centuries ago and had been approved by succeeding generations of botanists. So when a botanist has been questioned on the possibility that chess is produced from wheat, he has invariably referred to this law and answered that such change is impossible; that change cannot occur from one species to another much less from one genus, order, tribe, or family, to another. So this arbitrary classification of the botanists and this equally arbitrary law which they have made has ruled them, and they have decided all such cases accordingly without reference to the facts; or if they notice them at all, they make a supposed explanation, but so exceedingly thin that, in comparison, the explanation that the devil came and sowed the chess in the night, would be respectable.

But there is another branch of science, that of biology, in which many discoveries have been made of late years, thousands of facts hitherto unknown with regard to the origin and succession of plants from the lowest orders up to the highest. Few persons of any pretensions to science now dispute the idea of the evolution of species or that wheat had evolved from a vegetation of a much lower order than chess. It is now generally conceded that a plant in the processes of germination and incipient growth goes through all the forms of the lower orders through which it has been evolved during the countless ages of the past, and that an arrest of the development of the young plant, by unfavorable environment, may cause the plant to mature in the form of the state in which the development was arrested. In most cases of arrest of development of the embryo plant, it dies and never shows what it would have become had it lived, but there are some cases in which the embryo lives and produces a plant of a warped, stunted, and degenerated form, more widely different from the seed sown than some species differ from others. Biology is fast accumulating such facts, both in the animal and vegetable kingdoms, and formulating new laws in conformity therewith, and we would advise "Rural" and "Mark" to study biology awhile if they have any time to devote to natural history. The trouble with them is that they have gone no farther than botany as formulated with the imperfect knowledge of forty years ago. A few years hence will come the "New Botany," which will be as unlike the old in some respects as the "New Chemistry" is unlike the "Old Chemistry," of forty-five years ago, which taught that heat, light, and electricity were imponderable substances shot through space like cannon balls, instead of wave-like or molecular motions, merely motion or effect and not matter at all, as is now known to be the fact, or as unlike as the old astronomy, which taught that the sun, planets, and stars revolved around the earth, is to the newer astronomy of the present day.

The trouble with "Mark" and "Rural," the Ag. Rep. Writer and others, is, that they are conservatives, they hang on to this old in scientific matters and do not "keep up with the band wagon" in the march of discovery and progress. Probably the "old man" has held to the old botanical idea that chess cannot be produced from wheat, more years than either of them have or will, but the old man is a radical and don't get so badly stuck in the old ruts that he cannot get out.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Capt. J. S. Hunt announces, this week, his candidacy for re-election to the office of County Clerk. The Captain is too well-known to need endorsement from this paper. He is now serving his third term in that office, and his integrity and efficiency have never been questioned. He has now hosts of strong friends who are earnest in their desire that he should retain the office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The announcement of Capt. J. B. Nipp as a candidate for re-election to the office of County Treasurer appears this week. His careful and efficient administration of the office has received and is receiving the hearty endorsement of the people. He will be returned almost unanimously--a compliment of which he is eminently worth.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Democratic administration are making a pretty mess of it out of the cattle lease business, the Roach matter, and the seven hundred thousand dollars of money lost in transmission.

THE GOVERNOR--DODGE CITY ENFORCING THE LAW.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Gov. Martin is the most level-headed Governor that Kansas ever had. The laws of the State under his administration are enforced more effectively than under either of the preceding administrations, but in a way to produce the last possible friction and bad blood. He is always watchful of the interests of the State and its people and prompt to do the right thing in every emergency. He suppressed the Atchison riots before any injury was done any one by violence, and in a way which was effective. He poured oil on the troubled waters and balmy peace and good will was established between the contending parties. The Cheyennes became turbulent and threatened a raid through Kansas and a repetition of the atrocities they committed a few years ago, and the people of the southwest part of the State were alarmed as well they might be. The Governor did not wait until the damage was being done, but acted promptly on the first symptoms, and in an incredibly short space of time he secured a perfect cordon of military posts and patrols along the southern border of the State, sufficient to head off at every point the most formidable raid that the Cheyennes could have organized. His judicious promptness prevented the raid, and as a consequence, prevented the uprising of the Northern Cheyennes and various kindred tribes in the northwest as well as in the Territory. When through the orders of the national government, the trails through the Territory were opened up to the cattle from parts of Texas which have always carried the Texas fever with them and disease and death among the domestic cattle of Kansas when driven through or into this State in the summer; he promptly issued his proclamation commanding the sheriffs and other State officers to enforce the quarantine law of the State and prevent the incursions of these cattle. In several other cases we could name, he has been equally prompt and efficient and in every case he has done his work in the most sensible and judicious manner.

But there is a considerable whining and complaint that he did not call out the militia to enforce prohibition in Dodge City. It is claimed that he neglected an important duty. Agents of the State Temperance Union went there to take measures to enforce the laws in relation to the sale of intoxicating drinks, in that place notorious for persistent and open violations of the law. They were bulldozed, intimidated, and threatened with violence, and left. It was demanded that the Governor should call out the militia to protect the complainants and enforce the law. He prudently declined to do so on the ground that the emergency was not such as to require so exasperating and odious an experiment. In that action is he sustained by the Attorney General of the State, by the Adjutant General, A. R. Campbell, one of the most radical prohibitionists of the State and late president of the State Temperance Union, by Judge Strang, a radical prohibitionist and the judge of that judicial district who informed the Governor "that the orderly processes of law can and will be carried on at Dodge City without the aid of the military power, and that it would be the extreme limit of folly to send militia there," in which sentiment, not only A. B. Campbell, but a great many others of the leading prohibitions of the State concur.

"The history of civilized governments records no instance where military power has been invoked to aid in suppressing a misdemeanor," and if the militia had gone to Dodge, and a drop of blood had been spilled, the almost universal sentiment of the State would have revolted and in our opinion it would have been the most fatal blow at prohibition that could have been struck. The Governor's action was not only clear headed and judicious, but the very best thing that he could have done for the cause of prohibition.

There are silent but irresistible forces at work to regenerate Dodge City. The passage of the Texas cattle bill, the defeat of the trail bill, and the rapid settlement of the country south and southwest of Dodge have destroyed that place as a cattle town. The cowboy must go, and with him will go the gamblers, the courtesans, the desperadoes, and the saloons.

It is certain too, and every observant and intelligent man knows it, that the present law is steadily and quietly working a revolution. Ninety percent of the drinking and drunkenness in Kansas has been abolished. The reform already accomplished in the State exceeds the most sanguine expectations of the friends of temperance. Look at Topeka, a city of nearly thirty thousand inhabitants, and a year ago full of drunken men and saloons. A very prominent gentleman living there, one of the most prominent in the State and not known as a prohibitionist, tells us that he has not seen a drunken man on the streets of Topeka for four months, where formerly such were daily seen and some days in very considerable numbers. The City Marshal says that in July, including the 4th and up to the 18th, but five arrests were made for drunkenness. The Governor knows and appreciates these things and will do his part of the duty of enforcing the law as efficiently as will any man who is made because he did not send the army to Dodge.

NO ANTI'S NEED APPLY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

One of our anti-prohibition friends says that our article of yesterday intimating that certain postmasters are being suspended because they are offensive anti-prohibitionists, is blanked nonsense. We don't know about that. There are other reasons for the theory besides actual suspension of anti-prohibitionists. Gen. C. W. Blair is a prohibitionist and is nearest to President Cleveland of all the Kansas Democrats. His candidates get appointed, and why? Is it because he is a prohibitionist? John Martin is next to Blair in influence with the president. Is it because as district judge he struck the heaviest blows to enforce prohibition? Ex-Gov. Geo. W. Glick seems to have no influence with the president. Why does not the Great Mogul of Kansas Democracy control all the Kansas appointments, or some of them at least? Is it because he used his official power as governor to try to break down the prohibitory laws? Is it a fact that the president appoints for Kansas only prohibitionists when he knows it? Geo. C. Rembaugh was endorsed by prohibition leaders, perhaps under the impression that he was a prohibitionist. His prohibition predecessor endorsed him and that might seem conclusive. It looks as though he owed his appointment, partly at least, to the president's impression that he was a prohibitionists. He will have to join the prohibition ranks and advocate prohibition in the Telegram or the first he knows Cleveland will ask him to resign as he did Meade, of Hazelhurst. When it shall become well known that President Cleveland discriminates in favor of prohibitionists, won't prohibition take a boom and won't thousands of Democratic topers reform.

COUNTY FATHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The County Fathers met in adjourned session yesterday. The matter of a superintendent and matron of the County Poor Farm was considered. The bids were: R. L. Hogue, $1,200; Sam Martin, $800; Wm. Saunders, $800; David M. Sidle, $600; Nelson Utley, $460. Utley's bid being the lowest and his standing and recommendations being first-class, he was awarded the contract, providing he enters into satisfactory agreement and undertaking with the Board. Mr. Utley is a pioneer of Windsor township, where he now resides. He will move his family right on to the poor farm and will no doubt prove to be the right man.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

A J Thompson et ux to W H Brooks, lot 3 and w hf, lot 2, blk 331, Thompson's ad to Winfield: $600

William D Crawford to Marion Fitzsimmons s hf sw qr 18-31-3e: $200

John F Delzell et ux to Sallie G Vawter, 5 acres ne qr nw qr 25-34-3e: $1,850

John W Jones et ux to Susan M Bristow, n hf nw qr 7-35-3e, 80 a: $2,500

R R Roberson et ux to Frank J Hess, lot 14, blk 59, A. C.: $200

Montford Anderson to Robert Keller, lots 17 and 18, blk 159, A. C.: $175

Lenore Snyder and husband to F J Hess, lots 23 and 24, blk 23, 24, blk 75, 19, 20, 23, and 24, blk 75, A. C.: $600

Ella Tankisley to Thomas B Picks, e hf se qr 3 and 20 acres off s hf sw qr 3130-7e: $350

William B Hall et ux to Sarah D Stolp, lot 4 and e hf lot 5, blk 291, Courier Place, Winfield: $225

James McDermott et ux to James H Bullen, lot 12 and 11 frac lots blk 282 Dexter: $150

Will L Aldridge to David Sidenn, lots 13, 10 and 17, blk 52, A. C.: $1,500

Elizabeth A Lyon and husband to M L Gates, lots 5 and 6, blk 167, Winfield: $2,500

College Hill Town Company to N S Buckner, lots 13, 14, 15, and 16, blk 16 in C H Winfield: $450

College Hill Town Company to J F Huffman, lots 11 and 12, blk 16, in C H Winfield: $250

George Gray to Mrs. Kessiah Huff, lots 7 and 8, blk 5, Moffet's 3rd ad to Udall: $190

Adolphus G Lowe et ux to Fannie Eckert, lot 17, blk 168, Canal City's ad to A C: $168

William Cox to Tyler H McLaughlin, lot 6, blk 67, A C: $3,000

Albert A. Newman et al to Thomas H Tyner, lots 18, blk 36, A C: $380

Frank J Hess et ux to Thomas H Tyner, lots 23 and 24, blk 113, A C: $60

Harriet N. Bancroft et ux to Rufus B Haywood, lots 20, blk 65, A C, qc: $10

John R Cates to Thos J Brooks, lots 14 and 15, blk 17, Burden: $1,200

Addison F Smith et ux to Edward P Brooks, lots 6 and 7, blk 5, Burden: $60

E M Reynolds et ux to M L Robinson, lot 12, blk 10, Grand Summit: $100

R O Stearns et ux to Mary Jane Kempton, pt of lot 27, blk 1, Burden: $160

Isaac Johnson et ux to Albert Brookshire, pt n hf se qr 120-30-5-e, 15 acres: $1,500

College Hill Town Company to Southwest Kansas Conference College, pt of se qr 22-32-4 e, 20 acres, for College site.

J W Ross et ux to John W Moore, e hf ne qr 22-30-6-e: $800

Millard C Copple et ux to Lynda B Harper, lot 26, blk 17, A C: $3200

Alfred A Kevett to W M Sleeth, lot 24, blk 60, A C, qc: $15

James P Witt et ux to David G Lewis, lot 6, blk 60, A C: $150

Albert A Newman et ux to George A Beecher, lot 7, blk 127, A C: $35

Hugh R Darrough et ux to William S Houghton, lot 9, blk 67, A C: $35

Caswell C Endicott to Sewell P Channell et al, lot 9, blk 67, A C, qc: $1.00

Albert A Newman et ux to A Beecher et al, lot 5, blk 127, A C: $35

Emanuel L Miller to James H Miller, lots 3 and 4 and s hf nw qr 3-31-7-e: $800

Lydia B Harper and husband to Lizzie B Benedict, lot 26, blk 17, A C: $180

John McArt et ux to Daniel H Rigdon, lots 7 and 8, blk 126, A C: $150

College Hill Town Company to N Ashler, lots 13, 14, 15 and 16, blk 18, C H, Winfield: $450

Henry S Gardner to D B McCollum, s hf nw qr 13-33-4e, 20 acres: a$100

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

To the Public.

DON'T GET EXCITED!

There is goods enough to be had for all of you.

S. Kleeman

will start East at once, and will buy the largest stock of

DRY GOODS!

ever brought to Winfield. Having but a small stock of last spring's purchases, and goods now being about twenty-five per cent cheaper than ever known, you can buy new goods for less than old goods are now offered.

Our present stock, though, can supply your wants for this time of year.

We can match you up a pair of hose--or if you don't mind having them in two colors--or could sell you a Gingham dress cheap--if you could use two pieces.

Our Table Linens are as cheap as can be found--if you don't want a longer piece than we have in stock.

Our Parasols have not all been broken, but we will bet we will sell them about as cheap as if they had been.

We are sure we can save you money on everything in our line--if you will not wait until all is sold.

Our Calicoes are cheap at 5 cents, but we will sell you all you want at 4 cents; and if you think it funny to buy L. L. Muslin for 5 cents per yard, come in and have some fun out of it.

S. KLEEMAN,

813 Main Street

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Skipped Statement of County Treasurer for the Quarter ending June 30, 1885.

Small print! Hard to read.

Also skipped "School District Tax Fund" and "School Bond Fund" in this issue.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

University of Kansas.

[Photo. Identified as "Department of Science, Literature and the Arts.]

DEPARTMENT OF LAW.

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY.

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC.

DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION.

THE DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE, LITERATURE AND THE ARTS.

Offers eight distinct courses: Classical, Modern Literature, Scientific, Civil Engineering, Natural History, Chemistry and Physics, Didactics, leading to the degrees of B. A., B. S., B. D. A Preparatory Medical Course offers a year's thorough work to those studying medicine.

With an extended course of study, and a large corps of instructors and lectures.

THE LAW DEPARTMENT

Now offers the very best of advantages to students of the law.

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY.

With L. E. Sayre, Ph. G., late Professor of Pharmacy in the Woman's Medical College, and Instructor in Materia Medics in the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, as Dean, will give complete and thorough instruction in this line of work. The course will be two years in length.

A DEPARTMENT OF ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTION.

Is maintained especially for those who lack the preparation in the Languages necessary for admission into the Freshman Class. This Department will also give instruction in other preparatory branches.

THE FALL TERM OPENS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9TH.

Necessary expenses vary from $180 to $200 per annum. For pamphlets issued by Departments of Law and Pharmacy, or for Catalogue of University, and any desired information, address

J. A. LIPPINCOTT, D. D., Chancellor, Lawrence, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

NORMAL AND COMMERCIAL COLLEGE

WINFIELD, KANSAS.

First Term opens Monday, September 7, 1885.

Prepares Ladies and Gentlemen for Teaching for Business and for College.

For further information address or call on

J. A. WOOD, A. M.,

Principal of Normal Department.

Or PROF. I. N. INSKEEP,

Principal of Commercial Department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

BERTRAM & BERTRAM,

-AGENTS FOR-

ECLIPSE WINDMILL

-AND-

Althouse, Wheeler & Co. & Jones' Water-Packing Cylinder.

-DEALERS IN-

Pumps of Every Make and Description, Pipe and Fittings, Drive Points,

ROUND SQUARE TANKS,

Hose and Hose Reels, Etc.

The ECLIPSE will run in a lighter wind, having more wind surface, and will run steadier in a strong wind than any other make. The Althouse, Wheeler & Co., is a vaneless mill and regulates itself perfectly. We have one put up in our store and would be pleased to have it examined.

BERTRAM & BERTRAM

711 North Main Street, Winfield, Kansas.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

[Skipped Winfield City Markets.]

OUR NEW FEATURE--THE LATEST MARKETS.

Today's Markets in Chicago and Kansas City By Special Telegraph To

The Daily Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

CHICAGO, August 5, 2 p.m.

Wheat, cash: 87-3/4. Wheat, September: 89-7/8. Wheat, October: 92-1/8.

Corn, cash: 46-1/2. Corn, September: 46-1/4.

KANSAS CITY, August 5, 2 p.m.

Wheat, No. 2 red, cash: 80-3/4. Wheat, No. 2 red, September: 83-3/4.

Corn, cash: 35-1/4. Corn, September: 36.

Hogs: $4.15.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Having purchased the entire interest of A. T. Spotswood in the grocery and queensware business, it is my intention to do business strictly on a cash basis. All my goods will be bought exclusively cash and shall sell them for cash or for produce only, thus doing away with the expense of a bookkeeper and all the annoyance and loss that accompanies the credit system. Goods can be sold on smaller margins under this system. I have remodeled prices and shall give my customers the benefit of a cash deal. Have a large stock of queensware, lamps, etc., that must go, as the room is needed for other goods, and shall offer extra inducements to any wanting anything in that line until the entire stock is sold. Respectfully,

GEO. C. WALLACE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Sam Kirkwood, son of Dr. and Mrs. W. R. Kirkwood, gets this handsome send off from the Clark County News on leaving Ashland. "Mr. S. M. Kirkwood, who has been for several months manager of the Ashland lumber yard, of James H. Bullene, will start Monday for Minneapolis, Minnesota, to enter McAlister College, where he will take a thorough literary course. Mr. Kirkwood's business habits and moral ways made everybody here his friend, and we know of no one within the circle of our acquaintances that we wish more good fortune. May success be his at McAlister and his co-workers appreciate real merit is the wish of the News and his many friends here in Ashland."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Among THE DAILY COURIER carrier boys are some of very bright business tact. The little fellows are honest in their collections and take great interest in proper deliveries, feeling much grieved should they accidentally fail to deliver any subscriber a paper. Especially meritorious is Clifford McAlister. Besides delivering THE DAILIES for one "beat," he "shines 'em up" and does various little things averaging over five dollars a week. He deposits a good share of this and now has a bank account of over fifty dollars. A splendid showing for a twelve year old boy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Dispatches, wicked fellows, got on their red, white, and blue base ball lights, and accompanied by a number of spectators, lit out Sunday to play a game with the Dexter club. Arriving there no base ballists could be found--they were all at Sunday school, and after moseying around in the hot sun for a few hours, our boys betook themselves for home, sadder but wiser. It was a very effective sermon. It gave the boys religion and never again will they depart from the straight and narrow path of the Sunday catechism.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The festive burglars tried it on John Keck's residence Saturday night, but were scared off by little Junie Scofield, aged thirteen, who was sleeping in the front room. She heard two men talking at the window, a few feet from her head. They said, "This is the place." The window was open and they were trying to open the screen. Junie got up and started to wake up Mr. and Mrs. Keck, when she stumbled over a chair and the burglars got up and got. Brave little girl! Much better than some larger ones would have done.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire and A. H. Doane gave Alfred Brown, who appropriated Willie Doane's bicycle, a warm chase Monday. His track was easily scented to Wellington. He told certain parties there that he could make sixty miles a day easily. He got into Wellington at 7 o'clock Monday morning, got a loaf of bread, and sailed off. He was headed for Meade County, where his father and brother are. Sheriff McIntire went west on the S. K. this morning, preceded by telegrams and postals that will undoubtedly stop the rapscallion.

[The typos get worse! They had "Loan's" for "Doane's" in above article.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

At the close of the services at the M. E. Church Sunday, Mrs. N. R. Wilson presented the horn quartette, Messrs. Crippen, Bates, Shaw, and Roberts, with lovely bouquets as an appreciation of the beautiful music they rendered. This choir, vocal and instrumental, is one of the very best. The vocalists are Mrs. Fred Blackman, Miss Lizzie McDonald, and Messrs. Chas. Black and Louie Brown, with Miss Maude Kelly, organist.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The committee of the "Grant Monument Association," with headquarters at New York, have arranged with the Western Union Telegraph Company for the various operators throughout the country to receive contributions to the monument fund. Anyone desiring to contribute can get a receipt and proper credit by handing the same to Mr. Harris, at the S. K. depot.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Dispatches had a battle with the Walnut Valley Starts, a club composed of the railroaders of the K. C. & S. W., on the Fair Grounds Monday. Our boys got the score, 23 to 13. The railroaders battled our boys nearly out of the diamond in the first few innings, but the Dispatches waked up like magic and got there in good shape.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Arkansas City, as appears by our reporter from there, elsewhere in these columns, is beginning to get its dander up at the flagrant violations of the liquor law. As a "medicine" town, A. C.'s reputation is getting famous and we are glad to see this move toward choking the unlawful venders.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The different school boards of the county will bear in mind that at the annual school meetings, August 13th, a vote will be taken on a uniformity text book. Copies of the 1885 school laws can be obtained by calling on County Superintendent Limerick.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Dr. Park is on the jump just now. The baby mania is sweeping over this vicinity. Now it is J. T. Everett, who lives 1 miles northeast of town, presented with a bouncing 11 pound girl Sunday night.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Will L. Aldridge and Miss Anna McBride, of Arkansas City, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at the Brettun House Monday by Judge Gans, in his most appropriate manner.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Senator F. S. Jennings, with wife and boy, left Monday for two days at Sedan. Frank went on legal business and, as a husband should, took his wife along to keep him straight.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The drawing at Mrs. Wright's millinery store has come off. No. 120 drew the earring, No. 42, the breast pin, and No. 199 the doll. These tickets are still unclaimed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rev. N. S. Buckner, Arkansas City's M. E. minister, has bought lots in College Hill for a future home. Our college draws like a mustard plaster.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Poland China sow, with pig, and two male hogs, will be sold cheap. Thomas Worsley, two miles south of New Salem post office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Chilocco Indian School will have a new Superintendent soon. We trust he will be more affable than the present one.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Wm. McBride, A. C., was up Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge Pyburn was up from A. C. Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Geo. E. Conrad, Arkansas City, was up Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

H. P. Snow and T. J. Rude were down from Burden Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge Summer drove up from the Terminus Sunday evening.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

J. O. Cable, Chicago commercial tourist, was hung up at the Central Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mrs. F. J. Hess and Miss Thompson were up from Arkansas City last Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Chas. C. Black returned Monday from two weeks absence on D., M. & A. business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

H. R. Branson, R. C. Maurer, and W. D. Allen were over Saturday from Torrance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Cal. Swarts, T. J. Mills, and M. Johnson were up from the Terminus last Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Joe Conklin returned from Harper Sunday and reports everything booming out there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Frank Barclay is here for a week among his old friends. Frank is always warmly welcomed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Fred N. Dickie is doing a slashing business in his broom manufactory. He makes a good broom.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Lon Wharton and family got home Saturday from a week's rural vacation near Cambridge, much rejuvenated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

R. W. Stevens, of New Salem, has sent us in some very fine apples, raised on his farm. They are mellow, luscious, and of good size.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Marshal Dunbar has taken his billiard hall from the Mendenhall building and will move it to Atlanta, the new Omnia township town.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Governor Martin offers a $300 reward for the capture of the party or parties who murdered Mrs. Julia A. White, of Cowley County, June 29.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mrs. H. B. Schuler and son Willie, with her mother, Mrs. E. Moon, left Tuesday for a month in Streator, Dixon, and other places in Illinois.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rev. F. A. Brady was down from Udall Saturday accompanied by his old friend, Rev. Eli Pool, who is visiting him, from Adrian, Michigan.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rass Ross, on one of J. B. Holmes' farms, had a stack of oats struck by lightning. It struck in the center, and soon burned the stack up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Robt. Hudson has remodeled his counters and had them repainted and grained, which adds very much to the appearance of his jewelry establishment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mrs. Fred C. Hunt returned Saturday evening from two weeks with her parents at Ponca, accompanied by Will Hodges, who went back today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mr. Charles Rempe purchased sixty acres of land from Mr. John D. Pryor, two miles east of town, Monday, and will put it all in fruits, mostly small fruits.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ella Marley filed her petition with District Clerk Pate Friday asking the powers that be to divorce her from Alfred Marley, on the grounds of extreme cruelty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Bliss & Wood started up their mill Monday under full steam. This mill is now equipped with as fine machinery as can be found anywhere, and is a credit to this city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mrs. L. M. Williams and children left on Monday for Enfield, New Hampshire, for two months' visit. L. M. will pine away in the meantime and make a regular ghost--a fat, smiling ghost.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Prof. A. Gridley left on Monday to conduct the Kingman County Normal Institute, which holds during August. The Professor, owing to railroad connection, will hardly get home in that time.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The case of John E. Doyle against Anna E. Maidt and husband, suit to foreclose $520 A. C. mortgage; and Ellen Riley against Fairclo & Holloway, suit to gain possession of certain A. C. property, were filed with District Clerk Pate Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

From a Denver paper it appears that J. A. Cooper is president of the Beggett Bank in Denver. We wonder if this is our J. A. Cooper and the outcome of speculating in new towns. We always thought J. A. was cut out for the purpose of running a bank.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rev. S. R. Reese, of Holden, Missouri, has purchased, through Messrs. Curns & Manser, the Dr. Davis homestead in College Hill, for $1,155. Mr. Reese intends moving to Winfield at an early day and will make valuable improvements on the property purchased.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Warren Stone arrived from Emporia Monday and will open out his book store--the Red Front building, at once. His family will follow in a few days. He has the appearance of a man who will soon win public esteem.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

J. B. Pedrick was in the city Monday in the interests of the State Fair, which is to be held at Peabody, Sept. 1 to 4 inclusive. The fair this year is likely to outstrip all former efforts in point of attractions.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

R. H. White is now working at his trade, painting, in Sharron, Barbour County. He writes J. E. Snow to know what the county and State have done toward offering a reward for the capture and conviction of the murderer of his wife. The Commissioners offer $300 and the State $300.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

V. R. Woods, an employee at Schmidt's quarry, had a leg terribly mashed Friday while loading stone on cars with the derrick. A big stone caught his leg fair and square and mashed the bones up in bad shape. Dr. Emerson splintered it up and hopes to avert amputation if the warm weather doesn't head off the remedies.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

J. B. Cook, of the Neosho Valley Investment Company, writes M. L. Read that the D., M. & A. bonds in Spring Valley township, Cherokee County, carried Thursday last by forty-nine majority. The remaining townships in that county vote the 18th inst., while counties all along the line are considering propositions.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

E. S. Bliss, Capt. Gary, J. W. Millspaugh, I. N. Ripley and families took a flying trip to Chilocco Monday; also S. B. Millspaugh. They arrived at Chilocco in time to see the noble Red men of the Chilocco school loaded up and taken off on an excursion to Newton and other places. The Indians made a nice appearance. They were well dressed and well behaved.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Geo. W. Miller bought, last week, a little herd of seventeen hundred head of two and three year old steers of Allen & Gibson, Pacus, [?Pecos] Texas, at sixteen and twenty-five dollars per head, delivered at Mr. Miller's ranch in the Territory. Messrs. Allen & Gibson spent last Sunday here with Mr. Miller. They came up to buy Judge McDonald's Polled Angus cattle, not knowing they were sold.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mr. Wells, of the firm of Bates & Wells, contractors and builders, has just completed a very neat residence on East 10th avenue. Messrs. Reed & Oliver have shown remarkable skill in the interior painting and graining. Almost every conceivable kind of wood is represented as perfectly as the wood itself. These gentlemen are getting a meritorious reputation as artists of skill and reliability.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Bishop Ninde, who re-opened the M. E. Church Sunday, is one of the bright lights in American Methodism. His silvery hair adds to a fine form and pleasant, earnest features, and his address is very easy and fluent. He preaches in a conversational way that is very convincing and attractive. He has jurisdiction over the M. E. Churches of Kansas and resides at Topeka. He was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Read while in our city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Messrs. Willis & Sons, contractors, have just completed J. W. Johnston's fine residence and have the contract for the Winfield National Bank extension and other buildings of like magnitude. They are young men, but the excellence of their work, with the fact that as soon as they came here, only a short time ago, their business was put before the public through THE DAILY COURIER, has placed them into prominence as among our most desirable contractors. Enterprise and reliability always tell.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

John A. Smith, accountant for Col. McMullen, had his house entered Saturday night. John had suspicioned something of the kind for some time: had a kind of premonition of the impending affair. For a midnight visitor, John took the thing very nicely, never offering violence. The helpless, yet gentle and persuasive demeanor of the newcomer broke him all up and he upset every drawer in the house to find something with which to clothe the nocturnal visitor. He smiled and blushed and blushed and smiled and said coo! coo! just as though nothing was wrong. If Dr. Park hadn't been there, no telling what John would have done--just given a warranty deed to the premises. The stranger weighed ten pounds, and will soon wear pants and call John "paw." We smoke.

COWLEY'S "MEDICINE" RECORD.

Another Medical Analysis of our Invalids.

Only Four Barrels of Whiskey and 1,300 Bottles of Beer "Prescribed" in July.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Another month and a big quantity of liquid refreshments have fallen into the yawning chasm of bygone. The July druggists' record, as filed with the Probate Judge, is a sad blow to our Italian climate and famous healthfulness. Yet, when compared with the June record, it is a source of joy and thankfulness--in some quarters. In June, Winfield druggists sold 417 pints of whiskey and 828 bottles of beer, with about 180 pints of other drinks. The July record shows but 378 pints of whiskey and 54 bottles of beer. Winfield has about gone out of the beer business. So our invalids are convalescing. Arkansas City, too, shows a creditable decrease. In June she filed 1,774 statements, representing 833 pints of whiskey, 1,056 bottles of beer, and 309 pints of other "medicine." Her July filing shows but 1,484 statements, meaning 821 pints of "liquid hell," 596 bottles of beer, and 319 pints of various "stuff." The only contradiction to the decrease in miasma arising from the canal is that Grimes & Son, who were burned out the middle of the month, made no filings--statements, permit, and all going up in flame. This firm was the June lion, filing 500 statements, showing 142 pints of whiskey, 528 bottles of beer, and a few other drinks. Add to A. C.'s record half this firm June filings, and the steamboat city is yet very sick. But a great increase in "sickness" appears to be shown in the county "rhubarbs." Outside of Winfield and Arkansas City, in June, there were filed by druggists 785 statements, embracing 286 pints of corn juice, 510 bottles of beer, and 200 pints of various liquid refreshments. This time these towns show up 884 statements and 303 pints of corn juice, 740 bottles of beer, and 200 points of other healing liquids.

[Note: Did not give the breakdown shown by paper. Druggists mentioned in Winfield: Williams, Glass, Harter, Brown. Druggists mentioned in Arkansas City: Steinberger, Fairclo, Mowry & Co., Eddy, Kellogg & Co. Druggists mentioned in other towns: Avery, Grand Summit; Woolsey, Burden; Roberts, Udall; Rule, Cambridge; and Phelps, Dexter.]

The number of bottles of bitters sold in the county during the month aggregates 15.

If the above record is correct and it really represents all the liquors sold in July, it certainly indicates that a majority of Cowley's druggists are endeavoring to do about the square thing. Two or three need their heads smacked off. S. F. Steinberger, whom THE COURIER has fired several shots at, seems to be again crawling up as an ardent dispenser. Last month he dropped way down and we ventured the remark that he was on the tearful stool of repentance. His showing above is convicting on its face. But, with a third less population, E. W. Woolsey, Burden, vies with Steinberger for the lionship of Cowley in the beer business. 388 bottles in one month in a town of 1,000 is not so bad! Seventy-eight dollars profit for one month from beer alone is a fair showing--one that should be looked into by our officials. Grand Summit, for a little country village, is remarkably ill--in fact, the illness must extend all around there. Avery certainly has an eye to "biz," as 216 bottles of beer indicate. But, barring these few elevated filings, Cowley's prohibitory record is worthy of praise. Four barrels of whiskey in one month! Many and many a time during saloon rule in Winfield, as much has been sold in a single day, while the number of beer bottles emptied in a day would make the present record blush with shame. Men can stand around and howl about the non-enforcement of the law, and that liquor flows as plentiful as in saloon days, but the facts brand their argument a lie. It is a rarity to see a drunk man in Winfield, or any part of the county. If they get drunk, they stay at home, in the back alley or somewhere else from public gaze and disgrace. But any observant person knows that very little liquor of any kind is drunk now--to obtain it involves too much cost and risk, making an interior drouth preferable.

WOMAN SUFFRAGE SOCIETY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Woman's Suffrage Society met last evening with Mrs. C. H. Greer. A very interesting program was rendered: "Woman's sphere," poem, ready by Mrs. F. W. Finch; a select reading by Mrs. Gates: reading, "How to win," Francis Willard, by Mrs. Garlick; reading, by Miss Fannie Stretch; essay, by Mrs. C. H. Greer; music, by Misses Louie Stretch and Gussie Hilton; remarks, by Mrs. J. W. Curns and others. This society is made up of enterprising, energetic women, who are not ashamed of enlightenment on any subject. They take an interest in the republic's welfare for its elevation, and mean to work on and on until the goal of female suffrage, their battle ax, shall have been reached. Such women, with an earnest desire for the widening of the influence and sphere of their sisters, to be surely followed by greater feminine intelligence and independence, are a credit to the city--far beyond the slavery devotees of the flounce, the frizz, and the complexion, accompanied by inability and comparative nonentity.

BREACH OF PROMISE SUIT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Judge Snow's court is threatened with a breach of promise suit. A lady of color appeared before the Judge the other day and opened the artillery with "I'se done been foolished! Dar am a nigga in dis town dat's done swaded and swaded me fo to marry him. I didn' wanter git married. He tole me bout new home an all dis an dat, an so I gum it up an tole him ter take me. I had ten dollas in de bank. I spent ebery cent of it fo duds an Saturday we was to git jined, an fo de Lod dat nigga haint married me yit. I ain't guine ter hab 'im now noway, an I jis want yer ter put him thro fo all he ain worf." And she hustled around in blushing indignation. The Judge, with his loving dulcet tones, persuaded her to save her wedding clothes for another chance, that the law was a rugged resource, and she departed not so mad.

PATRONIZE HOME EVERY TIME.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Two or three years ago the county was flooded with sulky plow attachments which were soon thrown in the fence corner, the farmers' notes sold to the bank, and the irresponsible men who took them had skipped and no one left to be responsible for defects or the failure of these goods to do the work. The notes had been sold to an innocent party and the purchaser had his note to pay, notwithstanding the fact that he threw his attachment in the fence corner. This fall is far enough from that time that the sore is healed over and a similar game will be perpetrated on the farmers of this county. Farmers, why not buy your plows, drills, harrows, and implements of a regular dealer, who has to be responsible for his acts?

A Citizen of Cowley.

EZRA MEECH RECOVERING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ezra Meech was brought in from Silver Creek early Monday and is now receiving every attention at the home of Dr. Emerson. He was brought in on a cot in a spring wagon. Yesterday afternoon he began to exhibit consciousness and can now recognize everyone, though his mind wanders and has no definite hold on anything. He seems to know nothing of his accident, and imagines it is Thursday and he must rush to get the horses on the car for a start for Michigan. Dr. Emerson says he will recover, but it will likely be sometime before his mind entirely gets its equilibrium. Miss Jessie Meech, his sister, arrived today. The father was sick and unable to come.

MAYOR'S PROCLAMATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

MAYOR'S OFFICE, CITY OF WINFIELD, AUGUST 4th, 1885.

In respect for the distinguished services of our late countryman, Gen. U. S. Grant, and in order that we may testify in some degree our sorrow for his loss, I hereby request that all places of business in this city be closed on Saturday, August 8th, 1885, from the hours of one to five o'clock, p.m., and that all our citizens unite in the observance of memorial services on that day. By order of

W. G. GRAHAM, Mayor.

G. H. BUCKMAN, City Clerk.

DISTRICT CLERK PATE'S BUDGET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Still those bound in connubial ties yearn for their severing. Two more divorce suits were filed with District Clerk Pate Saturday. James A. Craine alleges that his wife, Lizzie Craine, is an adulterer, and he wants to be permitted to go hence. Alice V. Matson petitions for a divorce from John Matson on grounds of extreme cruelty and neglect of duty. J. W. Ross has filed a suit against A. B. Glass to recover $600 on title bond.

CITY RULERS.

What They Did at Their Regular Commune Monday Night.

Various Pithy Doings.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The rulers of the city met Monday in regular semi-monthly commune. Present: Mayor Graham and Councilmen McDonald, Connor, Myers, Crippen, and Harter. Absent: Councilmen Jennings, Baden, and Hodges.

A tax ordinance making a tax levy for 1886 was adopted.

H. G. Fuller was refused a permit to move a frame building to lot 6, block 127.

The sidewalk petition of G. W. Sanderson et al for walk on north side of 11th avenue was granted.

Building permits were granted J. P. Short and H. B. Schuler.

The petition of Samuel Steele et al for extension of water mains along Lowry street, from 11th avenue to Blandon street, was granted, and such ordinance ordered.

Following bills were ordered paid:

Black & Rembaugh, printing, $51.50.

T. H. Soward, copies plats, $3.76.

Nick Hurley, blacksmith work, $4.00.

Frank W. Finch, boarding city prisoners, $23.00.

S. C. Smith, city engineer, $34.00.

Winfield Water Company, water rent, full to July 15, 1885, $1,572.50.

Winfield Gas Company, lamp rent to July 15, 1885, $688.08.

A deduction of $211.82 was made from the amount allowed above to Gas Company, on account of an aggregate of 2,501 lamps not lit during the time specified.

G. H. Klaus, hauling stone, $7.35.

J. C. McMullen, rent fire dept. building, $25.00.

Salaries city officers, $179.98.

Wm. Moore & Sons, stone, $108.77.

H. L. Thomas, crossings, $63.21.

B. McFadden, burying dogs, $1.50.

Harrod & Paris, dirt on streets, $35.60.

W. A. Lee was refused permit to move frame building to lots 16, 17, and 18, block 100.

The fire department committee was instructed to notify W. H. H. Maris, New Salem, what Winfield's old fire machinery could be bought for.

Councilmen McDonald and Crippen were appointed to receive bids for boarding city prisoners.

An indemnity bond was required of John A. Eaton, making the city harmless from any damage that might occur from moving the Harter building into 9th avenue.

The proper committee was instructed to receive bids for constructing all sidewalks and gutters now ordered and not put in.

W. P. Hackney's resignation as City attorney was accepted and Joseph O'Hare's appointment to the vacancy was confirmed.

Jno. Steward was appointed city engineer in place of D. A. Millington, resigned.

The Commissioners, A. T. Spotswood, J. B. Lynn, and S. H. Myton appointed to assess damages caused by widening 5th avenue, between Main and Andrews street, reported damages of $525, to out lots 4, 5, 6, and 7. The report was received and further action postponed. These lots belong to J. C. Fuller and Judge Torrance, who kick on the amount of damages, claiming three times what the commissioners allowed.

[Note: Amount in last paragraph hard to read. Could be $325. MAW]

THAT WHEEL THIEF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

One of Sheriff McIntire's "Stop thief!" cards, describing Alfred Brown, who stole Willie Doane's bicycle, fell into the hands of Harper's marshal, and the Daily Graphic says:

"Officer Barton kept a lookout for the man, and at 5 p.m. the slick man who was described as riding a red bicycle came rolling along Main street going west. When he arrived opposite Barton's store, Marshal Barton stopped him in the middle of the street, arrested him, and took him to the corn crib down in the weed patch for safe keeping until Sheriff McIntire could come for the prisoner. There is little doubt about the prisoner being guilty and stealing the two wheeled horse he rode so well, for as usual in many of such cases the fellow told two stories. He first said that the bicycle was his own; afterwards admitting that it was stolen by a man by the name of Howard, who had hired him to ride it west as far as Anthony, where the two were to meet today. The Marshal agreed to take him to Anthony to meet Howard as per agreement, but the prisoner just then happened to think that Howard might not be there as agreed on, all of which will lead any reasonable mind to the conclusion that Howard was a myth, and the proper thief in jail, and is perhaps guilty of some other crime for which he is wanted. He left Winfield at 11 p.m., Sunday, passed through Wellington at 10 a.m., yesterday, arriving at Harper at 5 p.m. Distance, 75 miles; time, eighteen hours. The prisoner refuses to give his name."

This would have all been very nice if the corn crib down in the weed patch, alias jail, hadn't been rotten. Brown dug out Monday night and vamoosed on foot. Sheriff McIntire is after him again, and will no doubt rake Brown in. The bicycle, of course, was left in the marshal's hands and will be sent home. Willie is happy.

ALARMING REPORT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Monday's Wichita Beacon gives vent to this report which, if true, is one of great import.

"A somewhat alarming report was brought to our office this morning by O. W. Jones, who lives near Douglass, Butler County. Mr. Jones says that Dr. Votaw, a veterinary surgeon of Douglass, was called to the farm of a breeder of fine stock, living about one and a half miles north of Rose Hill (a postoffice in the southwest corner of Butler County, on the mail route between Wichita and Douglass), to see a herd of polled Angus cattle. The Doctor says he found the herd afflicted with the foot-and-mouth disease. Only one cow had an ulcerated mouth, but quite a number were badly affected in the feet, so much so that several hoofs were about to drop off and others were ulcerating and discharging. The owner told the doctor that the black Angus cows had been taken to an Angus bull in the neighborhood and had there contracted the disease. The owner of the bull, it is said, has just received two car loads more of Angus stock from the same place from whence the bull came. The State Veterinary Surgeon has been telegraphed for, and it is to be hoped that he will be able to state that a mistake has been made in the diagnosis of the malady. Our informant could not give the name of any of the parties who, it was claimed, had this trouble in their herds."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mr. M. Hahn, of the Bee Hive, was present at the marriage of his cousin, Miss Henrietta Greenewald, to Mr. M. Snattinger, at Topeka, last night. Mr. Snattinger is a cousin of Mr. A. Burgauer, of our city, and a wealthy and prominent gentleman. Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, who visited Winfield some time ago to wed Miss Minnie Burgauer and Mr. Carl Schlesinger, conducted the ceremony. The Commonwealth gave the wedding elaborate notice. The bridal party left this morning for an extensive tour in the east. At Philadelphia they will be given a big reception. Mr. Hahn accompanied them, and before returning will make the Bee Hive's fall purchases.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

John McGuire wears a long face and a melancholy grin this day. Mr. McGuire has received the intelligence that his duty as Uncle Sam's postmaster at the city of Tisdale is about to come to an end. John has amassed a snug little fortune from this office and he gives up his grip with a deep feeling of regret.

Jim Bliss, a Democrat, get there.

John steps out and Jim steps in,

McGuire is no more for Bliss does win,

Tisdale's mail for a time to come

Will be handled by a Bliss--full one.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The tower of the M. E. church is finished and will soon encase a fine bell. The M. E. folks have expended about fifteen hundred dollars in putting on the finishing touches to their church, making it one of the most complete and comfortable in the State. This amount was not contributed alone by the members of the church, but by citizens generally, and every subscription has been paid in full.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Farmers Institute meets Saturday afternoon at Curns & Manser's office.

ATTENTION, G. A. R.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

All members of the G. A. R. and all old soldiers are requested to meet at the G. A. R. hall one hour before the time for holding the funeral ceremony of Gen. U. S. Grant, Saturday, August 8th, 1885. By order of S. Cure, P. C., J. E. Snow, Adjutant.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

All those indebted to the late firm of A. T. Spotswood will please settle their accounts at once. I am needing my money and must have it. Your accounts are made out. Come in and get them receipted and oblige. Yours truly, A. T. Spotswood.

REV. B. KELLY CAPTURED.

A Number of Gentlemen Uniquely Surprise Him on Behalf of Numerous Citizens.

A Splendid Token of Esteem.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The faithful and productive labors of Rev. B. Kelly, as a minister and a citizen, met with a response Monday that left not a little additional sunshine in the Reverend's pleasant home. Numerous citizens, from a spontaneous appreciation, had made up a purse of three hundred and thirty-one dollars to be presented to Rev. Kelly, as a token of their respect for him. Christian and sinner, prohibitionist and anti-prohibitionist, rich and poor, were among the donors showing the universal admiration of Mr. Kelly's fearless and zealous advocacy of every good cause. To have so many interested, the matter had been kept remarkably still, and Rev. Kelly was completely in the dark. The committee of presentation, on the part of the donors, were Capt. J. B. Nipp, Judge T. H. Soward, Messrs. J. E. Conklin, John Arrowsmith, and R. S. Wilson, who, accompanied by our reporter, made the raid at 8:30 last evening. Mr. Kelly was found at home, and, with an astonished, though very genial manner, welcomed the party. Without any embarrassing preliminaries, Judge Soward said:

"Bro. Kelly: It gives me great pleasure, in company with these friends, to meet you in your home this evening. We do not come for the single pleasure of an hour's social intercourse. We come as the representatives of a large number of your warm hearted fellow citizens of this city, composed of all denominations and a very large number who represent no religious sect, to assure you of the high esteem which we have for you as a christian gentleman, and to express to you our admiration of the indomitable and untiring energy you have shown in behalf of the moral culture, happiness, and prosperity of our people. Words alone cannot express our feelings, and I bring you from these hands, acting under the impulse of warm and generous hearts, this gift, which we ask you to accept as a slight token of our esteem of a brave and manly man. The intrinsic value of this gift, in itself, is slight; but when I assure you that it bears with it the warm hearted wishes of your friends and admirers, who wish many more years of usefulness and happiness to your household, it becomes more valuable, as we know you esteem the confidence and friendship of your fellow citizens priceless."

Rev. Kelly, usually equal to any occasion, was to use a homely expression, "all broke up," and were we to publish his response in full, would no doubt demand a committee of identification. He was glad to welcome the gentlemen to his home on a mission laden with such esteem and encouragement. The surprise, he said, was so complete and of such a character as to incapacitate him for expressing as he would like his deep felt gratitude. He accepted the gift in the spirit it was given--a spontaneous token from warm and appreciative hearts. During his fifteen years residence in Kansas, he had tried to build up, in christianity, morality, and general prosperity. This he had done in Winfield and would continue to do. His fidelity was not prompted by monetary gain, but for the upbuilding of humanity and the calling he espoused. This gift would make one of the greenest spots in his memory. His heart was filled with inexpressible appreciation. With hearty hand-shaking, the formality was changed into pleasant converse, followed by seasonable refreshments, served very agreeably by Misses Maude and Hortense. Mrs. Kelly was ill and unable to appear. The gift was accompanied by a list of the contributors.

GRANT MEMORIAL.

Program of the Grant Memorial Exercises Next Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

ORDER OF MARCH.

The column will be formed as follows.

1st. W. R. Corps. 2nd. G. A. R. Post. 3rd. Military Co. 4th. Civic societies.

Column forming on Main street facing west. Head of column resting on 8th Avenue in front of G. A. R. Hall. The line of march will be as follows: The column will move promptly at the tolling of the bells, first facing to the right and marching north on Main to 7th Avenue, then countermarching and moving south on Main to 12th Ave., then east on 12th Avenue to Church street, and north on Church street to Baptist Church.

PROGRAM AT THE BAPTIST CHURCH.

1. Music by Orchestra. M. E. Quartet.

2. Music. By the Choir.

3. Reading Scriptures. Rev. J. S. Myers.

4. Prayer. Rev. J. H. Reider.

6. Music. Choir.

7. Address. Rev. J. H. Reider.

8. Music. Orchestra.

9. Address. Rev. W. R. Kirkwood.

10. Music. Choir.

11. Benediction. Rev. J. S. Myers.

12. Music. Orchestra.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Col. Tom Soward presents himself before the people as a candidate for re-election this week. Tom, like Capt. Nipp, is a Kentuckian--one of those whole-souled, open, free-hearted fellows, loyal to their friends and generous to their enemies, and whom it is a genuine pleasure to see succeed. He has made a capable and efficient officer and will succeed himself without much effort.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Methodist people certainly have reasons to be proud of the appearance of their church since its interior remodeling and outward finishing. With comfortable pews, recarpeting throughout, and beautiful repairing and other recent improvements, out of what was once a barn-like structure is one of the nicest churches in the State. It is now a real pleasure to spend an hour at services in this church.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Loomis street, this side of the Court House square, is getting a fill up from the Winfield National Bank cellar. It needs it, heaven knows. It is about the only street in the city that's a disgrace to the city. In dry weather, the stones and rubbish make it impassable and in wet weather it is a regular swamp. We are glad to see this move toward redeeming it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rain seems to have struck in various parts of the county, though we are dry at Winfield. J. F. Martin says they had a very fine rain in Vernon Friday night, a fall of an inch over a strip three miles wide. Around Seeley and north of this city, they also got rain. We must have general rain soon to insure a fine crop of corn. Now is just the time it is needed the worst.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Frank Small, charged with unlicensed association with Ellen Robinson, plead guilty before Judge Snow Tuesday, and, in consideration that he "clean out the unclean ranch," was let off with $5 and costs. Ellen and her little nieces, Mollie Burke's girls, shook the city's dust from their boots last evening, going East. Our officers mean to rid Winfield entirely of "soiled doves."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Mr. C. H. Seybt, a large flour exporter from St. Louis, is here talking up the export business with Messrs. Bliss & Wood. He was here last spring and has just returned from Europe with increased sureties. He exports for over one hundred of the large mills of the country. Mr. Robert Clark, of the Augusta roller mills, is also here.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Kansas City & Southwestern Railroad Company made the deposit with the County Treasurer today, to pay for their right of way from the county line as far down as the Commissioners have condemned--to the Walnut township line.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Our Dispatches, a base ball club just born, played a game on the Fair Grounds Saturday evening with the Southwesterns, from five miles above town. Seven innings were played, showing twenty-two of our boys and five for their opponents.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The new hardware firm, I. W. Randall & Co., have secured the McDonald room and will open up a nice stock of hardware about the 15th of August. Irve is a good businessman and the new firm will prove a strong one.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

For sale. Twelve good milch cows; one yearling and one two-year-old bull; one yearling heifer; a nice property in Howland's addition to Winfield, to sell or trade for a farm.

H. C. REYNOLDS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

All parties knowing themselves indebted to Cairns & Reynolds, or H. C. Reynolds, will please call at our old stand, at Brotherton & Silver's, and settle and save further costs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Winfield post office will be closed from 1 to 5 p.m. on the day of General Grant's funeral (August 8th). By order of Postmaster General.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Before borrowing money on real estate, call at the Farmers' Bank and get rates. No delay in closing loans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

James McLain is again master of the nocturnal billy and star, Night Watch Glandon having retired.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Money to loan by C. E. Fuller, 9th avenue, with H. G. Fuller & Co.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. "OLIVIA."

Dr. Crabtree is in Burden at present.

Fried chickens are good--so Mr. A. thinks.

You all know how hot the weather has been of late.

Widow Miller spent several days in Burden last week.

Mr. Gillette filled Rev. Knight's pulpit on Sunday in Salem.

Mrs. John Martin is better than she has been for some time.

Messrs. John Chase and J. A. Shields have a fine new mower.

Mr. Chapell, Sr., hurt his arm quite bad lately, but it is better now.

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hoyland visited relatives near Burden last week.

Farmers' wives and daughters are drying and canning corn for winter use.

Mr. Charles Claybolt is putting up a house in Salem. It looks suspicious.

Men are haying in the country and are perspiring in town--and country also.

Mr. C. C. Chapell has returned to the parental home and is quite indisposed.

Mrs. Vermilye, of the Magnolia farm, was the guest of Mrs. Archer last week.

Mrs. Pixley has been quite indisposed, but is better. Her father, Mr. Parker, is visiting her.

The McHenry Brothers have cut and bound their nice field of timothy, and will thresh it for seed.

Mr. Rolland Miller is back from St. Joe, but I cannot tell how his eye is. We all hope it is much better.

Mr. J. E. Johnson has rented his farm and bought a house in Salem, and will soon move to his new residence.

Mrs. J. J. Johnson is quite sick. Dr. Downs was hastily summoned and at last accounts she was better.

C. H. Miller and family have gone west. I hope they may find a pretty house and that happiness may be theirs.

In the cemetery there is another little mound, and another little angel in Heaven. A little Frazier girl died two weeks ago.

Messrs. Joe Hoyland and Almont Doolittle were down to the Territory for plums and grapes last week. They had pretty good success.

If anyone has lost a little buttoned shoe for a child four or five years old, they can find it in the house of Mrs. Condert. Mr. Condert found it on the Burden road, not far from Salem.

Miss Esther Gilmore is a happy Salemite once more, and so is Mr. James McWilliams, as he has also returned to our little burg. Happy greeting to all, and they seem glad to get back.

Mr. Stiff and family are again Salemites. Mr. Stiff has bought the livery stock of Mr. Spencer and he will now be the polite and handsome pilot to convey strangers to see our beautiful country, or conduct them safely to their friends.

Mrs. Dr. Dougan, of Little Rock, Arkansas, who is visiting her mother, Mrs. Walton, of Burden, was the guest of Col. Jackson's family several days last week. She is an old time friend of Mrs. Jackson's, and they took her back to her Burden friends when her visit was completed.

Mr. George Williams and Miss Mollie Cox were united in marriage at the home of the bride's brother, Mr. John Cox, on Sunday, the 19th of July. Rev. Knight, the M. E. minister, performed the ceremony. May their life be bright and happy is the wish of myself and their many friends.

Our city dads passed an ordinance some time ago, prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors on Sunday, except on a physician's prescription. It is not known who of the doctors hired the council to make this law, but some of them do more business on Sunday than during the rest of the week.

At the home of Mr. and Mrs. Watsonberger, July 22nd, by Rev. Geo. Bicknell, Mr. Arthur Emerson and Miss Florence Hughes, both of Sheridan, Kansas, were made one in the presence of a large number of guests. The happy couple were escorted to the train by Dr. and Mrs. Emerson, of Winfield, where they bade them adieu, as they started for a bridal tour to Davenport, Iowa. "Olivia" did not get fooled out of the cake as did those Floralites, for Mrs. Watsonberger made an honored guest of me, and provided some cake to bring the vision of a whispering man to the pleasant dreams that sometimes visit wedding guests. May this happy couple always be as happy as now.

ARKANSAS CITY. "FRITZ."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ed Gray started for Iowa last Friday. Why? Cause why.

Several of our boys went to Ponca last week to witness the sun dance, but were a few days too previous.

The Border base ball nine got done up at Wichita last week. They were "done up," not only for the game, but also for their board bill, which was sent to them the day after the game. A base ball club that is not courteous enough to entertain a visiting club had better quit playing ball and sell themselves to some dealer in swine. At Wellington, the boys were splendidly entertained and in return for their kind treatment, showed the natives some of the finest ball playing they ever witnessed.

Last Sunday evening a meeting was held at the Baptist church for the purpose of taking some steps in regard to the enforcement of our laws, both city and state. The principal object in view was to bring out the sentiments of the people in regard to the matter; to let the officers of the law know that our people expect them to rigidly enforce every law on our statute books, and that in doing this they will be backed up and sustained by the people. The evening was occupied by short speeches, many of our citizens taking bold and decisive stands in regard to the matter. The Sunday law and prohibition law received special attention as they are the two laws which, above all others, are disregarded in our city. Resolutions were adopted requesting our officers to use all diligence in the enforcement of all laws on the statute books, and also requesting the Probate Judge and County Attorney to thoroughly investigate the liquor business in Arkansas City. A committee of six were appointed to constitute a Law and Order committee. Arrangements were made for another meeting on the first Sunday evening in September. This begins to look like business. The trouble heretofore has been that no one has cared to come out and make complaint against persons violating the law, especially if the violator happened to be a person of some influence. It takes sand and a high degree of moral courage for a man to undertake to bring an offender to justice when he knows that his business is likely to suffer for it, that he will gain an enemy and that his motives will be misconstrued by many. But Arkansas City's safety depends on the fact that we have men who are willing to make all these sacrifices for the public good, and the intention which was avowed last Sunday night, to "hew the line, let the chips fall where they may," may well cause all lovers of law and order to feel encouraged, and for men who have for years been violating the law and relying on their standing in society for their safety from prosecution will find that "the way of the transgressor is hard."

HACKNEY SCRAPINGS. "TYPO."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

We noticed Dr. Grimes, of Arkansas City, at the depot Monday morning.

Mrs. Brown and Anderson are guests of Mrs. Lou and Frank Baker, of Seeley.

Lee and Lama Snyder were with many others, guests of the happy hostess, Miss Lettie Albert, one day last week.

There is but little sickness, but there are many with the haggard face, telling the effects of the hot, dry weather.

Messrs. Albert, Holland, and Anderson, of this community, are soon to become bibliopolists. We wish them success.

We noticed some ten or twelve young persons out enjoying the healthful exercise of horseback riding Sunday evening.

The rapid recovery of Rev. Lee's son insured to us the pleasure of one of the Reverend's pleasant sermons on every other Sunday.

Will Beach has lately made an addition to his house, which makes quite an improvement in the neighborhood as well as on his farm.

R. W. Anderson was the loser of a fine short horn calf Monday morning, the value of which he is trying to regain by selling some of his early peaches, of which he has a fine lot.

While the Scrubs, of Hackney, were skirmishing in the field a little last Saturday, Ed Fisher had the misfortune to let fly the ball bat, striking Chas. Metcalf on the arm, committing quite serious damage. Charlie has the best wishes of all the boys.



TISDALE. "GROWLER."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Whew! Hot and still heating.

John Hall meditates a new barn.

Sheridan and Tisdale are matched for a ball contest.

Our little rain was welcome, but not quite enough of it.

Don't believe all the railroad racket you hear in Tisdale.

Rease Moore and family visited their old haunts at Tisdale last week.

Corn is doing as well as it could. A rain or two will make a big crop.

The health of the community is better this summer than usual. There is nothing like good air and plenty of it.

Haying is being pushed for all it is worth and the yield is wonderful.

We regret that Salem has been unfortunate. There is danger in all cities.

A slide lantern show at the M. E. church on the 29th. Nobody "sold." Oh, no!

Hattie and Mamie Young are at home again after a three weeks visit at Humboldt.

Joe Bourdette starts, in a few days, in quest of wealth among the fairs to be held in Southern Kansas this fall.

B. E. Bacon harvested a fine crop of timothy. He says tame grass is as good a crop as Kansas farmers can raise.

Mrs. S. D. Pryor and Mrs. Henry Brown, with their little ones, spent the day with Mrs. E. P. Young last Wednesday.

We were pleased to meet our old friend, B. C. Swarts, in Winfield, a few days since. B. C. is a pioneer--one of the right sort.

Our road overseers have fixed up the bad places on the highways and cuss words are less frequent from the lips of the granger.

A. T. Gay has broke ground for his new house. We know of no class of persons better deserving of good homes than the old settlers.

Winfield Dads should pass an ordinance prohibiting bicyclists from running up and down Main street. Our country horses don't understand the things.

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Wm. Schwantes and wife took another trip to Vernon township. "There is no place like home."

A sister of Mrs. Foose has been visiting her for a few weeks, but contemplates returning soon to her home in Ohio. Thinks Kansas too warm for her.

A fruit tree agent sold quite a lot of fruit trees in this neighborhood last week. They are cheap enough if they are budded.

John Weakly, wife, father, and two brothers were at Winfield Saturday. Guess they thought it best to rest awhile from haying.

Mrs. Lida Sumner has gone to Denver, Colorado, to visit her parents. Her health has been poor this summer and she hopes the trip will benefit her.

Come out, Bethelites, and help us with our Sunday school. Don't let the hot weather keep you at home. Remember some of us never fail. Like to see all that way.

Uncle Joseph Hassell's folks most forget to prepare meals in regular order, since the purchase of their new Davis machine. But quite the reverse with Uncle Bob Weakly's, for they want to cook all the time; their new gasoline stove is so delightful. There are three in this neighborhood and all speak very highly of them. They are daisies sure!

VERNON NOTES. "ALIXIR."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Rev. Lee's son is slowly improving.

Considerable sickness in the neighborhood.

Things are looking well in this "neck o' the woods," but rain is badly needed.

Roads fearfully dusty, and the weather is very hot.

Dr. Marsh, of Tannehill had a run-away near Mr. Forbe's house, with the result of demolishing the top of his carriage, breaking a single-tree, skinning his legs and the legs of one of his little mules.

NOTICE TO THE FARMERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Gale Sulky Harrow Manufacturing Co., Detroit, Michigan, of which D. M. Ferry, the noted seedsman, is president, have at present, a depot at Winfield for the distribution of their goods. And it is the intention of the firm to show every farmer in Cowley County the workings of their famous Sulky Harrow, Sod Pulverizer, and corn cultivator. They also sell in connection with their Sulky Harrow the Hoosure Force-Feed Seeder, which is known to all farmers as a first class implement. Knowing full well that the farmers of this and most every other vicinity have been swindled by parties having no business standing and who were selling articles with no merit, I therefore invite one and all to inquire into the standing and the merits of these machines; any bank in this or any other city in the United States can give you the commercial standing of the Hon. D. M. Ferry, and I think there are very few farmers in the country who do not know that he is one of the most reliable businessmen of the whole country. Mr. R. A. Hibbard, who is manager at this point, will be glad to furnish you with names and P. O. addresses of several thousand farmers who are now using these machines and can testify as to its merits and the manner in which this company do their business. And we hereby challenge any person to show a single instance where we have broken a promise or done anything but an honest upright business. And we hereby issue a challenge to any party or parties who think our machine is an inferior one to meet us in a field trial. I will be glad to have farmers call and see what we have. Am quartered at the Brettun House and will do my best to use you nicely.

R. A. HIBBARD, Manager, Gale Sulky Harrow Manufacturing Co.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Wellingtonian, champion of Isaac Reed for Judge of the 19th Judicial District, and bitterly opposed to Judge Ray, is throwing its hat in the air over the assured nomination of its candidate. The primaries have all been held and twenty-nine out of the thirty-eight precincts show a majority of thirteen for Reed. Nine precincts, having twenty-two delegates, are yet to hear from.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

R. P. Galloway, representing the Clinton Copying Co., of Clinton, Missouri, is in town with headquarters at the Flag Drug store. Mr. Galloway makes a specialty of fine India Ink, Water Colors, Oil, and Crayon portraits.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

$5,000 to loan on short time on good personal, chattel, or real estate security.

HARRIS & CLARK.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings as Gleaned by the Scribes of The Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

METHODIST CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Yesterday the Methodist church was reopened after several weeks of repairing. The church was beautifully decorated with flowers and was crowded: both the main room and the lecture room jammed. Bishop Ninde preached an able discourse from Peter i:2-7. "Unto you therefore which believe he is precious." The following is a synopsis. St. Peter in these words addresses a very small and exceedingly select number. If he should utter the same words today, the company would be much larger. If I were to pass down these aisles and stop at every pew and ask if you believed in Jesus Christ, no doubt I would receive a unanimous affirmative, yet in every congregation there are some not believers. Some words have a biblical interpretation. The words of the text are such. Many assent to all in the new testament in regard to Christ, and yet are a bitter enemy to it all. In consenting, a christian embraces Christ. Such a believer can understand the words of this text as to himself. Our English cousins have seen fit to criticize our language as containing ambiguous words. Perhaps this is right, but everything in this country is on a big scale, and everything appears to us in an enlarged view; but my beloved friends, were you to attempt to convey a Christian's estimate of Christian words in our vocabulary, could you express the proper idea? We have not many precious things, beloved, in this world. We have not many precious friends, friends that are on the heart and on the tongue, that are friends in need and stand by us in trouble. Perhaps we can count them all on the fingers of our two hands, and yet far more precious than these is our Savior. He is exceedingly precious to the christian. A great many people have almost a heathenish conception of Christ. Some people only use Jesus for a means of ribaldry. I say to the Christian, believe that his conception of Jesus grows as his belief increases. I remark again, Jesus Christ is precious in His temporal coming. Christ made his advent upon earth that He might reconcile the love of God. I believe the old testament. I believe the God of the new is the God of the old. Yet there is a difference between the God of the old and the new. Christ came forth that he might reveal God in all a father's love and mercy. Christ appeared in the world to reveal the reconciling love of God. Jesus came to manifest an ideal human excellence. I see him everywhere, eating with Publicans and sinners; but in all his course, I see nothing against his spotless character. Where will you find a parallel? Call up the greatest characters of history, and Christ is the only perfect ideal of human excellence. I cannot be like Christ for I am only mortal, but I can follow after him. He can be my example; so can you, my beloved. Jesus Christ came into the world to take away my sins and yours, by his death upon the cross. The perfect Christ is not only in his life but in his death. It is only he who can see in Christ his Savior; can properly estimate Christ and his mission. I see one standing before the cross who says, "I see a martyr to cruelty." I see another standing before the cross crying, "Oh! Inexplicable mystery, who can solve this, that Jesus Christ must die upon the cross." The empty sepulcher explains it all. I see a Christian bow before the cross who says, "What a sacrifice is this that Christ must die to save the World?" Another says, "Behold the Lamb of God that taketh away our sins and falls at his feet." This is proper faith. Jesus Christ and his crucifiers afford exhaustless themes for the pulpit. The man who fails to discourse upon the blood is not a true Christian preacher. Blessed be God! He sent His only begotten son into the world to be a propitiation, to save the world. You can't compress all of Christ's acts into the short record we have of His life. We only have a short record of about three years. How can we account for it that a young man of 33 years of age left such a record that it has swayed the world for centuries. There has never been a period in the world's history when Jesus has been written or thought about as much as now. St. Paul said years ago, "The love of Christ constraineth me." If you want the mystery of His ability to do the great work He did and to bear the trials that He underwent it is this, the love of Christ, Precious Christ, whose blood has saved us! Christ is alive today. You can't find his bones if you search the world over. Wherever the Christian goes, he takes Christ with him. Christ is our friend. It seems to me there is nothing worthy of remembrance not connected with Christ. Jesus is precious for what he is doing now. The crucial question today is with everyone, "Is Jesus Christ precious to us all?" There is an incomprehensible meaning in the word salvation. Christ is a guide, a prophet, and a priest. We have one in the person of our ascended savior ever before the great high throne. Upon high stands our high priest interceding for us. He is a merciful high priest. He knows from experience our wants, and is our king. I am for absolute monarchy. I want Jesus for my absolute king. Life is a battlefield. There is not a place large enough for a young man to place his two feet upon but what it is raked by the artillery of hell. Christ is our spiritual nutrition. We fancy that happiness consists in satisfying our appetites. It is not so; there is a longing for food for the soul; there is a longing for God's help and care. Earth cannot fill the aching soul but Jesus can comfort us, no matter whether in the dungeon or the poor house; if we only have this solace, we are happy. Christ is precious on account of the christian hope he brings. Our chief happiness is in the future. You may be growing old; you may not be what you once were, but just as buoyant in spirit. We may be happier in the time to come. A Christian cannot stop in this life. Onward, onward, and the world beyond. We can't be unmindful of the world to come, and yet we know not much about it. No returning footsteps have revealed its wonders. Some things I know, that I shall lay down the cross and take up the crown; that the faces of my departed kindred, banished from me years ago, will welcome me upon that shore. I know the king will welcome me there. Oh! my brethren, heirs of God and joint heirs with Christ, can all this be withheld from you? All this is yours! Yours is Christ's and Christ's is God's. Amen.

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Elder Myers' text yesterday was from Proverbs. "Winning men to Christ." The astronomer is a man who can measure the distance of the stars from us and is said to be a wise man, but the man who can go among his fellow men and win them to Christ is known to be the wisest man of them all. Paul was a wise man and was sent among men to win them to Christ. How can we win men to Christ? Give them God's word and teach and preach it to them and by your actions and everyday walk cause them to conclude there is something better to live for than worldly things. We must have personal influence and we can never get it by carelessness to church duties and lack of faith. While some study nature and other art and still others history to mark the governing hand of God working out the destinies of nations, everybody studies God's people and if they have defects, they are bound to be seen, and it always works for evil, not for good, and consequently the Christian should ever walk in the light and truth and not darken or blight the prospects of any of his fellow mortals. It is one of the worst drawbacks to Christian progress, and God's followers should ever study to avoid this stoppage in the christian machinery.

BAPTIST CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Baptist pulpit was again filled Sunday morning by Rev. Geo. Campbell, from Wyoming Territory, who is visiting here. His theme was "God's loving kindness," based on Psalms xxxi:5-6-7. God is in all nature in its sublimity. Everything we look upon exhibits His love for those who follow Him. Yet it also shows his wrath--the terrible avalanche, so awe-inspiring and beautiful perched upon the mountain's peak, when it comes thundering down, deals death swift and sure. The greatest exhibition of God's kindness is in the rain and sunshine that makes the earth team with the abundant harvest. If all production was stopped and the world thrown on its accumulated supply, eighteen months would wind up humanity's earthly career.

Rev. Reider preached a sermon to young men in the evening, on "Industry, the way of success." Prov. vi:6. "Go to the ant, thou sluggard; consider her ways and be wise." It was a grand sermon: one worthy of wide consideration. We regret our lack of space for a synopsis.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Dr. Kirkwood preached Sunday morning from James xviii:2. "Show me thy faith without thy works. I will show thee my faith, by my works." In the days of the apostles there was much misunderstanding about this matter of faith and works, how it could be possible for God to justify the sinner without his performing some meritorious work, seemingly putting God under an obligation to perform the act of justification for him. He explained it in this wise. Suppose a man to be suffering the just penalty for his crime in a state prison with only a loathing for his sin and a longing to be free. His friends petition the governor. His mercy and compassion is brought into requisition, his pardon signed, and without any effort on his part is made free from the law. So with the sinner. He is made conscious of his sinfulness, of the justness of the penalty for his sins, of the willingness of God to pardon. He accepts the pardon and is free from the penalty of God's broken law, and from that moment he begins a new life, has new desires, higher aspirations. Then begins the work of sanctification, working in the heart, regenerated by an act of God's free grace.

UNITED BRETHREN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Sabbath School was well attended and the lesson was very interesting. The congregation was not large at this church, but the best of attention was elicited by the splendid sermon from Cor. xiii:9. "For we know in part." The first thought was the imperfection of men.

1st. As applied to his mental acquisitions.

2nd. His spiritual attainments.

He said that to a greater or less extent man had been a failure as he never accomplished all he hoped to. The school of nature is one of advancement, change, and development, and man is one of nature's best pupils, desiring to know more and more, but never reaching perfection. Man is constantly reaching out after some new thing and when that is obtained, he finds, like the little child, that he has more strength to reach after something which attracts his attention and desires, and he wants more and more.

He made a fine quotation from Pope, who said that the greatest study of life was man. The pastor's references to the scriptures and some of the most noted authors, philosophers, and divines of ancient and modern times were nicely woven in and applied to illustrate the thought he was presenting. His reasoning was logical and pointed. The usual announcements for the week were made.

STRIKE OF MAIL LINES.

The Pacific Mail and Four Other Steamship Companies Refuse to Carry.

The Mail Under Present Rates--Vilas Comes Out With a Sharp Criticism.

He Says the Companies are Far Better Paid than British Lines.

The New Arrangements.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

WASHINGTON, August 1. Five American steamship companies--the Pacific Mail, San Francisco to Australia; the Red "D," New York to Venezuela; the Clyde, New York to Turk's Island; the New York, Havana & Mexico and the New York and Cuba, lines have declined to carry the United States mails after today. In commenting upon this action Postmaster General Vilas said: "Certain American steamship lines, probably under the lead of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, entered into a combination with the purpose of forcing the distribution among them of the $400,000 appropriated by Congress for mileage compensation for carrying the mails. Some of them wrote to the Post-office Department, desiring to know what terms would be given. I proposed to each of the companies to go to the full limit that the law could allow, and award to them both sea and inland postage. This is about three times what they had been receiving for the same service during the past twelve years. It is

THREE TIMES WHAT IS PAID

for carriage across the Atlantic, and it is probably in most cases all that should be paid for carrying the mails. The companies were still acting in concert, and in consequence of their combination, refused to accept these terms, which were so liberal as compared with those they had had. The feel, I suppose, that they can drive the Government out of the position it had taken by refusing to carry the mails for the compensation offered. The companies seemed to think that if they refused to carry the mails, there would be no other course left to the Government but to make contracts with them and distribute the money, $400,000, accordingly. A complete schedule for the transportation of mails has been arranged, and they will all go with very little difference in point of time to the point of destination. A statement has been made in the newspapers to the effect that the United States Government is not as liberal as Great Britain in compensating steamship lines. In point of fact, the ratio which has been offered to our lines very much exceeds the rate paid by Great Britain. The rate we offered is about sixty-three percent more than British lines receive from their Government. It was a rate unjustifiably large, more than ought to be paid out. The Government deemed it fair to go to the utmost length which law and reason allowed, in order to avoid any difference with the American steamship companies until Congress should meet. The department has made such arrangements that the public suffer no inconvenience worthy of mention in respect to carrying the mails and in some cases--notably the Cuban--mails will be expedited." The Superintendent of the Foreign Mails said the American companies had refused an offer of $1.60 per pound for carrying the mail. This is what is known as the combined

INLAND AND SEA POSTAGE,

and is equal to $3,200 per ton that they receive at the present rate, or 44 cents per pound. The Postmaster General has directed the following changes to be made in the dispatch of correspondence for foreign countries, to take effect on the 1st of August.

Mails for Cuba, heretofore dispatched by sea from New York, to be forwarded to Key West, Florida, via Tampa, Florida, for dispatch from Key West to Havana by steamer, which leaves Key West for Havana every Wednesday and Friday.

Correspondence for New Zealand and the Australian colonies, heretofore included in the mails made up at San Francisco, for dispatch to those colonies, to be forwarded exclusively via Great Britain, in mails made up at New York as well as San Francisco.

There being only one dispatch during August next, on the 1st proximo, from San Francisco for China and Japan direct, correspondence for China, Japan, and the East Indies to be also forwarded until August 20, via Great Britain, in mails from New York, as well as San Francisco mails, made up at New York, to contain all registered correspondence for destinations above named.

LIKE THE EARLY DAYS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., August 1. While testimony was being taken in the office of Master in Chancery Houghton in the case of Sharon vs. Hill, Judge Samuel S. Terry, council for the defense, attacked with his cane H. J. Knowalsky, an attorney engaged on Sharon's side. Knowalsky drew his revolver and Judge Terry immediately drew his, whereupon Knowalsky fled into the hall. No shots were exchanged. Judge Terry is the same person who killed Senator Broderick in the early days of California.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

John A. Dutter, a prominent coal operator at Mahanoy Plane, Pennsylvania, has been foreclosed by the Sheriff. His liabilities are about $150,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Martin Van Buren, grandson of President Van Buren, died at New York on the 28th. He was a bachelor and a prominent society man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

John A. Benson, civil engineer and contractor of San Francisco, has assigned Liabilities, $450,000. Assets said to be equal to the indebtedness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

A duel between W. B. Walker and Samuel J. Dalton, of Aberdeen, Mississippi, was frustrated recently by the arrest of the parties at Starkville. They were on their way to Memphis to arrange for a fight.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Callan's motion of censure of John Bright for his utterances at the Spencer banquet was rejected by the British House of Commons. Callan took occasion to express his contempt of Bright and of the House.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Complaints having been received at the Department of Agriculture, Washington, that the sorghum seed distributed this year failed to grow, samples of it were tested in the gardens of the department and it was found that only about ten percent of it would sprout.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The report of Oliver Pain's death has been fully confirmed by Father Bonomi, an Italian priest who has been in the El Mahdi's camp and who has returned to Wady Haifa. A condition of complete anarchy reigns throughout the province and the city of Dongola.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The steamer Isle Royale, owned by Cooley, Lovague & Co., of Duluth, and plying between Duluth and Port Arthur, sprung a leak recently and sank near Susick Island. All the passengers and crew were saved. She was valued at $15,000 and was fully insured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The other evening, during a heavy thunder storm, lightning struck the house of W. J. Rains, at Lovelady, Texas. Six children, playing on the veranda, were prostrated by the shock, one of whom died. The others were in a critical condition and could hardly survive. Mrs. Rains was severely prostrated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Bedford Mackay, United States Consul at Rio Grande De Sal, Brazil, arrived in Washington recently on a leave of absence. Mackay is the Consul who, some weeks since, had a shooting affray with a Brazilian editor. The Consul reports that a colony of ex-Confederate soldiers is located in Southern Brazil.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Maud S. trotted a mile in 2:08-3/4 at Cleveland, Ohio, on the 30th: the quickest mile ever made.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

In the whole of Spain on the 29th there were reported 3,168 new cases of cholera and 1,252 deaths.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

A monument to the memory of Rebecca Nourse, who was hanged for witchcraft, July 19, 1681, was dedicated at her old home in Danvers, Massachusetts, on the 30th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

A recent Joliet, Illinois, special says: Three hundred men employed at the blast furnaces of the Joliet Iron and Steel Works have struck, claiming that they were being under paid.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Secretary Bayard received a dispatch from the United States Consul at Marseilles on the 30th, saying that the recent report of an outbreak of cholera in France was unfounded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Receiver Brown, of Brown, Bonnell & Co., at Youngstown, Ohio, has signed an agreement to pay the Amalgamated Association's scale of prices. The works employ 2,000 men.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Terrible and destructive storms, accompanied by thunder and lightning, have prevailed over the southern provinces of France. In Rodez, the capital of the province of Aveyon, lightning set fire to the priests' seminary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

It was recently rumored that Mr. Titcomb, Assistant Register of the Treasury, had been requested to resign. Register Rosecrans said that the report was not true, but that a reorganization of the bureau was contemplated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

In the second days proceedings of the Democratic convention at Richmond, Virginia, the platform was adopted and J. E. Massey was nominated for Lieutenant Governor on the first ballot and R. A. Ayres for Attorney General on the second ballot. Hon. John S. Barbour was unanimously re-elected Chairman of the State and Executive Committees.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The county jail at Barton City, Oregon, burned the other morning. Five persons were cremated alive and one severely scorched. With great difficulty Fred Winkleman, the half-witted murderer of Allen Rivers, was dragged from his cell insensible and badly burned. Every appearance indicated that the jail was set on fire by Winkleman, doubtless to make his escape during the excitement.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Stanley Hunter, a popular writer for the press and author of the famous "Spoopendyke Papers," died at New York recently.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

It was reported at Cairo that Osman Digna was killed in the Kassaia battle. The Mahdi's followers were everywhere demoralized.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Charles L. Skinner, of Baltimore, was recently disbarred from practice as an attorney before the Interior Department at Washington for extorting illegal fees.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The crew of the bark Bella, which was lying at Metis, Quebec, mutinied against the master ands took possession of the vessel recently.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Secretary of State received from Lima recently a telegram announcing the death of Lieutenant Nye, the naval attache to the American Legation at that place.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The Registrar General's quarterly return estimates the present population of Ireland at 4,924,342, showing a great decrease, which is chiefly owing to emigration to America.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

By a violent storm at Fargo, Dakota, recently, an iron electric tower 1607 feet high was blown down and twisted out of any semblance to original appearance. Many tin roofs and trees in the city were carried away and great damage done in the country near Glyndon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

In the British House of Commons an amendment to the criminal bill providing for the flogging of prisoners convicted of outraging children was rejected by 125 to 91. An amendment raising the age of protection to girls to sixteen was carried by a vote of 179 to 71.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Nine men got into a bucket to be hauled to the top of a shaft connecting with the new Croton aqueducts at New York, the other day. When up sixty feet the bucket caught on a projection and tipped. Four men were thrown out, two clung to the bucket; but the other two, William Cunningham and Timothy Harrington, were dashed to death.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The findings of the naval court martial before which ex-Surgeon General Wales was recently tried were suspension from rank and duty for five years on furlough pay and to retain his present number in his grade during that period. Dr. Wales was tried for culpable inefficiency in the performance of his duty and for neglect of duty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Dr. Henri Milne Edwards, the French scientist, is dead.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Ben Simpson, the United States Marshal of Kansas, was reported to have sent in his resignation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

Jerome F. Manning, an attorney, has been disbarred from office before the Court of Alabama Courts for alleged insolence to the court.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The United States Consul at Denla, Spain, reported to the State Department at Washington by cable that cholera had been officially discovered [?] at that port.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The clerks in the Fourth Auditor's Office at Washington were dismissed on the 29th for various causes. Their places were filled by transfers from other offices.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

An official of the Pennsylvania Railway Company said recently at Philadelphia that there was no truth in the report that the company contemplated an advance in emigrant rates.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

At a Papal Consistory the Pope proclaimed the Rev. Father Byrne Bishop of Mobile, Alabama, and the Very Rev. R. Phelan, present Vicar General, Coadjutor Bishop of Pittsburgh.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

A destructive fire occurred at Mannsville, New York, the other morning. Every store in town, nine dwellings and the Church of the Disciples, were burned. Loss, estimated, $70,000; insurance, $45,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

T. K. Miller, Secretary of the Iowa Legion of Honor, his daughter, and her friend, Miss Hall, were drowned in Cedar River, about fourteen miles from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the other evening.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The people of Huesca, Spain, have risen in revolt against the execution of the excise laws. The rioting was serious. The enraged people attacked the office of the Excise Collector and burned it to the ground.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

[Had to skip next two items. Streak through paper.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

The rate of postage on letters from the United States to Australia and New Zealand via England, Brindisi, and the Suez Canal, has been reduced from fifteen to twelve cents, making it uniform with the rate via San Francisco.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 6, 1885.

SANTA FE LUMBER YARD.

Lath, $3.60 per 1,000. Lime, $1.25 per barrel. Standard Hair, 30 cts. per bushel. Washed Hair, 40 cts. per bu. Doors, 2-6, 6-6, 1-38, with hinges and white knob locks, $1.75. Doors, 2-4, 6-4, 1-3/4, with hinges and white knob lock, $1.65. Plank, 2 x 12 in., 12, 14, 18, 20, $1.70 per 100 feet. Clear yellow pine flooring, $2.50 per 100 feet--4 or 6 inch. First-class yellow pine flooring, $2.25 per 100 feet--4 or 6 inch. Second yellow pine flooring, $2.00 per 100 feet--4 or 6 inch. We warrant our lime equal to any sold in Kansas. A full line of doors, blinds, gate hinges, screen doors, cupboard locks, latches, etc. We deliver goods, free of charge, to any part of the city.

A. H. McMASTER & CO.,

1321 Stewart Street, Cor. River Ave.

Telephone No. 86.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 1885.

OCTOBER MEETING OF THE STATE TEMPERANCE UNION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

We are informed by those who ought to know that it is probable that there will be more people in Topeka on the 13th and 14th of October, on the occasion of the meeting of the State Temperance Union than was ever in the city on any political occasion. It is estimated that there will not be less than 2,000 delegates in attendance. They are coming, too, to speak, after the manner of the profane, with "blood in their eye." They are determined that the temperance laws shall be enforced in Kansas. They believe that they have a law, strong enough to prevent any infraction of it, if the officers whose duty it is to enforce it but do their duty, and they are going to see why the governor and others, whose duty it is to enforce, and who have been clothed with power to do it, do not do so. The ladies and gentlemen who will be in attendance believe that prohibition is to be the issue in national as well as state politics in the future and they do not propose to go into future canvasses, handicapped by the statement that "prohibition does not prohibit in Kansas," when, as they say, they know it can be if the officers nominated and elected for that very purpose do their duty. Almost to a man those who will be heard believe that these prohibitionists, or pretended ones, who favor prohibition in Kansas and yet endorse the Republican platform in Ohio, which favors license, stultify themselves, and there is a general disposition to ignore Kansas prohibitionists who favor and advise license in Ohio. The feeling is nearly unanimous, and it strikes the average man that they are right, and that no man can be an honest prohibitionist in Kansas without advocating the same law for all parts of the Union. There are many men in Kansas who are not prohibitionists per se, that is, they have not heretofore and do not now believe that that is the best way to lessen the evil from the sale of liquor, but, they say, "it is a law, a part of our fundamental law, and we are getting sick of these half-way measures, to enforce it." That class, as a rule, would be glad to know that prohibition did prohibit, and are willing that the whole machinery of the government shall be used to do it. They say on the one hand that they are sick and tired of the half-hearted attempts to carry out the provisions of the law and on the other hand of the statements made by a class of Kansas prohibitionists and Ohio license men, that law is enforced, when they say it is not.

It is evident that all of these classes are coming together in October, as we said above with "blood in their eye" for business. They don't want, nor won't have any half-way support from men who they elected or from papers which they, with their patronage, have built up; so we take it, there will be music in Topeka at that meeting.

Commonwealth, July 30.

The above article was evidently written by an enemy of prohibition whose experience and observation have taught him that so long as the prohibitionists of this State work together, as they have been doing, they will control the legislation and most of the elections of the State; and prohibition is a fixture, bound not only to stay but to prohibit more and more completely until there is no more opposition to it than to laws against murder and robbery, and that the only way to beat prohibition is to divide the prohibitionists into two factions and to set them to warring on each other. Thus the Topeka Journal and other pro-whiskey papers, lead off in the kind of articles which tend to divide temperance men and stimulate dissensions in the prohibition ranks. They well know that a great majority of the prohibitionists of this State are Republicans, and that a great majority of these will stay by the Republican party and compel it to make such nominations as will tend to strengthen the prohibition cause. Hence the only way is to stimulate the formation of a prohibition party in opposition to the Republican party, to cast all the odium possible on the Republican party, in the hope that a sufficient number of Republican prohibitionists will adhere to the new political party to divide the prohibition forces very nearly equally and set them to fighting each other. Thus with two prohibition candidates for each legislative district, senatorial and representative, and for each State and county office, they would so divide the forces of their enemy that they could beat either wing, elect a legislature which would enact laws making the constitutional provision powerless and elect officers who help kill two birds with one stone, prohibition and the Republican party. It seems that some Republican papers are so much more for free whiskey or license laws than for their party that they would kill both of the birds rather than not kill the prohibitory warbler.

Unfortunately there are many prohibitionists who in pique and spite at real or fancied wrongs and neglects, desire the defeat of the Republicans even at the expense of annihilation to the prohibition cause. These the rum power expects to marshal with its friends and followers as the instruments of their designs. Thus the two extremes meet and work together to ruin the cause supposed to be dearest to one of these extremes.

It looks as though such articles as that above quoted are written for the purpose of forwarding such a scheme, and we do not like its tone and tendency. Prohibitionists, who are such from principle, should see and understand this matter clearly and be sure and not do the very thing which their enemies most desire them to do. It is always safe to refuse to do what your alert enemy wants you to do.

We hope that the meeting of the State Temperance Union, October 13th and 14th, will be as important and attract as much interest and as many delegates as the above article predicts, and we hope that the meeting will adopt and continue the policy to go into the conventions and primaries of the parties to which they have hitherto belonged and compel them to make such nominations as will be satisfactory to prohibitionists. If in any county or district, they have not strength enough to control the nominations of either party, it is then absolutely certain that all that third party nominations could do would be to show the prohibitionists much weaker than they really are.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The following, from the Columbus Courier, describes the present ambition of our former United States District Attorney. "Col. Hallowell offers, as a premium, to the person furnishing the most cream for his creamery, between the 1st of August and the last of January, the sum of $20 in gold, and $10 in told to the one furnishing him the next largest amount."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The announcement of J. G. Shreves as a candidate for County Clerk is made. Mr. Shreves comes from the extreme south and east part of the county, a section that has never heretofore been represented in the Court House. He is a lifelong Republican, well qualified to fill the position, and receives the hearty support of many friends.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Constanzer & Co.'s little grays lit out down the back alley Saturday, hitched to the spring wagon. They went as straight as though reined by a driver until reaching the Tunnel mill ford, when they were caught. Result, broken pole and singletree, and excited citizens.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

At the meeting of the Board of Directors of the Winfield Building and Loan Association Friday evening, there were bids for $1,900 in seven different bids, premiums ranging from 7 to 10 percent.

THAT VEXED "CHESS" QUESTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

EDITOR COURIER. Having read, with a great deal of interest, the various articles lately published relative to the origin of chess, please permit me to call your attention to what appears to my mind a fatal defect in your theory of evolution or development. If, as you claim, chess is the parent of wheat, or in other words, if wheat is the result of development, through various forms of inferior grain, seed, or grass, and now, during the process of germination, passed through the various stages necessary to produce those several inferior grains, seeds, or grasses, and if arrested at the proper stage during germination, by favorable, or rather unfavorable conditions of soil or weather for producing wheat, why is it that it should always appear in the form of chess, and never in any of its other numerous forms? Or do you claim that chess is the only previous form in which wheat has existed? Again, if the development theory is true, why is it that under thousands of years of cultivation, with every advantage of soil and climate, it should fail to continue to develop and produce some grain as superior to wheat, as the latter is now to chess?

The writer freely admits that there are some things connected with the sudden appearance of chess in such profusion, as is seen this season, that are very difficult to account for, and right here I will relate what came under my personal observation thirty-five or forty years ago, which is still more difficult to account for. My father's barn stood on a gentle slope less than a hundred yards from a small creek, in front of the barn was (as was termed there) the barn-yard, an enclosure, five or six rods square, where straw was stacked, cattle fed, the litter from the stables thrown, etc., usually accumulating during the winter a bed of manure a foot in depth. The creek bottom and the slope, up to and around the barn-yards, was in timothy, and had been for a period of twenty-five or thirty years. Heavy rains, during winters and springs would leach out this bed of manure, and the rich liquid would meander down the slope through the timothy to the creek. Now for the mystery, which I would like you to explain. Two or three separate times, during my boyhood, there came a perfect bed of chess just where that manure water ran across the meadow from the barn-yard to the creek. The line was sharply defined on either side: pure timothy, where the manure water had ran, and pure cheat, from one to two rods wide, on the other side. It was always cut before the seed matured, and the following year would be pure timothy again. Is chess the parent of timothy also? To which it reverts under certain conditions? Or is chess a form in which all grains and grasses occasionally appear when unable to make anything else?

I have also cleared the timber from land, sown the same in wheat, and where the log heaps were burned, there would come beds of cheat. I have no theory to advance or explanation to offer for these phenomena in the vegetable kingdom. I simply state facts as I have observed them. There are some very plausible arguments in favor of the development theory, but it seems to me that it won't "hold water" when able to rid my mind of a belief in the truth of that great law laid down by the Almighty at creation's dawn, viz: "That every tree and every plant should produce fruit and seed after its kind." If wheat is the result of development, is not corn, oats, rye, etc., as much the result of development? If so, why do they never appear in any of their previous forms? Surely last spring was cold, wet, and unfavorable enough to have made corn turn back to some one of its original forms, but it didn't do it. But I am not disposed to make fun of the theory of the "old man" of the COURIER, and I would remind "Rural" and "Mark" that ridicule is not argument, neither are assertions unsupported by proof. Give us your theory, gentlemen, and the proof, if you can. S. S. LINN.

THE BODIES RECOVERED.

The Bodies of the Fruits Boys Found Four Miles Below the Drowning Scene.

Terribly Decomposed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Friday, after nearly two days' incessant searching, the bodies of Will and Dave Fruits, whose drowning at the Higgins' ford, eight miles up the Walnut, we chronicled Friday, were recovered. A hundred men assisted in the search and the remains were found four miles down the river, lodged in the drift on an island. One body was discovered by the hair sticking up through the drift, under which it was floating. The other was floating under some willows fifty yards away. Both bodies were horribly swollen and decayed, having been in the water two days and two nights. The coffins were ready, and without any ceremony the victims of the waves were deposited on mother earth. The boat was found in the same island with the bodies, showing that the bodies had raised and floated down there. The boat in which the boys started across the river was a little skipper, only intended for one passenger, and the weight of the two heavy persons sunk it right down. It is said the water was only five feet deep, on a riffle, where the boat started, and could have been waded by Dave, who was a six footer. Neither could swim much and were probably too badly scared to try to wade. They were hard-working, well-liked young men, and their terrible fate is deeply mourned. This affair has a great moral, like the Carman-Kaates drowning a few weeks ago: learn to swim. Don't stop until you are an expert in water. Good swimmers are among the great minority who drown. Take your boy to the river and teach him to swim like a duck.

A SNAKE STORY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mt. J. H. Fortner, who resides near Guelph, on the Territory line, says the A. C. Democrat, took his wife, two daughters, and a son last Saturday, and went down on the Chicaspa river, about fifteen miles below the State line, to gather plums. After they had found a good prolific plum patch, they selected a shady nook and unhitched the horses, and proceeded to gather the luscious fruit. After the elapse of an hour or more, Mr. and Mrs. Fortner were startled by the screams of one of their daughters, and hastening in the direction, soon came upon a sickening sight. Rose, the oldest daughter, was seated upon the trunk of a log and a huge black snake was coiled up in her lap. She was so badly frightened that she dared not move; but the younger daughter stood off at a proper distance, making the woods ring to the full extent of her lungs. Mr. Fortner took in the situation at a glance; and placing his wife in front to attract the snake's attention, stepped behind his daughter, and, taking her by the arms, quickly drew her from the log, and the snake rolled to the ground and was dispatched in short order. Rose said she had fallen asleep and when she woke up, the reptile was in her lap. The fright gave her such a shock that she has been confined to her bed ever since.

A LAMP DID IT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

"Fire! Fire!!" Shouted our elongated scribe Friday and with a single bound he landed up the steps and in two jumped and ran over seventeen men, twelve signs, and a dog, and stood breathless before the portals of the Commercial hotel, eager for an introduction to the conflagration. The scribe's heart went down into his old brogans as he heard, "All out; only a lamp exploded!" as the hose companies came pell mell down the street, cutting a gap in a street jammed full--of excited people, all gawking and running forward. The hanging lamp in the hotel parlor got on its ear and exploded, covering the carpet, center table, etc., with coal oil, followed by fearful flames. A bucket of wet water, an old comfort, and some men squelched it before any damage was done--excepting the complete demolishing of the lamp. This is another argument in favor of gas. A hotel without gas is liable to explode. The Commercial has lots of gas--on the sidewalk in front, among the airing boarders. Put it in the building.

THE DEVIL LOOSE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The devil and all his imps break out in a print shop sometimes, and we'll bet they were accompanied by sheol in the Wellingtonian office Friday morning. That paper comes to us with this at the head of its usually bright and newsy local page. "Pi! The press-man 'pied' our local form while going to press this morning, hence the absence of our usual local news."

The "cuss word" vocabulary would down a Methodist preacher on such an occasion. A day's hard labor gone and nothing but a conglomerated mass ready for the "hell box," or three days incessant "picking" type by type, to again fit the "pi" for the boxes, as the old time "silent messengers of thought."

The Wellingtonian office will now need a long sitting at the mourners' bench to again place them on the straight and narrow path.

THE ASYLUM CONTRACT LET.

Cowley Has the Lowest Bid and Gets It.

The $25,000 All To Be Dropped Here.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The State Board of Charitable Institutions met in Topeka Wednesday to receive bids and let the contract for the erection of the asylum for idiotic and imbecile youth at Winfield. The first bids were all of larger amounts than the appropriation, $25,000; so these bids were all thrown out and the bidders, all of whom were present, were given notice to put in bids Thursday for constructing the main building and one wing of the asylum. John Q. Ashton, a contractor of Arkansas City, who built our Central school building, and J. E. Conklin, of Winfield, had the best bids and were awarded the contract. The Board appointed architect S. A. Cook, of our city, as superintendent of the work. Bids from contractors all over the State were among those considered, but the increased facilities in reach of our contractors enabled them to walk off with the cake. The amount of the contract just about equals the appropriation. The building will be finished and ready for occupancy about January fist. This means twenty-five thousand dollars to be immediately disbursed among the laborers of Cowley, which, in addition to the numerous other extensive improvements to at once begin, will place our laborers and people generally at high tide. The reliability of Messrs. Ashton and Conklin is widely established, and the rapid and first-class construction of the asylum is assured. The letting of the contract to these gentlemen is a meritorious feather in Cowley's cap, in addition to the asylum itself. Foreign contractors would have spent much of the appropriation out of this county, and likely run in much foreign labor. From the Topeka Capital we get the bids as follows.

P. Martmean & Co.: $20,700; E. W. D. Drought, $24,500; John Q. Ashton, $19,600; E. P. Dexter, $23,075; Henry Bennett, $20,984; James Cuthbert, $21,654.

J. E. Conklin furnishes all the stone and brick while Ashton has the general contract, including all but furnishing and steam and gas piping, which will consume the remainder of the $25,000.

GRANT MEMORIAL.

How the Day of the Great General's Funeral Was Observed in Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

This has been a big day all over the Nation--big in demonstrations of respect for the hero of war and peace, General Grant, over whose body the last sad rites of the dead were solemnized today, in New York, while in every city and hamlet memorial addresses and ceremonies eulogized his life. In Winfield the preparations, under the G. A. R. and W. R. C., were complete. At two o'clock the Post and Corps and Co. C, K. N. G., formed in line and marched to the Baptist Church, where seats had been reserved for them. The procession was led by the Courier Cornet Band, with low, sweet music, while the Juvenile and Union Cornet Bands were at suitable places in the march. Nearly all the business houses closed from two to four o'clock and the church was immensely thronged. The decoration, through the taste and energy of the ladies of the Relief Corps, was uniquely appropriate and beautiful, and the music, addresses, etc., grand. We press too early for a full report today, but Monday will issue a Grant edition, containing addresses and all.

ENTERPRISE AND TASTE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Grant Memorial decorations over the city Saturday are rather profuse and attractive, but among the most unique and popular, was that in Sam Kleeman's dry goods store windows. In one window was a picture of the dying hero, surrounded by family and friends, the "sword and peace" to the left and the cathedral to the right. The other window contained a stack of arms, the red, white, and blue, and a cartoon, "Let us have peace," with the north and south clasping hands over the body of Grant, sanctioned by the Goddess of Liberty, with Mars and Clio, war and peace, sitting at either side. The backgrounds and trimmings were lovely and exhibited the superior taste and energy of P. S. Kleeman and M. B. Tanner.

OFF FOR THE WEST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

An expectant party of four of our best young men, composed of Aus. F. Hopkins, Addison Brown, Claude Rinker, and Gene Welch, lit out Thursday for a three weeks' vacation in the wilds of the western counties. Claude's team and lumber wagon were the means of transportation, accompanied by a complete camping outfit and enough guns and ammunition to kill the whole Cheyenne tribe--or a cotton tail rabbit. The boys are innocent and credulous and we don't blame them for going as a kind of perambulating armory. They will certainly have the grand time they expect, and will return weighing four hundred pounds apiece, more or less.

WICHITA EXCURSION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

About two hundred Wichita people, filling four coaches, passed through on a special S. F. train Thursday morning to Arkansas City. The excursion was gotten up for a ride on the "Kansas Millers," which will make short trips up and down the river. The A. C. folks had made big preparations to entertain their visitors in various ways. The big attraction was a second contest between the Wichita base ball club and the Terminus Borders, now claiming themselves the crack nines of the southwest. The purse was $100. Fifteen or twenty of our people accompanied the excursion from here.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Evening picnic parties are now popular, Riverside Park being the scene of one or two almost every evening. Nothing could be pleasanter than to take hammocks, ladies, baskets, and a determination for a good time and spend the evening under those branching elms. The boating course is good, but the boats bad and the approach worse. Good boats, with a little special preparation at the wharf, would insure lucrative patronage to anyone making these conveniences.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Winfield excursionist had a rough experience on the river last week, when they stepped aboard the "Kansas Millers" to enjoy the romance of a moonlight ride. There were too many in the party, some of the excursionists had large avoirdupois, and the boat resented the invasion by getting hard aground. The COURIER "fat man" was on board, and the lean editor, left in the office, irreverently poked fun at his distressed brother. Traveler.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Ponca agency is going through a mild revolution. A new agent has been appointed to succeed Dr. Scott, whose family left a month ago. Dr. Quimby, the post surgeon, has been relieved, the Poncas having no fund to pay a doctor; the families of M. French and Kendall F. Smith have come to live in town, and the other employees have their grip sacks packed in readiness to flit. Traveler.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The pretty school ma'ams, after a months' sunshine, have forsaken the city, and the hearts of our young men have all shriveled up. Nothing so captivates the palpitating motor of a young man as a rosy-cheeked, vivacious country school ma'am. She crushes every time, and she know it. They are the bulwark of the Republic, and of course their influence is always felt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Capt. J. B. Nipp, our popular and efficient County Treasurer, took a trip over the rail on Monday to the Canal City, and during his brief stay was welcomed by hundreds of friends. He announces himself in another column as willing to handle the funds of the county during another term of office. Traveler.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Watermelons are now coming in from everywhere. The boys are seen carrying them home in every direction. We are quite sure that we will soon be able to report a few cases of bilious colic.. A little watermelon is good for the system, but too much makes a conglomerated duck pond of the stomach, and if stirred up, will get sour.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Some mischievous fellow transformed the Wells Fargo sign Thursday night. It adorned the awning fronting Dr. Wells' office. Next morning a canvas covered all the original sign but Wells, finished out to read "Wells' office, Medial and Surgical Institute." Mr. Taylor was mad and yanked it off with alacrity.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

An exchange measures it correctly when it says: "A man who never told a lie, a woman whose tongue never got the better of her judgment, and a man who could publish a newspaper to suit everybody, are the three white society elephants which would be the leading cards in a circus of the world.

A VISITOR'S VIEW.

An Indianian Gives His Impressions of the Handsomest City

He Has Seen, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mr. T. L. Lingle, of Gosport, Indiana, visited Winfield a short time ago, and thus chronicles his impressions, in the Owen County, Indiana, Democrat. "We arrived at the enterprising city of Winfield a little past noon. We found our friend, Gabriel Robinson, formerly of Paragon, Indiana, who kindly showed us through the city and cheerfully furnished us all the information desired, besides agreeably entertaining us otherwise. Winfield, with a population of more than 6,000, is the county seat of Cowley County, and located on the Walnut river, which affords excellent water power for the manufacturing and commercial industries located there. It has two lines of railroad, the S. K. and A., T. & S. F., thus affording excellent shipping facilities. Has a large reservoir of water just east of the city, brick and tile works, tannery, two breweries, two planing mills, wagon and carriage shops, a foundry, machine shops, fine opera house, a skating rink, fine flouring mills, one having made the flour exhibited at the World's Fair that took the premium as the best, and other industries too numerous to mention. Will probably have a street railway in operation some time during September. The site is selected on a beautiful mound over-looking the city from the east, where the Methodist college is to be located. Also an Imbecile school is to be located at Winfield. Winfield has excellent church and educational privileges, three weekly papers, one daily, gas and telephone line. The city has about 150 miles of good stone sidewalk, and most of the streets are well shaded, thus giving the city a fine appearance. The business blocks for the most part are composed of brick and magnesia limestone, which is taken from the extensive quarries adjacent to the city. When first taken from the quarry, the magnesia limestone can be planed or sawed into almost any shape; but upon being exposed, it becomes hardened, so that the structures made with the limestone are substantial. The city has numerous fine residences, surrounded with beautiful shaded lawns. Trees thrive well in that locality and it is a grand fruit country. Plenty of fruit this season. Peaches in abundance, many trees having to be supported. Vegetable growth is luxuriant. We were agreeably surprised at finding such a fine and prosperous city so far out in the state, and we judge Winfield to be one of the handsomest cities that we have seen. Also the morals of the city are said to be excellent."

SOME WINFIELD PEOPLE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Winfield men have been largely instrumental in building up the "wild west." About half the western county towns have had some of our enterprising citizens connected with their founding. Their absence from here is only temporary, of course. The new world conquered, they always return. Speaking of the Protection, Comanche County, Town Company, the Echo says of Winfield men: "Prof. E. P. Hickok is president of the company and looks well to the interest and general welfare of the town. He takes special pride in and lends his influence to establish a progressive and moral community. He has had experience with newly settled counties in Kansas and well knows the true worth of a new country. The Prof. resides on his claim and rides back and forth night and morning on his thorough-bred horse. A. P. Johnson is vice-president. His residence at present is at Winfield, where he is engaged in the practice of law. It is to be hoped that he will see fit to reside here in the near future. Come out, Johnson, and Protection will boost you for Prosecuting Attorney after you prove up a claim and become one of our citizens. W. P. Gibson is treasurer and in his hands the cash of any enterprise would be safe, being a man of superior honor and financially responsible. Chas. W. Wright with the other officers compose the board of directors. Mr. Wright has filled responsible positions, is well educated, and has lots of good judgment to back it. When he decides a question, it is pretty apt to be a 'right' decision."

Charley Wright will be recognized as the son of Dr. W. T. Wright, of this city, while Mr. Gibson is a Queen City denizen and owns property here.

LEAN BUT FUNNY NEWSPAPERDOM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The faber of Charley McIntire, the religious and funny man of the A. C. Democrat, emits some sparkling things occasionally. The following fits Charley as a competitor with Bill Nye, Alex Sweet, and other "phunnyistic" fellows.

"One more week and the Democrat will be six years old, and still we live. When we launched out into journalism, it was not done with a view of amassing a colossal fortune, for having been engaged in sticking type for ten years previous we had saved a pile, most of which we had invested in real estate in the shape of one town lot near the canal, which was sold for taxes. But with a good supply of cheek and an abundance of stick-to-a-tive-ness, we have managed to pull through and at the end of the sixth volume, we are still in possession of a wife, three babies, and a print shop, all our own, unencumbered by mortgage or debt. Although we have managed to keep our head out of water, we have not handled more of the dollars of our dads than could be taken out of our port by the Kansas Millers as one cargo; still we are not discouraged and expect to keep the Democrat on its pins until 'death doth us part.' But I can say without the least equivocation, mental reservation, or self-evasion whatsoever, that there is no big money in the newspaper business, and have decided after our six years experience that the best way for the average country editor to make his paper a success financially is to get his life insured and then die. The widow, with the insurance money, could 'jine hands' with the office foreman or devil and make newspaper business lively for a time. We think of trying this plan, and commend it to the boys generally."

A BAD COOLER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Harper's poor old bastille must feel terribly humiliated from such cruel thrusts as this, from the Harper Daily Graphic: "Well, we do declare! How could a well regulated bicycle thief possibly get out of our all hand sewed and cut bias double-back action cooler down in the weed patch among the bugs, old plows, and harrows? But he is gone--'he is, by gosh!' The supposition is that he leaned a little hard against the front door and fell out backwards into the back yard, and then skipped out, hard heartedly leaving the cooler to lonesomely spend the balance of the night alone. The city should hide that calaboose somewhere until it becomes old enough to sell to the dudes of the next century for a relic, or else sell it for a corn crib, and then buy a 12 x 10 wall tent to confine the prisoners in. The sun would roast all sins out of the prisoners, and they would soon be too weak to escape, or they would not wish to, soon becoming infatuated with the summer resort on the inside, and they would really be ashamed to escape from such a prison."

EZRA MEECH LITTLE BETTER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Very little change is noticed in Ezra Meech's condition since he was brought in from Dr. Emerson's ranch last Saturday. His injury is much worse than expected when he first returned to consciousness, and his friends greatly fear the injury to his mind will be permanent. His left side is paralyzed--he only being able to move his arm a little. While he recognizes everyone, his mind won't stay for a moment on one subject. The Doctor, however, sees some change for the better. In the pleasant home of Dr. and Mrs. Emerson, with his sister, Miss Jessie, and kind friends at his side, he receives every attention. The accident broke not a bone--scarcely left an outward scar. The jar did it.

AN EXTERMINATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The base ball game at Arkansas City Wednesday between our Exterminators, composed of Frank Hathaway, G. D. Byerly, Tom J. Eaton, George Byington, Arthur Bangs, James Vance, John Crane, Cap Whiting, and James McLain, and the Terminus' "Rough on Rats," was a daisy game, for good feeling and genuine exercise, with some very good playing. The Rough on Rats were made up of Arkansas City businessmen, who went in for the fun of the thing: and got it. Our fellows put it to them with a score of 33 to 17. The Rats entertained the Exterminators in royal style, and all pronounce the occasion tip top. The Rats will return the game in a short time. Our Eli's are getting a daisy "rep."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Wichita's whiskey "joints" have all been choked off. Says the Beacon: "The joints have all closed. The little places where a boiled ham and a sandwich on a counter in a front room were the sign of a bar in the back room have quit."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Wichita Beacon seems incredulous: "The Winfield COURIER claims to have seen a hen's egg that was eight by nine inches in size, and further claims that it was laid on its table. This statement is not to be doubted, for there are persons here who are confident they heard the old hen that laid that egg cackle after the deed was done. The hen is said by the COURIER to be a "Cochin" hen, which is, no doubt, a correct classification of the species. But don't try to coach us any more, Mr. COURIER, if you have a Coaching hen."

We hardly expected a Wichita man to believe any such thing. They are not accustomed to such prolific prolificness. Such productions have long since ceased to be wonders in Cowley.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

An exchange says that a pinch of salt put in a cat's saucer of milk and its meat two or three times a week will prevent it from having fits. So will a load of Buck shot, but you must put them all in the cat.

ANOTHER WALNUT DROWNING.

The Waves Swallow Two More Souls. The Fruits Boys the Victims.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Again has the water of the Walnut closed over its victims. The scene, too, is but a few miles below the fearful Dawson ford, where six souls went down only a few weeks ago. Wednesday Will and Dave Fruits, young men twenty and twenty-six years old, residing near Seeley, crossed the Walnut and came to Winfield for two loads of lumber for their uncle, Ben Friar, who lives on the west bank of the Walnut, at Higgins' ford, east of Seeley. They got their lumber, and when reaching the ford, at about 7 in the evening, found the river had raised two feet during the day and was past fording. So they put their teams up at a farm house near the ford, and asked the farmer for his boat to cross over home on, and said they would come back in the morning when the river would likely be down, and get their teams and loads. The boat was half a mile down the river and the boys started to get it. That was the last seen of them. Their failing to turn up instituted a search. The boat can't be found. Signs on the bank indicate that the boys got the boat. The water there is very swift and rather deep and there seems no doubt that it capsized and the occupants were drowned. It was a little red boat ten feet long and will likely be caught floating down the river. One of the boys could swim a very little and the other not at all. Will Bruington and Frank Senseney, who came down Friday for coffins, said fully a hundred men were searching for the bodies. The young men were both industrious and of good standing and such a fate is greatly deplored.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

T. Marriott was over from Burden last Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Clarence and Joe Witt were up from A. C. Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. P. McCommon were over Friday from Burden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

R. S. Phillips and J. R. Bowdish were over from Oxford Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

N. T. Snyder and H. J. Donnelly were up from A. C. Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Rev. J. H. Reider, Rev. Geo. Campbell, and Prof. J. A. Wood went out to Floral Thursday to attend a Sunday School Institute.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Gene Wilber came from Rock last night for a visit with George L. Gale and wife. Dr. H. F. Harnady was also down Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The case of William Blizard [?] against Frank L. Thompson, suit to recover $40 for labor, appealed from Justice Bone, Silverdale, was filed Thursday with District Clerk Pate.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Misses Fannie Stretch and Leota Gary went over Saturday evening to visit the Misses Woods, near Burden. Miss Fannie will remain a week. Miss Gary returned Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Fred Collins, accompanied by John and T. J. Bassett, drove over from Burden Thursday afternoon to meet Fred's old friend, John Eades of Wichita, whom they took back with them for a visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

E. C. Seward and D. Rodocker talk of putting up two blocks on the corner of 7th Avenue and Main Street. Rodocker will erect a fine art gallery, eighty feet long, with all accessories for photography.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Miss Anna Hunt left Thursday for several months' visit with her aunt, at Peabody, Marion County. Miss Anna will be greatly missed in our social circle, but will no doubt have a very enjoyable vacation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Newt Fowler is in from Fowler City, Meade County. He says the development of that section is wonderful. It's a wrestle for the county seat between Fowler City and Meade Center, the latter having the census taker.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

L. D. Dobbs, the G. A. R. cancer and dead beat, was here Thursday, going to Douglass to play the Spy of Atlanta. He sticks like a leach. It is queer that any of the G. A. R. Posts will have anything to do with him. Most of them won't.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Judge and Mrs. E. S. Torrance got in from Manitou, Colorado, Saturday, called back by the illness of one of their children. The anticipated several weeks mere vacation, but had a glorious time while they were away.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A man called at this office Friday with an item. Said he, "Did you hear the report on the street? It's h ." When he picked himself up from the bottom of the steps, he resolved to play no more such jokes on a newspaper man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mr. Frank Williams, of the Occidental Hotel, left Wednesday for a few weeks' trip in Dakota. Judging from the amount of shells he loaded and the shooting apparatus he took along, he expects to enjoy some fine shooting. Wichita Beacon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Dan Miller was before Judge Turner August 5th, charged with using unbecoming language in "cussing" Hull Bixby. Dan fought long and strenuously, ably abetted by O. M. Seward; but O'Hare and Bixby got thee, $19.25 worth. It was a little family difficulty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Constable Tom Harrod went down to Cedar township Thursday to bring up Dalby, charged with trying to brain Jacobs with an ax. His arrest was made in the country justice's court, but will be transferred to Winfield, where facilities for such a case are wider.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Again one of the old COURIER boys comes to the front. Frank W. Frye, for several years an attache of THE COURIER, has been appointed postmaster of Parsons. Frank is one of the most genial, whole-souled, and trustworthy young men in the State and every way worthy of this prominence. We congratulate him heartily.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The building committee of the School Board awarded the contract of the excavation for the Central school building addition to Jim Connor, and work was begun Thursday. By this means, everything will be ready for the contractor who gets the building to begin the stone work on Monday, August 17th, as soon as his contract and bond are signed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mrs. Page, administratrix of the estate of Wm. S. Page, made her first annual settlement with the Probate Court Friday. George Williams, administrator, filed inventory of personal property, in estate of Wm. Kaats, deceased. Mrs. Elliott, as guardian of her minor children, filed a petition for an order authorizing her to mortgage real estate belonging to said minors.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire came in from Harper Wednesday--with Willie Doane's bicycle, but without Brown, who broke out of Harper's corn-crib jail--a little wooden thing that wouldn't hold a mouse--and skipped. He will likely round up in Mead County, where his father and brother live. Sheriff McIntire has got a trap on the scent and will soon bring Brown in.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Elk City Star man has got 'em again. Hear him. "A man's opinion embodying contumacious diacoustics and the diagraphical effect of thunder, lightning, and floods, was seen crossing the street, the individual staying with it. But few tackled the opinion or the man, however." As near as we can figure out, he means to convey the idea that "the man" was oratorically drunk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Drs. W. T. Wright and C. E. Pugh returned Friday from a trip to Cincinnati to consult eminent specialists regarding a peculiar throat abscess that is making Dr. Wright's days a burden. He got but little relief, and seems to anticipate very serious results. The abscess has broken and now gives him some relief. During their absence they spent two days among Dr. Pugh's Kentucky friends.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Revs. J. H. Reider and George Campbell and Profs. J. H. Wood and A. H. Limerick attended the Richland Sunday School Convention at Floral Thursday. The attendance was large, and the interest warm. It was undenominational, and a mass convention of all the Sunday schools of that township. These institutes are held annually by Richland, a fact worthy of emulation by other townships of Cowley.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

While Asp's court was busily examining Steinberger's statements Friday, one was found that all but Asp declared to be "H. E. Asp, Winfield, one pint gin, for rheumatism." This abashed Henry, but it looked mighty plain. When Steinberger got on the stand, however, he took the joke off Henry's shoulder by swearing that the name was "H. E. Sop." The "S" very much resembled an "A," as did the "o" an "s."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

"It is not impossible that the stealing of bicycles will soon become a more common crime than horse-stealing," remarks the Wichita Beacon. "One has lately been stolen in this city, and in Winfield the COURIER reports that a fine new bicycle was taken from a barn and ridden off. In the latter case it is supposed the young thief is known. He has been tracked west, and the sheriff is after him, but as the thief is a good rider, he is likely to escape unless the electric wires can head him off. A good bicycle is worth from $60 to $140, and cost as much as the average horse, and though not so much in demand, or so salable, it has the advantage of being easily concealed. Owners of bicycles should see that their vehicles are safely secured when not in use.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Marshal McFadden took in a couple of young tramps one night recently. They were evidently in the first stages of trampdom and didn't look so very bad. An inventory, by the marshal, of their worldly goods showed two "guns," a twelve dollar watch and chain, and six dollars in lucre. This pile they laid at the shrine of Judge Turner as recompense for the concealed weapon charge. The Judge took the "guns" and watch, paid the marshal and city attorney their cash fees, and the tramps departed, to return in a few minutes with, "Say, mister, there is an engraved dollar on that watch chain that my sister gave me. Can't I have it!" The Judge looked at it and answered, "Yes," and the tramps departed happy. This is the straight of the sympathetic tale a man with more mouth than brains tells on the streets, making out a false charge of concealed weapons and that our officials took everything on top of green earth the poor tramps had, even refusing to return a gold dollar watch charm given the tramp by his dying mother. Our officials carry out the law, but in doing so exhibit no brutish greed or cruelty.

A RING THIEF.

A Girl With a Hankering for Jewelry Drive s Her Fellow to the "Jug."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A green looking young fellow, apparently from the rural districts, went into Bob Hudson's jewelry store this morning and asked to look at some ladies' rings. Bob, always ready for a sale, yanked out the ring case and began to expatiate on the merits of different rings. The young fellow was evidently suffering from Cupid's darts and was hunting a token: in fact, he was bold enough to assert that he wanted a ring for his damsel. He looked at this and that one and finally found one to suit; but said he didn't have the lucre just then and for Bob to lay it away to await his call. Bob said, "all right," and the fellow started off, followed by numerous interrogations, which brought out the fact that his name was Mason and he lived at Akron. He was nineteen years old. Bob was not oblivious to the fine engraved gold ring the fellow had slipped on his little finger, doubled said finger under, and was endeavoring to get away. Bob edged along toward the ring boy until the latter got out, when Bob, being alone, turned the key on his store door, and at McGuire's corner, gripped the young man's shoulder and looking him square in the optics said, "Hame me that ring you stole, and do it quick." The young man's face caught fire and he squirmed like an eel, saying he had the ring for three months; but when shown Bob's trade mark caved and tearfully confessed all. Bob gave him a lecture and let him off. Returning past Hudson Brothers' store, Bob said, "There goes a fellow that just tried to steal this ring from me." Johnnie seemed to have a flea in his ear, and rushing into Hudson Brothers' ring case, exclaimed, "By jove, that same fellow was looking at our rings ten minutes ago and one is gone." Seeing the young man across the street, George Hudson called him, drawing a confession, but not the ring--it had been given to a fair damsel, the youth said. The marshal was notified and the young man now languishes in the bastille. He says he stole both rings for his loved, one, and no doubt he did--he had a far-away, clear gone look that was melting. The first ring was worth eight dollars and the last one five. The youth will plead guilty and get a term in jail. He swears it is his first thievery.

AN UNFAITHFUL HUSBAND.

After a Year's Ignorance as to His Whereabouts, His Wife and Daughter

Cage Him in Winfield With Wife Number Two.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Thursday Mrs. George Bethel arrived here from near Cherryvale, and hunting up Marshal McFadden, put him on the track of her run away husband. She was accompanied by one of her five children, a daughter of fourteen. She is a good looking lady of forty-five and her daughter quite winsome. About a year ago her husband suddenly decamped, leaving her to care for the family the best she could. They had previously got along all right and she couldn't tell what was up. It hadn't occurred to her that a woman was the cause until she received word from Winfield that he was keeping house here with a woman he represented as his wife. This exasperated her and she determined to run him down, and thus her arrival. Our marshal had little trouble in ferreting out the unlicensed couple, and Thursday evening, leaving the mother and daughter a block away, bombarded the house, near the Santa Fe elevator, and without any trouble proceeded to march Bethel and wife number two to the portals of the bastille. Stopping where the mother and daughter were in ambush, the Marshal introduced Bethel to his deserted companion, and then he realized the true animus of the box he was in. The meeting was as chilly as an iceberg. Scarcely a word was said and soon the iron door of the jail shut the criminal couple in. Mrs. Bethel instituted suit this morning in the District Court and Frank W. Finch was appointed receiver, taking charge of Bethel's three horses, $140 in the bank, and other property he had. The unlawful mistress was one Lotta Bennett, thirty-five years old and said to be a professional soiled dove. Mrs. Bethel is grit from the word go and determined to put her adulterous husband and his "soiled" female through to the bitter end. Bethel is about fifty-five years old and several of his children, by his deserted wife, are married and have families. He had been here about three weeks. The affair doesn't seem to "break him up" to any alarming degree, but is proving a severe test to his outraged wife.

A BOOMER ON OUR OFFICIALS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Col. Sam Crocker turns away from his galling thoughts of martyrdom in Cowley's bastille to tilt his faber in the Oklahoma War Chief, thusly. "While it is humiliating to be incarcerated within the walls of an American prison for exercising the rights of free speech and free press--something to be abhorred, detested, and despised by any and every person with the least spark of pride and good breeding, who may have the sense of shame left as a heritage of manly or womanly birth; yet, for all this, there is one thing connected with our confinement and treatment that we feel thankful to acknowledge; and that is, no manlier humans or courteous set of officials, from the deputy U. S. marshals down to the sheriff and jailor ever contributed more to the needed comfort of an innocently incarcerated prisoner than Deputy United States Marshals Reed and O. S. Rarick, Sheriff McIntire, and Frank W. Finch, jailor. It always afford us pleasure to speak of governmental officials as we find them, and we would most certainly do these gentlemanly officials a great injustice to speak of them in any other light."

THE D. M. & A. BOOMING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A gentleman came in from Belle Plaine Thursday and says the D., M. & A. contractors are pushing things with a vim. He counted fifty-eight teams in one grading corps, while several hundred men were throwing dirt between Belle Plaine and the Arkansas river. All delaying preliminaries are ended and there will now be no let up until the "kears" are whistling along the entire contracted line, three hundred and twenty-five miles, from Baxter Springs, on the east line of the State, to Larned, Pawnee County. This is business and what all have been anxious to see for these many months. The K. C. & S. W. are also getting down on their muscle in good shape. Trains are running into Atlanta, the graders are tearing the sod this side of Floral, and the survey through Winfield will be determined in a few days. With outstretched, affectionate arms we stand ready to embrace the first "toot" of the K. C. & S. W., and D., M. & A. They mean prosperity unceasing and unequaled.

ASP'S GRAND JURY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

County Attorney Asp, Judge Gans, and Sheriff McIntire, with Miss Eva Dodds as stenographic reporter, held a County Attorney's Court of investigation at Arkansas City Friday, as provided by the late liquor law. All the druggists, beer, and whiskey guzzlers, "it don't prohibit" growlers, and everybody from whom anything could likely be pumped, were up before a fire of interrogations, continued up to twelve o'clock last night. The greatest irregularity was found against Grimes & Son, with Steinberger following up closely. The Terminus was considerably stirred over the examination, which was rigid and fruitful. Whether or not some of A. C.'s druggists will be made to perspire under the gills, will appear later, when the vice gets ready to close. In the meantime, we think several druggists will come down in the number of statements and amount of ardent dispensed. Asp and Gans are bound to keep the druggists status quo, or chop off their heads.

A MEAN MAN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A South Winfield citizen gives us some pointers on a mighty mean man. This individual moved into the house of an old widow lady, in the south end of town, last spring, and paid one month's rent in advance. He has been there since, but has put up no more lucre. The other day he moved out, and the pleadings of the old lady, whose means are very scanty, to give her either her due or collateral, were ignored. He swore he would burn his furniture in the street before he would sell it to pay his debts, and raised the neighborhood with oaths. His family seem humiliated and we withhold his name on this account. The neighbors should take this animal in hand and choke him into recompense. Nothing is mean enough for a man who will beat a poor widow, and if amends are not made, we'll use names next time.

UDALL SENTINEL CLIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Al. Roberts has moved his family up from Winfield, and will now give the meat market his personal attention. Al. Is a musician, as well as his brother, Chas., and will likely become a member of our Sentinel band.

M. S. Williams was arrested and taken to Winfield last week by Capt. H. H. Siverd on a complaint lodged against him by a girl who has been raised in his family. She claimed that he had misused her. Mr. Williams was released on his own recognizance and the trial set for August 18th. The case will likely be dismissed for lack of cause and evidence.

Chas. A. Roberts, of Winfield, a brother of Al. Roberts, our new butcher, is here this week helping Al. to get settled. Chas. is a cornetist and music teacher by profession, and his performance on the cornet is highly applauded by those who hear him. He may possibly locate here. If he does, the band boys may consider themselves fortunate in having among them such an excellent musician and teacher.

County Attorney Henry E. Asp passed up the road Tuesday evening, and stated to a Sentinel reporter, who questioned him concerning the D., M. & A. road, that he had not heard a whisper but that the road would pass through Udall; that he felt confident that we would get the road. That great corporations move very slowly, and could not be expected to build a road in a day, especially when they had two years in which to do it.

The D., M. & A. surveying corps are busy this week in Fairview township making a new survey. The new line will be a mile or two north of their previous survey. This change is made in order to comply with the stipulations concerning the location of a depot in that township. This move on the part of the company makes it still more favorable for Udall, and should convince unbelievers that thee is something in this D., M. & A. enterprise for our growing city.

The game of ball between the Udall Dudes and the Winfield club came off last Friday afternoon as advertised. The boys were in good shape to play and everything passed off pleasantly until a foul ball struck Tom Norton, the catcher, square in the eye. This accident to one of their best players rattled the Dudes badly, and when two more of their players got hurt, one by a broken finger and the other by catching the ball in the leg, they were so broken up that the Winfield nine, after four innings, won the game easily by eighteen tallies. A large crowd witnessed the game, and had it not been for these accidents, the Winfield boys would have found a nine worthy of their mettle. One of the visiting club caught a ball on his cheek, which made a very painful bruise.

THE GOOD TIME APPROACHETH.

The Panic Bands Loosening and Winfield and Cowley

Kick Up Their Heels in Response.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The last year has been an extremely hard one on every branch of business, but especially so on the laboring man: the man dependent upon his daily earnings, "by the sweat of his brow," for his daily bread. And these tough times have not been confined to Winfield, but extended over the entire country. But the gladsome sunshine of prosperity begins to cast its rays over Winfield and Cowley County. The avenue for the laboring man is gradually opening and men with a desire to perspire can do so at good wages, and the demand has just got on its legs. With the K. C. & S. W. and D., M. & A. railroads booming this way, each employing now two or three hundred men; twenty-five thousand dollars soon to go into labor and material on the Imbecile Asylum and as much more on the College, with both residence and business buildings looming up all over our city and county, the prospect is flattering. A month more will show a building impetus in Winfield astonishing to all. The new school building, the Winfield National extension, the fine Farmers Bank and J. P. Short blocks, and other notable improvements are now progressing, while a drive around the city exhibits residence buildings and improvements on every hand. And our contractors are busily figuring on numerous prospective improvements--all extensive and valuable--in harmony with the general progressive air of the Queen City. The growing crops are now almost assured, and will be as prolific as any year of Cowley's history, far better than earlier anticipated. This fall will show an immigration, material prosperity, and general advance in Winfield and Cowley unexcelled by any period of their past history. The air is now laden with the "big time a comin'"--you can see it in the move of every inhabitant. The fruits of our railroad, asylum, college, and other triumphs are budding and will soon be in full bloom, with a flower for all with "git up and git" enough to pluck it.

MUSICAL CULTURE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Professor Merriman gave an invitation to the patrons of his class in vocal music and to all interested in voice culture to be present at the closing exercises of his first term of twelve lessons at the Christian church Friday. There were a goodly number present and all seemed deeply interested, and expressed themselves well pleased with the advancement of the Professor's pupils. His classes are composed of near forty pupils: primary, intermediate, and adults. Thos in the primary and intermediate classes are from six to ten years old and in this one term have learned to read music nicely and sing beautifully. In the adult class many of them have considerable knowledge of music and express themselves well pleased with his manner and method of teaching. We would be glad to have Professor Merriman return to Winfield and believe that with perseverance he will succeed. We were somewhat surprised and sorry to see so few boys in the classes. If Shakespeare's sentiments be true, the boys need it. The man that has not music in his heart and is not charmed by concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treason, stratagem, and spoils. Let no such man be trusted. The scarcity of boys as well as the scarcity of numbers in the classes showed the necessity of having vocal music taught in our schools, and if the Professor returns, we hope the board will reconsider the matter and conclude to introduce this branch. It is not a good policy to sacrifice the present, where such a refinement and moral benefit is to be attained.

FATHERLY ADVICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

As the reporter was passing along 9th Avenue Thursday evening meditating upon diverse things; his thoughts were cut short by someone exclaiming, "Old man, a fellow can't trade horses and be a christian." This struck us forcibly, coming from an old horse trader, and in connection with this we wondered if a newspaper man could be a christian. We will admit we once heard of an editor being classed under this head for about three months, but it was too much for him, and when a spring poet sent in an effusion, he broke over and all the force of the preachers in town could not reach him. As a rule, a christian newspaper man runs a weakly paper. Newspaper bills, doctor bills, and twenty-year old due bills come under the same classification in the minds of the average man. This should not be. A newspaper man should be a christian, and as good a one as a doctor. This can't be done by Sunday schools or picnics, but by the public lending a helping hand. Don't send up spring poetry and criticize our paper for being dreadful dull; can you draw blood from a turnip? Can you get news when there is none? Some days are dull with newspaper men just the same as with trade. Don't kick my friend. If you do, kick yourself.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The drug store of Mowry & Sollitt, at Arkansas City, was entered about 1 o'clock, Thursday night, and the safe blown open. The night watch saw the flash, though some chemicals had exploded, and went to Mowry's house, got him, and together they entered the store just in time to scare the burglars off without the safe booty. They only got $10 out of the till. Not caught.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

One of our reliable citizens purchased a pound of butter uptown the other day and took it home and that night a tramp reached into the pantry window and tried to steal it; but it was so strong, it drew him in and whistled for the dog. The tramp vows that he will never tackle any more store butter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

"There is, perhaps, some satisfaction in the certainty," says the Newton Republican, "that when the law don't do up a hard citizen, the lawyers usually scalp him for all he is worth."

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

ANNOUNCEMENTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Repeat of announcements with possibly one or two new ones...J. B. Nipp for County Treasurer; J. S. Hunt for County Clerk; T. H. Soward for Register of Deeds; J. G. Shreves, County Clerk; Geo. H. McIntire for Sheriff; S. J. Smock for County Clerk.

THE DOLPHIN OUTRAGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Since 1862 John Roach has received from the government over $10,000,000, besides numberless ships and valuable machinery sold to him at old junk rates. Among all the vessels built by Roach for the government, not one of them have been available for purposes of modern warfare, and in fact, have hardly been seaworthy. Telegram.

We would suggest to our c. c. that it is not necessary to pick up and circulate all the lies invented to help Whitney out, which it finds in the papers whose managers are licking boots to get the recognition of this administration for some office. The editor of our e. c. has got his office and now should tell only the truth in this case, viz:

Congress passed an act providing for the construction of three steel cruisers and also another vessel of greater speed. In pursuance of said act, Secretary of the Navy, Chandler, appointed an advisory board of the men of the United States reputed to be best acquainted with naval affairs and ship building, to prepare models, plans, and specifications for the ships and superintend their construction. This board prepared these and the letting of the contract to build the vessels was advertised in the regular way with the right reserved to reject any or all bids, the ships to be built according to the models, plans, and specifications on file.

John Roach was the lowest bidder on all the vessels and the contracts were awarded to him.

The first of the four ships completed was the "vessel of greater speed," named the Dolphin. Within the contract, and according to custom in such cases, the ship was allowed, and required, to make three several trial trips before acceptance or rejection. This is for the purpose of thoroughly examining and testing the ship. It is expected that on the first trial, some defects will be discovered, and that on the second, they may not be wholly remedied. The third trial ought in reason be sufficient to test any machinery. In this case, as is common, the first trial showed defects; on the second, there was nothing wrong beyond a little heating of journals, and on the third test there was nothing wrong. The advisory board, having watched the building of the ship as it progressed, knew what materials had been used in its construction, and then being present on everyone of the trial trips, they knew just what the ship was. The board was satisfied with the Dolphin, passed it on careful examination, and recommended acceptance. Secretary Whitney refused to act upon the board's advice, and he appointed a special examining board. The report of that board shows that the work was done according to the plans and specifications, but the examiners say the ship is "structurally weak," and that in their opinion, it has not power enough to make the desired speed on a rough sea. There is nothing in the contract about speed, but it was intended by the department, by Congress, and by the advisory board that the ship should have a speed of fifteen knots an hour and 2,300 horsepower. On the third trial of six hours on Long Island Sound, the Dolphin made more than fifteen knots an hour, and ran so steady that a glass even full of water set on deck did not spill a drop; and when the ship was maneuvered rapidly in turning about and being thrown against a new position of the rudder, the tremor of the ship was so slight that the test glass on deck displaced so little water as to be barely measurable.

The advisory board in their criticism upon the report of the examiners say that compared with other vessels the Dolphin is exceptionally strong structurally and that it is not reasonable to accept the fact of the heating of a crank pin to which engines, and particularly new ones, are at times liable, as evidence of weakness of any character. And they also say that a vessel's speed depends on its design and that when fifteen knots of sea speed was mentioned by the board as what the Dolphin should show, it means making fifteen knots on a calm and for an ordinary day's run, and the board asserts that this is the only proper way of measuring sea speed.

Secretary Whitney having predetermined to "sit down on John Roach," and seeing that this "structural weakness" business was too thin to go down well, called off Attorney General Garland, whose offices seems to be, to do the dirty work for the administration, to help him out. Garland understood his business and promptly came forward with an "opinion" that the contract was illegal or rather was no contract, and therefore the Secretary could not recognize it by accepting the vessel. Thereupon Whitney rejected the vessel, bankrupted John Roach, and threw out of employment 2,500 workmen, depriving their families and dependents of their means of living. It was one of the most atrocious outrages ever committed by a government, done evidently for political spite and political capital. We shall see how much capita is made by it.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

E. ENANOVITCH, General American Manager, P. O. box 1968, New York, who sends out the advertisement of the London Sal-Muscatelle Co., is a swindler and a dead beat. Publishers should beware of the picture of the priest holding his finger up. We know of what we speak. Champion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mary J. Bethel has filed petition in the District Court asking $1,000 alimony from Geo. W. Bethel and attaching all his personal property. She lays the grounds adultery, desertion, etc., but asks no divorce. M. G. Troup files suit against Mary C. Zall to quiet title. John Lowry, Jamison Vawter, and G. H. Buckman have each filed appeals from allowances of the County Commissioners.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The portals of the Brettun are now guarded by a watch dog of savage mean, with his paws on the key and a bloody gleam in his eye. Look out for him. Old Jack, Bret's split-nosed "bull purp," is jealous--mad with envy at his successful rival.

EDUCATIONAL COLUMN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

[This column is edited under management of the Cowley County Teacher's Association. Fannie Stretch, Alfred W. Wing, and R. B. Moore, editorial committee.]

INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE OF STUDY.

The order of instruction in the different subjects is fixed by the nature of each subject, and by the law of the mind in receiving knowledge.

There is therefore an established mode of procedure in teaching any branch.

Every subject is made up of parts, such that, in the order of learning them, some must precede others. Each step furnishes a necessary condition for taking the next.

The pupil must pass from a known fixed point in a subject to the following unknown. He must, also, take that phase of the subject adapted to his mental development. What is true of the parts of the subjects is true of the subjects themselves. Some necessarily precede others; first, because some furnish a necessary condition for the study of others; second, because some are adapted to an earlier stage of mental development than others.

These two facts, namely, the necessary relation of the parts of the subject and of the different subjects, and the law of the mind requiring it to receive different kinds of knowledge at different stages of development require school work to be graded or stepped.

If these steps in the branches be set forth in the order of dependence, and in the order they may be received by the mind, there will be formed a graded course of study. A line of progress (pro and gradi, to step forward.) If a school be properly organized with such a course, as a basis, it will be a graded school.

This course of study has been arranged to make our school work definite, organic, and progressive.

The aim has been to set forth the steps so that each teacher will know just what to do. Each part of the work will then fit in as an organic part of the whole.

To impress the fact that subjects and not text books are to be studied, the parts of the subjects have been stated instead of referring to the pages of the book.

This course answers for both teacher and pupil the following questions.

In addition to these it names as optional branches: United States constitution, philosophy, elements of bookkeeping, and drawing.

The Cowley County Reading Circle was organized to help on the good work of popular education, by arranging such course for home reading as would unite instruction and pleasure, cultivate a taste for the best literature, and secure regularity, breadth, and progress in reading.

In order to meet the expense of correspondence, printing, etc., a small fee of 50 cents is charged each member. This fee is the only charge for the year.

S. J. SMOCK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The announcement of S. J. Smock as a candidate for the office of County Clerk appears in our columns today. Mr. Smock is a veteran soldier of the late war and carries his credentials in the scars by which he is decorated. His left arm was so completely shattered in an engagement as to be now almost entirely useless besides being still a source of much suffering. But his right arm is all right and he wields a fine pen and a good hand. He is an honorable, active, and pleasant gentleman, well qualified to fill the office he seeks with credit to himself and to the county.

GEO. H. McINTIRE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Today appears in this paper the announcement of George H. McIntire as a candidate for a second term of the office of Sheriff of this county. George is one of the veteran officers in this State, second to none of the sheriffs in ability, energy, efficiency, and courage. He always does his duty, always get there and by the surest way. He needs no commendation from us for his grand record is well known to the people of this county who will give him a second term sure.

R. R. TRACK THROUGH THE CITY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

MESSRS. EDITORS: As a citizen I have actively opposed the occupation of any of the streets through the residence portion of our city by either of the railroads now approaching us. But after looking over the ground carefully, I can see, and everyone who is interested will see, that there is a line of passage which could be given them with little detriment to public and private convenience, and with advantages more than commensurate with the injuries sustained. I refer to the occupation of Loomis street, from the Kansas R. R. southward to between 11th and 12th avenues, and then following the course of the ravine by the Walnut river. By so doing, we could secure, First--the proper filling and grading of that "valley of dry bones" and catch all of the debris of the city--between 9th and 12th avenues. Second--the opening of a complete drainage for the low grounds on the east and south sides of our city. There is no denying the fact, that if we would avoid the future devastation of our homes by disease and pestilence, we will soon have to inaugurate a complete system of drainage, and the expense attending it will amount to more than the appropriations already made by the city to the roads. If the railroad companies will provide and keep up a sufficient drainage outlet, the city could well afford to contribute to pay for some of the consequential damages for occupation of the street. In footing the interest of the roads, we can demand reciprocal benefits in this and other matters. I will not enlarge upon this subject; I wish only to call the attention of the City Council and citizens to this matter and to advise a candid and thorough examination of the subject before action is taken in deciding the course to be pursued.

C. PERRY.

COUNTY TAX LEVY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Board of County Commissioners met Monday to complete the county tax levy for the coming year and adjust some minor matters. The levy was made as follows: General fund, ten mills; pauper fund, one-half mill; furnishing poor house, one-sixth mill; Oliver McRoberts, a youth put in the "jug" for "lickin' the stuffin" out of his playmate, was released. The Board meets again today.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Democrats in Ohio are expecting to get a large prohibition vote this fall. Some of them put it at 50,000, and they expect to draw about three-fourths of these from the Republican party. The philosophy of the thing is too deep for our comprehension. Why prohibition Republicans should vote for the Democratic party is something that it would be difficult to understand. But the average Democrat will believe anything if it is stated seriously in favor of Democracy.

MURDERED HER MOTHER!

Is the Verdict in the Celebrated Frankie Morris Case.

A New Trial Probable.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Sen. Hackney came in Tuesday morning from Osage Mission, where he had been defending Frankie Morris, whose arrest here two months ago charged with the poisoning of her mother in Reno County for $15,000 insurance is yet fresh in the minds of our people. It was a wonderfully peculiar case, and its trial occupied six days, an account of which can be seen in our telegraphic news, and was attended by thousands of people. The evidence was all circumstantial. She had had trouble with her mother and poison was found in the old lady's stomach. The highest card against Morris was the establishment of her hard character. She was divorced from A. A. Hurd, yet he was one of her attorneys, and the public strong in the belief that he was an accomplice in the poisoning. At the same time she had a lover and constant guardian, H. D. Loveland, who brought her here, where as it was instituted for the insurance, the company refusing its payment. The jury in her trial was out all night. At first it stood only seven for conviction, but finally came in with a verdict of murder in the first degree. Morris exhibited not a tremor through the whole trial, until after the verdict, when she wept for a half day. The verdict, if not reversed, means confinement one year in the State "pen," and then death Sunday night, after the verdict. Loveland and she were married, in the Hotel parlors, with Hurd, her divorced husband, present. Loveland had just got a divorce from a former wife, and claims that they would have married long ago, but for this hindrance. Senator Hackney filed a motion for a new trial, the hearing of which was set for the 31st inst. If not given, he says the verdict will undoubtedly be reversed by the Supreme Court. He thinks a prejudicial jury was the cause, and that a change of venue will give a different decision. It is one of the deepest cases that has struck the State, and the legal counsel, with Hackney at the head of the defense, is making an immense fight.

AN INFATUATED YOUTH.

Joe Mason, the Ring Purloiner, Is Released After a Half Day in Jail

And Given a Good Lecture.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The case of Joe Mason, whose theft of two rings from the Hudson Bros. we chronicled Saturday, is another forcible exhibition of what youthful infatuation will bring. The youth is the son of a respected widow residing near Akron, with whom he came to town. His sweetheart was also in town that day, a young girl several years less aged than Joe, who is nineteen. He had promised the ring as a plight of faith, but he didn't have the wherewith to get it. It could be postponed no longer, and in his desperation the youth conceived his successful plan of purloining one from the jewelry store of Hudson Bros. His first attempt was so successful, that, hunting up his Dulciana and depositing the ring on her dainty finger, stalked off for another conquest, at Bob Hudson's, but landed in the bastille, as badly scared as any youth ever was. This was Joe's first offense. Prominent men from his neighborhood plead his cause before County Attorney Asp, declaring Joe to be industrious and previously honest. The news fell like a pall over the mother, who lay in a fainting stupor in Pixley's store all afternoon. Joe made a clean breast of the whole affair to the County attorney, who, with the consent of Hudson Bros., released him, after talking to him like a Dutch Uncle. Joe's penitence was very tearful. He accompanied an officer, hunted up his girl, got the ring, and returned it to Hudson Bro's. Those few hours behind the grates, with the lesson in full, will follow him as an ever-present dictator of right. The penalty, of the two cases, would have given Joe a year in jail. His release was the proper thing. The offense, with the heartfelt penitence and his previous good character, will be condoned by his neighbors and friends; and we predict for him a bright and honorable life--one averse to female smiles and ring desires. The love fever is a dangerous malady.

JUDGE GANS' PROBINGS.

A Druggist at Arkansas City Struck by Lightning.--Other Pointers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Thomas Walker and May Hanchett were granted a certificate of unalloyed bliss Tuesday morning.

John D. Maurer has made final settlement as administrator of the estate of Jonas Maurer, deceased.

Some other "medicine" venders at A. C. are looking for lightning bolts. Judge Gans means to choke off every "medicine" man who gives convicting evidence of irregularity.

Chas. Holloway, who succeeded Butterfield in the drug "biz" at Arkansas City, was refused a permit and has determined to "git up and git" for a western county, where he thinks permits are easier to get.

Lightning has struck one of the druggist's of the "Medicine" City--Grimes & Son. They were burned out some time ago, but had bought a stock to again enter business at Arkansas City, expecting to go it on their old Probate Court permit to sell liquors. The investigation by County Attorney Asp and Judge Gans, the other day, revealed violations by Grimes, and Tuesday their "medicine"head was chopped off--their permit revoked.

Bob Phelps, of Burden, has been granted a druggist's permit. He was several months in obtaining it. The objections by people of Burden were many, but when ferreted out, proved to be mostly through personal spite. The objectors, when placed on the stand before the County Attorney's Court, knew nothing in fact. Every charge was thoroughly investigated by Asp and Gans, in a Court at Burden, and nothing sufficient to warrant a refusal could be gleaned.

A WOMANLY VISIT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Arkansas City's feminine population was well represented in Winfield today. Eighteen of her Woman's Relief Corps were up for a picnic with the Corps of this city. The trains were inconvenient, and they drove up. Arkansas City has had no rain, and they started with big picnic expectations. The rain here made our beautiful Riverside Park too damp to receive the party. The visitors were taken to the Brettun, and dined, as the guests of our Corps. Capt. Nipp, always perfectly at home as a "ladies' man," decoyed our modest reporter into the Brettun parlors, before this array of ladies. The Captain's encouraging whispers and the pleasant reception given, were big cards in our composure. We noted the following visitors: Mrs. J. Q. Ashton, president of Arkansas City's Corps; Mrs. S. Mansfield, senior vice-president; Mrs. E. Taylor, junior vice; Mrs. J. Cooper, secretary; Mrs. R. J. Hubbard, treasurer; Mrs. May Daniels, conductor; Mesdames S. A. Smith, H. Bluebaugh, S. H. Davis, H. M. Guthrie, A. R. Randall, E. H. Bishop, L. H. Rarick, M. S. Jones, H. R. Hopps, A. E. Maidt, and Miss Sadie Pickering. They are all ladies of good appearance, intelligence, and zeal "just such as enter into every good cause. Our corps, led by its officers, Mrs. E. P. Hickok, president; Mrs. Samuel Dalton, secretary, Mrs. W. B. Caton, and others, were busy entertaining. A meeting at the G. A. R. Hall, this afternoon, was addressed by Judge Soward, and a source of much profit and pleasure. Such visits are most acceptable. The visitors returned this evening.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

OTTER TOWNSHIP. "OTTERITE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Oats crop excellent.

Wheat crop very small on the average. Yield poor, quality good.

Haying has begun in earnest and the splendid grass will yield a heavy hay harvest.

Our Cedar Creek boys having formed a base ball nine some time ago, have, in the usual course of nature, challenged the Cedar Vale club. A game was played on July 4th and again last Saturday, in which we are sorry to chronicle Cowley's boys were, to use a westernism, "left."

Mrs. Rob. Nelson has made a trip to Illinois, accompanied by Emanuel Zimmerman. We understand Mr. Zimmerman has written back from the "old camp ground" that he has not seen as good a field of corn in Illinois as Rob. Nelson has growing on his Otter township farm; and of course, it is a very ordinary field in Cowley.

Where is the D., M. & A.? THE COURIER is anxiously scanned each issue for information on this head. To know it is not coming at all is preferable to present uncertainty. Ground was to be broken at Belle Plaine July 4th. Again, we were told July 24th was the day fixed for beginning work. Our people are much discouraged and this dissatisfaction will have great effect on the Chautauqua County bond election August 24th. Give us news 'ere we perish. We know THE COURIER can relieve us if it can be done.

HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. "MARK."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Our blacksmith shop needs a striker on the anvil now. A good smith could do a profitable business here.

Lewis Brown yesterday purchased a new Deering mower and sulky-rake. They are a superior kind of mower.

Our Scrubs are arraying themselves in nobby uniforms preparatory to giving the Cyclones a few pointers in base ball.

The oat crop on the Holtby farm, of seventeen acres, averaged sixty bushels per acre. A few acres of Texas red variety yielded eighty bushels per acre.

Mr. L. D. Hon purchased a challenge windmill of the agent, Zack Whitson, a couple of days ago. These mills are rapidly becoming popular with our farmers.

The Grange Company have removed their stock of goods into their cosy and capacious new store building. If their goods do not appear to advantage now, and sell readily, it will be no fault of their new quarters.

Mr. Lindsey Williams disposed of his farm a few days ago to his neighbor, Zack Whitson, for three thousand dollars. L. Williams has purchased another farm north of Winfield and will still remain a citizen of the county.

The festival given at the Victor schoolhouse last Friday evening was largely attended. A hundred gallons of ice cream and as much lemonade failed to quench the thirst and lower the temperature of the perspiring crowd. The proceeds were for the benefit of the Sabbath school.

Two of our farmers are now hauling their surplus of old corn to town and selling it for thirty-five or forty cents. A short time ago they refused forty-five cents at the crib. There is nothing like being independent, you know, and practice "saving at the spigot and losing at the bung hole" policy.

It is to be hoped that "Neppie," of the Telegram, will remove that stigma on his ancestral record so vehemently vociferated by W. P. Hackney. Come, Nep, don't quail before the irate and "notorious Bill," and hide behind "Rural," but stand up and explain to a sympathizing public the "true inwardness" of the matter. "Strike until the last armed foe expires."

The early corn is firing and past redemption by rain. It will scarcely make a half crop. Late corn would be much benefitted by a good rain falling "quick-soon." Query! What have we mortals in this locality done that the rain clouds should spill their liquid contents all around us and leave our section in a parching condition? Is it because of our unbelief in the Senior's chess theories?

G. E. Heffron finished threshing last Tuesday, the wheat crop on the Holtby estate. It made an average of twelve bushels per acre--a total of fifteen hundred bushels. This average is about half a crop for an ordinary season. Mr. Heffron operates a good machine, runs a full force of hands for the accommodation of the farmers, and does excellent work for six cents per bushel. His patent stacker is far superior to the old method of stacking straw. With the introduction of patent stackers to threshing machines, farmers will preserve their straw for more profitable use than burning it in the field.

TISDALE. "GROWLER."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A. T. Gay's new barn is a daisy.

Late peaches will be plenty and of a good quality.

Henry Huff swings the stone-hammer on A. T. Gay's new house.

The little rain Sunday morning was refreshing to church goers.

A. B. Tanner and West & Co. are piling up hay at a wonderful rate.

There is no longer any question about the corn crop. With a few exceptions it is extra good.

We are all ready for the D., M. & A. and are glad to know that dirt has commenced to fly.

Too much cannot be said in praise of our road boss, W. M. Conrad. He's good enough to keep.

What a bonanza farmers will have in the hay crop this year if prices should be as high as last year.

Our people should not forget the school meeting on the 13th. Matters of importance will be considered.

McGuire don't understand how he can be classed with offensive partisans. Got to git just the same, John.

Hugh Chance made a big sale of stock hogs to Mr. Moore last week. Uncle Hugh knows how to turn an honest penny.

E. P. Young and B. E. Bacon have made a temporary exchange of houses. E. P. will try city life for a while and get the advantage of the schools for his family.

Our new P. M., Mr. Bliss, is all O. K. and sound on the goose. His appointment meets with the approbation of all. Jim used to play knucks with Sen. Garland, you know.

A BABY COMPROMISE.

Trower Jacobs, Laura Alexander, and George Dolby

Settle a Bastardy Case for $316.

Costs Divided.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Judge Snow's court was entertained Monday and Tuesday by an interesting case from Cedar township, wherein Laura Alexander charged Trower Jacobs, a young man of twenty-five, with being the unlawful father of her month old babe. George Dolby also came in for a share, being charged with assault on Jacobs with intent to kill, and Dolby had a case against Jacobs for disturbing his peace--three cases all in one, a spicy mixture. Dolby is a widower of forty and Laura, a girl of twenty-two, is his sister-in-law and keeps house for him. Jacobs was her "feller," without ever popping the question. After his arrest for bastardy, he gave bond and returned to his farm, where Laura sent for him. Dolby had told him to keep off the place, and when he went over, let him have it with an ax, cutting Jacobs up considerably. The cases were all thin--seemingly a kind of a normal mix up that meant money, and this morning Laura compromised the matter for $316, and all the cases were withdrawn, each litigant paying their share of the costs. A good share of Cedar township were on hand as witnesses. Senator Jennings was counsel for the defense.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

[Skipped Winfield City Markets.]

OUR NEW FEATURE--THE LATEST MARKETS.

Today's Markets in Chicago and Kansas City

By Special Telegraph To The Daily Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

CHICAGO, August 12, 2 p.m.

Wheat, cash: 87. Wheat, September: 88. Wheat, October: 90-7/8.

Corn, cash: 46-5/8. Corn, September: 46-5/8.

KANSAS CITY, August 12, 2 p.m.

Wheat, No. 2 red, cash: 79. Wheat, No. 2 red, September: 81-1/4.

Corn, cash: 35. Corn, September: 35.

Hogs: $4.15.

NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Kansas City and South-Western Railroad Company will, until further notice, run a regular mixed train from Atlanta to Beaumont, leaving Atlanta at 8 o'clock a.m., making close connection with the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway train going East; also connecting with the 'Frisco train going West, will leave Beaumont at 4:30 p.m., arriving at Atlanta at 6:30 p.m.

S. C. GIBBS, Gen. Freight & Pass. Agent.

Winfield, August 10, 1885.

THE WAGES OF SIN.

George Bethel and Lotta Bennett Are Given Terms In the Bastille for Adultery, etc.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

George Bethel and Lotta Bennett were before Judge Snow Monday, charged with unlicensed co-habitation. George left his wife and five children, most of whom are grown, a year ago, and went to New Mexico. The wife got letters right along until a few months ago, and was oblivious to the fact that George had picked up a professional "soiled dove" and taken up his abode in Winfield. George is fifty-two years old and his wife forty-five. His assumed mistress is an Englishwoman of thirty-five. George ran against the thorns when he brought Lotta here and introduced her into his brother Jim's family as his wife, claiming to have been divorced from his former better half. Jim knew that George and Polly had lived twenty-six years in Kansas without any serious trouble, and he couldn't see why a row should separate them on the steep incline of the down grade. So he investigated: wrote Polly and found she was daily expecting her husband home, from his long silence. At Jim's request she boarded the train and bearded her unfaithful husband in his den here--a house near the Santa Fe elevator where he had gone to housekeeping with his paramour. Arrests. Jugged, Extreme chilliness by both Polly and George. Frank W. Finch as receiver takes charge of all George's property. A few hours in Judge Snow's court. He fifty dollars and six months in the bastille; Lotta twenty-five dollars and sixty days under county hospitality. Remorse, disgrace, and bankruptcy. Polly treed her game with grit. She has entered suit for alimony and swears quits for life.

A DAUGHTER CLINGS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The youngest child of George Bethel, the adulterer, a nice looking girl of thirteen who accompanied her mother here from near Cherryvale, to cage the father and his paramour, was given a conversation with her father at the jail on Tuesday. Bethel's stolidity, stoutly maintained all through the arrest and trial, was broken and he cried like a child. The daughter was also grief stricken and the scene very affecting. Bethel's hair is considerably tinged with gray. Lotta Bennett seems to have peculiarly infatuated him, though she is far from winsome. Polly Bethel, the lawful wife, caves not an inch. When the old gentleman was first put in jail, the girl said, "Oh, pa! I hate to see you go in there." Polly said, "I don't; I could see his legs sawed off." She resents her outrage with becoming grit.

K. C. & S. W.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Railway Age, the official railway publication of the United States, is giving our Kansas City and Southwestern railroad considerable attention. It has the following to say of the progress of the road in its last issue.

"Track is now laid from Beaumont, Kansas, on to the St. Louis & San Francisco, southwest 27 miles, and will reach Floral, 33 miles from Beaumont, by August 8, and Winfield, 9 miles farther on, about September 1. Grading and bridging are nearly finished to the latter point, and the rails are on hand. This line is intended to run from Kansas City by way of Paola, Burlington, and Eureka to Winfield and The Territorial line beyond Arkansas City, with a branch southwest to Wellington and Caldwell. The line is being built by Chicago capital, with local aid, and is intended to be operated independently."

DR. KIRKWOOD RETIRES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

After a very eloquent and convincing sermon Sunday morning, Rev. Dr. Kirkwood made some beautiful and touching remarks and declared the Presbyterian pulpit vacant, as per order of the Presbytery. The expressions of regret at his determination to leave Winfield for another field and work, that of Professor of Mental Philosophy in McAlister College, Minnesota, are many and heart-felt. To fill his place will be a very difficult task. His profound knowledge and zealous work have engrafted him in the hearts of our people. His last address in Winfield was a temperance lecture at the Presbyterian church Sunday evening. It was a complete summing of the prohibitory question, showing its grand results in Kansas and its prospects for widening. The Doctor and family take their departure tomorrow.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Col. Sam Crocker has been released from the bastille, on his own recognizance, and returned to Caldwell to do the giant act on his War Chief. His first determination to suffer martyrdom in incarceration wasn't the romantic reality he had dreamed. It didn't bring him the notoriety for which he thirsted--people didn't pay any attention to him. His pall, Odell, went with him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

And now the peaceful slumbers of the slothful Sunday morning delinquent have another distress: the new Methodist bell, a twelve hundred pounder, of clear and mellow tone. It will be placed in the new belfry at once. The M. E. folks now have a complete church building, inside and out--one to be proud of, a big credit to our city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

THE COURIER is in possession of about two hundred copies of public documents and reports of various kinds, which will be distributed to any citizen of Cowley who desires such reading and will call and get a copy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Dr. Turner, the renowned physician and optician, and founder of the American Surgical Institute of Indianapolis, is coming to the city and has engaged rooms at the Central. He will be there on the 19th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

W. O. Johnson, of the G. B. Shaw lumber yard, informs us that the building boom is commencing. He has been very busy for the last few days figuring on bills of lumber. Let it come.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Borders and Ashlands had a little practice game at the Fair Grounds. Walk-a-way for the Ashlands. Score twenty-three to four. A hundred spectators, with gate money.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Santa Fe has made slight changes in its time card, which will be noted by a glance at our official time table.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

John Goodrich was up from Cedarvale Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mullin & Fuller have made the largest sale of the season--the Burden Mill to Eli Reed. Price: $14,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Otis Robertson, one of Udall's flourishing druggists, made the city a flying visit Monday, on business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

James Ostrander, of Ostrander & Stayman, machinists, went to Burden Saturday to finish up a boiler job he has had on hand there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

W. R. Benson, W. E. Burhage, John C. Hanes, Bill Cutnam, C. P. Clark, W. E. Ballenger, and C. A. Friedley were down from Udall Tuesday, to see the ball game.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Geo. Osterhout brings us a stalk of upland corn twelve feet high and eight feet from the ground to an ear that will weigh four pounds. This is a very productive corn year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

G. C. Wallace now occupies the new extension to the Morehouse building, as a ware room, giving one hundred and forty feet and a very commodious and convenient grocery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Mrs. Carrie Legg has received a letter from B. M. Legg, after nearly two years silence, and he is very homesick. The roses he expected to find have turned to thorns. Married men take warning. B.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

James Jordan was seen hooked on to a fair damsel, making for the Probate Court, Monday, looking neither to the right or left. The movement has caused much anxiety on the part of Jim's many friends.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Capt. Steuven has been offered a field office in the State Militia of Colonel or Major, but has declined it, preferring to remain as captain of our Militia. There are not many that would refuse a chance of this kind.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

It is now George C. Rembaugh, P. M. George and Mr. Millington squared accounts Monday, and the Winfield postoffice is now a Democratic institution. The old force, Roy Millington, Will McClellan, and Eva Berkey, will likely be retained.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

J. A. Cooper left Monday afternoon to put the new town of Veteran on its legs. This town is only twenty-two miles from the Santa Fe railroad, on the Colorado line, in old Stanton County, and promises much. W. R. McDonald and others go out Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

DIED. G. E. Constant, formerly of this city, who went to Manitou, Colorado, some few weeks ago, and then to Colorado Springs, where he has been for the past two weeks, died there last Saturday night at midnight. Mr. Constant had been in delicate health for years, and he and his family thought the bracing air of the mountain would build him up. His many friends will regret to hear of his death. THE COURIER extends sympathy to the bereaved family. He was buried today by the G. A. R., at Colorado Springs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The J. P. Short landmarks were all sold Monday and will be moved off to make room for an imposing block, an honor to the city. A. P. Johnson bought the Headrick building, $87; the Harris & Clark office, $100; and the Bliss & Wood grain office, $51. A. H. Doane got the harness shop, $101; and H. G. Fuller got the little tin shed, $5. The buildings will likely be moved onto residence lots. Work on the bank and Short lots will commence at once. The Harter building will be moved over in Ninth avenue.

RETURNING FIRE.

E. W. Woolsey, of Burden, Rises to Explain His July Drugstore Record.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Permit me to say through the columns of your nest issue, that in commenting on what the COURIER is pleased to call "Cowley's Medicine Record," on the 6th inst., you not only do me great injustice by evident, though I trust not intentional, misrepresentation, but any patrons also, by scornful insinuations. I have been accustomed to look for fairness and impartiality from the COURIER, but the article in question is scarcely more than flavored with these ingredients. I am quite sure that at least a very large proportion of my patrons do not "gulp" the liquor they buy, but use it as they would use any other medicine. Some are on beds of sickness, whose lives depend from day to day upon the whiskey and brandy they use. And yet the COURIER can find no other word in its vocabulary to make use of in describing the manner in which liquors are used than "gulped."

But further: "388 bottles of bear in a month in a town of 1k,000 inhabitants is not so bad; $78.00 profit for a month from beer alone is a fair showing--one that should be looked into by our officials," says THE COURIER. But a more critical examination of the matter will prove that the novelistic style of the editor makes a more novel than truthful showing; even to continue the investigation by similar comparison, would be suicidal, for the Dexter druggist reports sales in July of 102 pints of whiskey in a town of about 200 inhabitants, while "Woolsey" sells but 96 pints in a town numbering 1,000, and yet THE COURIER hasn't advised his decapitation. The druggist's register shows that less than one-fourth of my sales were made to the people of Burden; that Dexter reports no sales of beer, but buys it of "Woolsey," one of her physicians ordering 24 bottles last month, and other customers smaller quantities. And that instead of selling the quantity reported to the 1,000 people of Burden, more than three-fourths of all was sold to druggists, physicians, and people of Dexter, Torrance, Box City, Glen Grouse, Baltimore, Floral, Polo, and the wide expanse of country adjacent.

But this is not all, for the "$78 profit" spoken of is a conundrum that only the astute financier of THE COURIER can explain. At least according to the best financiering that I am capable of, I have been unable to make even $30, which is not enough to pay for the trouble of handling, and for this reason I discontinued the sale of beer the 1st of August and shall not resume until THE COURIER can show me how to realize the per cent it has credited me with. The druggists of Winfield discontinued the sale of beer for the same reason. The editor sums up in the conclusion that "two or three need their heads smacked off" and places my name on the death role, for which accept my thanks, and permit the public to decide whether the facts warrant the view taken. That prohibition has lessened the sale of intoxicating liquor in Kansas I am quite willing to agree. The recent investigation of Judge Gans and the County Attorney at this place showed, if it showed anything, that I am not a favorite of intemperate vice, but that in consequence of their inability to buy of me, they had resorted to other means and ways of obtaining it. I invite the investigation that T HE COURIER solicits, and would especially request that the editors and employees of THE COURIER be employed as a board of special detectives to aid in unearthing the damnable volcano of alcoholic fire that it has lead the public to believe is consuming the vitals of Burden society. I am conscious of having obeyed the law both in letter and in spirit, as strictly as it was in the power of man to do and sell the article at all. Not a drop has gone from my store that has not been recorded, and not a drop has gone from there in violation of law, to my knowledge, and the fact that spirituous liquors may and must be sold under the law shall be recognized, and when vendor and vendee act in good faith, strictly in obedience to it, they should have due credit, without having to feel that the finger of scorn is upon them.

E. W. WOOLSEY.

A BAD ACCIDENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Walter Lewis, formerly of this city, having been employed by A. Herpich for some time, met with perhaps a fatal accident Wednesday. Mr. Lewis has been in the tailoring business at Oxford for some time. He came over on the 7 a.m. freight train this morning. In switching near the tank, the caboose was uncoupled from the rest of the train. The engineer thought it was still attached, and on backing up to it with great force, knocked everything endways in the car. Mr. Lewis, not expecting anything of the kind, was thrown violently down and injured internally. He was brought to Brown & Son's drug store at once and Dr. Park sent for. The doctor thinks he is very dangerously hurt, though at this writing anything definite as to the extent of the internal injury is not sure. Mr. Lewis is a man of past middle age. Word was sent at once for his wife.

A CHANGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Walter G. Seaver, the optician of the Dexter Eye, will take business and editorial charge of the Telegram next Monday, in place of George C. Rembaugh, whose attention will now be devoted to the postoffice. Walter is a thorough businessman, having worked on some of the metropolitan papers, a genial fellow, and will keep the Telegram up to its past standard of merit. He is a Democrat of long standing. We are glad to welcome Walter as a neighborly cotemporary, though sorry to see George retire from active newspaperdom, for which he was to the manner born. He rejoices in a fatter take.

GREAT MEMORIAL!

Our Citizens, With the G. A. R., W. R. C., and K. N. G.,

Give Honor to the Nation's Greatest Character.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Grant Memorial Services Saturday were grand. The G. A. R. and the militia were out in full force. The Courier, the Juvenile, and the Union Cornet Bands discoursed sweet music; the city was draped in mourning and business suspended from 2 to 4 o'clock in honor of the dead hero. The south and the north joined hands and hearts in mourning for the silent man of Vicksburg. The procession started from the G. A. R. hall at 2 p.m., followed by the Militia, marching to the Baptist church where the services were held. The church was beautifully draped. Over the pulpit was a banner with the inscription, "Our Old Commander," over a picture of Gen. Grant. The pulpit was draped in black, decorated with beautiful flowers arranged in crosses. The outside of the church was also appropriately in mourning. The G. A. R. occupied the front seats, with the militia and Woman's Relief Corps. We cannot speak too highly of the music. The Courier Band rendered sweet music at the church. Also the choir of the church, composed of Miss Lola Silliman, organist; H. E. Silliman, Miss Walrath, Mrs. C. A. Bliss, and Prof. Merriman. As the Corps marched in, Crippen's instrumental Quintette played Lincoln's Funeral March--as charming as ever greeted the ear. Captain Siverd and Sam Gilbert showed their usual gallantry in conducting all to seats. After music and prayer by Rev. Myers, the Committee on resolutions, D. A. Millington, Geo. Rembaugh, and Buel Davis, read fitting resolutions lamenting the death of the old hero and eulogizing the acts of his life. After this Rev. J. H. Snyder, of the United Brethren church, and Dr. W. R. Kirkwood, of the Presbyterian church, delivered very fine discourses. Rev. B. Kelly, who conducted the services, made a few remarks about the General's religious character. Mrs. Grant is a Methodist and the General always leaned that way. A few months before Grant's death, the old friendly pastor called and the General made a confession of faith. Following are the addresses.

REV. SNYDER'S ADDRESS.

MY FELLOW CITIZENS: When, on the morning of the 23rd of July, the telegraph wires flashed to all parts of our country and to the nations across the deep waters, the sad intelligence that General Ulysses S. Grant, the distinguished soldier and statesman of the American Republic, was dead, no sadder tidings could have been heralded to a distressed people. At once the nation draped itself in the sombre habiliments of mourning. Public offices, marts of trade, and manufactories closed and curtained their doors. Flags on capitol and fortress were hung at half mast. From lakes to gulf and from ocean to ocean, a thousand bells tolled a nation's requiem. Officers of public trust, from the president of the United States on down to governors of commonwealths and mayors of cities, issued proclamations to the people, reciting the nation's loss and inviting them in some suitable manner, to give expression to their sorrow.

From every direction, at home and abroad, words of condolence were sent to the bereaved widow and stricken family; for in the death of General Grant, not only had a loving family that has tenderly and affectionately hung over his couch of suffering; nor a community whose every impulse had been dictated by generous feelings of sympathy; nor a nation for whose life and peace and prosperity he had unselfishly given all the years of his vigor and manhood and on whose scroll of worthies, side by side with the cherished names of the immortal Washington and Lincoln, had been indelibly inscribed the name of the fallen hero; but a civilized world throughout whose every part the name of Grant had become a household trophy, had come to sit as a common mourner.

For many long and weary months, this greatest of military chieftains had been a sufferer: protracted first by reason of injuries sustained in a fall, and then with a cancerous affection of the throat. Unable at times to eat or sleep, or to communicate with those at his bed side; assured by the persistency of the disease of the certainty of his dissolution; sensitive of the wrong committed in depriving him of the means to provide for his desolate household, yet never in any instance did a murmur or a word of complaint escape from his lips.

No one can adequately describe the deep suspense which filled the hearts of the American people during his prostration. All were anxious as to the probable outcome of his condition. The most eminent physicians were constantly at his side, directing every expedient that medical wisdom and skill were capable of employing. Every day, dispatches conveyed to all the land suitable information relative to his condition. Every wish of the sufferer was anticipated, and every want most faithfully gratified. The movements of his friends and physicians were closely observed by the eager throngs that gathered around the home of the patient. The whole land had its hand upon the throbbing pulse and its mutations of feeling rose or fell according to the symptoms.

When the hot, sultry days of midsummer came, to avoid their enervating influence, General Grant was removed from his own residence in New York to a quiet, cool retreat generously tendered him on Mt. McGregor. It was hoped by all that the refreshing mountain air would give tone to the wasting system. For six weeks longer the vital functions performed their office, but the end came at last, and after a brave, patient, and persistent struggle with the last earthly energy, he who had passed unharmed through the countless dangers of a hundred battle fields, and at whose feet, had been laid, again and again, the arms of a fallen foe, was at last compelled to surrender to the conqueror of all. What the arts of war had failed to accomplish, was effected at last when the tocsin of war had been hushed into silence by the symphonies of peace.

In harmony with that spirit of homage that calls the people of the land together today to offer, with bowed heads and heavy hearts, a memorial tribute to the deceased hero, we have left our homes and occupations to drop with them a tear of sorrow, and to renew with them our devotion to the cause in whose defense he won his renown. This occasion calls for the laying aside of all sectionalism, of all distinctions of color or creed. Party lines should merge into the common sorrow and all classes should view this loss as their common heritage.

It is neither possible nor would it be proper, in the brief time before me, to enter into any minute analysis of the life and public services of General Grant. The journals of the land for these twenty years have so abounded with references to him that every child has grown familiar with his life and deeds. He has been the most striking figure of the nineteenth century. Other men have risen to distinction, but no other man ever obtained a position as world-wide in its prominence. No other person has won a record of such deserving merit in the face of such grave responsibilities. He had his opposition, but in every effort of his life, he acted upon convictions of duty and right, and proved himself true to the trust reposed in him. He came up from the ranks of the lowly. He was without the prestige of birth or wealth to secure to him nobility and influence. Every stage of progress reached bore evidences of the single-handed struggle through which he had come. His was a life of deeds and not of words. Modest to a fault, his reticence won him the title of "the silent man." He was free from the spirit of fault finding. He was no croaker. Gentle as a woman, he was, nevertheless, as solid as the rock. Without ostentation; oblivious to the spirit of flattery; free from pride at his many achievements; firm in his convictions; indomitable in his undertakings, he moved forward in the open path of duty as only a true great man was able to do.

The heroism of his life has become the inspiration of thousands, infusing a profounder love of country, a grander ideal of manhood, a nobler love of duty, and a purer devotion to the right.

Three important epochs belong to the life of General Grant.

1st. It is in the profession and office of a soldier that General Grant appears to the best advantage. From time to time the world has produced many eminent military leaders, but no injustice will be done to the life and eminent services of any of them if it be said that the annals of history has failed to produce his equal.

Rome had its Caesar and Greece its Alexander. England reveres the name of Wellington and France points with pride to the first Napoleon. Victor Immanuel will live in the annals of liberated Italy, and Von Moltke in the sturdy heart of Germany. America does homage to the illustrated name of Washington.

But viewed in the light of the nineteenth century--in the light of every event that clusters around the lives of these heroes of history; in the light of the circumstances and issues involved in the struggles through which they obtained their distinction; in the light of advancement in both military prowess and the appliances of war; in the light of the cumulative experience which has come down through forty centuries to the assistance equally as well of friend and foe--the impartial historian, who shall hereafter write the history of the world's great men, will feel amply justified in pronouncing General U. S. Grant the ablest general the world has ever produced. One already has called him "the first soldier and the first citizen" of the American Republic.

Many, whose names, like Philip of Macedon, and Alexander and Napoleon, have obtained a place in History's Valhalla of heroes, after all, were actuated to the deeds performed by the love of self; by personal ambition; by the love of power. Little cared they for the welfare of others. Little cared they for the true ends of government. The love of glory became their inspiring genius. They fought for self and empire.

In an utterance made in 1877 in London, General Grant said, "Although a soldier by education and profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war, and I have never advocated it, except as a means of peace." He sought the elevation of the public good and the welfare of his race. He was a hero in the typical, the truest, the divine sense.

His advancement in military rank came up by promotion on merit, through every grade of the military service from brevet lieutenant to general of the army. He entered the military academy at West Point at the age of 20. In the war between the United States and Mexico, he bore a valorous part with his regiment at the battles of Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma; Monterey, and the siege of Vera Cruz. He was promoted for gallantry on the field of Molina del Ray, and again at the storming of Chapultepec.

In 1854 he resigned his commission in the army, having risen to the rank of captain, and for a few years he followed farming near St. Louis, afterward entering upon mercantile life with his father and brother in Galena.

On the 13th of April, 1861, Fort Sumpter fell. On the 15h President Lincoln issued his first call for troops, and on the 19th, just six days from the fall of Sumpter, Grant was drilling a company of volunteers in Galena. Four days later he took his company to the city of Springfield. Remaining for a few weeks to assist in organizing the troops of the state, Governor Yates commissioned him colonel and gave him command of the 21st regiment of Illinois infantry. Moving soon after to the seat of war, he reported to Brigadier General Pope and was stationed at Mexico, Missouri. On August 23rd he was commissioned brigadier general of volunteers, his commission taking rank from May 17th. His first military achievement was the seizure of Paducah, Kentucky. After this he fought the battles of Belmont, Ft. Henry, and Ft. Donelson. His reply to General Buckner, in command at Ft. Donelson, who sent to him asking terms of capitulation, revealed a trait that became eminently characteristic in his entire service. "No terms except unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works."

For these services, General Grant was at once promoted to be Major-General, and appointed commander of the District of Tennessee. After this came the memorable battle of Shiloh; Corinth was taken; Vicksburg, that Gibraltar of the west, was besieged and captured. Johnston was driven out of Mississippi, Bragg was defeated at Chattanooga.

General Grant, following these victories, was made a Lieutenant General, and placed over the entire union army. In March, 1864, he began those grand movements, which led to the fall of Richmond; which gave Thomas victory in Tennessee; which gave us the fall of Atlanta and Sherman's march down to the sea; which joined the armies of the east and west in a grand cordon of ruin around the army of Lee, and which culminated at last in the laying down of the arms of the confederacy at Appomattox.

2nd. To those who served in the Union army during these dark and bloody days, the death of General Grant comes with peculiar force. Hundreds of thousands of brave and noble men marched and fought under the very eye of that beloved and trusted leader, while under his supreme command, the mighty columns moved gradually forward to victory. To each one of these veterans of the war, the death of General Grant comes as a personal bereavement. Nor is there lack of the kindest feeling for the memory of the illustrious dead on the part of the defeated army. Those who espoused the cause of the South and followed under the leadership of Johnston and Lee, remember with gratitude the magnanimity of the victor in the hour of their humiliation and defeat.

History teaches us that the embers of civil warfare are slow to die. A contest waged between brother and brother is waged most bitterly of all. And yet, the short space of twenty years finds the whole South pouring forth tears of honest grief upon the bier of him to whom it yielded up the sword upon the field of battle.

One by one the heroes of the blue and of the gray are passing over the silent river. As we who remain unite in performing our last sad duties to the Nation's dead, let us remember that with the same starry flag, floating over us, and with the benign influence of the same institutions yielding to us their protection, we are brothers, and laying aside the bitter memories of the past, let us devote ourselves to building up

A union of hearts, a union of hands,

A union that none may sever.

A union of lakes, and a union of lands,

And the American Union forever.

While he was preeminently a soldier, yet we must not fail to view the life of General Grant as possessing many of the distinguishing traits of statesmanship. We are no little surprised that one whose education and life had been so closely devoted to the duties of a soldier should have attained such eminence in the management of the machinery of government. In 1868, and again in 1872, by the suffrages of the people, he was elected to fill the highest office in the gift of the Nation. In the second election he received a popular majority over Horace Greeley of nearly 800,000 votes. At the Republican National Convention of 1880, his name was prominently urged for a third term, and defeated only on the ground of the precedent.

While no man, however capable and honest, has ever occupied the Presidential chair without carpings and criticism upon his plans and methods, nevertheless General Grant in the eight years of his public service as Chief Executive, gave almost unbounded satisfaction. It must be remembered that he assumed the reins of government at a critical juncture. The Nation was just emerging from the awful crisis of civil war. The machinery of state was not, as yet, properly adjusted. The spirit of bitterness that for so long a time had held sectional sway, was not assuaged. It was a time of peculiar embarrassment, and yet, in his recommendations to Congress, and in the administration of the laws of the land, General Grant exercised such wise discretion, such magnanimity of spirit, such discernment of the true wants of the people, such honesty of purpose in the maintenance of the law, and such loyalty to the welfare of the Federal Union, that he greatly aided in the removal of the dark shadows which had so long enveloped the whole land, and in inaugurating an era of peace and prosperity whose benign influences still continue to minister to and comfort the people.

In the field of statesmanship, those same elements of modesty and firmness attended him. He made no display. In public address his words were few and well chosen. He, unlike many others, magnified the office rather than that the office should magnify him.

At the close of his term of office, accompanied by Mrs. Grant, he made a tour around the world, visiting all the leading Nations, in whose courts he met a royal welcome that did honor to his native land. In the records of time, no other man ever met with such a royal ovation at the hands of the Nations. In honoring the man, they honored the land of his birth, and the principles enunciated and defended by him, and on which his country was founded. He went abroad as an American to study the methods of government in oriental lands, and to build up the spirit of amity that binds us to the Nations.

3rd. Viewing General Grant as a citizen, we observe that he recognized and practiced only those elements which build up and better the condition of a people. All his so-called mistakes and his misfortunes came from the abuse of confidence by others. He chose for companions those whom he believed to be worthy.

In his line of duty as a commander, he appointed only those to position in whose capability and integrity he felt to trust, and none of the many proved the wisdom of his choice as did the great Thomas--"the Rock of Chickamauga"--and Sherman, and Sheridan, "the hero of Winchester."

In domestic life he was a kind husband and an affectionate father. In the closing scenes of his life, his love of home and the dear ones about him revealed itself in all its resplendency. After his death, a letter was found upon his person directed to his wife, in which he said: "Look after our dear children and direct them in the paths of rectitude. It would distress me far more to think that one of them could depart from an honorable, upright, and virtuous life than it would to know that they were prostrated on a bed of sickness from which they were never to arise alive. They have never given us any cause for alarm on their account, and I earnestly pray they never will. With these few injunctions, and the knowledge I have of your love and affection, and of the dutiful affection of our children, I bid you a final farewell until we meet in another, and I trust a better, world. You will find this on my person after my demise."

In matters of religion, like many great men, he said but little. St. Augustine once being asked, "What is the first article in the Christian religion?" replied, "Humility." "And what the second?" "Humility." "And what the third?" "Humility."

When General Grant approached the subject of religion while there was a broad, catholic spirit, yet there was revealed a spirit of reverence and commendable humility.

When he was in Paris on his tour around the world, a great Sunday race was arranged for the entertainment of the distinguished American traveler and his party. The French President was greatly surprised at the answer of General Grant to the invitation to attend the race arranged as a special mark of honor. The General sent a courteous declination with the explanation that as an American citizen he wished to observe the American Sabbath as a day of rest. At different times during his illustrious life, he showed a profound respect for the Lord's day.

When asked by his pastor, Dr. Newman, "what was the supreme thought on his mind when eternity seemed so near?" he replied, "The comfort of the consciousness that I had tried to live a good and honorable life." These words revealed "the hidden life of his soul."

Among his last utterances was this one, given in response to the assurance that "we are praying for you." "Yes, I know, and I feel very grateful to the christian people of the land for their prayers in my behalf: Catholics, Protestants, and Jews, and all the good people of the nation, of all parties as well as religions, and all nationalities, seem to have united in wishing or praying for my improvement. I am a great sufferer all the time, but the facts that I have related are compensation for much of it. All that I can do is to pray that the prayers of all those good people may be answered so far as to have us all meet in another and better world."

So this hero lived, believed, and died. Unpretentious in life, of but few words, actuated by honorable convictions, choosing only such actions as were commendable, recognizing his supreme allegiance to God, loyal to his family and to his country, brave amid the most trying dangers, not unmindful of the esteem of his friends, wisely planning for his loved ones and for his own future, in the days of the greatest capability, he fell asleep.

The Nation mourns today a citizen, a statesman, a soldier fallen. He lived nobly; he did his duty well. He rests from his labors. May God bless the bereaved family, and his sorrowing countrymen who gather this day to do honor to his memory. And may God bless the land of his birth, on whose uplifted banners posterity will find inscribed the names of America's illustrious trio: Washington--"The sage of Mt. Vernon," "Lincoln--"The martyred President," and Grant--"Our great commander."

REV. DR. KIRKWOOD'S ADDRESS.

"They are exalted for a little while, but are gone and brought low; they are taken out of the way as all other, and cut off as the tops of the ears of corn." Job 24:24.

The Bible gives many illustrations of due honor rendered by the people to departed leaders. David's lament over the fall of Saul and Jonathan will stand forever as one of the most touching and noble eulogies pronounced upon the dead.

A man nobler and more happy than Saul, both in his living and in his dying, has gone from the sight of the American people; and today his mortal remains are consigned to the grave. This hour the funeral cortege moves in solemn splendor to the burial place, to lay the dust of the old soldier to sleep with its kindred duet; and we, unable to join the throng around his bier, meet here to pay tribute to his memory.

For twenty-three years Ulysses Simpson Grant has stood in the eyes of the world one of the foremost and grandest figures in American affairs.

Prior to 1862 he was almost unknown. The captain of Fort Donelson, in February of that year, brought him to the notice of the whole people. This was followed by the two days battle at Shiloh, April 6th and 7th, 1862, a tremendous struggle in which the advantage was with the enemy at first, but from whom it was wrested by skill and strength of endurance, and the close of the second day saw the forces of Johnston and Beauregard beaten and broken, in rapid retreat, while their greatest leader was left to fill a soldier's grave.

Next in the great moves was the campaign of Vicksburg--one of the boldest and most difficult, as well as one of the most successful campaigns of the war. On the 4th of July, 1863, the city fell. The total loss of the rebels in this siege was the fortified city with 172 cannons, 15 generals, 42,000 prisoners, 12,000 killed, and 6,000 scattered stragglers, besides all the small armies. Meanwhile, Rosecrans was cooped up at Chattanooga in great peril. Bragg was sure of capturing the whole army. Grant was sent to replace Rosecrans. At once the whole situation was changed. Plans were laid and put in operation; and on the 25th of November, 1863, Bragg was beaten on Lookout Mountain and Missionary ridge, and driven away in utter panic.

In March, 1864, Grant was promoted. The grade of Lieutenant General, originally created for Washington in 1798, had been conferred on the veteran General Scott, by request. This grade was revived, and the full honor conferred on Gen. Grant: the second American to whom it was given. He was made commander-in-chief of all the armies of the United States. Going east he made his headquarters with the Army of the Potomac. Halleck was made chief of staff, with headquarters at Washington. Sherman was put in command of the military division of the Mississippi. McPherson succeeded to the command of the army and department of the Tennessee, and being, soon after, killed, Thomas succeeded to that command. Banks remained in command in the Southwest beyond the Mississippi. Butler held command of the Army of the James; and to Sheridan was given the Army of the Shenandoah.

The campaign opened in 1864, all along the line. The first heavy battle was that of the Wilderness in May, followed by the Spotsylvania and Coal Harbor; and thence to Petersburg.

Starting at the same time with Grant, Sherman fought his way to Atlanta, and on the 1st of September captured that city--next to Richmond, then the most important city of the South. On the 19th of September Sheridan fought and won the battle of Winchester. Again Early, reinforced, gave battle to Sherman's forces at Cedar Creek; and, on the 19th of October, was scattered and broken up forever, the last rebel Army of the Shenandoah, and its camps, caissons, artillery, small arms, ambulances, and thousands of prisoners fell into Sheridan's hands.

Meanwhile Sheridan had started out his grand march through the heart of the confederacy to the sea, leaving to Thomas the care of the rebel army under Hood. Sherman made one long triumphal march to the end. Thomas, at Nashville, met Hood and practically annihilated his splendid army of 50,000 men, capturing 13,000 prisoners, 72 cannons, and scattering the broken remnant of the rebel army. By March 1st Sherman had reached the heart of North Carolina, and was coming up in the rear of Richmond, Gen. Joseph Johnston being utterly unable to check his march.

While his lieutenants were thus crowding and crushing the life out of the Confederacy, in their respective places, Grant was holding Lee in a vice at Petersburg and Richmond. Both were strongly fortified and the fighting was tremendous. Grant was crowding closer and closer. On April 2nd, 1865, Lee's lines were broken in three places, and he telegraphed Davis, "Richmond must be evacuated tonight." On Monday, April 3rd, the Union General Weitzel took possession of the city while Grant hurried his army in pursuit of Lee. And then, on the 9th of April, at Appomattox, he captured Lee and his entire army, and the war was closed. He who, at the beginning of the war, was an unknown captain, had risen step by step to the highest possible rank. He had been pitted in the wager of battle against all the ablest generals of the Confederacy: A. S. Johnston, Beauregard, Joseph Johnston, Bragg, and Lee, and he had beaten each in turn, and left them helpless.

Many have attempted to depreciate his military genius; but this is manifestly unjust. His own unassuming modesty gave them something of an opportunity. There was nothing of parade about him, and he never seemed to think of himself as great. Yet he was great as a general beyond any man America has produced. In comparison with Lee, he cannot suffer, for he beat Lee on the very ground where so often Lee had conquered others. If it be said that Lee had not as many men, yet he was on his own ground, and had the inside lines. And what that means may be read in the light of Antietam, and still better, at Gettysburg, where Lee was beaten at his best and strongest, by confessedly inferior men--men who could not beat him on his own ground. But Grant, going on that ground, with the same army that had hitherto been beaten, overmatched, and beat, and broke him down, and ground his army to powder.

Compared with Wellington, Grant exhibited the same cool, clear insight into the situation; the same power over his men; the same inflexible tenacity of purpose; the same unflinching courage; the same patient fortitude under temporary disaster; the same energy and skill in redeeming disaster and winning victory; and he did this with larger armies and on a more extended field of action than the Iron Duke was ever called to try.

Compared with Moltke, he does not suffer in the least. The German Field-marshal had studied the ground which was finally the seat of war for years. He knew every road and water course--had a complete topographical map of the whole territory. Grant had no such maps of the seat of war in America.

The German leader had absolute control of his armies and was sure of his place, having the autocratic power of the Emperor for his support. Grant was in control of the armies, but he could not rely implicitly on the backing of the government. Stanton was autocratic and hard to please. The Congress was factious and was a difficult body to manage, its counsels often divided. The governors of the states were able men, as politicians, statesmen, but critical and ever ready to find fault. The press was free to criticize, and used its freedom to the extent of license. The peace democracy, in session at Chicago, proclaimed the war a failure, and the stump speakers and the press of that party never spared Grant. All these elements had to be controlled in the rear, while the enemy had to be conquered in the front; and it was only Grant who did it. I do not derogate from the honor of the President; but if Grant had been less than he was, the power of the President would have been exercised in vain. Again: The German Field-marshal had leaders, and subordinates of every rank, who knew how to obey. They had been taught that from boyhood. Many of the American leaders did not appreciate the one-man power. They had ideas of their own, and were not slow to utter them in captious, critical, jealous terms; and often they were half-hearted in rendering obedience where they did not fully approve the plans of their commander. Yet again: The total area of France was but about 260,000 square miles--about the size of one single state in the Confederacy--while the seat of the Franco-Prussian war embraced only about 85,000 square miles, or ten times the extent of the seat of war in France. Once more: The entire strength of the German army was 1,300,000 men, of which over 600,000 were in the field, if memory is not at fault. The force at Grant's command, in the field, was about 1,000,000 of men, according to the best estimates I can find.

Now, on a territory of 85,000 square miles with over half a million men, Moltke played his game of chess: played it as a master, and won. On an area ten times as great, with only twice the number of men, when, to make the candidates equal in this respect, he should have had ten times as many men as the German over an unknown country full of mountains, rivers, swamps, natural obstructions innumerable, Grant played his game in an equally masterly way, and won. On the 3rd of March, 1863, he was made Lieutenant General and Commander in Chief. On the 24th he began the work of reorganizing his armies for the summer campaign. About the 3rd of May, the work began. From the Atlantic to the Rio Grande, 1,200 miles, was the extent of his front. The armies of the James, the Potomac, West Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, and Southwest were all put in motion, and the fleets as well; and they were kept in motion, not blindly, but wisely and harmoniously, guided by the one-controlling mind.

Check after check was given to the foe; army after army was destroyed; point after point was gained and held, until on April 9th, 1865, less than a year from the beginning of his play, Grant delivered check-mate at Appomattox, and the game was done.

By forcing the play, he made Lee and Johnston and Hood and the rest obey his will; as formerly Lee had held McClelland, Pope, Burnside, and Hooker obedient. Lee was a master; but when Grant took command, the mastery of Lee was done. Thenceforth Grant was the master. And when the conflict was done, the stake for which Davis and Lee had played was lost. Secession was killed. The doctrine of state rights was sunken in a sea of blood. The supremacy of the general government was established. The degree of emancipation was established and slavery was no more.

No greater game, for greater stake, was ever played; no game was ever better played, or more triumphantly won; and the winning stamped the winner as one of the greatest soldiers, if not the greatest, of his age--great enough to rank with the greatest of any age. And this was completed with the completion of the General's forty-third year. He was yet a young man. In 1866, July 25, a bill passed both houses of Congress creating the office of "General of the Army of the United States," and limiting it to Grant alone. On the same day he received his commission in accordance therewith.

Further honor was in store for him. On the 19th of May, 1868, the National Republican Convention in Chicago, on the first ballot, nominated him as its candidate for the Presidency of the United States. In November of the same year he was elected by an overwhelming majority. In November, 1872, he was again elected to that high office. When his second term expired, he went abroad, and made a journey round the world. This journey was one long ovation, in which, crowned heads, soldiers, statesmen, and private citizens in Europe and Asia alike did him honor. On his return home, he was persuaded to let his name be used again as a candidate for the presidency. He failed. It has been said he was ambitious. Perhaps he was. Who of his detractors would not have been? But perhaps it was not a vain, unworthy ambition. He may have felt that he had made mistakes in his former presidency, and had been betrayed, and trusted that he should be able to give a better administration. Be that as it may, he was not nominated. And there is no ground for charging him with base motives, any more than any other man who has aspired to the office.

Such were the honors heaped upon him. Measured by the standard of men, he fairly won them: colonel, brigadier general, major general, lieutenant general, and general, in military life. In civil life, twice President of the United States, and then, honors extraordinary, abroad. And all this fell to his lot within the brief space of fifteen years. Exalted indeed, but exalted for a little while!

And now comes a sad chapter in his life. Going into business, he doubtless thought to pass the remainder of his days in honorable employment. But he did not understand the ways of sharks, and he was made the prey of one. He was robbed of his earnings, robbed of the treasures that to him were above price--the gifts of appreciation--from friends, government at home and authorities abroad--robbed for a time of his good name, until the facts were brought out.

It is a sad, a painful chapter in his life, but one from which we must not turn away. And it is gratifying to know that the unblemished integrity of the man shines out even in the midst of this ruin--that he kept back nothing that could help to meet his pecuniary obligations.

But this was near the end. He did not long survive. How much, or how little, the shock of this transaction had to do with the development of the disease which ended his life, we shall never know; and it is of no importance. The little time of exaltation came to him. It passed by, and he is "taken out of the way as all others" have been. He has been cut off as the ripened grain. What boots it to speak of his illness and his death? You all know the story. Let me indicate some of the points of his character for the benefit of the young men here today.

1. He was diligent in business. "Whatever his hand found to do," he did with his might. He was not always successful in business. Indeed in the common occupation of that term, he was never successful. As a farmer he constantly grew poorer. As loan agent and collector, he lost still more. As a member of the leather firm at Galena, he was barely able to maintain his family. As President, he was only partially successful. The only place where the man appeared with the strength that was really his, was at the head of the army. There he was easily chief among American soldiers, and equal to the ablest European. But let none say, therefore, that as a man he was not great. To be a great soldier in a time like that of Grant, is to be greater than any money king, or any combination of them. Under the Providence of God, General Grant was the man who saved the money kings and their value, as well as the poor. His were the shoulders that bore up the temple of American liberty and prosperity. He put his whole soul into the business of studying the art of war in his youth; and when called on to act the part of a man, he was ready for the part. He did not need to fall back and study anew the first principles of his art. And in the application of these principles, he was thorough. An enemy was to be beaten. It was not enough to drive him off of the field. He must be crushed--his power to do evil destroyed. Did you ever think how completely Grant destroyed the forces opposed to him before he let go? Look at Donelson. A whole army was destroyed. At Shiloh the army of Johnston and Beauregard was so badly broken that it was long unable to make any strong resistance. At Vicksburg an army of 60,000 men was literally wiped out of existence. And he finished his work by wiping out that of Lee, with all his fortifications at Petersburg and Richmond. Diligent work, with all the force a man has, is the way to success.

2. Patience and fortitude under adversity, is another lesson of Grant's life. No man ever heard a wail or a whine from him during all the years of adversity and toil prior to war.

Then after he won Donelson, the jealousy of superiors was awakened; and again after Shiloh. "He was incompetent." "He owed success to anybody or thing but his own hard work." "He was a besotted drunkard." "He was unfit for command." But to all the storm of vituperation, to all the injustice of superiors, he was silent. No more pathetic picture is presented than that of the man whose promptitude saved Kentucky to the Union, kept open the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, the way into the heart of the South, took Donelson with a whole army and all its stores, beat two of the ablest Generals of the South, and drove their army more than decimated, a scattered and broken mass, southward--such a man retired from his command, practically under arrest in the very midst of the army he had led to victory, coming daily to his superior's tent for orders, and daily sent away by an aide, with the brief answer, "No orders for you today, sir." But no man heard a single wail or moan from him. And so it was in the financial crash in which he was involved by another's crime. And so it was through all the weary months while his life was ebbing away. Calm, self-controlled, patient, brave, he suffered, waited for the storm to pass, the pain to end, the day to dawn, the triumph to come.

3. His generosity to his foes.

He could crush them on the battlefield, but he could admire their constancy to their cause, their knowing and skill. And when they were crushed, he could be generous beyond most; as witnesses his treatment of Lee and his army at Appomattox--treatment which wrung tears from Lee himself. And, again, when his business partner had financially ruined him, left him without a home or the means of subsistence, yet was caught in the toils and sent to prison; no man heard a word of abuse fall from his lips. Where other men would have uttered curses loud and deep, Grant was silent. If he cherished enmity and hate to the man who brought ruin to his home, and the last storm-cloud over his life, no man heard the expression of such hate. In his generosity he left his destroyer alone.

4. His correctness as a family man is worthy of note, and imitation.

The wife he loved and wedded in his early, obscure days was beloved and honored to the last. And when, in anticipation of his death, great cities were offering their choicest sites for his last resting place, he would have none where the dust of his long-loved and honored wife might not rest beside him. As a husband, as a father, he was ever the pure, stainless, honorable gentleman.

That he was perfect, none will claim. That he was great, and true, and pure, generous, and noble, none can deny.

For his christianity, I cannot speak. I do not know. When he was a colonel and the regimental chaplain had joined the regiment, Grant said to him, "Chaplain, when I was at home, and visitors stopped at my house, I always invited them to ask a blessing at the table. I suppose it is as much needed here as there, and I shall be glad to have you do it whenever we sit down to a meal."

But I am not his judge. His heart life was known to God and to himself. His wife's declaration is that he was a Christian. I am glad to accept that declaration, and to hope and believe that he was. And I know that he is in the hands of one who is wise and just, and merciful, "Who doeth all things well." There I am glad to leave him.

We owe him a boundless debt of gratitude--one we can never repay. He has gone from among us. The tireless brain is still. The generous, brave, loyal, patient, manly heart beats no more. The strong, faithful, noble soul has left its earthly dwelling place. It has proved the mystery of death, the splendor and righteousness of the judgment throne. It has gone to its eternal reward. This day and hour, a mourning nation turns to an open grave in which loving hands with reverend touch deposit his dust. The sympathies of all our millions twine in prayer and benediction around the lonely widow in her woe, and cover her with their tenderness and love; and they mingle no less with the sorrows of the children whom he left behind, and whom he loved with an undying love. Peace to his ashes! Let the earth lie lightly over them! Let the grass wave, the flowers bloom, and the sweeping breezes sigh a requiem over them! And may peace, eternal peace, be to his soul, in that fair land,

"Where falls no hail, or rain or any snow,

Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies

Deep meadowed, happy, fair, with orchard-lawns,

And bowery hollows crowned with summer leas."

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

RECAP. Probate Court. Matter of the Estate of William Kaats, deceased. Notice given of Geo. H. Williams becoming Administrator on August 4, 1885.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Divorce petition: Lilly Carter, Plaintiff, against James H. Carter, Defendant. Request for minor child, Charlie Carter. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for Plaintiff. Date: September 35, 1885, for judgment.

NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

For sale. Twelve good milch cows; one yearling and one two-year-old bull; one yearling heifer; a nice property in Howland's addition to Winfield, to sell or trade for a farm.

H. C. REYNOLDS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

All parties knowing themselves indebted to Cairns & Reynolds, or H. C. Reynolds, will please call at our old stand, at Brotherton & Silver's, and settle and save further costs.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

For Sale. Three hundred Merino ewe sheep for sale or trade. Inquire at J. W. Prather's shoe store, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Sea Foam, Graham, Oat Meal, Ice Cream, Champaign and Sugar Wafers--the nicest thing out for tea--at J. P. Baden's. Try them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Blunt's Havana Press Drill is the only press drill that has given entire satisfaction. W. A. Lee is the agent for Cowley County, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

If you don't want to be troubled at night, give your little ones Cole's Diarrhoea Remedy for cramps, colic, etc. Prepared and sold only at Cole's Drug Store, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Three of my family had the ague. One bottle of Cole's Ague Cure has cured them. I can cheerfully recommend Cole's Ague Cure as the best ague remedy I ever used.

A. L. CRABTREE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

If you want a good, substantial fence, go to Eastman & Cochran, the slat and wire fence manufacturers. They make all lengths, from 30 inches to four feet. South Main St., rear of Bullen's lumber yard.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

For Sale. My farm in Richland township, within a half mile of the proposed new town of "Wilmot," on the K. C. & S. W. railroad, consisting of 320 acres. Also my stock--55 head of 1 and 2 year old heifers, in calf by imported Galloway bull. Also 28 head of half-blood Galloway calves by their sides. The farm is fenced with wire, and good, perpetual running water. A. T. Holmes, Wilmot P. O.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

TO THE AFFLICTED PUBLIC.

Dr. A. P. TURNER

Will be at the Central Hotel Parlors, Winfield, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 1885, one day only. And in future 2 or 3 days per month.

Prof. A. P. Turner, the founder of the most successful Surgical Institutions in the west. I have spent 20 years in my own institution. The world wide reputation of my American Surgical Institute at Indianapolis, Indiana, is sufficient of itself to satisfy the inquiring public of my skill both as a surgeon and a physician. Wherever I have been sufficient time to give my patrons my time and attention, I most cheerfully ask the public to write to any of my references for information and it is my intention to remain with you and treat all cases to the success which I have heretofore shown in my profession. Special attention given to the eye,. Cross eyes straightened in one moment without pain. The hundreds of testimonials of those treated by me for the above, and which you are at liberty to examine by calling at the Central hotel, will remove all doubts as to my success in the treatment. Remember, WEDNESDAY, August 19, at the CENTRAL HOTEL, call at the parlor. I have established a branch institution at Independence, Kansas. . . .

[I skipped the rest of this ad.]

RIVERSIDE REST.

The Remains of General Grant Escorted by an Immense Procession

To The Final Resting Place at Riverside Park.

NEW YORK IN MOURNING.

The Continuous Roll of Muffled Drums--The Minute Guns--The Order to March.

Route of the Procession--The Companies Participating--The Arrival at

Riverside and the Final Ceremonies.

The Services in Various Cities of the Union.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

NEW YORK, August 8. The closing day of the funeral services over the remains of the late General dawned with a clear sky, bright sun, and cooling breeze more beautiful. Four o'clock passed and the gray dawn had deepened into red daylight. Nearby the strains of the dirge music crept out on the morning air. Sunrise was near, and the sad music grew more distinct. Then the blue-coated veterans of Meade Post, Philadelphia, five hundred strong, came tramping to the dirge music of trumpets. The veterans entered the plaza, marched past, while the muffled drums made their footsteps heavy. The guns boomed out, the chimes of Old Trinity pealed mournful notes. The sound of the muffled drums grew fainter.

It was sunrise. The day was born, the last, for the solemn services which are to mark the commitment to the tomb of all that is mortal of him whom the Nation mourns. From the firing of the sunrise gun this morning, the boom of minute guns fired at stated intervals by both military and naval details selected to pay tribute to the Nation's dead, is heard proclaiming to the people that the last sad rites are under way, and before the day closes the hero of the Union will have been committed to his tomb. Church bells began tolling, ringing in the mournful cadence, and their pealing has added to the general feeling of sorrow and gloom that is everywhere displayed. Not in the history of the metropolis or of the Nation has there been such universal mourning as on this occasion nor has there been exhibited such wide-spread sympathy for the family of which the Nation's hero was late the head.

The streets along the route laid out for the passage were packed with people since early this morning. Many have remained up all night for the purpose of finding an advantageous position to view the pageant. Military and civic bodies are marching to the beat of muffled drums, and are marching to and fro taking up positions in the streets leading to Broadway, and preparing to fall in at the signal for the start. Everything is bustle and the crowds are well behaved and police arrangements so perfect that the military and Grand Army posts experience but little inconvenience in going to the places assigned to them. The funeral cortege will undoubtedly be the grandest and most imposing ever witnessed. Fully one hundred thousand men follow the body to the grave at Riverside Park. Thousands were disappointed when the doors closed at one a.m., not being able to see the remains. The line then extended clear around the park and some distance along Broadway and adjacent streets. It is estimated that fully 300,000 people viewed the remains yesterday. Immediately after the doors closed, the plaza was closed. The undertakers took charge of the remains, and allowed those present to take one last look.

Then the casket closed forever. Then the dead was left in the care of the guards who stood erect within the closed iron gates and beneath the black drapings. The night wore on and the grey of daylight was creeping up the east. The still stir of the tomb-like corridors became heavy with the perfume of flowers near the dead.

At six o'clock Wilson Post, of Baltimore, marched by, followed by the Chicago organization, the last guard of the Grant G. A. R. post, save the thirteen who will attend the body to the tomb. Later General Hancock and his staff trooped slowly into the plaza from Broadway and presented front to the City Hall, and then moved to the end of the plaza. When they rested one hundred members of the Liderkranz Society filed up to the steps of the City Hall, and led by four instruments, sang with impressive effect the chorus of "The Spirits From Over the Water," by Schubert, and the chorus of "The Pilgrims," from "Tannhauser." The regular guard filed into the open space at nine o'clock. Company "A," Fifth Artillery, and Company "E," Twelfth Infantry companies and the guard and regulars is under the entire command of Colonel Beck. The regulars took position beneath the trees opposite the City Hall and stood at rest. Then came the original guard of honor that was on duty at Mt. McGregor. These took places beside the remains, under command of Jno. H. Johnston, of the Grant Post, Brooklyn. The men as they stood were as follows: To the left of the casket, Comrades Corwin, Howatt, McDonald, Squires, Knight, and Gilliam. To the right of the casket, Comrades Tibbets, MacKeller, McKeever, Brodie, Collins, and Barker. At 9:35 the imposing funeral car, drawn by twenty-four jet black horses in black trappings, halted on the plaza in front of the City Hall steps. Inside the corridor Commander Johnson was waiting. "Columns in position, right and left," was his command. The Veteran Guard of Honor stood erect.

"Lift remains," was the next command. The twelve men stooped to the silver rails with gloved hands.

"March," was the word. The body moved out upon the portico and down the steps with measured tread across the open space to the steps of the black waiting car. Commander Johnson stepped aside. The silver mountings glistened as the buried case and its honored burden was carried up and placed upon the dais in the mounted catafalque. The veterans retired down the steps. The Honor Guard, next to the hearse, on either side, took the same positions they had maintained to the remains while being borne to the hearse. The steps were drawn away from the funeral car. Commander Johnson took his place in the center and immediately behind the car. At his left and right, on either rear corner of the car were Comrades Downing and Ormstice of Wheeler Post, Saratoga. Next and directly behind these were representatives of the Loyal Legion abreast as follows: General John J. Wilhan, General C. A. Carlton, Paymaster George D. Barton, Lieutenant Colonel Floyd Clarkson, Lieutenant Colonel A. M. Clark, and Captain E. Blunt. The clergy and physicians had paid respect to the remains by alighting from the carriages and accompanying them from the steps to the hearse; they then entered their carriages.

THE START.

NEW YORK, August 8.--The carriages following the funeral car as it left the City Hall contained Rev. Dr. Newman, Bishop Harris, Bishop Potter, Rev. Dr. Chambers, Rev. Dr. Field, Rev. Dr. Bridgeman, Rev. Dr. West, Rev. Father Deshon, Robert Collyer, Rabbi Browne, and Drs. Douglass, Shrady, and Sands. Colonel Beck was in command of regulars. He commanded his company to positions, Company A on the right and Company E on the left of the hearse. The colored men were at the bridles of the twenty-four black horses. Sixteen men of Meade Post, of Philadelphia, of which Grant was a member, were directly in front. The David's Island band preceded them. The signal was given and the line of coaches with the clergy moved off the plaza on to Broadway. The band stood waiting at the head of the funeral cortege. Colonel Beck advanced to the head of the line of black horses before the coach.

"Move on," were his words of command with uplifted sword. The leaders stepped forward led by the colored men and in an instant the black line of horses had straightened the traces, and the wheels beneath the remains were moving. The hour was 9:47 and the band played a dirge to the tramp of the regulars. Thousands were beneath the trees and crowding the sides of the square, and looked silently on. The black funeral car rolled over the curb into Broadway. The black corridors of the City Hall were silent. Grant's last journey was begun. Comptroller Low and Aldermen Sanger and Jachne emerged from the City Hall and entered the carriage that had drawn up in front. The members of the Common Council followed and entered carriages, and when it was ten o'clock the police lines were withdrawn, and people streamed across the piazza. The last scene was ended.

THE FAMILY--THE PRESIDENT.

NEW YORK, August 8.--The members of the Grant family, with the exception of Mrs. Grant, have decided to await the arrival of the funeral procession at the Fifth Avenue Hotel, where they are staying. Dr. Douglas joined them at nine a.m. Mrs. Sartoris was deeply affected during the meeting and sobbed as she shook the hand of the physician who bore such an important part in the closing days of her father's life. At precisely ten o'clock the carriages drove up to the entrance and members of the family took seats in them as follows: Colonel Grant, accompanied by Mrs. Sartoris and Mrs. Fred Grant took seats in the first carriage. The second carriage was occupied by Mr. and Mrs. U. S. Grant and Senor Romero. Jesse Grant and wife entered the third. In the fourth were Mr. and Mrs. Cramer. The next carriage contained General Creswell and wife, and was followed by Potter Palmer and Mr. Honore. In another and the last carriage were Mr. Morton and Dr. Exel. At 10:30 a.m. President Cleveland appeared at the entrance of the hotel and entered his carriage. He was accompanied by Secretary Bayard. The President was dressed in a plain black suit, black high silk hat, and carried an umbrella. Following the carriage of Cleveland and those of the Grant family were the carriages containing Vice President Hendricks and delegation of the United States Senate and House of Representatives. These carriages formed in Twenty-third street three abreast on the line extending toward Sixth avenue, waiting the arrival of the catafalque. At precisely 11:45 General Hancock reached the head of the column, which was then at Twenty-third street and Broadway. Riding along the whole line of formation, from the City Hall on his coal black charger in front of his brilliantly uniformed staff, he was the cynosure of all eyes. He rode with easy grace, and as the people caught sight of the commanding figure of Gettysburg, they were inspired with expressions of admiration which were only partly suppressed by the solemn character of the occasion. On arriving at the head of the column, the General issued the order to march, and the mournful cortege began to move, wending its way up Broadway to the solemn music of bands, en route to Riverside Park.

THE PROCESSION.

NEW YORK, August 8. The cortege is moving in the following order.

Two platoons of mounted police.

Major-General Hancock and staff.

General Aspinwall, chief aide, and staff.

General Shaler and staff.

FIRST DIVISION TROOPS (UNDER ARMS).

Federal troops, 1,500.

United States Engineers Corps, 450.

Pall bearers in carriages.

Funeral car with catafalque upholding the body of General Grant.

Gentlemen of General Grant's family in carriages.

Clergymen and Physicians of General Grant in carriages.

U. S. Grant Post, of Brooklyn, and Meade Post, of Philadelphia, escorts of honor.

United States Naval Brigade, 1,000.

First Division, N. G. S. N. Y., 4,500.

Second Division, N. G. S. N. Y., 3,000.

Division, N. G. S. N. J., 2,800.

First Regiment, Pennsylvania N. G., 500.

Second Regiment, Connecticut N. G., 500.

First Regiment, Massachusetts N. G., 700.

Battalion Virginia Volunteers, 200.

Governor's Foot Guard of Hartford, Connecticut, 175.

Toffey Guard of Newark, N. J., 150.

Colimbo Guard, 100.

Washington Continental Guard, 100.

Old Guard, 80.

Veteran Association One Hundred and Fifty-fifth New York Volunteers, 75.

Highland Guard, 50.

Veteran Colored Guard, 50.

Union Veteran Corps, Washington, 50.

Gate City Guard, Atlanta, 50.

Veteran Zouaves, 30.

Ancient and Honorable Artillery, Hartford.

Veterans First New York Regiment.

Mounted Rifles.

Columbia Guard.

SECOND DIVISION (UNARMED VETERAN CORPS).

Posts of the Grand Army of the Republic of New York, 10,000.

Posts of the Grand Army of New Jersey, 3,000.

Posts of the G. A. R. of other States.

Veteran Associations of seventeen New York regiments.

Veteran Associations of New Jersey other than the G. A. R.

Veterans of the Civil War.

(Eight unattached associations.)

Loyal Legion Commanderies.

Sons of Veterans, twelve companies.

Seventh Regiment Veterans, 200.

National Veteran Association of Chicago, 10.

THIRD DIVISION (CIVIC BODIES).

The President of the United States.

Members of the Cabinet.

House and Senate Committees.

Admiral Jouett and staff.

Governors of the various States.

Mayor Grace and President Sanger, of the Common Council.

Members of the Common Council.

Commodore Chandler and staff.

District Attorney, Comptroller, and Chamberlain.

Register, County Clerk, Sheriff, and Coroners.

Judges of the various courts.

Heads of all municipal departments.

Majors and representatives of other cities.

Representatives of civic bodies.

The route is up Broadway to Fourteenth street, to Fifth avenue, to Fifty-seventh street, to the Boulevard, to Riverside avenue, to the tomb.

THE THIRD DIVISION.

NEW YORK, August 8.--The third division is the one which attracted the bulk of the attention.

The carriage in which President Cleveland rode was drawn by six black horses.

Immediately behind this carriage followed six other open carriages containing the Vice President and members of the President's Cabinet.

Behind these followed a carriage drawn by four horses, in which were seated ex-Presidents Hayes and Arthur. The other civic guests followed in the order named below: United States Senators, ten carriages; Members of Congress, sixteen carriages; Admiral Jouett, one carriage; Foreign Ministers, ten carriages; Cabinet of General Grant, four carriages; retired army officers, ten carriages; General Grant's staff, two carriages; family and relatives, seven carriages; clergy, four carriages; attending physicians, two carriages; pall bearers, six carriages; General Sheridan and staff, four carriages; chiefs of the bureaus of the War Department, four carriages; General Schofield and staff, one carriage; Judges of the Supreme Court, six carriages; Governor of Illinois and staff, eight carriages; Governor of Michigan and staff, three carriages; Governor of Wisconsin and staff, five carriages; Governor of Massachusetts and staff, ten carriages; Governor of New Hampshire and staff, three carriages; Governor of Connecticut and staff, four carriages; Governor of Vermont and staff, four carriages; Governor of Pennsylvania and staff, twelve carriages; Governor of New Jersey and staff, fifteen carriages; Governor of Rhode Island and staff, four carriages; Governor of Iowa and staff, two carriages; Governor of Dakota and staff, seven carriages; Governor of Virginia and staff, three carriages; Representatives of the Governor of Indiana, two carriages; Legislature of New York, thirty carriages. General Franklin, President of the Soldiers' Home, one carriage. Messrs. Drexel and Childs, one carriage. Board of Indian Commissioners, two carriages. Mayor and Representatives of the City of Brooklyn, fifteen carriages. Mayor and Common Council of New York City, thirty-five carriages. Mayor and Common Council of Boston, six carriages. Mayor and Common Council of St. Louis, ten carriages.

ALL READY AT RIVERSIDE.

NEW YORK, August 8.--At Riverside all is ready at this hour, one p.m. for the reception of the remains. The burial services at the vault will be brief, but impressive, and consist of the service of the Methodist Episcopal Church for the dead. There will be no address. Dr. Newman and Bishop Harris will officiate. The services will be preceded by the ritual of the G. A. R., conducted by a detail of fifteen comrades from the George G. Meade Post No. 1, of Philadelphia. The members of the family and pall bearers will then withdraw and the coffin will be placed in the cedar "shell" by the undertaker and his assistants. The lead lining will be soldered together and the top of the box fastened on. It will then be placed in the steel case within the vault, which will be securely riveted. The undertakers and others will then withdraw and the salute will be fired, which will conclude the final ceremonies.

ARRIVAL AT THE TOMB--THE FINAL SERVICES.

NEW YORK, August 8.--The body arrived at the grave at 2:45 and the burial rites of the G. A. R. are now being performed. Dr. Newman will follow with the reading of the burial services of the Methodist Episcopal Church, after which the firing of three volleys of musketry and three salvos of artillery will do military honors to the dead. The ceremonies at the grave will conclude with a salute of twenty-one guns by the light battery, Fifth Artillery, and bugle taps.

FINISHED.

NEW YORK, August 8, 6 p.m.--The services ended as indicated in previous dispatches, the tomb has been closed, and the multitude has silently dispersed.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

DENTISTRY.

DR. T. S. BROWN.

DENTIST.

Office in McDougal Building.

(Over Baden's Store.)

All the modern improvements in the profession, and first-class work a specialty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

THE STATE FAIR OF KANSAS

Will be held

Sept. 1, 2, 3 and 4, 1885,

AT PEABODY,

Under the auspices of the

Marion Co. Agricultural Society.

The premium list is full and the speed program unexcelled.

For particulars, address

A BUCK, Secretary, Peabody, Ks.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Russian Prince Alexander Gagarine, driven to desperation by heavy losses at the gambling tables of Monte Carlo, had committed suicide.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A Franco-German newspaper was broke out recently consequent upon an article in the North German Gazette accusing the Tempe of Paris of getting up a Chauvinistic agitation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

In the recent Kentucky election, Tate, Democrat, for State Treasurer, was opposed by Fox, Prohibitionist, but was elected by a good majority. A light vote was polled all over the State. The constitutional convention measure was defeated.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Under a decree of the United States Circuit Court in favor of the International Trust Company Union, Marshal Cabell, of Dallas, Texas, advertised the Texas Trunk Railway for sale on the first Tuesday in October. The road extends from Dallas to Kaufman, a distance of forty miles.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

An Austin special says: The complaint to President Cleveland by Kansas cattlemen leasing lands in the Indian Territory that Texas is already stocked to its utmost capacity, sounds strange in face of the fact that there are 30,000,000 acres of school and university lands subject to sale and lease in Texas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

By Indian Inspector Armstrong's census of the Cheyennes and Arapahos, the population of these tribes was found to be 2,167 and 1,207 respectively. They had been drawing rations for ten years for 3,769 and 2,198 members, respectively. The saving in beef and flour alone by the new census is $105,000 a year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Later information concerning the cyclone near Philadelphia is that five persons were killed, four reported missing, and sixty injured, some so seriously that recovery is impossible. The loss will be $500,000 including $200,000 on property in Camden; $100,000 on property in Philadelphia, and $200,000 on vessels damaged on the river.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The notorious Mexican outlaw, Abelardo Figera, was captured on the night of July 30 by county officials and lodged in jail at Edinburg, Texas, on the charge of assault with intent to kill. This man has killed several men in Mexico, and is supposed to have been implicated in the murder of Andrews and Noble, who were killed some time ago.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Perry Bros., jewelers, of Chicago, have made an assignment. Liabilities, $40,000; assets, $60,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Frankfort and Berlin bourses were seriously affected by the recent bickerings between French and German newspapers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A mob the other night at Oakland, Mississippi, hanged a man named Vance, who recently killed his wife and afterwards attempted to kill himself.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Civil Service Commission, after inquiry, exonerated Aquilia Jones, postmaster of Indianapolis, of the charges preferred against him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The village of Milford, Wisconsin, was almost destroyed by fire the other night. It was the fourth fire in a short time and was thought to have been incendiary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

During a heavy thunderstorm at Gerona, Spain, recently, a church was struck by lightning during the celebration of the mass. Two of the worshipers were killed and fifteen others were badly wounded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

President Cleveland recently wrote a letter to a Cincinnati man, who confessed to recommending an unworthy person for a judgeship, a bitter letter of denunciation of such treachery and deceit in misleading the Administration.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The discontented section of the Tories, led by the Whig section of the English cabinet, are making overtures for a coalition. By a coalition it is intended to obtain in the new Parliament a majority sufficient to control the Radicals and Parnellites.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A dispatch from Vienna to the London Telegraph says Austria has formally notified the United States Government that Mr. Kelley is not acceptable as American Minister to Austria, and has expressed the hope that he will be recalled and another appointment be made.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, fearing that the strikers would forcibly prevent the sending out of trains, recently requested the Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pa., to send a squad of police to the junction at Glenwood. The police arrested eight men and remained in the company's yard to prevent an outbreak.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Commissioner Coffman was informed recently of an undoubted outbreak of pleuro-pneumonia in a herd of sixty thoroughbred cattle at Port Richmond, Staten Island. Four or five valuable animals have died. The Commissioner has written to the Governor of New York asking whether he will cooperate with the department in quarantining the herd.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

There were 4,294 new cases of cholera reported throughout Spain on the 6th and 1,638 deaths.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

General Lew Wallace, ex-Minister to Turkey, has closed his accounts with the Government.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Adolf Erdman, of Missouri, and James Dugan, of Mississippi, have been appointed special examiners of the Pension Office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The bark Wyoming, which arrived at New York on the 5th, reported finding a dory off Cape Clear, without an occupant, and it is supposed he had been drowned.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A severe hail storm occurred the other morning between Elba and North Loup, Nebraska, destroying corn and other crops in a strip of territory ten miles wide. It broke all the windows in a passenger train on the Black Hills branch of the Union Pacific.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

At Prestonsburg, Kentucky, recently during a disturbance caused by drunkenness, Proctor Arnett was killed, Lee Patrick fatally wounded, and two others injured. Thirty or forty shots were fired. The men were all colored.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Yellow fever appeared at Mazatlan and Tehuantepec, Mexico. At the former place the disease is not violent and the physicians have good success in treating it. At Tehuantepec efforts are being made by the municipal authorities to stamp out the fever.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Myrtle Ross, a handsome and respectable young lady of Cleveland, made arrangements to wed Samuel Smith recently. The guests assembled but Samuel did not appear. It has since been learned that he fled the city and that he had a wife in Medina, New York.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Officer Thomas Bender attempted to arrest an unknown man who was drunk and disorderly in Pittsburg the other night. The man resisted, and the officer struck him twice with a hand billy. The man fell on the pavement and shortly after died. The officer surrendered himself and was locked up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The directors of the Mountain Company (Mt. McGregor) are talking of leading a movement, after the popular subscription to the Grant monument shall have been made, for cutting in the granite face of the hill a colossal profile of the General finishing his book. The estimated cost is about $100,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The United States Consul at Denla, Spain, reported to the State Department at Washington, by cable, that cholera had been officially declared at that port.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The public debt statement showed the decrease during the month of July to be $8,662,789.96.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Commercial Bank, of Suffolk, Virginia, suspended Friday. The deposits were about $100,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

S. S. Cox, United States Minister, has been especially instructed, it is reported at Constantinople, to resume negotiations with the Porte for a modification of the Turkish tariffs on American imports.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

The Rt. Rev. Richard Phelan was consecrated coadjutor Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Pittsburg, and Tutelar Bishop of Phrygia at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on the 2nd. The ceremony was very imposing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

Urley Pugh and J. D. Smith, two young men residing three miles west of Ranger, Texas, while in an intoxicated condition, were run over and killed by an east bound passenger train on the Texas & Pacific Railroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

An official dispatch from Victoria, B. C., says that extradition papers have been granted in the case of Hibbs, the defaulting postmaster of Lewiston, Idaho, and that $10,000 found on his person will also be turned over.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

A full grown and ferocious lion made its escape at Texarkana, Texas, recently, as Robinson's show was leaving the town. It sought the woods and was seen several times prowling around the outskirts of the town. It was subsequently shot after injuring a man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

In accordance with the act of the Legislature prohibiting the employment of boys under twelve years of age in the coal breakers and under fourteen years in the mines, about five hundred boys were discharged from the collieries in the Shamokin, Pennsylvania, district on the 6th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

HAD TO SKIP THE LAST TWO ITEMS...STREAK THROUGH PAPER MADE THE ABOVE ITEM HARD TO READ AND THE LAST TWO WERE ALMOST OBLITERATED.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

REMOVED.

To make room for the new building on Main Street, I have moved my stock of

Saddlery and Harness Goods

-TO-

EAST NINTH AVENUE,

Opposite Ferguson's Livery Stable, where I hope to see all my old customers and as many new ones as need goods in my line.

Thanking you for past favors, and hoping for a continuance of the same, I am,

R. E. SYDAL. East Ninth Avenue.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 13, 1885.

WARNER & McINTYRE.

CONTRACTORS & BUILDERS.

Turned Work, Scroll and Bracket Work, and all [?] machine work got out to order. Stair Building a specialty. Estimates furnished on all work and satisfaction guaranteed.

Shop Corner of 6th and Main, Winfield, Kansas.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, AUGUST 20, 1885.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official and Social Notes as Gathered by Our Regular

Washington Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

General Sheridan returned to Washington last Saturday evening, and called upon the President yesterday. He reported the Indian affairs to be quiet with no prospect of future outbreak. Capt. Lee, the new military Indian agent, has assumed charge, and all arrangements seemed satisfactory. It is understood that Gen. Sheridan made a strong report against the manner of conducting business by some of the Indian agents, showing irregularities and abuses tending to cause trouble among the Indians, and recommending an entire reorganization of the Indian agent system. It is said that he discovered that one Indian agent was drawing supplies for twice as many Indians as were in reality within the limits of his agency.

The suit against First Controller Durham by the authorities of Mississippi to compel him to give a warrant for five thousand and some odd dollars due that State from the National government, is brought with Judge Durham's consent. There are two contrary decisions in the lease by Judges Lawrence and Porter. Under these circumstances and owing to the contrary statements of the case, Judge Durham determined to leave the matter to Congress or to the courts to decide. It will probably go now through the courts and be finally settled by the Supreme Court.

Attorney General Garland, in reply to questions from Secretary Manning, has decided that in the event that holders or owners of distilled spirits on which tax has not been paid shall have failed within the seven months specified in the bond to withdraw them in fact from the distillery warehouse a forfeiture of the bond follows, and the spirits are not protected thereafter from an obligation for a domestic tax. The effect of the bond while in force and before forfeiture is to free the spirits from such obligation, but this effect ceases upon the forfeiture of the bond. Also, that the spirits covered by exportation bond, after the failure to withdraw them and after the forfeiture of the bond, are liable to distraint, and that the condition of the bond, having been broken by the failure to withdraw the spirits from the warehouse, the right of the government to proceed upon the bond is unquestioned.

The impression is that the man who got so severely handled by the President for making a bad recommendation which he was not willing to stand by, does not live in Ohio, but that some other State--or territory--had the distinction of proposing a new judge whose backers didn't mean it. Ex-Representative Follett says he has thought the thing over, and finds that there has been no judge appointed in Ohio, and no Ohio man appointed to a judgeship outside of the State. Mr. Follett and other Democratic members have informed the President on different occasions that nobody ever meant anything by signing a petition, and that it was not fair to hold them to a recommendation unless it was made in a personal letter; but the President has refused to see the thing in that light, and wants to know what recommendations are for if not to recommend. The President's letter receives commendation on every hand, and particular significance is attached to the reference to his fight against the "bad elements of both parties."

The National Civil Service association meet at Newport today for their annual convention, and, no doubt, the gentlemen of the association as they recline on the spacious piazzas of the cottages of that ultra-fashionable resort, swim in its surf, will criticize sharply all the shortcomings of the administration and give it a large amount of good advice.

A commercial enterprise that promises well, invites American manufacturers and merchants to deposit samples of their goods at a permanent exhibition at Rome for the purpose of extending American commerce with Italy. The project starts under responsible auspices, and if judiciously managed, ought to help our foreign trade. At present we export very little to Italy, though we leave annually a good deal of American money in that country. A well managed commercial agency, such as is now proposed, might enable us to keep the balance of trade near even.

Secretary Whitney has made public the criticisms of the naval advisory board upon the report of the Dolphin board of examiners, with the reply of the latter. The naval advisory board take up the objections made by the examining board to the Dolphin and discuss them at great length, endeavoring to show that the Dolphin is not structurally weak and has the speed contracted for. The examining board in their reply maintain their former views, and point out further defects in the Dolphin not previously mentioned. L.

BEAR AND FORBEAR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

There is a time when forbearance ceases to be a virtue. And the citizens who live in the vicinity of the courthouse have reached that stage, and do most earnestly call a halt. We all love music, but don't care to have it mixed up with our sleep. There are two bands that practice in the Court House, each two nights a week. But we all love music--yes, love it, and can't help it, and have not raised an objection, but when you blow your horns till twelve o'clock, we object, and have threatened to blow you up with dynamite, courthouse and all. Now look out, for we are in earnest. Practice on, boys. We appreciate you. We want Winfield to continue to have the best and most bands of any city in Kansas, but for heaven's sake hold in your courthouse horns at half past nine, and give Old Morpheus a chance. Selah.

WEARY CITIZENS.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

J. O. Taylor is in from several weeks' rambles in the western counties, and is imbued with the flattering prospects. Sod corn, in many places, will make forty and fifty bushels per acre. He says Ashland and Clark County are developing magically, as are counties farther west, where one hundred and fifty claims a day are being taken. He mentions, as a small sandwich, the killing of one Peck at Englewood the other night. The Peck brothers were at a dance with their Dulcianas. They started to go, a cowboy persisted in their staying, followed the party out to the wagon, where a fracas took place. One of the Pecks was shot dead and the cowboy is in the toils.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

R. W. Handy came in Friday from a few days at Elk City, with a bad hand. He started for home Thursday night in the caboose of the accommodation train. Sitting near the door when the train stopped with a jerk, he threw his hand around to catch himself on the door frame edge. The door was unfastened and that shut like a bullet, cutting one of the fingers almost off at the first joint and badly using up others. He stopped at Moline, had the severed member stuck on again, and hopes it will grow back all right.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The seven-year-old son of T. L. Davis, of West Bolton township, climbed upon the edge of a rain barrel about half full of water, and doubled himself up over the rim to see the "wiggle tails" play, when he lost his balance and plunged head first into the barrel. He was unable to extricate himself, and had it not been for the timely appearance of his mother, the little fellow would undoubtedly have perished. He was as limp as a rag when his mother pulled him out, and they rolled and pumped him for five or ten minutes before he was restored to consciousness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

About the only first-class crossing culvert in the city has just been constructed across Loomis and Ninth avenue, this side of the Court House. It was put in by Hank Thomas, under supervision of Mr. James Connor, chairman of the city council's street and alley committee. The bottom is lined with water tight flagging, the walls are built solidly to the top, and the crossing stones are six inches thick and four feet wide--will last forever. This culvert will not fill up and sink down in a year or so and be worthless, worse than none. It will clean itself with every good rain and make a first-class drain. Put in more like it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Baptist church held a lap social at the home of Rev. Reider Friday night. The occasion was largely attended and very enjoyable. The evening was cool and balmy, making the absence of ice cream acceptable and giving a warm reception to yellow legged chickens and other splendid culinary productions. A Baptist is as bad on chicken as a Methodist. The recent improvements of the Baptist parsonage make it a very pleasant and convenient home. The room is doubled and the appearance, interior and exterior, thribbled. Our Baptists are mediocre in nothing. About two hundred were present last night. The social was not for gain, but a purely social occasion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A press dispatch from Belle Plaine, dated Aug. 14, says: "Sixty-one miles of the Denver, Memphis and Atlantic railway was sub-let here yesterday to be completed ready for operation by November 1st. This is a portion of the new road to be built from Denver to Memphis direct. Messrs. Fitzgerald and Mallory have a contract to complete 235 miles. Four hundred teams will be at work next week."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

John R. Eriembusch, of Mt. Pulaski, Illinois, and Dora G. Morstetter, of this county, were joined together by Judge Gans Saturday in the blissful matrimonial one. They hadn't met each other for a long time, and on the groom's arrival this morning, accompanied by the mother of the bride, the happy couple proceeded immediately to the "P. J." office to get "jined."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Once more we are happy to chronicle the event of being banqueted to as fine a watermelon as the children ever sat down to. Holmes & Son are the benefactors. Long may they live. They have our thanks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A man was struck dead by lightning last Tuesday while walking across the street at New Kiowa. [?] (Paper had Kiawa.)

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The militia are trying to raise money enough to build a good armory. They have purchased a lot on the corner just west of the Presbyterian church. They do not wish the citizens to give anything without value returned, but prefer to sell shares at $10 apiece. They will put up a good building--the upper story to rent. It does seem to us that this will be a good investment, looking at it in this light. Our businessmen should take hold and give the boys a lift. The only way to keep our militia company is to erect a good armory. We have a militia company that we may justly be proud of and let us give the boys a lift. You are not giving it but will receive a good rate of interest on your investment. Tom Harris is soliciting shares for this enterprise. You don't have to pay all the money at once but in small installments.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Our thanks are due to the aesthete who so kindly and thoughtfully left a mammoth sunflower on our desk. If there is any one thing more than another that our reporter delights in, it is the calm contemplation of large sunflowers; and they are so lovely for the button-hole at evening; or, if there was enough of them, they could be used to garnish a large and loud figured chintz mother hubbard, so that it could se said of those thus arrayed, that Solomon in all his glory was ne'er arrayed like one of these--and we'd be willing to bet, if we were a bet-ter man, that he was not.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A man inquired for oysters at one of our restaurants yesterday. The proprietor told him that oysters were good only in the months with an "r" in them, like September, October, etc. "Well," said the man, "this month has an "r" in it." "How do you make that out?" asked the restaurant keeper. "Why, if o-r-g-u-s-t (spelling it out) hasn't got an "r" in it, then I can't spell, that's all."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Humor has it that one of our eligible widowers will soon take unto himself a better half--about next week, watch out, boys, for the cigars. It is better to live with a good woman than to endure single woe. This should be rigidly enforced by a city ordinance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Uncle Jimmy Land is happy, though he might be happier. His fine Norman mare was presented with a fine colt at daylight Saturday. He says it is the finest colt he ever saw. If it had been a mare, he had a standing offer of $40 for it as soon as born.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Profs. A. H. Limerick and J. A. Wood delivered temperance addresses at Burden Friday night, and organized an adjunct to the State and County Temperance Unions.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Dr. S. Wilkins and Mr. Dwyer were over from Cambridge Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

R. P. Hutchison and wife were up from the Canal City Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Watermillions are as plentiful as the sands by the sea shore.

AN EASTERN TOUR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Our elongated scribe spent Friday at Burden and other eastern Cowley places. Such a trip imbues one with the prominent fact that Cowley is a mighty big and wealthy institution. We like Burden. We have always liked it. The people are enterprising and social and the town comely and substantial; and the ladies--well, we won't enhance the envy of our ladies just now. Like every other town in the Union, Burden's business is not on a rush just at present. This is the dullest season of the year everywhere. But a number of good buildings are going up, prominent among them a new Baptist church. The Baptists have had no organization in Burden, but Elder Childs, from Rev. Reider's old Indiana home, has come on and is working the matter up very successfully. Behind John Ledlie's flyer and in his little red buggy, John showed us the town and where all the Honorables, Colonels, and Judges live. Pretty lawns and neat houses are no exceptions in Burden. A drive northeast of Burden reveals as pretty a country as the eye ever beheld--showing the grit and energy of Cowley's best farmers. The farms of R. F. Burden, J. K. Woods, and many others in that section are famous among Cowley farms. There are no "Rip Van Winkle" farmers in that country--in fact, such are exceedingly "scarce" all over Cowley's fair domain. A drive to Cambridge takes in a glimpse of Cowley's sheep and cattle country: big pastures, gentle kine, little "lams," and hoggish swine in profusion. Dr. F. A. Howland, sone of our A. H. Howland, and well known here, is working up a splendid practice in Cambridge and vicinity. He is a young man, but a thorough student, and will succeed. The corn in all eastern Cowley is about safe and will be immense. Such a trip relieves the dull monotony of newspaper work--grind, grind, day in and day out. The relief almost instigates a leap over the moon.

NO BOB TAIL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

"The surveyors on the K. C. & Southwestern railroad," says the A. C. Democrat, "arrived in our city Monday, having completed the survey to this place. The depot has been located opposite Central avenue, about three hundred yards north and east of the A. T. & S. F. depot on the northwest corner of John Harmon's farm. This undoubtedly will settle the question in the minds of those who bellowed so loud about this road being a "bob-tail" concern owned head and tail by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe, and would run from Winfield to this point on that track. We did not believe that Mr. Hill would attempt to gull our people into any such scheme, as he has too much at stake in Arkansas City to place a stumbling block in the way that would tend to cripple or injure her future. As we have said before, we believe the Kansas City and Southwestern is an independent road, owned and controlled by the Gould system and will be a competing line and of vast benefit to our people when completed, and there is now not a question of doubt about it being completed, and that too within a very short time. A permanent survey has been made to this point, and we are informed that the contract has been let for four miles of grading on this end of the line, which will be commenced next week. The company expect to have the grading done, the track laid, the rolling stock on, and trains running into Arkansas City by the middle of October or first of November. Before the summer is ended and the harvest gathered in, we will all feel like taking off our hats and giving three cheers for Jim Hill and the Kansas City and Southwestern railroad. Not a "bob-tail thing," but a concern with a narrative of sufficient length to wag Arkansas City into a boom that will place her far in the lead of any city in the southwest. Just listen! We will be the Terminus of two competing lines of railroad, the head of navigation, and the great supply point of the Indian Territory. Surely Arkansas City has in store for her a bright future."

HYMENIAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. J. B. Garvin, whom we mentioned some time ago as having gone to Wheeling, West Virginia, returned Saturday. While in Wheeling he was married to Miss Clemma Parrish, an intelligent and accomplished young lady, and she accompanied him as far as Kansas City and from there went west to Lincoln Center, Nebraska, to visit with friends for two or three weeks, when she will come to Winfield, where Mr. and Mrs. Garvin will make their future home. Mr. Garvin is a young gentleman of first-class business abilities and socially is very much admired by his acquaintances--in short, he is possessed of all the qualities that go to make a true gentleman and which will insure his success in any business field. THE COURIER extends hearty congratulations and a sincere wish that Mr. and Mrs. Garvin may enjoy a life of peace, happiness, and prosperity, and may the claws of a divorce court never scratch them asunder. We will smoke at the bridegroom's pleasure.

PATE'S GRIST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

District Clerk Pate turns out an unusual day's grist--six cases for Friday. Warren Cottingham, Nancy A. Cottingham, and James Hollingsworth, all appeal from the K. C. & S. W. damage allowed them by the County Commissioners; Arkansas City's police court ends up three appeals: City vs. L. C. Rice--he appeals on a fine of $100 and costs for illegal co-habitation with a fair damsel. City vs. Frank J. Hess, the latter appealing on conviction of illegally connecting with Arkansas City's water works. City vs. Chas. Bassow. Chas. kicks on conviction of unlawful co-habitation with Mrs. E. Matson, for which he was fined $10 and costs.

THE WINFIELD FENCE WORKS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Winfield Fence Works of Smedley & Gest are now in successful operation. They have two of the Everett fence weaver machines, the best, easiest, and most perfect machine made, and can make from one hundred to two hundred rods of fence per day. They have a large stock of material on hand, and are selling fencing by the mile. They have on exhibit a hammock made on their machine: a perfect hammock and swinging chair combined, well worth seeing. Ye reporter has taken a contract to swing all the pretty girls in Winfield. Who comes first?

ANOTHER VISITOR'S VIEW.

He Compares Cowley's "Git Up and Git" to Indiana's Poke-Easiness.

Enthusiastic Praises.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. W. A. Pickens, one of the editors of the Spencer, Owen County, Democrat, and who, with his sister, spent the last few weeks here visiting his brother, Dr. F. M. Pickens, writes as follows to his paper.

"When the Creator put the finishing touch on the earth, he made Southern Kansas. Some of your Owen County readers may think the reports of the great prosperity of Kansas are lies gotten up by real estate men and railroad managers, but they are not. When you remember that Kansas took the premiums at the late World's Fair at New Orleans on grains, on fruits, and on flour, you will not be surprised at the reports of her wealth that reach you. The best grains, the best fruits, the best flour in the world--that is the whole tale shortly told.

"The firm of Bliss & Wood, millers, at Winfield, handles over four hundred thousand bushels of wheat a year. This is not the only mill here. Ask your millers at Spencer what they handle and you may have some idea of the wheat product of this country. The leading grocery firm here handles over one hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars worth of poultry a year. Ask your leading grocer at Spencer the amount of his business in this line. A few instances of individual prosperity and success will give you an idea of the general growth of wealth. I will take Owen County men. Wm. Bonnewell came to this vicinity about 1872. He came from near Vandalia and brought with him two teams and a small amount of money. His corn crop last year was 8,000 bushels; this year he estimates it at 10,000 bushels. John Cain came here from the same neighborhood a little later. Last year he had 1,560 bushels of corn and 800 bushels of wheat. This year he estimates his wheat crop at 1,800 bushels. He is only a renter and these figures represent only his share of the crops he has raised. I might give numerous instances like the above, but your readers who are used to the hills of Owen would not credit them. These things look unreasonable to the people in Owen County, but you must remember that there is scarcely an acre of ground in this country that is not tillable and that it is all richer than the best of your White River bottoms. The people here are public spirited and free with their money when it comes to any public enterprise. A few weeks ago the M. E. Church at this place decided to re-furnish and re-paint their church house and to buy a bell. It required $1,100. They raised the money by contributed subscriptions in less than a week. The other churches are equally well supported."

ATTENTION CO. "C" K. N. G.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The second Monday evening in every month is regular monthly muster and inspection. For the benefit of those that are liable to be negligent, I publish the following part of State Statute.

Art. XI. Sec. 12-59. Every non-commissioned officer, musician, or private, who shall willfully neglect to attend monthly muster and inspection, or appear without his proper uniform and arms, shall be deemed guilty of a breach of discipline and shall be fined in such sum as the Company Court of discipline shall assess against him, not to exceed five dollars for the first offense; nor more than ten dollars for the second offense; and for a third offense he shall be fined twenty-five dollars and shall be dishonorably discharged from the service.

Art. XI. Sec. 61. All fines imposed under any of the provisions of these rules shall be paid within ten days from the date of review of sentence, by the proper reviewing officer, and upon failure to pay such fine the Company Commander shall place the proper papers in the hands of a Justice of the Peace in the township or city in which the offender lives, and the Justice of the Peace shall at once issue his process (Sec. 24, 25, Art. VIII, ch. 141, laws of 1885.) These laws will be strictly enforced. C. E. Steuven, Captain.

TOO MUCH HAY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

R. N. Clark, a farmer who lives near Tannehill, had a very peculiar accident happen to him Thursday. He was filling his barn loft with hay. A boy was inside stowing the hay back. Underneath were the stalls for the horses in which were two horses and a colt. All at once the floor of the loft gave way and four tons of prairie hay and a boy came down upon the horses. One broke its alter and gout out and the colt also managed to get away, but the other was fastened up tight and sure. Mr. Clark dug an opening to where the animal was lying, fastened a chain to the hind legs and with a team, drew it out. The animal was all right, no damage except to the floor.

WELLINGTON DUEL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Wellington dudes have struck a novel scheme for sounding the equilibrium of their affections. Winfield has just such a case, and we present this from the Press, as a pointer: "A couple of our prominent society young men, not exactly agreeing with each other's connection with a young lady, Saturday eve repaired to the outskirts of the city and proceeded to fight a duel, the winner to have the free will of the other to pay his addresses to the lady in question. We withhold all names as they of course do not desire their publication. Considerable beefsteak and arnica is being used by the defeated party."

A NOVEL TRIP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A. T. Spotswood and Q. A. Glass are home from a novel three days' fishing expedition. They took Quincy's skiff and went down the Walnut, loaded with fishing tackle and expectation--and recreative determination. The first night they hauled up at Mr. Hunt's, near Odessa schoolhouse, with a good string of fish. The next night was spent at Magnolia farm. They brought back no fish, having loaned them all out, but they were weighted down with the realization of the best and most novel recreation they ever had.

EDUCATIONAL NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

At a meeting of the Cowley County Teacher's Association, held the last week of the Institute, an arrangement was agreed upon for carrying out the work of the State course of study in the schools of the county. A committee of teachers will arrange the work for each month, and give, through the county papers, such outlines and suggestions as will enable the teachers of the county to follow a uniform system of instruction. Examinations will be held at intervals during the school year on questions proposed to cover the work as it progresses. From these examinations each teacher will be enabled to measure his school with those of his fellow teachers, and determine its standing.

The advantages of a carefully arranged plan by which all the schools of our county can move in one unbroken phalanx, with one common end in view, can hardly be estimated. Among them we might name the following.

1st. The assistance that can be given to each school in the arrangement of its study through the suggestions of a committee that will give the matter careful thought and study.

2nd. The stimulus that will be given by concert of action.

3rd. The emulation arising from the knowledge that others are doing the same work as ourselves.

4th. The discussions of subjects and plan of study at Teachers' Associations, and

5th. The one "Projective Point" at which all are aiming.

Now, will not our school officers and patrons join in this movement and aid in putting our schools on the high road to success?

The efforts of the best teacher, directed by the most careful management, without the sympathy and cooperation of parents and officers, must be, at best, but partially successful.



Let us each, then, with our co-equal interests in our schools, do our part in this great drama, and we shall see this year mark a new epoch in our educational growth.

A. H. LIMERICK.

ANOTHER WINFIELD TOWN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

There has been another enterprise organized here during the week. It is for the purpose of laying out a town in old Stanton County, and is called the Veteran Town Company. The members are: J. A. Cooper, J. B. Nipp, M. L. Robinson, Geo. W. Robinson, Ivan Robinson, J. L. M. Hill, J. R. Taylor, S. H. Rodgers, Jas. H. Bullene, W. R. McDonald, T. H. Byers, F. L. Branniger, F. S. Jennings, E. P. Greer, John Arrowsmith, A. R. Nipp, J. C. Long, J. C. Vorheis, Wm. Camery, and T. H. Soward. The offices are: J. A. Cooper, president; J. B. Nipp, vice-president; W. R. McDonald, secretary and general agent; Geo. W. Robinson, treasurer. The company owns eleven hundred acres of land in Stanton County, one section of which is now being laid off as the town of "Veteran." It is located in the beautiful Bear creek valley, and will be the county seat of that new county when organized. The company is a strong one and will proceed at once to build a city without further ado. A large number of lots have been already contracted for and buildings will go up on them at once. A newspaper is now on the way and the VETERAN COURIER will soon unfold its banner to the breeze. W. R. McDonald is the authoritative business head of the company and will remain on the ground.

ASSURING PROOF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Santa Fe company have learned that the D., M. & A. is a surety, and have set to work to defeat its bonds in Chautauqua County. It says if Chautauqua will defeat the bonds on the 25th, it will extend its line from Independence down through Sedan and on west along the border to Caldwell, and that it will also extend its branch from Howard to Sedan. It has furnished transportation for a large number of Chautauqua's prominent men to attend a conclave at Topeka Saturday. But the solid men of our sister county see the Santa Fe's game. It has held a monopoly of the business of Southern Kansas. It knows the D., M. & A. to be a live, reliable reality and that its monopoly is about to be busted. So it gets up this checkmate scheme. The bonds defeated, it will sit back on its monopoly and stir not a peg. The S. K. is owned and controlled by the Santa Fe and through it, has this territory in its grasp. Messrs. M. B. Crisman and L. J. Wiley, of Wannetta, Chautauqua County, were over today. They say the people of that county know the superior benefits to them of the D., M. & A., have tumbled to the Santa Fe racket and will vote the bonds without difficulty. The Santa Fe puts up no guarantee money--all talk.

OUR BIG CORN CROP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The corn crop for this county is well assured. The partial failure of the wheat caused much of it to be plowed up, and corn was put in its place. The web worm destroyed some of the latest planted corn, but persons who have traveled much over the county claim that we will have from twenty-five to thirty percent more corn than has ever been raised in any one year. The question arises, what shall we do with it? We would say, don't sell it to be shipped, nor for 15 or 20 cents per bushel. The late order of the President in regard to the range cattle will cause a great many to be driven into this state to finish fattening for the market. This, with other causes that are now in sight, lead us to think that instead of shipping corn east, we will be shipping corn from Kansas City to these southern tier counties. Burden Enterprise.

ATTEMPTED BURGLARY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

M. G. Troup's residence was the place of an attempted robbery Thursday night. The domestic was awakened about 3 a.m. by suppressed talking. Looking out she saw two men lurking around the corner of the house. She came to the conclusion at once that someone was going to attempt an entry into the house. The young lady proved gritty under the circumstances and calmly waited for the entry, when she would catch him by the hair of the head and throw him out backwards from the window. Unfortunately, the young lady is troubled with a cough, and one of these coughing spells came on about now, just when the burglars were seen to try and raise the window. This scared the men away in a hurry.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A number of our young folks attended a hop at Tisdale Wednesday, for a few hours in perspiration and mirth. The drive was lovely, after the cooling rain, and the dance a regular old time occasion--all in for a good time, with none of the usual "stiffness" of such occurrences. The hop was in the Bourdette Hall, with Joe and Ed Bourdette as manipulators, with a splendid supper. Such an evening, in ruraldom, away from the city bustle, was a big recreation--one taken in to the fullest extent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Udall Sentinel remarks: "Madam Rumor has it that the A. T. & S. F. road will build a branch road from Udall to Geuda Springs, via Kellogg. This gives us encouragement concerning the extension of the Douglass branch to Udall. With the Santa Fe and its branches, the D., M. & A. and the ultimate building of a branch of the K. C. & S. W. through here, Udall promises to become an important railroad center. So we boom."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Constable Tom Harrod made a swoop on Maple township Thursday, bringing in Lon and Alfreda Walck and T. M. McMillen, in the toils for a family melee. The two Walck's are cousins by marriage and Miss Alfreda is a sister of McMillen. Walck says she beat and abused him, ably aided and abetted by McMillen, who is a young boy of eighteen. The row has been going on for three years.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Republican Judicial convention met at Harper on the 12th and nominated on first ballot, Hon. J. G. Reed for judge. This is the end of a terribly bitter fight, between Judge Ray, the present incumbent, and Reed. The Wellington papers contained column after column of contest matter during the candidacy for the Republican nomination.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The editors returned Friday from a trip up the K. C. & S. W. railroad the entire length. Work is progressing right along and without friction. The track is laid about nine miles in this county, reaching about four miles this side of Atlanta and within 18 miles of Winfield. The grading is about completed to Floral and is progressing down as far as Limbocker's.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A delegation of leading men were before County Superintendent Limerick Saturday regarding the redistricting of Beaver township. The Superintendent decided it inexpedient to make the division now, the tax levy and new school boards for the coming year having been made.

BURDEN EAGLE CLIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

In a recent serenade given the Eagle office by the S. K. band, we noticed Prof. Page, of Winfield. The boys have greatly improved, and on this occasion with the addition of Mr. Geo. Kimball, cornetist, and Prof. Page, the band excelled any music ever played in this city.

Cambridge people had a little exciting episode Wednesday. Albert Hicks, armed with an attachment for property belonging to a Mr. Laird, living on South Prairie, visited the latter but was met with a gun dangerously handled by Laird. He went home, got a warrant for Laird's arrest, took a posse, and they were again met by the man with a gun. Hicks got the drop on him, and after a struggle, Mr. Laird was placed hors de combat.

The latest ordinance is to order business houses closed on Sunday. What a foolish farce! No business that the law will close has been kept open. True, an occasional resident who has forgotten through the week, or a farmer who could not come during the week, has prevailed upon a clerk to accommodate him by selling what was necessary to get, but it was no money to the clerk. Wonder what they'll find next. Too much law has killed many towns and Burden needs more business than law at present.

Prof. R. B. Moore came in Wednesday evening to pass a few days with friends in this city. He is sun browned, and shows the unmistakable marks of a son of out door toil. Since closing the schools at this place, the Professor has visited the "wild and wooly," taken, improved, and is now the owner of a farm in Clark County, this State. It has been the best paying vacation he could have taken, and though his trials have been many, he will return to the superintendency of our schools the happy possessor of a good farm and some city property the result of industry.

FUNNY CUPID.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Cupid is a queer fellow. He casts his darts in various ways. Sometimes the wounds are slight and the victims soon recover. Then again they go deep! Such a case was witnessed Saturday. It was a good looking couple. Cupid had shot them bad--awfully bad. They went to get spliced. Judge Gans wasn't in. Sending an ambassador for the Judge, the happy couple took to the shade by the north window of the P. J.'s office. Around each other's necks they entwined their arms: a lovely sight for all who passed. Not until Judge Gans came down, witnessed the circus, and called in the handsome and innocent Al Taylor did the affectionate arms adjourn. Al fainted, and fears of his recovery are many. Lovers should always pull down the blinds on such occasions. It breaks up whole communities to see such a silent "matinee."

TOO MUCH FOR DOGS, EVEN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Even the dogs' poor little hearts are filled with terror at sight of our mighty fighting editor--alias fat man. He is becoming well and widely known even among the canine tribe. Sunday as he was passing Dr. Marsh's office, a dog belonging to one of the Doctor's customers who had called on him, was standing in the street when he spied the fat man's portly avoirdupois waddling in his direction. No sooner did he see him than he rushed frantically into the Doctor's office, tail between his legs, and barricaded himself behind the door and not until he was sure that the apparition was at a safe distance from him could he be persuaded to leave his retreat, and then it was with the utmost precaution that he slyly peeped around the door frame at the retreating figure of our fat man. Bring on another dog.

A FINE FARM FOR SALE.

A GOOD BARGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

One of the best grain and stock farms in the county, 240 acres fine bottom land, 230 acres under plow, 40 acres timber, 200 acres of upland pasture, timber, and pasture enclosed with barbed wire fence, fine running water and several large springs, house 16 x 26 story and a half, stone barn 21 x 33, sixteen foot walls, room for ten head of horses, granary room for 3,000 bushels, necessary outbuildings, corrals, etc., peach orchard, 1 miles to schoolhouse. This place will be sold, if sold soon, on very reasonable terms. Inquire of or address THE COURIER, Winfield, Kansas.

A BOLD TRICK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

R. A. O'Neal, a young man who lives four miles west of town, drove up to A. T. Roberts' residence, near the Baptist church, Thursday evening and hitched. He had a fine young team. He stopped some little time. Upon coming out he was surprised to find the post, but no team. He thought at once that they had broken loose and torn everything up by that time. Hunting around, no trace of broken bridles could be found and he came to the conclusion that they were stolen. The night watchman noticed some boys riding around with this team and took it away from them. It is strange that the boys were not seen as parties were sitting on the porch at the neighbors. Some of the boys in the city are good ones. They might not steal a red hot stove, but would wait a long while for it to cool.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Again, oodles of drugs mentioned. Skipped all of these on front page. MAW

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

E. L. Wilson was in Thursday from Akron.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Judge Sumner was up from the Terminus Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

John Evans took in the village of Wellington Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

W. E. Buhrlage and O. M. Roberts were down from Udall Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Ab Holmes and his mother, Mrs. John B. Holmes, were down from Rock.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Senator Hackney left Wednesday for a St. Louis legal trip, of a few days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Chas. C. Black went to Belle Plaine Wednesday to look after the D., M. & A.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. Saunders and family left Thursday for Iowa, to make that State their future home.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Miss Alice Dickey went over to Grenola Wednesday, to remain till our city schools open.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

James Jordan has left for the bracing breezes of the "Rockies." This will do him good no doubt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A. H. Jennings and family returned Wednesday from an extensive and very enjoyable visit in Del Plaine, Ohio.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Fred Krupp is pulling the old shanties out from Main and 9th, where five new buildings will soon adorn their sites.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

John W. Huffman, of Thorntown, Indiana, a brother of Capt. Huffman, is visiting his brother, with a view of locating here.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

C. W. Pitts has moved his family to Burden. This point is more convenient for his business. The daily will follow him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

W. C. Barnes, formerly teacher in the city schools, will become ye local of the Tribune. We gladly welcome him into the circle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

J. P. Baden is loading a car a day with watermelons, at Arkansas City. J. P. will soon strip the county of melons at this rate.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. Ferguson will hold a basket meeting at Sheridan schoolhouse Sunday, August 30th. A general turnout is expected.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Walter Lewis, the tailor that was hurt Wednesday morning on the west bound freight, is improving. Dr. Park thinks he will get well.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

D. Mater has bought the Wm. Rogers' property where Judge Beck lives. Mr. Mater will remodel the house and fix the place up generally.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Fred Blackman has resigned as S. F. operator here and gone up to Atlanta, with the K. C. & S. W. He will take one of its important stations.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

McD. Stapleton and I. D. McKeebran. [THIS ITEM WAS NOT COMPLETED.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

J. S. Mann is off for the wicked city of Chicago to buy a fall stock of goods. He will be gone three weeks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Bro. Seaver, of the Dexter Eye, and now of the Telegram, moved his family to town Thursday and will go to work at once. Give us your bow, brother.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We received a pleasant call Tuesday last from Mr. Walt Limbocker, of Winfield. Mr. Limbocker is a son-in-law of Mr. Ison, of Bolton, where he and his wife have been visiting for a few days. A. C. Democrat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

J. R. Sumpter, of Beaver, has threshed his eighty acres of which, which yielded nineteen bushels per acre, machine measure. It is clean and very handsome wheat but not quite as plump as his wheat was last year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Messrs. James Bullene and S. H. Rodgers will start a lumber yard this week at Syracuse, twenty miles from the Colorado line, on the Santa Fe. It will be the supply point for Veteran, the new Winfield town, and other places.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Dr. W. R. Kirkwood got off Wednesday for Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he fills the Presbyterian pulpit a month, during the absence of the pastor, before entering upon his duties in McAlister College. The family go a week from Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Miss Mattie West, one of Burden's most winsome young ladies, and formerly a Winfield resident, visited the hub Thursday, the first time in half a year. She is accountant in the Burden bank, and possessed of the grit and independence that always wins.

[Not certain of her last name: could be West, Wert, Welt, or something similar. MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Now if there is anything we are partial to, it is a fat, juicy watermelon. We were straying around loose Friday at noon and going into Baden's he made us get out quick with a big melon under our arm. J. P. has our thanks for one of the best melons that ever graced our imposing stone.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Constable Tom Harrod shot Will Sharp into the bastille Friday, to await the call of a Wellington official. He has been wanted since last May for mortgaging property belonging to another and skipping with the proceeds. Our officials had his description and Tom readily spotted him. He had been here three days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Blubaugh [Bluebaugh] liquor case drew like a mustard plaster, the following gentlemen from Arkansas City being in attendance Saturday: S. M. Land, Frank Thompson, H. M. Maidt, Hugh Gallagher, J. T. Dinwiddie, E. F. Balyeat, W. A. Moffett, R. Courtright, C. R. Fowler, W. D. Kreamer, J. T. Armstrong, O. S. Rarick, J. W. Secrest, and P. H. Franey.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire brought in two new banqueters for the hotel De Finch, Wednesday, from Hines' court, Dexter, Augusta Bell and Mac Newton, convicted of petty larceny and sentenced to thirty days in the bastille. They stole an overcoat, two pair of pants, and numerous sundries, $5 and $12 worth a piece. They are young men. The man who would steal an overcoat in weather like this ought to go to the "pen" for life. He would freeze an iceberg.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

William Blizzard was brought up from the Terminus Thursday and lodged in "Castle Finch." William, it seems, has been trifling with his attorney, T. J. Stafford. Frank Finch tells us this is the first case of this kind brought here. It seems that Mr. Blizzard owed Mr. Stafford $72, and we should judge from the papers Blizzard was trying to get out of the State and defraud Mr. Stafford out of this debt, whereupon he was arrested. He is a bad Blizzard to attempt to knock a lawyer out of his fees.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The judgeship, 18th District Republican convention, was not a close fight. Reed received nineteen delegate votes out of the thirty-six in the convention upon the first ballot. Geo. D. Orner, of Barbour County, put in nomination Judge Ray, the present incumbent; Judge Botkin, of Harper County, and I. G. Reed, of Sumner County, were put in nomination. Upon balloting the following result was obtained: Barbour Co., Ray 5; Comanche Co., Ray 4; Harper, Botkin 8; Harper, Reed 1; Sumner, Reed 18. Total: Ray, 9; Botkin, 8; Reed, 18.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Brother Henthorn, of the Burden Eagle, convicted himself of "assault with intent to kill" in the following. Any man who would deliberately, with malice aforethought, seek to inveigle a fellow sinner into abject poverty and sure death by starvation, should receive a long term in the "pen." Listen: "There are several towns in Cowley County needing newspapers. The field is open. Atlanta, Wilmot, Floral, Torrance, New Salem, Box, Glen Grouse, Maple City, Tisdale, Hackney, Kellogg, Polo, and Rock are among the number."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Josie, the little girl of Mrs. E. St. Clair, living over Wickham & Co.'s grocery, took a dangerous tumble down the long flight of stairs last Friday. The mother was away and the little one was wheeling her doll buggy at the head of the stairs, when she went over backward, head over heels, thump, thump, down the flight. She was badly bruised, the worst being over the right eye on top of her head, which were at first thought to be concussions. It is astonishing the injury is not worse. As it is, it will be some time in healing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. John Ferguson and S. Eastburn and wife, of Fremont, Iowa, arrived on Friday for an extended visit with Mr. D. Robertson and family and other relatives, of Walnut township. The former gentleman is the father-in-law of Mr. Robertson and brother of the Rev. S. Ferguson, while the two latter are brother and sister-in-law of Mr. Robertson, respectively. This is their first visit to this section and they seem infatuated with the country. They are not here to locate but we sincerely hope they may conclude to locate among us, as they are gentlemen of means and are the kind of citizens Cowley needs and wants. They are both extensive farmers and stock raisers.

"A NICE DAY, MR. GRIMES."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Lightning has struck one of the druggists of the "Medicine" City--Grimes & Son. They were burned out some time ago, but had bought a stock to again enter business at Arkansas City, expecting to go it on their old Probate Court permit to sell liquors. The investigation by County Attorney Asp and Judge Gans, the other day, revealed violations by Grimes and today their "medicine" head was chopped off--their permit revoked. Courier.

Last Saturday Father Grimes came into our office bright and early and ordered his paper stopped, his advertisement discontinued, and paid his bill. We did not inquire into the cause of Mr. Grimes' wrath for we had grave suspicions that it was visited upon us because we dared to publish the report of the whiskey sales made by the druggists of the county during the month of July. It is true we were somewhat surprised at the turn affairs had taken, but we published the report as a news item so one and all could know how the new law was working, never dreaming anyone of our druggists would object to a holding up to a public gaze a copy of their record. A man who has conscientiously followed the teaching of the new law will not be averse to the public knowing just how he is dealing in the traffic. If he has sold all intoxicants strictly within the bounds of the law, he will be pleased to have everybody know his record. On the other hand, if not, he will want his record concealed. 'Tis only the guilty that oppose publicity. We are not sorry that we published the report. We are glad. It was our duty, as publishers of a newspaper, we owe our 1,200 subscribers, and they will appreciate our efforts and stand by us as we try to advance the grand cause of prohibition. Arkansas City Republican.

THE RAILROAD MATTER SETTLED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

After a long and tough wrestle, the city "dads" have fixed railroad matters up. Council met in special session Thursday night. The room was crowded with interested property owners. Everything passed off smoothly. The following is a copy of sec. 1 of the ordinance passed last evening. "There is hereby granted to the Kansas City & Southwestern railroad company the right of way to construct and operate and maintain the main line of their road and all necessary side tracks, across the following streets, avenues, and alleys in said city, to-wit: Loomis street, north of Fourth avenue, and Millington street, north of Fifth avenue; Fourth avenue, west of Loomis street; Main street, north of Fifth avenue; Fifth avenue, west of Main street; Manning and Menor streets, north of Sixth avenue; Sixth avenue, west of Menor street; Eighth and Ninth avenues, west of Walton street and through the alleys in blocks 105, 85, 65, and 8 in said city." As far as we have heard, this gives a general satisfaction to the public. The following is about the projected line as near as we are able to ascertain: Crossing Timber creek north of Andrews' addition, through this addition just north of Mrs. Andrews' house, thence running along the line of the A. K. railroad through R. B. Waite and J. B. Lynn's six acre tract, northwest of Sam Myton's residence, through the Water Company's grounds near the pump house, across the west end of Mrs. Manning's lots just north of J. C. McMullen, and thence west of south in the direction of the Kickapoo corral. We are glad this matter is settled and we hope, satisfactory to all.

ATLANTA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Atlanta is about twenty-two miles from Winfield in the center of Omnia township, and is starting on a substantial basis. The buildings already erected are better buildings than are usual for the first buildings of a new town. They are painted up well and make a fine appearance. R. S. Strother has his hotel, the Atlanta House, completed and is running it splendidly and doing a large business. It is quite a good sized and good looking building. Another hotel nearly completed by Mr. Burroughs is a still larger and better building, and is finished in front in a very stylish and artistic manner. Gillard & Darlington have a general store and quite a large stock of goods, and are already having a very considerable trade. There are two other stores with small stocks, a postoffice, land office, and two livery stables. Some buildings are in process of completion and others are just beginning to get material on the ground. It is going to make a good town, and perhaps the prettiest town in the county.

Wilmot and Floral.

About nine miles this side of Atlanta is the town site of Wilmot, just being laid out and already building has begun. Only one frame is up yet, but several are preparing to build and the town will take a boom as soon as the track reaches it and commences bringing in building material. Floral is also preparing for a second birth, with a prospect of becoming a town of considerable consequence in the near future.

BEFORE THE COURTS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

JUSTICE SNOW.

State of Kansas vs. T. S. Green; dismissed by County Attorney.

State of Kansas vs. D. Bluebaugh, charged with selling intoxicating liquors without the proper license. Trial set for tomorrow morning.

State of Kansas vs. Eph Sears, charged with gambling. The defendant was arrested on this charge once before and the case was dismissed for want of prosecution.

Fred J. Patterson vs. S. K. R. R. Co., action for labor; amount sued for, $23.40. This case is a little peculiar as it will test the question of whether a railroad company is liable to pay for extra time worked, when the foreman directed it.

State of Kansas vs. M. S. Williams, charged with assault and battery upon his child. Continued to the 24th.

State of Kansas vs. Alfreda Walck and Thomas McMillen, charged with assault and battery. The defendants plead guilty. Fine and costs $45.00.

JUSTICE RUCKMAN.

J. B. Torbet vs. Geo. Osterhout, and action in replevin.

W. H. Turner vs. Ed Franklin, action for debt.

In Police Court everything is quiet today.

EIGHTY TWO WATER MELONS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Bob Farnsworth, the Ninth avenue restaurant man, invested in a lot of female melons Friday morning, or rather a lot of melons from a female. Two white women and an American of Ethiopian extraction drew up before his door early this morning with a nice load of melons, and Bob, the darkey, and the two women commenced at once to draw a bargain. After due time a trade was made. The melons unloaded, the women found fault with the counting. At last it was settled that there were forty-one melons, and one of the women went and collected pay for eighty-one melons. The clerk took her word for it. There was either a big mistake on their side or it was intentional. As soon as the women got in the wagon, they drove off very fast, and seemed to be in a hurry to get out of town. The clerk followed them for some distance, but couldn't catch them. Coming back, Capt. Siverd was put on the track. Cap. has great power with ladies and no doubt he will compromise the affair amicably.

A NOVEL WAGER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

While the base ball fever seems to be at fever heat all over the country and clubs play for love, for skill, and for money, the wager in New Mexico comes nearer the ideal of the average player. We notice from an exchange, the Silver City Enterprise, that a game was just on the qui vive and the wager was to be beer. Money is somewhat exhilarating, for money and a good prescription are the essentials to obtain beer, but just think of it, ye "Cyclones," ye "Exterminators," the wager a big drink of beer on ice. What fresh exertions, what super-human efforts would be made to make a tally? Nary a ball would be muffed, and flies would constantly be in the air; and again, there would be no trouble in procuring aspirants for the game. If beer was the wager in this country, the base ball fever would be far more intense than now.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

TRY IT YOURSELF. The proof of the pudding is not in chewing the string, but in having an opportunity to try the article itself. J. N. Harter, the Druggist, has a free trial bottle of Dr. Bosanko's Cough and Lung Syrup for each and everyone who is afflicted with Coughs, Colds, Asthma, Consumption, or any Lung Affection.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Republicans of Liberty township will meet in caucus at Rose Valley schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, at 2 o'clock. J. A. COCHRAN, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Twelve persons in jail including one woman.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings as Gleaned by the Scribes of the Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Elder Myers filled the pulpit of the Christian church, as usual, Sunday. His theme was, "Jesus of Nazareth, the light of men," based on John i:4. "In him was life; and the life was the light of men." Before Christ, the world was in darkness: had gone to the lowest depths of sin and idolatry. His light cast its rays over all, making peace, happiness, and a surety of heaven to all who would walk in that light--close to its fountainhead. And he continues the light of the world. No rival has ever dethroned this light. Aristotle, Plato, and Mahomet have faded, Christ stands. The world never has and never will produce such a beacon. Walk in the light as he is in the light and all is well. Keep close to Christ; don't allow yourself to drift away into the dark.

BAPTIST CHURCH.

Services were held as usual at this church morning and evening, with large attendance. A splendid sermon was preached in the morning by the pastor, from the text, "Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only," found in James 1:22, in which he set forth the necessity of being doers of the word, following the teachings of the word, and working for the upbuilding of God's church in the world. The sermon in the evening was especially for the young people in which the speaker showed the necessity of early training, of following the teaching of the word while you are yet young; how the follies of our youth will follow us down through old age, even to the grave; young men should shun the evils which so easily beset them. Young man, strive to be great, to be wise, to be noble; thus you can shun the main evils of the world.

METHODIST CHURCH.

The usual announcements for the week. Rev. Gates discoursed from Acts i:8--"But ye shall receive power after the Holy Ghost is come upon you." The sermon was forty minutes too long. The following is a brief synopsis. Prior to this conversation he requested the disciples to go to Jerusalem and wait for the power of the Holy Ghost to come upon them. They were converted before this. They had a thorough training. Three important events had happened to them. First, they were converted to God. Second, they had been commissioned to preach the gospel. Third, they were to receive the Holy Ghost. They were together with one accord waiting for one thing, the endowment of the Holy Ghost from on high. It seems to me that Christ being born in Bethlehem of Judea is not the most significant fact in christian history. I believe the most significant fact in the history of the infant church was the ten days tarrying at Jerusalem before being endorsed. This endowment was absolutely necessary to the success of the gospel conversion. Our children should never know what it is to be outside of the church. We are too apt to let the Devil take charge of our children until fifteen or sixteen years of age and then hire some Methodist preacher to bring them back into the fold. The way, my friends, is to baptize your children into the church and then keep them there. There are men and women in the church today that have been converted and yet are spiritual paralytics. God wants no silent witnesses. Show me the man or woman who has the love of God in their hearts, and they will tell it. They love to talk of God's mercy. They will tell the world they love God.

THE CATHOLICS

held their regular semi-monthly services yesterday. Father Duggan, the new priest, preached a very good sermon--one full of pithy points and admonitions. Father Duggan is a priest of much ability and zeal, and will soon gain the good graces of our people.

UNIVERSALIST SERVICES.

Mrs. Sophia Gibbs, a Universalist, preached in McDougall hall yesterday morning and evening. She is a pleasant speaker--unusually so even for a woman, showing a thorough command of language and of her subject. Her morning sermon was from Cor. xii:12-13. She dwelt upon the brotherhood of humanity. As every member of the individual body reflects the shock at any injury of its fellow member, so does the public at large feel the individual act of every inhabitant. Our every act, no matter how insignificant, has its effect on humanity surrounding us. The Universalist doctrine of punishment by nature, on earth, was advanced. Every violation of nature has its punishment--for the prompting of perfect life.

THE DEATH RECORD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Merritt, the infant son of John McMahon, of Kellogg, died Saturday.

Mrs. George Thompson died Friday last at her home in Dexter township.

Mr. Holmes, residing on the dairy farm just southwest of the city, died last night, and was laid away in the Vernon cemetery today. He got hurt last winter, and being an old gentleman, could not survive it.

Mrs. Victoria Pace died at her home, near the Christian church, last evening. She was in her twenty-fifth year and came here but a few weeks ago with her husband, from Kentucky, to where the husband accompanied the remains this evening.

Mrs. L. C. A. Zetzer, aged 34 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Black, died yesterday at her home, corner of Twelfth avenue and Mansfield street, of malarial fever. She was a widow, and leaves two boys of five and eight years of age. The family came here in July. Mrs. Zetzer was a lady of admirable life and her early demise is deeply mourned. The funeral took place at 10 this morning from the residence, Rev. Reider, conductor.

[Name not clear. Paper had "Zetzer" and then "Zitzer" the second time.]

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Last Saturday evening as the train on the S. K. was switching around in the yard, one of the hands unfortunately caught his left hand between the bumpers and it was horribly crushed and mangled. He was brought to Dr. H. J. Downey's office, where the Doctor removed the entire middle finger and dressed the rest of the hand up and will be able to save the other fingers. It was a very neat surgical operation and was done with comparatively little pain to the patient.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

George Corwin and Al McNeil piled themselves and families, with a bushel of culinary delicacies, hammocks, etc., into their rigs Sunday and picnicked four miles up the Walnut. Such a day's vacation is exhilarating--drives away dull care, and makes the world light and cheery. William Cullen Bryant says the forests were God's first temples, and where can a man find a better place to spend an occasional Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Attica Advocate of last Friday, says: "Mrs. J. W. Johnston, Misses Ida and Beryl Johnston, of Winfield, relatives of D. C. Irwin, of the Kansas Furniture store, spent the week at the National hotel." "Messrs. Brown, Rinker, Hopkins, and Welsh, of Winfield, friends of D. C. Irwin of this city, passed through here Monday on the way southwest on a hunting expedition."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Verily a dog "corpus" is mightier than an army. The remains of a deceased canine whose burial was neglected, and said remains tilted out by the wayside just across the S. K. railroad crossing, is about to drive everybody out of that vicinity. Its influence is felt afar, and our marshal should yank that "corpus" to some distant bone yard forthwith. It smells strong enough to walk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The County Commissioners met today and organized as a county board of health. The Commissioners and Dr. Emerson, member elect, compose this board. The by-laws and suggestions of the State board were adopted. Our local board will next dissect the county and see to its various rottenness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A fine portrait plan of the new central school building adorns the postoffice front. This plan, prepared by Architect Ritchie, will give us as handsome a school building as the west affords. The contract for its construction will be let by the school board tonight.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The grocery of A. S. Wickham has been closed on mortgages. The first, $522, is held by Read & Robinson; the second, $298, by Ridenour & Baker; and the third, $900, by Mrs. Trobridge. The stock will probably invoice twelve or fifteen hundred dollars. The invoice is now progressing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The most intolerable nuisance we have in Winfield is the crank preacher who stops in his wagon near a street corner and howls the most senseless jargon at the crowd, who stop to hear him out of curiosity and block up the ways. It is time he was suppressed. He should be sent to the insane asylum.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

LEPROSY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The press reports a Chinaman leper in Chicago and it appears that cases of leprosy are frequent among the Chinamen of San Francisco. Leprosy is perhaps the foulest disease known and seems to be indigenous to Asia where it is considered inevitable, just as small pox has been considered in Ireland or the measles in New England. The Asiatics get used to it, loathsome, distressing, and finally fatal as it is, and suppose it cannot be cured or avoided. It is contagious and parasitic, and seems to be inherent among the filthier classes of people of the Orient. It is always present among the lowest, laziest, filthiest, most degraded and beastly of the people there, while the better, cleaner classes are comparatively more exempt from it. Its prevalence in Judea and other provinces of Eastern Asia in the New Testament times indicates the degraded condition of the people of those times.

Now, one of our chief objections to allowing Chinamen to occupy or live in this country is illustrated by the fact that they bring with them dangerous, loathsome, contagious diseases to infect the American citizens with whom they come in contact. We believe in quarantine laws that will effectually prevent the landings in this country of the filthy, diseased, vicious, and ignorant, of all foreign countries. We have enough to do to clean up, civilize, educate, reform, and render less dangerous the degraded elements that are already among us, especially in the large cities.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The New York Times says: "Another illustration of the utter worthlessness of the recommendations of prominent politicians appears in the case of C. P. Judd, who was appointed some time ago a special agent of the bureau of labor statistics. The charge that he was a horse thief has been confirmed by his own admission. He is now in custody for horse stealing and confesses that he has served no less than three terms for the same offense in Kansas and Colorado, and yet he was strongly recommended for the appointment by senators and ex-senators of Colorado, and when Commissioner Wright inquired into his record, he was assured that there was nothing against him. Probably the men who endorsed his application did not know his character. They recommended him because they were asked to do so without inquiring into his fitness. The President has by this time learned the value of such recommendations, and he is not the man to be deceived more than once by the same persons."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The New York Commercial Advertiser estimates the number of visitors to New York City to see General Grant's funeral at 400,000, and their expenses as follows: Hotel expenses at $6, $2,400,000; traveling expenses at $5, $2,000,000; spending money at $10, $4,000,000. Total: $8,400,000. To this should be added, probably, $1,000,000 they expended to procure positions from which to view the funeral procession. The probability is that their total expenditures footed up $10,000,000, which is about $9,900,000 more than that city will contribute toward a monument.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Commonwealth claims that Albert Griffin caused the nomination of John A. Martin for governor and that the Commonwealth is responsible for his election. "O! wad some power, etc." Mr. Griffin could not have prevented the nomination nor could the Commonwealth have prevented his election. The Republicans of this state wanted Col. Martin and were bound to have him. They will stand by him in his present course without reference to Mr. Griffin or the Commonwealth.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Philadelphia North American warns the Prohibitionists that by deserting the Republicans and setting up in business for themselves, they are playing directly into the hands of a party from which they have nothing in common. Every Prohibitionists of intelligence knows that, and he ought to know that he has most to gain by cooperating with the party which is prepared to go the farthest in his direction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

By Indian Inspector Armstrong's census of the Cheyennes and Arapahos, the population of these tribes were found to be 2,167 and 1,207 respectively. They have been drawing rations for ten years for 3,769 and 2,198 members respectively. The savings in flour alone by the new census is $105,000 a year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Type-setting in this country is estimated to cost $30,000,000 annually. Careful statisticians have figured that $20,000,000 more would be required to set up all the communications that Veritas, Old Subscriber, Constant Reader, Tax-payer, and Pro Bono Publico flood newspaper offices with.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

All the cabinet officers are absent from Washington, excepting Garland and Lamar, and the latter is to leave on September 1, before the president or other absentees return. And this was to be strictly, constantly, and indefatigably a business administration.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Col. Tom Moonlight is to be United States Marshal Jones' first deputy. This is something like putting the cart before the horse, or getting a tail muscular enough to wag the dog.

SIGNING BAD PETITIONS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We commend President Cleveland for the way he "sits down on" Democratic politicians who sign petitions recommending unfit persons for office. Some of our co-temporaries think the President is over nice in this matter; say he should pay no attention to petitions whatever, and only pay attention to personal letters from the party recommending, for it is well known that politicians and other men do not have enough stiffening in the spine to refuse to sign anybody's petition. Some when they sign a petition to the appointing power for the appointment of a man they don't want appointed, write personal letters telling the officer who makes the appointments to pay no attention to their signatures on the petition and to refuse to make the appointment as unfit to be made. Now, if we were President, we would take the same ground that Cleveland does and would never tolerate for a moment that kind of treachery and cowardice. If a man had once signed a petition to mew for the appointment of an unfit man to an office through that kind of cowardice and treachery, I would never pay any attention to his petitions again, I would never appoint him to any office and would never tolerate him in my presence.

We have never signed a petition asking for an appointment we deemed unfit but have often refused, as politely as we know how, and have made enemies thereby, while others have signed the petitions and made red hot friends thereby, though they wrote personal letters at the same time urging that the candidates named should not be appointed. It is our rule, it should be the rule of every honest man, to never sign a petition unless he knows enough about the subject matter to be fully convinced that the petition ought to be granted. It is no excuse for a man to indulge in this cowardly, treacherous, and pernicious habit, that "they all do it" anymore than it is an excuse for lying or any other vice or even crime. A man who has not the courage to do right though some will take offense without cause or reason, is not a good citizen to say the least.

GRANT MONUMENT FUND.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The City of New York is the most colossal and persistent beggar in the world. The opulent thousands and tens of thousands of people of that metropolis are a herd of swine. They are as able to raise a million of dollars to beautify their own city as the State of Kansas to raise fifty thousand dollars or the city of Winfield to raise one hundred dollars for a like purpose. Yet when it is proposed to ornament New York with the Bartholdi Statue at an expense of $250,000, New York can raise but a minor part of the amount but begs all over the United States to raise the larger part of the amount. Again, it is proposed to raise a suitable monument for General Grant at Riverside Park in the City of New York, a monument which would be the most attractive ornament that the metropolis will have, one that will cost about as much as the people of New York City made in clean profits off from the Grant funeral, yet they expect to raise the funds for that monument from the people at large throughout the United States by persistent begging and to accomplish their purpose at very little expense to themselves. Were the New Yorkers like the people of the West, they would raise a million of dollars in that city for the Grant monument fund in twenty-fours and never beg a cent for that purpose, though they need not refuse proffered contributions from other parts of the country. But they will get the money from the country and then make all the profits they can out of the erection of the monument and out of its visitors for all time.

While we desire to assist what we can in the erection of the grand monument to suitably commemorate the dead hero, we wish that monument and his tomb had been located at the National capital. As it is, we shall give our contribution and attention to the Grant monument to be erected at Leavenworth in our own State.

DODGING PERSECUTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Some of the Republican newspapers are disposed to turn the tables on the Democratic administration. They say that during the administration of Gen. Grant and other Republican presidents, the Democrats kept up a howling because the presidents took vacations in summer, although they were always within reach of telegraphic communication, while Cleveland is now hiding away in the Adirondacks, forty miles from any telegraph office, and neglecting his duties, and say that this is a poor showing for this vaunted business administration. But the case is different now. Republican presidents were not persecuted to death by an appetite for office, "a conspiracy for spoils," while Cleveland is. Poor man, he has been hounded by the hungry horde for five months and the only wonder is that he is able to get to a hiding place. We don't wonder that he prefers mosquitos, galli nippers, rattlesnakes, and hornets' nests in the Adirondacks to the persecution he has endured at Washington, If we were in his place, we would either resign or bring Gen. Sheridan with the military power of the nation to Washington to help sit down on them as he did on the cattlemen.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The latest news from the Cheyenne agency is to the effect that the cattlemen are preparing to drive their herds off the reservation before the expiration of the forty days in which they have been ordered to remove them. It is said, as well, that the Indians are feeling very "uneasy" about being deprived of the revenue they derived from the cattlemen for leasing them their lands. It amounted to as much as $12 per capita, and when a chief mustered a good sized family, his income was quite a desirable sum for him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The report that a genuine and fatal case of Asiatic cholera, imported at that, has occurred in Camden, New Jersey, just opposite Philadelphia, is enough to create an alarm in this country that will cause a general cleaning up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We guess it can be safely assumed that El Mahdi is dead for a certainty at last, and that his death will make the re-conquest of the Soudan comparatively easy of accomplishment, if the English care to undertake it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The appointment of Judd, the self-confessed horse thief, has been revoked. Judd, the horse thief, and Meade, the murderer, are two appointments that can be scored up against the present reform administration.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The French of Canada are strenuously endeavoring to save Riel's neck, and it is not at all unlikely that they will succeed between now and the 18th prox., the day set on which it is to be stretched.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The greatest cotton crop in the history of the country is expected this year, and corn is also growing very rapidly. If prosperity does not return, it will not be because of nature's stinginess.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Omaha Republican insists that Senator J. J. Ingalls, of Kansas, shall be the next Republican nominee for president, and thinks the New York Sun will support him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

There is no abatement of the cholera in Spain, or France. On the contrary, it is spreading in both countries, and an unprecedented fatality is attending the disease.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

All the accumulations of our surplus stock of summer goods will be sold now regardless of cost or value. We must make room for our fall stock now in transit. M. Hahn & Co.

EDUCATIONAL COLUMN.

[This column is edited under management of the Cowley County Teacher's Association. Fannie Stretch; Alfred W. Wing; and R. B. Moore, editorial committee.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Teachers' Reading Circle inaugurated at the State Teachers' Association on the Chautauqua plan, if properly conducted, must result in great good.

Indiana and Ohio started in a very similar work last September, and report good progress with bright prospects.

The committee having the whole affair in charge is certainly a good one, and will soon have all ready.

The plan of organization and course of study were laid before the teachers of the State through the Western School Journal, (a paper which every teacher in the State, those of Cowley not excepted; should take and thoroughly read), and by circulars sent out by the educational department of the State.

We urge upon every teacher the necessity of sending name and membership fee to W. C. Barnes, Winfield, immediately, in order that he may be able to report at the September association.

No teacher in the county should allow this opportunity of better preparing himself for the great work that he has undertaken to pass by unheeded.

Should it be asked what are the advantages offered to the readers of the course, it may be replied they are three-fold.

1. The work of the course has been carefully arranged. The need of both general and professional culture has been kept in view. To have carefully followed the course is of no slight value. The personal benefit will be incalculable. Teachers of the state reading and thinking along uniform lines of the best progress in thought, must dignify their work. The first advantage then is a professional and moral one.

2. The honors to be conferred upon members who complete the course are not empty, meaningless, or to be cheaply esteemed. Certificates are to be issued only upon satisfactory completion of the work. No complimentary certificates will be given. Examinations while free from catch questions and obstructions, will be made fair and sufficient tests of the work done.

3. Finally there is a practical advantage that will commend itself to every teacher, and which will be of itself worth all the needed study and expense.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

DEXTER DOTS. "MOSS ROSE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Jake Barnhart is afflicted with sore eyes.

Mrs. Secrist has gone to Kansas City to visit relatives.

Mrs. E. I. Jackson visited her sister, Mrs. Bullington, last week.

Nicholson & Oliver have erected a new livery and feed stable since our last writing. Dexter is on a boom.

There will be a Sunday school picnic in Peabody's Grove next Friday. Several schools are invited to participate and have a good time.

George Drury has almost completed his new dwelling house in Dexter. It will be a great improvement to Dexter when finished, as it is a two-story and will be a convenient house.

Mr. Kaster gave an entertainment at his residence for the benefit of the Dexter band boys last Saturday evening. Good music, boat riding, etc., were among the amusements, and all seemed to enjoy themselves immensely.

Rev. E. C. Ferguson of Wellington, Kansas, will preach at the Sheridan schoolhouse the fifth Sabbath in this month (August), and plenty of good shade will be erected and a basket dinner will be on the programme, so all come with your baskets filled and hear a sermon.

Miss Ella Thompson was taken violently ill last Thursday morning at her home in Dexter, and died at half past twelve that night. Her sudden death was a sad blow to her family. She leaves a husband to mourn her loss; she was about twenty-two years old. Her funeral was preached from the M. E. church Friday afternoon, and about 4 o'clock, her remains were laid to rest in the Dexter cemetery. The husband and family have the sympathy of the people in this vicinity in their sad bereavement.

The Grant memorial exercises were held in the new M. E. church. Rev. Woodson from Burden delivered the oration in a very eloquent manner. The members of the G. A. R. were out in force. The choir rendered some choice music selected for the occasion. Miss Mattie Truesdell presided at the organ. The church was tastefully draped in mourning and decorated in flowers. There was an immense crowd present to pay the last respect to the old commander.

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Hardwick celebrated their tenth wedding anniversary Saturday evening, August 8th. Quite a number of friends and relatives were present. They were the recipients of some very useful tin presents. At 6 o'clock a fine supper was served and a bountiful supply of ice cream during the evening, when we were ready to depart. Mr. Hardwick requested us to come again in ten years. Mr. and Mrs. Hardwick know how to entertain these guests and make them feel at home.

WILMOT WAIFS. "T. R. C."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. Cottingham will have his blacksmith shop ready for the workman in a few days.

The Town company here finished their well 93 feet, with an abundant supply of water 40 feet.

Mr. Adam Stuber is on the invalid list, having been so for the past two weeks, but is improving somewhat at present.

Work on Mr. Lorton's building is progressing rapidly and will be ready for our Kansas City merchant in a few days.

Mr. R. C. Jones of Polo is figuring on the probable cost and place for a store room at Wilmot, and expects to be one of us in the near future.

A restaurant on the tapis this week, and will be ready to furnish the hungry yeomanry and others with the necessary of life (good grub) in short order.

Mr. D. F. McPherson will move his stock of goods this week from his old stand at the postoffice to Mr. Phoenix's stone building, which he will occupy until he has time to erect a building of his own.

Mr. David Roberts, we understand, has purchased the Coon quarter of land adjoining his farm, which will be a splendid addition to his already improved farm; also, that F. B. Moery [?Mowry] has purchased the Shannon quarter, 8 miles northwest of town.

The town of Wilmot is located about 13 miles northeast of Winfield, on the line of the K. C. & S. W. R. R., in one of the most prosperous and enterprising neighborhoods in the county. The sound of the hammer is heard and the streets present a busy appearance.

We learn that Mr. Holt has rented his grain and stock farm to Mr. J. R. Thompson for a term of one year, and will take up his abode in the suburbs of Wilmot, having already purchased 5 acres of land from the Wilmot Town company. He expects to erect a residence thereon this fall.

The K. C. & S. W. is completed to Wilmot, building will commence in dead earnest now that the lumber can be laid down here by the cars. The boom is surely coming to this part of the moral heritage. The dry bones re beginning to rattle, and the purchase of land is the talk of the day.

The county commissioners were out Monday to see if the railroad company had filled their contract in regard to the first 10 miles of constructed road in the county before they issue the county bonds to the railroad company as per contract. We predict they will find the road all right. We understand that L. D. Latham, of Chicago, was also down along the line this week looking up the future prospects of his belongings.

DEXTER. "MOSS ROSE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mrs. Geo. Bryant, living east of Dexter, is very sick.

Most of the Dexter young folks attended the basket meeting at Liberty last Sunday.

Mrs. E. J. Johnson, of Sheridan township, visited her sister, Mrs. Bullington, Monday.

The rain showers that have fallen the past week have been very refreshing, but a good rain is needed badly in this part of the country.

Rev. E. C. Ferguson, of Wellington, C. P. minister, will preach at the Sheridan schoolhouse the fifth Sunday in this month. Good shade will be prepared.

Since our last writing Miss Ada Tetrick [?Tedrick] and Mr. Aaron Reynolds have gone from single wretchedness to married blessedness. We wish them all the joy and happiness that life affords.

The Grant memorial services were held in the new M. E. church. The ladies of Dexter furnished the flowers for the pulpit and tastefully draped the church in mourning. Rev. Woods, of Burden, delivered the address in a very appropriate manner. Some choice music was furnished by the choir with Miss Mattie Truesdell as organist. There was a large attendance--more than could be seated. The members of the G. A. R. were out in force to pay their last respects to their old commander. Everything passed off quietly.

Mr. and Mrs. Hardwick were at home to a number of their friends last Saturday evening, it being their tenth wedding anniversary or tin wedding. They received several useful presents in the way of tinware. Mr. and Mrs. Hardwick did all in their power to entertain their guests. At six o'clock supper was served and a supply of ice cream was on hand during the evening. When the guests were ready to depart, Mr. Hardwick requested them to come again in ten years. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. Joe Furman, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Peabody, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Bullington, Mr. and Mrs. Kaster, Misses Abbie and Julia Herrin, of Burden; Miss Lizzie Burdick, Mr. Gilliland, of Burden, and several other young gentlemen, but failed to get their names.

A very enjoyable occasion took place at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Elliott Monday evening, August 3rd; it being their 40th wedding anniversary. A large number of friends and relatives were present. The presents were presented by Rev. Rankin with a few appropriate remarks, after which ice cream and cake were served and a good social time was enjoyed. Excellent music was rendered by the string band. Following is the list of presents.

Large plush chair: Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Hines, Mr. and Mrs. Serviss, Mr. and Mrs. Riggs, Mr. and Mrs. Taplin, Mr. and Mrs. R. Hite, Messrs. Phelps, Nickelson and Leffler.

Neck tie: Mrs. Booth.

Silk tissue and cane: Mr. and Mrs. Salmons.

Fine shirt and hose: Mr. and Mrs. Truesdell.

Fruit dish and gloves: Mrs. Thompson.

Dress pattern: Messrs. Truesdell and Williamson.

Knives and forks: Mrs. Emma Fay.

Silk Kerchief: Mrs. C. A. Peabody.

Table cloth: Mrs. Geo. Stephens.

Bed spread: Mrs. R. Hite.

Cake stand: S. H. Wells.

Paper holder: Mrs. A. O. Elliott.

Silver spoons: Mrs. Brown.

Spectacles: Mrs. Phelps.

Lace curtains and slippers: Mr. and Mrs. Serviss.

Linen table cloth: Mrs. Al. Elliott.

Cake: Mrs. W. Fay.

TORRANCE ITEMS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. A. O. Elliott and wife were in Winfield Wednesday on business.

Quite a crowd from Dexter and Burden attended the social here some time ago.

Misses Sallie and Lolly Haygood and Mattie Wilson spent Friday with Miss Laura Elliott.

Our Sunday school intends taking part in the picnic at Baltimore Saturday, if it don't rain.

Misses Lou and Mattie Wilson entertained a number of their friends at home Thursday evening.

Mr. Ed. McLean and Sherman Crawford, of Burden, spent Sunday afternoon at Capital Hill. Come again, boys.

Miss Matt Rittenhouse, Eva Reynolds, and Ermie McKee are home again from the Normal. They report a pleasant time.

The third nine of Burden played our second nine here Saturday. They had a good game, Burden coming out victorious.

Mrs. G. W. Gardenhire and her son, Jake, who have been visiting her daughter in the Territory, arrived home one day last week, much to the joy of Mr. Gardenhire.

Mr. A. O. Elliott was hit by a ball last week while playing, and came very near having both eyes knocked into one. He looks like he might have been knocked down with a rolling pin.

Mr. Bob Nipp, of Winfield, came down on the train Sunday evening and stayed until Monday morning. He and Mattie were at Capital Hill Sunday evening. He was accompanied as far as Burden by his friends.

Mr. Dean Swim, of Stonington, Illinois, who spent a month here this summer, and who has since been staying with his parents in Winfield, passed through here Wednesday on his way back home. We hope he left with a good opinion of Kansas, and that he will visit us again some time in the near future.

STAR VALLEY. "DUFFY."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Considerable hay is being put up this year.

The corn is being damaged greatly by the hot, dry weather.

"Verily, verily I say unto ye," Mahlon Fatout has a new iron pump in his well.

"Ned," the Telegram correspondent, has developed into a full-fledged, measly hod carrier.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brown and Miss Caddie Ridgeway, of Dexter, are recreating in this vicinity.

John Richards is having the walls put into his cellar. Mr. Trip, of Winfield, is doing the mason work.

J. C. Martindale, James Walker, and O. M. Akers returned from the Normal last week, looking pale and thin.

Last Sunday was a gala day for Mrs. Wilson. Only twenty-six visitors and not a very good day for visitors either.

Jack Justice sold his pony to Silas Anderson for forty-two and a half dollars. Jack concluded to sell it before it was stolen again.

We would advise Otis R. to return the log chain he borrowed some time ago for fear of a second class funeral and he riding in the head wagon.

Richland Killion, one of Cowley's pioneer settlers, but who, for five years past, has lived at Fort Scott, Kansas, is spending a few days among his old friends here.

N. E. Carter and wife, of Odessa, passed through here last week, en route for Pratt and Clark counties to look for a location, and to visit friends and relatives who had gone before.

We wonder what has become of "G. V." of late. Can it be possible that the business of his holy office has drowned all his journalistic attempts? Come, G. V., brace up and live through it, and let us hear from South Bend once more.

Another sad drowning affair took place near the Dunkard Mill on Wednesday evening of last week. Two brothers, named Fruits, went to Winfield after a load of lumber; when they returned in the evening the river had risen to past fording. The boys left the team and wagon on the east side and started to cross in an old boat. This was the last seen of them until they were found by a party of searchers Friday afternoon. The boys were well thought of in their community, and their sudden and tragic death will cast a gloom over the entire neighborhood.

CAMBRIDGE AND VICINITY. "H."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A child of Ben Burns' is lying very ill with typhoid fever.

R. F. Roberts is in the east recuperating his failing health.

S. M. DeBolt and wife have returned from their visit to Ft. Scott.

Rev. Warren preached to a small but appreciative audience Sunday afternoon.

Dr. Long reports Mrs. M. J. Weaverling, who lives east of town, as being dangerously ill.

Owing to the "dampness" of the morning, Rev. Dwyer failed to fill his appointment here Sunday.

Henry Dyer and wife have returned to Cambridge to stay. We are glad to have such acquisitions to our society.

W. S. Koons is very sick. But little hopes of his recovery is entertained. Dr. Rude, of Burden, has the patient in charge.

The Band of Hope met with Mrs. Weaverly the last time. We understand they are making arrangements to have a picnic somewhere on Grouse, in about two weeks.

There is a great deal of sickness in and around our town, though comparing our druggist's report with those of other towns of the same size, Cambridge is not very sick, or else we use other medicine than whiskey, gin, beer, etc.

Prof. A. H. Limerick and other speakers, of Winfield, will be out Friday evening, August 14, and have a meeting at the schoolhouse for the purpose of organizing a Temperance Union. These gentlemen are working in the interests of the State Temperance Union, and are speaking and organizing all over the county. They are able men for the work and we bespeak for them a good audience.

NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. "OLIVIA."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. E. D. Franklin has treated himself to a new wagon.

Mrs. B. has been spending a week or two in the west.

Mr. and Mrs. Watsonberger have been on a pleasure trip in the nation.

Mr. and Mrs. Royce expect to start east on the this week.

[THREE OR FOUR ITEMS IMPOSSIBLE TO READ. BIG WHITE STREAK!]

Mr. Robert Nelson and daughter of Indiana are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Jessie Nelson. They have come to stay, and the rest of the family will come to them ere long.

Mr. Folks of Salem has sold out and will go west and get some of Uncle Sam's nice land.

Mrs. Douglass is home to her mother's on a visit. She came with the Bryant family when they came back.

Messrs. Franklin and W. P. Hoyland will go to Grand Summit this week to put up a large quantity of hay.

We are glad to say our esteemed citizen, Mr. W. H. Lucas, has again been deputized as postmaster in Salem.

I received a very short but pleasant call from one of the COURIER boys, Mr. L. M. Dalgarn, the first of the week.

Mr. John Orand is putting up a nice little house, and somebody is making some pretty quilts. Be busy and happy while you may.

Mrs. Friend of Winfield has been the guest of Mrs. Cob Jackson this week. They have been having a nice time visiting friends in the country, and she intends staying another week.

The young ladies are searching the cook books trying to find a No. 1 pie recipe, as they think pie on Sabbath eve will captivate a handsome bachelor (not a hundred miles from Salem) if anything will.

The Bryant family will leave for their western home this week. There will be a lonely "Lot" in Salem. The Sunday school voted thanks to Miss Virgie as secretary and chorister, and accepted her resignation.

Mr. Eli Reid will soon move to Burden as his business will be there, he having bought the Burden mill. We shall miss him and his good wife from our little village, and their vacant seat in Sabbath school will be hard to be filled. May prosperity attend them in their new home.

The M. E. sewing society met with Mrs. James Baker last week and had a pleasant time; took dinner with them, and Mrs. Baker added bountifully some good things from her larder and nice vegetables from her garden, and all were provided for. Quilting was the occupation.

The Grant memorial services were held in the M. E. church and an excellent sermon was delivered by Rev. Popkins, the other ministers in Salem assisting in different ways. Rev. Bicknell was accompanied by his wife to his Walnut field of labor this week. They expect to make some visits in that vicinity.

Mrs. Dr. Crabtree received a telegram a short time ago asking her to come to the bedside of the afflicted brother, Wilber Crabtree (late of Burden), as he wished to see her and the baby once more. She hastened on the sad journey but ere she reached his home, his spirit had left the house of clay and only the silent form was left for her to gaze upon.

Mr. Editor, your "devil" gave me the credit of one of your items in last "pencilings," and made it sound as if we Salemites were putting on airs, for we have no "city dads," and if "our physicians did more business on Sunday than any other day," we do not know it, and if they sell whiskey, we hope it is only for medical purposes. The item in itself was all right, but we want it sent home to the "city chaps."

Mr. Nelson's team ran off last Thursday with Mrs. Vance's youngest child in the wagon. They ran from Mr. J. W. Hoyland's house to Mr. McMillen's, where they were stopped by the men just out from school meeting. There were some white faces and wildly throbbing hearts anticipating the final of the run-away, fearing a little mangled form would meet their gaze. Little Dallas had run out and climbed into the wagon and seizing the whip, gave the horses a sharp cut, when they broke loose and away they went. He came off well, only receiving a cut on his chin.

Oh! The cards are out for a wedding and who do you think it is? Someone you nearly all know; well, he will be happy ere this is published, so I'll tell. It is the Rev. C. P. Graham and a Chicago lady, a Miss Ellen Piggott. May they be very happy and find their wedded life to be a path of roses without the thorns, and may their good works live after them and be as lasting as the roses perfume--

"Like the vase in which roses have once been distilled--

You may break, may ruin the vase if you will,

But the scent of the rose will hang round it still."

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rain is very much needed in these parts.

Henry Weakly has fully recovered from his throat trouble.

Uncle Joe Hassel's folks have put up a nice lot of hay lately.

Mr. S. A. Rucker and wife, of El Dorado, are visiting J. A. Rucker and family.

Mrs. Alex Shelton called and spent the afternoon with Mrs. Ad Rucker recently.

Miss Lida Howard has secured the school at No. 37. This is her second term. Success to her.

But few at Sunday school again. Why don't you attend? Come now, the heated term is most over.

The stage from Winfield to Douglass has changed time and driver. It now stays overnight at Douglass.

Mr. Will Schwantes and wife had a visit Sunday from her parents, I. F. Martin and wife, and other relatives; also at night by some young folks.

Ad. Rucker's youngest daughter had the largest boil on her forehead I ever saw, but after Dr. Rothrock used the lancet, it commenced healing rapidly.

TORRANCE ETCHINGS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. W. S. Rigden was in Winfield Wednesday.

Mrs. McPherson and Mrs. Combs are lying dangerously ill.

Mrs. Crawford, of Burden, spent Thursday with Mrs. G. W. Wilson.

Ed McLean and Miss Rosa Pierce were at Capital Hill Sunday.

Miss Lyda and Alice Taylor spent Friday with Mrs. Crawford, of Burden.

Miss Eva Reynolds and Mattie Baxter made a short visit to Burden Monday.

Mr. Branson, of Eureka, was on a visit to his sons, Henry and Link, last week.

Our young folks intend taking in the picnic at Dexter Friday. They are expecting a big time.

Mr. Frank H. Greer, of THE COURIER, and Fred Collins, of Burden, called at Capital Hill Friday.

A number of our young people attended the picnic at Baltimore Saturday. They report a big crow and lots of dust.

Mr. John R. Fusselman, of Douglass, was one of our latest visitors. He came down Saturday and stayed until Monday. Come again, John, we are always glad to see you.

Minister Cox and Other American Citizens Pay Touching Tributes to the Dead

Soldier, in Which English Sympathizers Join.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

NEW YORK, August 18.--A cable special to the Herald, dated Constantinople, says a largely attended meeting of American citizens was held today at the Consul General's office for the purpose of paying a tribute of respect to the memory of the late General Grant. The Rev. Dr. Wood, of the Scutari School Mission, presented, as the oldest resident, several resolutions which were unanimously adopted, expressing sympathy with the country and family of the dead General, and eulogizing his great qualities as a soldier, patriot, and statesman. Minister Cox introduced resolutions, in a very touching address, in which he referred to General Grant's magnanimity as a conqueror, and the many proofs he had given that the reconciliation of the sections was ever the nearest thought to his breast. Mr. Dilon, of South Carolina, following Minister Cox, paid a warm tribute in behalf of the Southern people to the high qualities of the head and heart that had characterized the departed hero. He expressed the hope and belief that the last vestiges of antagonism between the North and South had been forgotten in the mourning over Grant's grave. Several English sympathizers were also present, among others Woods Pasha and Major Tretter, a British military attache. A copy of the resolutions will be forwarded to the family of General Grant.

TEXAS CATTLE FEVER IN ILLINOIS.

The Disease Discovered to Exist Among Two Car Loads Late Arrived

At Bloomington from Hutchinson, Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

BLOOMINGTON, ILL., August 18.--The Spanish or Texan fever has developed here and is creating considerable excitement among stockmen. Two weeks ago Michael Brothers, large cattlemen near this city, shipped sixty-one stock cattle here from Hutchinson, Kansas. When they arrived they appeared to be in perfect health. On Friday last the cattle showed signs of being sick, and already fifteen are dead and twelve more down with the disease. When it was learned that they were sick, fifteen were shipped to Indianapolis. The veterinary surgeons say it is genuine Spanish or Texan fever. The Cattle Commissioner has been

[ARTICLE WAS CUT OFF AFTER THE WORDS "has been"...]

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.

All persons knowing themselves indebted to me, either on account or by note, are requested to settle by September 1st, 1885. I must have money by that time, and any one failing to settle then must not grumble if they have costs of suit added. It is utterly impossible for me to run my store on promises. Persons owing me must heed this notice, as I mean business. J. B. LYNN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

This space belongs to J. P. Baden and will be filled with tidings that will gladden the hearts of the people of Cowley County. Watch it!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

NEW FIRM!

NEW ROOM.

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

A large invoice of

Salt & Smoked Meats,

bought very low, which we will retail to our customers accordingly.

Bacon--Sides: 10 cents.

Bacon--Breakfast: 12 cents.

Hams--Sugar Cured: 12 cents.

N. Y. Shoulders: 10 cents.

Picnic Hams: 10 cents.

Picnic Boneless Hams: 10 cents.

Lard: 10 cents.

Job lots of 50 pounds or more a specialty.

Holmes & Son,

South Main St.

Free Delivery to any part of the city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

KING OF THE VALLEY.

The Imported English Draft Stallion "King of the Valley," will make the season of 1885 at Magnolia Farm on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of each week, and Friday and Saturday at Hands & Garry's stable, Winfield, Kansas.

VERMILYE BROTHERS.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Skilled Winfield City Markets.

NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Kansas City and South-Western Railroad Company will, until further notice, run a regular mixed train from Atlanta to Beaumont, leaving Atlanta at 8 o'clock a.m., making close connection with the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway train going East; also connecting with the Frisco train going West, will leave Beaumont at 4:30 p.m., arriving at Atlanta at 6:30 p.m.

S. C. GIBBS, Gen. Freight & Pass. Agent.

Winfield, August 10, 1885.

A TRIP TO DEATH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We find the following regarding Mr. G. E. Constant, for years a resident of Winfield and well known in connection with Constant's boarding house, east 10th avenue, in the Colorado Springs Republic. It is signed by "A Comrade." Mr. Constant took a trip to Colorado for his health; but instead, met death. "Died at Colorado Springs, August 8th, 1885, of consumption, Comrade Garrett E. Constant, who was born in Logan County, Illinois, June, 1834, where he resided until 1873, when he removed to Colorado Springs, where he resided five or six years, afterwards removing to Winfield, Kansas, where he married his second wife, who now survives him, as also a married daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Lanterman, now residing in Local County, Illinois. The summer of 1884 he spent in Colorado Springs for his health, returning again about six weeks since, but it was evident that he must soon answer to the roll call before the Commander-in-Chief of all the armies, and in spite of the best of skill and the kind, constant attention of a loving and faithful wife, death claimed him for his own. In the early days of the late war, he answered to his country's call and went forth to fight the battles of his country as a Corporal of Co. I, 106th regiment Illinois volunteers. He proved a gallant soldier, having served faithfully for three years, and as a member of Winfield post, No. 85, G. A. R., Department of Kansas, he took a lively interest, and it was indeed fitting that he should finally be laid to rest by his surviving comrades. A noble man, a kind and indulgent father, and loving husband--peace to his ashes--we, his comrades, salute the dead."

TEN MILES ACCEPTED.

The County Commissioners Inspect the K. C. & S. W.

Everything First-Class.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Board of County Commissioners, accompanied by County Attorney Asp, inspected the first ten miles of the K. C. & S. W. railroad built in this county Tuesday. The rode over the line from Richland township to Beaumont, and were surprised at the completeness of the road bed and equipments. They found everything first-class--far from the scrap iron and two-ties-to-a-rail line the Burden Eagle and other sorehead papers had been trying to make believe. The engines are as fine as ever run on a track, and like the cars, and everything else about the road, are splinter new. The Commissioners were unanimous in pronouncing the road, so far, as good as any in the west, and unhesitatingly accepted the first ten miles. They also examined the abutments of the Dutch creek bridge and found them of the very best. The track is about twelve miles from Winfield now, coming right along. Side-track has been put in at Wilmot. The Commissioners went out today to condemn from the north line of Walnut township to Timber creek. The survey around the city is not yet settled.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We see our e. c. advertises our note book. We have known papers to cabbage matter after it was in print, but to take it from an innocent and unsuspecting individual while upon a friendly visit to their sanctum, and to allow the spirits to spirit it out of the reporter's pocket, is too bad. Our e. c. can keep the note book; it is no good to us, anyway, for we can never read our writing after it gets cold. Keep it, and fill your columns up with its rich treasurers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Once more we are happy to tell the old, old story. As the reporter was out Wednesday seeking whom he might devour, Cooper & Taylor started him off with a fifty pound watermelon. It is needless to say the reporter felt good clear down to the bottom of his boots, reaching the office with a struggle under the heavy burden. The typos did effective service. It was the daisy melon of the season. Cooper & Taylor have our thanks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

It is the hard cash that commands now-a-days; the best value for the money and with this medium in hand our Mr. Hahn is now doing the eastern markets in order to buy a very large and choice stock of Fall and Winter goods. The old maxim of "goods well bought are half sold" will be a convincing fact to an intelligent public. M. Hahn & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

In answer to an order issued by Col. Woodcock, commanding the Second Regiment, K. N. G., Capt. Steuven, Lieutenants F. W. Twitch and J. E. Snow were called to Wichita Tuesday to attend a meeting of the line officers to elect a major of the regiment and do other business. They go up on the morning freight.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire, wife and little girls, left on the S. K. Monday. Mrs. McIntire and children go to Wisconsin for two months with her parents and George accompanies them as far as Kansas City. Our Sheriff will make a fine looking and lively widower.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Ezra Meech has almost recovered from the terrible accident that made two weeks blank in his memory. His mind is almost entirely restored and he sits up and is rapidly gaining in strength. A few weeks more will bring him out all right.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mary F. Briscoe, of Burden, filed a petition with District Clerk Pate asking a rending asunder of the connubial ties that bind her to M. S. Briscoe. Her grounds are habitual drunkenness and extreme cruelty. S. J. Day is her attorney.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Col. J. C. McMullen sends us the Mt. Washington, N. H., "Among the Clouds," stating his arrival at the summit of Mount Washington, 6,293 feet above the sea. The Colonel appears to be enjoying a very fine summer vacation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Excelsior district No. 9, two and a half miles south, at its school election on the 13th, was a tie on uniformity on text books. E. C. Smith was elected clerk. Eight months school was determined on for the coming year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Sheridan township basket meeting for next Sunday will be held at Dunning's grove instead of Sheridan schoolhouse as at first announced.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Republicans of Fairview township will meet at the Akron schoolhouse Saturday, September 12th, at 2 o'clock p.m. J. L. Foster, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

To make room for the fall stock, August Kadau will give better bargains than ever before. Call and see him and convince yourself.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Glass fruit jars at reduced prices for the next 30 days at McGuire Bros.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Joe Harter is moving his drug store into the Green building, next to Johnston's furniture store.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Noble Caldwell left on Tuesday for an assurance spin around Wellington, Wichita, and other places.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. Reider will preach at Valley View schoolhouse, district No. 12, next Sabbath afternoon, at 3 p.m.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

O. J. Dougherty has bought a fine bay flyer, which he expects to sleep up and make the mile in a three-minute trot.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mrs. George Dresser, children and sister, left to join her parents at Burton, Kansas, for an Iowa visit of several months.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

E. C. Seward has bought the Harter drug store building and will move it to the lot where Stubblefield's meat market now is.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mrs. Wm. Camery is home from a three months visit in Dayton, Kentucky, and William is happy: the wrinkles have left his brown.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Dr. Emerson's office is still over Harter's drug store--but not at the old place. It is now in Green's building, next to Johnston's furniture store.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Homes & Son did a land office business in watermelons Saturday. The sold 163. Charley was delivering melons until ten o'clock at night.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Ed Millard, the Democratic choice for postmaster at Burden, received his commission Monday and has entered upon the duties of his office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

State Architect George Ropes and daughter, of Topeka, are at the Brettun. Mr. Ropes, as architect of the Imbecile Asylum, is here to look after it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Misses Cora and Lizzie Sloan accompanied their mother, aunt, and uncle to the Indian Territory Sunday to see Chilocco school and other sights.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Messrs. Harris & Clark will occupy the rooms of the Winfield National Bank until the new extension is finished, when they take its first room.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

G. E. Brewer, formerly connected with our Roller Skating rink, is home after several months in Texas and western Kansas. He will be here with his family for a while.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Charley Bahntge's little sorrel trotter is attracting attention as the boss flyer of the town. The animal picks himself up with admirable alacrity. Charley imported him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Tom C. Daniels, a substantial farmer from Maple township, with his wife and babies, are visiting with his father-in-law, Wm. Atkinson, the merchant tailor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

H. D. Loveland, of Frankie Morris fame, has been relieved of his engagement with the Wichita grocery. His recent romantic actions have destroyed his usefulness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Capt. Sinnott's family have moved back to Arkansas City, and the captain is a lone "widdy" most of the time, foraging on hotel hash. He spends his Sundays at home.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Rev. W. N. Sloan of Corry, Pennsylvania, will preach in the Presbyterian church next Sabbath morning and evening. Rev. Mr. Sloan will fill the Presbyterian pulpit for about a month.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

James R. Foster, of Brookfield, Missouri, is visiting his nephew, G. W. Foster. He was here last fall and is almost persuaded to sell his fine Missouri farm and invest here. Proper thing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

George Corwin was the lucky winner of the twenty-five dollar oil painting at Whiting Bros.' prize drawing Saturday evening. The painting is a beauty and George is happy, as he should be.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Charley Gay is enjoying a visit from his father, from Butler County. The old gentleman is sixty-seven years old, and one of the pioneers of this country. He moves around like a man of forty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Green Wooden got a glass the other night in his heel to the bone, and limps like a man of ninety. A piece as big as a thumb nail was cut out by the doctor. He set his foot down in the wrong place.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Judge George D. Orner, whose wife is spending a few weeks at the Brettun under the medical care of Dr. W. T. Wright, came in from Medicine Lodge yesterday, and left this afternoon for Topeka.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Judge Soward delivered a temperance address at Silver Creek schoolhouse, near Burden, Sunday. The attendance was large and the interest warm. The Judge's niece, Miss Mattie Marshal, accompanied him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mrs. E. D. Garlick opens her Kindergarten school again the first Monday in September. Her school has always been popular and will have as large attendance as ever. There is no better education for the young up to the seventh year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. Lafayette Gibson brought to the COURIER office yesterday the best bundle of millett we have seen this year. It is about six feet high with heads ten inches long, and was raised on the Nancy Randall farm.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We have been handed papers containing portrait and highly complimentary notices of George W. Gardner, mayor of Cleveland, Ohio. He is a brother of James Gardner, of this city, and prominent in politics, business, and philanthropy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Joe Voorhees, a friend of Senator Long and Capt. Nipp, was in the city with his wife Tuesday, on his way to open a hardware and furniture store at Veteran. He was out to Veteran a few weeks ago with Capt. Nipp and is charmed with the prospect.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Adam E. Schatz, of Easy Starter and Gold Ore fame, is at the Brettun, from New York City. He will be remembered as prominent in the big gold mine excitement with "diggings" in Ninnescah township in early days. He is now one of Gotham's attorneys.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

County Superintendent Limerick discoursed on temperance at Floral Sunday, and organized an adjunct to the county Temperance Union, of which he is president. Floral's society starts off with fifty members. Mrs. Limerick accompanied the Professor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

J. G. McGregor, a friend of P. Powell, has bought C. W. Stolp's interest in the hardware store on East Ninth. The firm will be Berkey & McGregor. Mr. McGregor is a thorough businessman and will make many friends. We bespeak for this new firm a good patronage.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Sheriff Henderson came over from Wellington Wednesday to get one Freeman, taken in by Constable Harrod on a burglar description. Though answering the description to a "T," the Sheriff said he wasn't the man. It was another fellow that looked like Freeman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

An experienced farmer of this county says sorghum is the best feed that can be found for stock. He says he drills or sows it thick, immediately after harvesting his wheat or oats, and cuts it with a machine before frost, allowing it to cure about a week. He gets from one to three tons to the acre.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The invoice of the A. S. Wickham & Co., grocery stock was finished Tuesday, showing $1,460. Capt. H. H. Siverd is the officer in charge and will probably sell the stock out at forced sale. Bad location and high rent seem to have been the trouble. Messrs. Wickham & Trobridge brought $2,200 here with them, and lose about all.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Thompson, of Washington, D. C., after a short visit with her sister, Mrs. E. D. Garlick, left on Tuesday for a western tour. Mr. Thompson has charge of the western division of the U. S. Geological Survey, the principal party of which is now operating in Arizona and New Mexico, where Mr. C. A. Garlick is.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Tuesday we had the pleasure of a call from Mr. Adam B. Schatz, the bright young attorney of New York City, who went into the gold ore speculation in this county a few years ago and got left. He explains that he was deceived by a New York assayer who had got floor sweepings of gold dust mixed up with his samples. We expect his land in this county is now worth all he paid for it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

S. H. Rodgers and W. R. McDonald left on Tuesday for Finney County. Mr. Rodgers will start a lumber yard at Syracuse, on the Santa Fe, near the Colorado line. This will be the supply point for a large territory that is rapidly settling up. Mr. McDonald goes to Veteran to assist in getting it on its pegs in the midst of a big boom.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The sixteen-year-old son of A. DeTurk, of Pleasant Valley, got a bad injury yesterday. He was hauling water to a thresher in a barrel. The barrel upset and threw him under the horses' feet. A horse stepped on his head, fracturing his skull over the brain. Dr. Emerson raised the skull and took out the splinters, and he may recover. He is unconscious and very dangerously hurt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The COURIER has been favored with two very fine bouquets. Their beauty at first was entrancing, but the cognomen given them by the lady donors, "third party bouquets," made the poor things sadly wilt. Water would have no effect on them. The ladies, however, say they will never wilt in their third party stand. They think Miss Newby's position about right. Just a little mistake in judgment, you see. The good intention is very apparent.

[I rewrote the next article, which was riddled with errors. The "typo" or the reporter for this article must have been "very sick" when writing this article up. They even had the name of the architect wrong. They had "Ritcher." MAW]

THE NEW SCHOOL BUILDING.

Shall We Have a Building a Credit to the City or a Duplicate of the

Present Rookery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The School Board met in regular session Monday for the purpose of letting the contract for the completion of the addition to the Central school building. The bids were received for two propositions as follows.

First. For the erection and completion of the building according to the plans and specifications, as prepared by Architect Ritchie. This contemplates the removing of the roof of the new part of the present building. (This is now dangerous, and is liable to cause a serious accident at any time because of the poor construction of the roof, which is spreading, so that the plastering is cracking and falling off the upper ceilings. It is only a question of a short time until the ceiling will fall in, causing, no one can tell how much damage, if not attended to now, while it can be helped.) This roof would be removed entirely. A new roof and cornice would be built (including the top ceiling of the rooms), which will correspond with that of the new part of the building. This will make a building, an accurate prospective drawing of which Mr. Ritchie has completed and had framed. It is now hanging at the postoffice door.

Second. The second proposition that the bids were received for contemplated no change or work on the roof of the new part of the present building.

This must be done though by a separate contract before school can be held in this building, or we will at some near future time, be called upon to chronicle the injury, and perhaps the death, of many of our school children, caused by a falling ceiling and roof of the building.

The contemplated roof on the new building will correspond in style and beauty with that on the building as it now stands.

Bids Received.

The bids on the first proposition were $12,794, which would complete the building as the drawing shows.

The bids on the second proposition were $9,655, which would give us a building of the same style as the present one with the tower as shown on the drawing.

Neither of the above bids include the seating or furnace.

Bid for Building Awarded to Connor & Son.

The contract for the completion of the building, up to the height of the stone walls on the present building, including the top joist, plastering, etc., was awarded to Connor & Son, of Winfield, their bid being the lowest, and work will be pushed rapidly so as to lose no time in getting the building completed.

Special Election.

The school board reserved the right to accept either plan the citizens decide upon, and have another contract entered into on the first day of September. To this end the special election was called for Monday, the 31st day of August, and thus let the taxpayers and citizens of Winfield decide as to whether we shall have one public school building that our citizens need not be ashamed of, and can point at with some pride as a sample of the good taste and style of our flourishing little city; or whether we shall continue to sink our money into such looking, botched, and patched up concerns as we have the honor of calling our public school buildings, and which have gained for Winfield the notoriety of having the worst looking public buildings in the State. Consider this matter thoroughly and examine the drawing of the proposed building (which is as correct as a photograph of the completed building could be), which will hang at the postoffice door until after the first day of September, thus giving our citizens an opportunity of knowing what they are going to get for the additional $6,000 worth of bonds, which will be necessary to complete the building. And remember that besides the style and appearance of the building, we will get four rooms on the third floor which can be fitted up and used as class rooms or school rooms when an emergency (such as the present one), should arise and we should need more school room.

When the seating and furnace is put in and all completed after the cheapest plan of roof has been put on, the cost will be about $11,000, ($3,000 more than was voted for the building purpose) while to finish the building according to the plans and specifications will require only $6,000 more than was voted for that purpose.

Now the question is: Can the city of Winfield afford to cut off the four rooms on the third floor and lose the only possible chance it has of having one public building that we may be proud of for the small difference in the two propositions?

BLUEBAUGH DISCHARGED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The case of the State against D. Bluebaugh came to a final in Judge Snow's Court Monday, after two days trial. He was charged with violating the law in keeping on ice and selling extract of malt over the bar of his billiard hall at Arkansas City, at thirty-five cents per bottle. This extract of malt is a cute subterfuge for beer. It is nicely labeled as a medical beverage, good for everything under the sun. One man drank several bottles of it daily for his "kidneys and bad digestion," and when these were well, he drank it to "cool off." He drank beer--when he could get it--for the same purposes. The evidence showed that the beverage was drank as a substitute for beer--to fill up the beer vacuum. It is just as near beer as anything possibly could be--without being beer. Frank Manny's tester was turned loose on it, and showed six percent alcohol; the same tester showed beer to have but five percent of alcohol, while it made simple, gentle champagne cider that isn't considered strong enough to make a little spider-legged dude "full," to contain seven percent of alcohol. The court decided that either Frank or his tester was badly off. No evidence that anybody ever got drunk on this stuff could be deduced. This was the point. If it wasn't intoxicating, it was from under the law's ban. It is sickening truck. Nothing but a cast-iron stomach could take in three or four glasses of it. Our reporter tried a spoonful, and had to get a twenty-pound weight to hold it in his interior department. It is worse than Arkansas' river water--regular slop. But they can't get beer, so the nearest thing to it, this slop, must be gulped. They must have something. It couldn't be proven intoxicating, however, and was turned loose. Bluebaugh was happy, and will soon be rich, if he sells as much of that truck as the dozen or two witnesses said he had been selling. However, he is liable to get taken in on the beer substitute--if it gets too strong. It will be well for him to "luke a leedle oud," and keep all boozy fellows from his premises.

[Both Arkansas City papers reveal that his name was "Bluebaugh." Courier was very consistent in using the name "Blubaugh," which is incorrect. Have corrected his name when I have caught this error. MAW]

JUDGE GANS' BUDGET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

John W. Davis and Vada Gordon were tied in a connubial knot on Monday by Judge Gans. They are a good looking young couple and will no doubt have a continual honeymoon and long life.

The Probate Judge has made an order permitting Mrs. Elliott, as guardian, to borrow sixteen hundred dollars to pay off a mortgage lien on real estate belonging to minor heirs of Dempsy Elliott, deceased.

A. G. Carman has filed inventory of personal property of Jay W. Carman, deceased, showing $735.

A. G. Carman has been appointed guardian of the estate of the minor heir of Jay W. Carman. Jay W. Carman is one of the Dawson ford victims of a month ago.

A BAD CASE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We are in receipt of the following. In the absence of our revising editor, we run it in verbatim.

"The railroad Boss of Seely The age of light-y three wanted a young girl of Seely Between 19 and 20 to Be his Bride and She recived and called him a Big old jool Thee mades and wides and grave wiges of Seely has all gon a back on him and if there is any young girls that wontes to be a old mans darling furst krat a card or a call at Seely and yea will finde M.r.s Jim manoham please let this in all the papers Seely Kansas"

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

My entire stock of dry goods, groceries, show cases, and store fixtures. I will give a first-class bargain for cash or exchange for city or county property. The stock invoiced $21,000 at 10 to 20 percent, less than cost. Everything in good order, nearly new, as the party from whom I lately purchased the stock had been in business only four months. I have no time to attend to it and will sell or trade at the first chance. THOMAS H. LYNCH, Wichita, Kas.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

I will receive sealed bids until August 29th, for the building of two stone approach walls to the timber creek bridge, walls two and one half feet at bottom, eighteen inches at top, six feet high and thirty feet long each. Also five hundred linear feet of grade near S. E. Burgess farm, as per specifications now in my possession. Right received to reject any and all bids.

J. C. ROBERTS, Trustee, Walnut Township.

[Yes. They had "Right received" instead of "Right reserved.]

NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Will the party who sent us a postal card from Tannehill, in regard to a lost dog advertised in this paper, please send us his address again, as the card was lost?

NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The public is hereby notified that the undersigned will not be responsible for debts contracted after this date by H. H. Paramore, August 17, 1885. J. SCOTT, Baker.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The record of marriage licenses recently granted in Cincinnati contains the name of Miss Carrie Damm. The fact that she is willing to get married is, perhaps, evidence that she doesn't.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Kansas National Guard now consists of one light battery and four regiments of infantry. Section A, of the battery, is stationed at Winfield and is attached to the second brigade. Section B, Topeka, is attached to the first brigade. The first regiment of infantry is commanded by Col. S. L. Patrick, of Ottawa; the second regiment by Col. L. N. Woodcock, of Wichita; the third regiment by Col. J. W. F. Hughes, of Topeka, and the fourth regiment by Col. Henry Casey, of Beloit. Each regiment is now recruited to a strength of eight companies.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Boomerville is deserted now, the boomers having broken camp and taken quarters in this city and around in the country. Some of them have taken contracts to put up hay for cattlemen and others, while others have gone to freighting. The offices of the colony have been removed to the city and opened out. The colonists appear to think that Mr. Cleveland intends to remove and keep all trespassers out of the B. I. T., whether they be cowmen, boomers, or others, it makes no kind of difference. Caldwell Journal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A sewing machine man seldom gets left, but he has a black mark this time. He went to one of our hotels to collect rental and repair a machine leased to a lady boarder. Both were seated at the machine when the fellow happened to let his arm fall down in the wrong place in an embracing position. A scream! Bewildered man! Scared boarders! Everybody rushed to the scene and the woman told a blushing story, and declares on a stack of anathemas she'll never pay the agent on that machine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Mrs. F. C. Pritchard, recently of Sedalia, Missouri, aunt of Mrs. Perry Tucker, is erecting a very neat and roomy residence on Mansfield Street between Eleventh and Twelfth. It is 34 x 50, twelve rooms, and of modern and handsome design. Bates & Wells have the carpentry and A. C. Hitchcock has just finished the stonework, basement under the entire building.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

John Goodrich, the old pioneer, curly-headed John, again holds forth in J. P. Baden's dry goods department. John was with J. P. for years in Winfield's pioneer days. For a year or so he has been running a grocery on his own hook at Cedarvale. We are glad to see him again handling the yard stick and scales in Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Methodist folks have put the finishing touch on their new church tower--an artistic railing and ornaments. The tower, all finished, is very neat, giving the church greatly enhanced appearance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Father J. F. Kelly has accepted the permanent pastorate of the Osage City Catholic church and leaves Wellington Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

One Blunt's Press Drill taken up almost new, for $35. A bargain. W. A. LEE.

CAPT. STEUVEN CAPTURED.

Co. C., K. N. G., Present Him a Fine Token of Regard.

A Beautiful Sword and Belt.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The interest that Capt. C. E. Steuven has always taken in our militia company has won the warm esteem of all. As soon as the new law of last winter went into effect, he set about with energy and ability to get up one of the best companies of the three State Regiments of Kansas National Guards. His success was marked. We now have a company, over sixty strong, composed of our best young men and possessed of a proficiency in the manual of arms which could have been attained in so short a time under no less efficient drill master than Capt. Steuven. The company has rented the Rink and fitted it as an armory, for which purpose it is perfect. For some time past the members have been planning a token of the warm esteem in which they held their captain. The token was secured. Monday eve was the climax. It was the regular weekly drill, and the fascinating "left, right, left, right" was at its zenith when Dr. H. L. Wells, surgeon of the company, requested the captain to draw his men up in line guard rest. "Can't you wait until we finish our drill?" said the captain. "No; I have a few words to say, and must say them now," answered the Doctor. The rest was made, when the Doctor stepped forward and in words of warmest appreciation presented Capt. Steuven with a valuable and beautiful sword and belt on behalf of the company. The sword is of modern design, uniquely mounted. On the blade is engraved, "Presented to Capt. C. E. Steuven by Co. C., 2nd Regiment, K. N. G." The Captain was "all broke up," but after putting the sword on and admiring it as the small boy his new red wagon, made neat remarks in appreciation of the handsome gift. Then the company gave three cheers for its Captain, the drill was resumed, and a happy event was ended.

A WOMANLY LECTURE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The temperance lecture of Miss Jennie Newby at the Presbyterian church last evening was good in the main. She talks in a pleasant conversational way, and makes some fine points, though she lacks novelty. The prohibitory part of her address was excellent, showing up the gigantic evils of the liquor curse and the absolute necessity of its prohibition. She also gave the chronic anties some hard knocks. Then she branched off in the wake of the greatest hypocrite and demagogue the nation ever saw, St. John, advocating a third party, as the only hope for the cause. She failed to eulogize the Republican party for its grand achievements in Kansas, Iowa, and other places. This third party idea needs no refutation. It has no bottom. The Republican party has put Kansas in the front rank of prohibition--the only party in the broad universe that ever did or ever will successfully cope with the liquor traffic. Miss Newby says she is a Republican, but her prejudice is apparent. Only the bright side of Democracy was shown up; only the dark side of Republicanism. The Democratic party is generally conceded to be the biggest demi-john in America.

THE MINSTREL LAST NIGHT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Minstrel shows are usually dull monotonies--the same thing over and over again. Such is always expected, and when one does depart from the old ruts, the audience heaves a sigh of relief, is most happily disappointed. This was the case Monday night. Billy Kersands is champion among minstrels, and has a first-class company. He has studied novelty. He is a whole show in himself and made everybody laugh a fearful "pain in their suspender." His "A new dude in town" was a paralyzer to our dudes, convulsing them. They didn't know how it did look to be moulded and run into their "duds." Wallace King's tenor voice is immense. The vocalists were all good. The troup, from Kersands down, are of the Ethiopian persuasion. The audience last night was good, sprinkled with ladies. A good minstrel show livens one up--straightens out a man's liver and sanctimonious, long drawn-out visage, and brings in its stead good cheer. Nothing equals genuine old plantation humor and wit.

SULKY SEEDER TAKE IN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A party of itinerants have been traveling over Cowley County selling a sulky harrow and seeder, of which D. M. Ferry, the great Detroit seeder, is claimed patentee and proprietor. The machine may be all right. That the sellers are tricky, we know. Joe Mack, of south Walnut township, bought one of these seeders. He wasn't to pay for it until October first, and gave an order on John D. Pryor, his agent, payable then, telling the seller to get Pryor's endorsement. The order was presented to Mr. Pryor, with no explanation, and not noticing the future payment clause, Mr. Pryor drew a check for $60, and the fellow walked off. The trick was noticed afterward, and Mr. Mack made the harrow dispenser admit the October contract, "but I've got my money and you don't get it back," said he. No man doing an honest business would play such a game, and people will do well to treat these fellows accordingly.

ED PATE'S BUDGET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

And now Arkansas City comes up with another divorce case, about the twelfth one for the September sitting of court. Elmira Only, a colored girl of eighteen, petitions for a divorce from Joseph Only, whom she charges with extreme cruelty and other diabolical things unmentionable. They were married on the 17th of last June, and on the 30th of that month he skipped, and hasn't been since heard from. Hackney & Asp are her attorneys.

Daniel Maher appeals from the $545 allowed him by the county commissioners as K. C. & S. W. damages.

A BAD ACCIDENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Frank Keller started to thresh some oats on Tuesday in Highland Park. He was going to haul oats to town and was pulling up near the thresher when the mules became frightened, running off. Mr. Keller had the lines wrapped around his arm and was unable to unwrap them. The mules ran twenty rods, by this time breaking loose, throwing him out, and the wagon running over his arm, broke it in two places, above and below the elbow. Dr. Emerson was sent for at once, and set the broken limb.

PATES' GRIST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

James F. Mayo has filed an injunction in the District Court to prevent Richard Constanzer and H. Moulsh from building a slaughter house on or near his premises. J. W. Cottingham, M. C. Hedrick, Arthur Orr, W. J. Orr, and Volney Baird have filed appeals from the K. C. & S. W. damages allowed them by the commissioners.

CITY RULERS.

Grindings of Their Last Night's Meeting. A Big Grist.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The rulers of the city met last night in regular semi-monthly session, Mayor Graham presiding and Councilmen Connor, Jennings, Myers, Crippen, and Baden present; absent, Councilmen McDonald, Hodges, and Harter. An ordinance assessing cost of sidewalks put down by the city; an ordinance providing for the construction of certain walks; an ordinance providing for the annexation of certain territory in the city were passed. Petition of W. A. Lee to build stone building with shingle roof on lots 16, 17, and 18, block 109, was rejected. The resignation of W. J. Cochran as street commissioner to take effect on the 20th inst., was accepted. Councilman Jennings was appointed to contract for boarding city prisoners, and they decided on paying only thirty-five cents per day each for said prisoners, a day to include three meals and a night's lodging. An ordinance, after some discussion, in which the property owners most interest took part, was ordered widening east Fifth avenue. W. J. Wilson, clerk of the school board, presented the tax levy made by the board for school purposes, as follows: For general school purposes, 10 mills; for bond fund, and to pay interest on one bond, 4 mills, which levy was approved by the council. The street and alley committee was instructed to purchase dirt for street grading from the Eaton-Short cellar excavators, ten cents per load, delivered. The following bills were ordered paid: Wm. Moore & Sons, stone for crossings, $106.68; H. L. Thomas, crossings, $59.01; N. Hurley, blacksmithing, $4.35; John Roberts, work for city, $4.87; A. G. Glandon, salary assistant marshal to Aug. 4, $5.

A HORRIBLE WICHITA DISCOVERY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Yesterday's Wichita Beacon contained this graphic head over a column sensation: "A Startling Discovery! Was it a Murder? A coffin Containing a Body Unearthed by a Gang of Workmen on Williams street!" The reporter then proceeded to run his legs off a column's worth to get the facts. But the principal actor in the discovery said: "Don't say anything about it, as the party suspected of the crime may skip, and evade the just retribution in store for him." "May I go with you to view the body?" said the reporter. "No, not now; Coroner Garrison, who was hastily summoned when the corpse was discovered, has it in charge, and has orders to let no one view the remains until certain papers have been served. It may even be necessary to inter the remains again privately." But this didn't satisfy the hungry man of news. He ceased not his hunt until he had run a man, who knew it all, into a dark corner and extracted this. "On Friday, when a gang of men were cleaning the street and cutting the grass away from the sides of the gutters on Williams street, near John Exton's place, they discovered a hole near the sidewalk which had the appearance of having been recently made. On digging down a little way, they were horrified in finding a coffin, a couple of feet below the surface. City Engineer Bayley was at once summoned, who sent word to Coroner Garrison, who came on the run. The coffin was lifted out, the lid taken off, and a body found wrapped in a blanket, outside of which was pinned a handsome wreath of flowers. The body was unwrapped, and the remains exposed to view. It was the body of a dead dog."

BOLD, BAD BURGLARS.

They Crack the Back Door of L. M. Williams' Store and Unlock the Safe.

$50 Haul.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The festive burglars, so long asleep in Winfield, crawled from their den Monday night and got in their work on L. M. Williams' drug store. They were cute ones and knew just what they were doing. They had evidently examined the premises cleverly and very cleverly did their job. The back door has no lock, is fastened with a slide bolt. The burglars inserted their chisel in the corner of the window frame next to the bolt and neatly pried out a little piece of the glass large enough to insert a hook and slide the bolt. Then they walked in and proceeded to dissect the safe. It wasn't hard to dissect. It has a little single knocker combination, and Mr. Williams seldom kept much wealth in it, preferring the bank for safety. On this occasion, however, he had about $50 in it, which the burglars shoved down in their nether garments. The door of the cigar case was down and the brandy bottle sitting on the floor. The money till, containing some small change, wasn't touched. They evidently got the fifty dollars, took a few cigars and a drink of brandy, and lit out. It was a very slick job, and was evidently done by two expert cracksmen. The job itself wouldn't need an expert, but the way they went at it, it showed science. There isn't the least clue to the identity of the burglars.

'HELLO, ANYWHERE!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A Telephone Circuit to Embrace all the Arkansas Valley Towns--Sure Thing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Elmer E. Peck, traveling solicitor for the United Telephone Company, who has been working up a telephone circuit embracing nearly all the Arkansas and Walnut valley towns, informs us that arrangements for the circuit are now complete and the lines will be put in in a month. The necessary amount in deposits were made today. Winfield took $350 in tickets, half what was asked. The circuit takes in Wichita, Mulvane, Belle Plaine, Wellington, Caldwell, Hunnewell, South Haven, Oxford, Winfield, Arkansas City, and Geuda Springs. Burden can also get in, too, by a little exertion and money. Then the line will soon be extended to Douglass and El Dorado, and the whole valley will be bound by the electrical, hello! This circuit will be a big convenience and we hail its final with joy.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Will Shivers et ux to L Turner pt se qr 28-32: $140

Mary and D A Millington to Emma F Dunbar lot 123 blk 148 Winfield: $200

Arthur H Fitch to Giles F Gilliland, lot 14 blk 76, A C: $125

Mary E Grady and husband to Jennie Hoffman, lot 18 blk 47 and lots 19 and 20 blk 47, A C: $1600

John F Medman et al to David R Beatty, lot 9 blk 80, A C: $3,200

Mary E Meigs to William Henry Nelson, lots 24, 25 and 26 blk 61, A C: $1,000

A D Prescott et al to David R Beatty, lot 9 blk 80, A C: $3,200

Mary E Meigs to William Henry Nelson, lots 24, 25 and 26 blk 61, A C: $1,000

A D Prescott et al to James T. Shephard, lot 17 blk 81, A C: $2,750

Chas H Holloway et ux to Harry P Farrar, hf lot 19 blk 81, A C: $750

Albert Worthley et ux to Johnson Loan and Trust Company, pt lots 15, 16, 19 and 18 blk 80, AC: $1,000

David R Beatty et ux to C R Stedman, lots 8 and 9 blk 100 and lots 13 and 11 blk 112 and lots 21 and 23 blk 113 and lots 23, 24, 25 and 26 blk 120, A C: $1,000

Charlie R Steetman to M E Carlton lots 18 and 19 blk 109, lots 13 and 14, 112 and 28 and 24 blk 113 and 23, 24, 25, blk 120, A C: $600

J G Wall et ux to W B Pixley, e hf pt out lot 2 Winfield: $200

Geo A Miller to Wm H Correll se qr ne qr 21 and s hf nw qr 25-32-7e: $300

William H Standeford to David E Standeford, e hf ne qr sec 17 and se qr se qr ne qr 8-33-7e: $575

Wm F Moore to W H Hill lots 21 and 22, 19-30-8e: $500

Joseph F Thomas et ux to George R Porter, s hf sw qr and ne qr sw qr 10-31s-6e: $600

Louise Wilcox et al to S W Stout, ne qr nw qr 20-33-5e: $00

Cordia Dennett and husband to S W Stout, ne qr nw qr 20-31-5e: $84

Joseph Smith et ux to Joseph A Jones, w hf ne qr ne qr nw qr 25-31-7e: $175

E S Miner et ux to W R McDonald hf se qr 2-34-4e: $1,000

Augustus M Bell et ux to Geo W Wallis, se qr 17-34-7e: $1,300

Henry G Bailey et ux to Robert Exter, lots 23 and 24 blk 137, A C: $100

John C Savage et ux to T W Wood, lot 32 blk 40, Burden: $200

J P Woodyard et ux to John Landes, lot 20 blk 70, A. C., qc: $10

Sarah E Stuart and husband to L V Coombs, lots 22 and 23 blk 127 A C: $1,100

C H Gaskill et ux to M L Robinson, 6 acres ne qr 8-31-8e: $500

Chas C Canada et ux to Thomas B Plough, s hf sw qr 4-32-5-3, 80 acres: $1,800

Wm K Patrick et ux to L J Richards, ne qr 7-31-8e, 160 acres: $1,160

Dolphus D Kellogg et ux to Levi Arnold, lot 16, blk 30, Udall: $25

R I Law et ux to Leonard Straub, sw qr 8-31-3: $1,600

John Rodgers et ux to Albert Stewart, w hf nw qr 10-31-5-e: $1,000

John D Lewis et ux to David Hite, lot 7, sw qr ne qr 4-34-7-e: $350

North V. Brubaker et ux to David Hite, lot 1, and se qr ne qr 4-34-7-e: $500

John Alexander et ux to C W Alexander lot 25 blk 62, A C: $80

C B Carlin et ux to Oliver Stevenson, lot 4 blk 32 A C: $300

Lafayette McLaughlin et ux to Tyler H McLaughlin, hf lot 7 blk 67, A C: $600

D H Mills et ux to Hiram Coucher, lots 11, 12, 3 and 4, blk 187, A C: $250

Jonah Moore et ux to J C Poor, lots 11 and 12, blk 94, Winfield: $1,300

Miles T Gibson et ux to Robert J Yeoman, 75 acres S S ne qr 4-32-3-e: $3,100

James S Herron et ux to Albert H Abrams, W 80 acres ne qr 3-34-33-e: $2,300

Jareph A Gaines to Albert G Gilkey, s hf ne qr and se qr nw qr 30-34-6-e, 120 acres: $400

Linnie Thompson et al to Amanda Malone, lots 21 and 22, sec 62 and lots 3 and 4, blk 117, A C: $275

Edward Malone et ux to Linnie A Thompson, lots 19 and 20 block 51 A C: $850

Jacob Morris et ux to Maggie Nail, lots 10 and 11 blk 153 A C: $450

F J Hess et al to John A Leonard, lots 21 and 22 blk 7 A C: $150

Wm D McCabe to Melville B Lewis, w hf ne qr 23-34-4e, 80 acres: $1,200

Chas B Parr to Townson J Parr, w hf ne qr 14-34-5e: $700

Asbury C McEwen et ux to Thos. H Spragins, lots 8, 9, and 324, 19-34-8e, 105 acres: $638

James Hill et al to John Patton, qr acre ne qr 31-3s-4e: $75

James H Wooley et ux to District 131, one acre se qr 36-35-3e: $1

Almeda R Mendenhall and husband to J F Gard, lots 1 and 3, s hf ne qr 1-30-6e: $1,500

New Salem Town Company to Eli Reed, lots 2 and 3, blk 7, N S: $40

New Salem Town Co to H P Snow et al, lots 3 and 4, blk 8, N S: $60

Eli Reed et ux to H P Snow et al, se qr 31-31-5e and w hf sw qr sec 3 and e hf se qr, 4-34-5e: $7,400

Eli Reed et ux to H P Snow et al, lot 12 blk 4 and lots 2 and 3 blk 7, New Salem: $2,000

William Davis et ux to John M Hutchinson, e hf se qr and s hf ne qr 2-30-5e: $1,000

Jacob Smith et ux to the Jersey Cattle Co., lots 31 and 31, 31-34-6e: $550

Albert Gilkey et ux to Albert P Johnson and James McDermott, lot 16 blk 148, Winfield: $700

Albert Gilkey et ux to Silas H Sparks, lots 13, 14 and 15, blk 148, Winfield: $4,000

THE CHOLERA.

The Disease Remains Stationary at Grenada.

Refugees Carry it Into New Districts.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

MADRID, August 18. In the whole of Spain yesterday there were 4,696 new cases of cholera and 1,556 deaths. The places in Spain in which the principal increase of cholera occurred yesterday as compared with Friday last week are Tarragona and Valladolid. In the former place there were yesterday seventy-seven new cases and ten deaths. The official returns show that in Grenada the disease has reached its height and remains stationary. In Albacete yesterday there were twenty-eight new cases and 23 deaths; in Castellon de la Plana, 23 new cases, and 17 deaths; in Cuenca, 154 new cases and 32 deaths; in Terni, 46 new cases and 32 deaths; in Valencia, 82 new cases and 49 deaths; and in Madrid, 20 new cases and 2 deaths. All of these returns show decreases in the numbers of both new cases and deaths. There have been eight riots at Lograno, due to the resistance of the inhabitants to certain sanitary regulations. The Governor of Grenada has been attacked with cholera. There were 24 deaths from cholera in Marseilles today and 52 new cases were reported. Thirty deaths from cholera have occurred in Salon and 15 in two neighboring towns. There have been 109 deaths from the cholera in Marseilles since Friday. Refugees fleeing from the cholera in Marseilles have introduced the disease in Sistereon and other villages in the Alpine Provinces of France.

NO NURSES TO CARE FOR THE SICK.

NEW YORK, August 18. A Marseilles special cable to the Herald says: The Mayor has recently opened five new temporary hospitals, but refuses to make any announcement of the fact for fear, as he says, of alarming the public. No nurses can be found to take care of the sick, as the people are disgusted with the injustice received and the small recompense awarded during the last epidemic. Corsica has ordered a three days' quarantine for ships arriving from Nice, thus giving an advantage to those from Italian ports. The Governor of Algiers causes all mails received from Marseilles to be disinfected. The commerce of Marseilles is paralyzed by the quarantine, and in their distress the people are talking of holding a meeting to compel the French Government to enter into some arrangement with foreign powers by which the severity of the sanitary measures may be lessened. The scare still continues, and it is reported that refugees from the city have introduced the disease into Sistereon, a town of some five thousand inhabitants in the department of the lower Alps, and into some of the neighboring villages.

MAXWELL PENNILESS.

But Claims That He Has Money Invested in England.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

ST. LOUIS, Mo., August 18. Very little of general interest has developed in the Maxwell case today. He had a number of callers during the day, but the police authorities restricted permits and allowed but few persons to see him. The chief event of the day was the retaining by Maxwell of John J. Martin as counsel. He says that when formal action is taken against his client he will not waive the preliminary examination. Maxwell is still in the police "holdover," and it has not yet transpired when he will be turned over to the Sheriff. His attorney has given him permission to write for the newspapers and in all likelihood he will make engagements at once and thus derive a little revenue. He claims to have 6,000 invested in English bonds and expects to arrange for the transfer of some of it here, but just now he is without a dollar and wholly dependent on the police authorities for anything he requires.

SPECIAL POST-OFFICE DELIVERY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

WASHINGTON, August 18. Appended is the list of the Post-offices in Missouri and Kansas in which the special delivery system will be put in operation October 1. The Postmasters are authorized to appoint as many messengers as may be required to carry out the intention of the law by the instant delivery of letters upon which an extra ten-cent special stamp has been placed by the party mailing the letter. Messengers will receive eight cents for each missive delivered, which will be the only compensation received. The appointment of the boys will be placed in the hands of the postmaster at each office. The offices in Missouri are: Chillicothe, Hannibal, Jefferson City, Joplin, Kansas City, Louisiana, Moberly, St. Charles, St. Joseph, St. Louis, Sedalia, Springfield, and Warrensburg. Kansas: Atchison, Emporia, Lawrence, Leavenworth, Ottawa, Parsons, Topeka, Wichita, and Wyandotte.

ESTABLISHING A QUARANTINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

AUSTIN, TEX., August 18. The State Health Officer, R. M. Swearingen, left yesterday for El Paso to personally see about establishing a quarantine against points in Mexico infected with the yellow fever. He informed a newspaper correspondent yesterday that the Governor's proclamation would be rigidly enforced in order to guarantee protection to Eastern points this side of the Rio Grande, but said that the howl against the passport requirement was based on a misunderstanding. The Governor did not mean that passports would be required of passengers eastward bound from Texas points on the Rio Grande, but that persons from Mexico would be required to show they had not been in an infected point within twenty days. The proclamation is both in English and the Spanish language, and has been thoroughly distributed at all points along the Rio Grande.

ATTEMPTED MURDER AND SUICIDE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, August 18. Andrew Undra, a miner at Nanticoke, yesterday afternoon purchased a revolver. On leaving the store he went to the house of a Hungarian, named Joseph Tomaski, with whom he boarded. The wife of the latter being at home alone, he told her that since he had resided with them, her friendliness toward him had inspired him with love and he wanted her to leave her husband and go and live with him. Mrs. Tomaski refused, when he told her to bid her children good bye. She laughed at him, whereupon he shot at her, the ball grazing her neck. Undra then turned the weapon upon himself and fired two shots. One of the balls passed through his windpipe and lodged in the base of the brain, causing instant death.

SAFE BLOWERS AT WORK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Lamar, Missouri, August 18. Last night the store of H. L. Reed, of Irwin, a small town on the Missouri Pacific Railroad, eight miles north of here, was broken open; the safe blown to pieces and over $600 in money, jewelry, and postage stamps stolen. The post-office is in Reed's store, and about $30 in postage stamps were taken. The parties who did the work were evidently not experts, and suspicion points to persons living in the neighborhood. Officers from this city are now at work on the case.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Who says advertising in the DAILY don't pay? Cooper & Taylor put in a local in regard to brick. Hardly had the paper got cold when parties commenced to come in for brick. They have a rushing trade on brick now. We inserted a small ad to rent two rooms yesterday. The party hadn't time to eat his supper before renters began to pour in. It is a fact, a little "ad" will do the business. If you don't believe it, try it and be convinced.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

In order to close out the balance of our stock of ladies white embroidered robes we have reduced our

$4.25 robes to $2.75

$4.50 robes to $3.00

$7.50 robes to $5.00

$8.00 robes to $5.50

M. Hahn & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

EYE AND EAR. Dr. Brandom or Hays of Twin Brothers Infirmary, Wichita, will visit Winfield every first and third Monday and Tuesday of each month, at Central Hotel. Measures eyes for compound spectacles.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Don't fail to attend our ribbon sale. They are neither satin-faced nor all silk, but they are nevertheless decidedly cheap at 5 cents a yard, for any width, color, or shade.

M. Hahn & Co.

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Recap. Administrator's Notice. Geo. H. Williams, Administrator of the Estate of William Kaats, deceased. Date of appointment: July 20, 1885.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

We want 1,000 more BOOK AGENTS for the Personal History of

U. S. GRANT.

40,000 copies already sold. We want one agent in every Grand Army Post and in every township. Send for SPECIAL TERMS TO AGENTS, or secure agency at once by sending 50 cts. in stamps for outfit. Address FORSHEE & McMAKIN, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

NORMAL AND COMMERCIAL COLLEGE.

WINFIELD, KANSAS.

First Term opens

Monday, September 7, 1885.

Prepares Ladies and Gentlemen for Teaching, for Business, and for College.

For further information address or call on

I. A. WOOD, A.M., Principal of Normal Department.

OR PROF. I. N. INSKEEP.

Principal of Commercial Department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

BOOTS AND SHOES.

Having purchased the business of M. J. O'Meara, and in order to make room for Fall Goods, we must

REDUCE OUR STOCK.

In order to do so we will make prices so low as to guarantee perfect satisfaction. We have in stock an elegant line of

Ladies' Slippers and Gent's Low Shoes

that we will sell at greatly reduced rates.

Come and Get Prices

and we will convince you we mean business. Our aim will be, as it always was in the past, to give you full value for every dollar spent with us.

W. C. ROOT & CO.,

(Successors to M. J. O'Meara.)

3 Doors North of Post Office.

THE BEST SHOW.

How Martin Griggs Slipped Into Sam Jones' Tent.

An Arkansaw Man Who Was Led Through the Influence of the Southern Evangelist

To Become a Sincere and Earnest Christian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

[Arkansaw Traveler.]

Martin Griggs, known in Eastern Arkansaw as Bad Martin, was in Little Rock the other day. He did not, through evil deeds, gain this unenviable name, but won it by his paroxysms of rage and by his almost ceaseless habit of swearing.

"Martin," said a friend, "they tell me that you have a professed religion."

"Yas, Abe, it's a fact. I ain't cussed none fur more than two months. W'y, sah, tuther day when the old spike-tail hoss bit a mouthful o' hair outen my head, I gritted my teeth, but didn't cuss. My wife expected to hear me cuss a sulphurous streak, but I smiled after awhile an' quietly took the air out of old Spike Tail's mouth. 'Here, mother,' says I, handing the hair to my wife, 'you can stuff your pin cushion with this."

"What was the cause of this great change?"

"Sam Jones and the Lord."

"You heard Sam, did you?"

"Oh, yas. I went up to Nashville to make arrangements for sellin' a lot of Arkansaw whiskey for Robertson County. I hadn't hearn a sermon sense I was a boy. My wife, she couldn't git me to go to church. Wall, the first night arter I got to Nashville, I was walkin' round and seed a big tent. 'Hello,' thinks I, 'here is a show. I'll jes' go in for I ain't seed a peart hoss in a long time.' My, I never did see such a crowd. Folks jammed agin one another like they wuz afeered thar wan't goin' to be seats enough. I scrouged my way along, but couldn't find the ticket warrant. I seed sich a crowd pourin' in that I thought I mout slip in an' I done it as slick as a whistle. I looked round for the animals but couldn't see none, so I took a seat an' waited for the fun to commence. Putty soon a small shirttail of a feller hopped up.

"'Thar's the ringmaster," thinks I. "He's goin' to tell us about the concert that'll take place arter the show is over. But bless you, he commenced to give out a hymn. As wicked as I was, I couldn't help but think that he was carryin' the burlesque a leetle too far, but what was my 'stonishment when the folks took up the hymn an' commenced to sing it. I leaned over to an old feller that sat close to me an' whispered: 'I live out in Arkansaw whar a man that has the cramp because he wants to fight so bad can always find accommodation, but they don't jump up and fall down on the gospel this way.' The old feller looked hard at me, and said that if I didn't hush he would have me put out. This riled me. I told him that thar mout be men enough in the show to put me out, but agin if they got through somebody would rurther go home than to stay an' laugh at the clown. Then he perlitely told me that it warnt no show, that Mr. Sam Jones, the great revivalist, was going to preach. I thanked him for his information, tuck a chaw terbacker an' le'nt back, concludin' that it didn't cost me nothin' an' that I could stand it till they passed the hat around. When Sam commenced to preach, I chawed my terbacker an' didn't pay no attention to him, but putty soon it appeared like he was playin' on a banjer. I stopped chawin' and looked at him. Then he tuck up the pruttiest flute I ever hearn. I flung out my terbacker and listened. The fust thing I knowed he had put down the flute and tuck up a fiddel. Laws a massy, I nefer heard such music in my life. I commenced to get sorry that I had ever swapped hosses on Sunday, an' it twan't long till I would have give a putty of I hadn't p'izened Weller's dogs. I thought of things that I stole when I was a boy--thought of the thousand o' lies that I had told an' the tears commenced to run outen my eyes. I thought o' my wife, how true and' how patient she had always been, an' how often I had hurt her feelin's; thought of my children--an', oh, Lord, the face o' my little boy--the little boy that I whipped a few days before he died come up before me. I couldn't stand it no longer. I drapped on my knees and' cried, 'Oh, Lord, have mercy on me, a sinner.'"

"I didn't care who was lookin' at me. I wouldn' have cared if the whole world had been thar. I humbled myself in the dust, an' deep in my heart I vowed that never gain would I ever do anything wrong. A flash of warm light entered my soul. A great gladness spread over my heart. I got up. Thar, standin' close to me, was Sam Jones. He retched out his hand an' said:

'Brother, the Lord has been kind to you.'"

"I don't know how I got outen that tent, but I know that while I was walkin' along the street, everybody seemed to want to shake hands with me. I went straightway to the depot an' tuck the fust train for home. When my wife seed me comin', she walked slowly to meet me, but, sir, the blessed woman, seein' something in my face, uttered a shout and rushed into my arms. Right thar I atoned for every time I had hurt her feelin's. That was the best show I ever went to, Abe--it was a show whar every man had a chance. I ain't done nothin' wrong sence, an' as I told you, I didn't cuss when old Spike Tail bit a han'ful o' hair offen the top o' my head."

MARRIAGE AND AGES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

[Olive Logan's Letter.]

Recently I sat next to the Baroness and Mr. Burdett-Coutts at a place of entertainment. Her ladyship was superbly appareled, and, on appearing among the audience, was presented by a young girl, dressed in black, with a large white bouquet, all lilies and red roses, trimmed with white lace. Mr. Burdett-Coutts seems to be endowed by nature with that most enviable of all gifts, a mirthful disposition. He has a laughing mouth, and a splendid set of white teeth. He is a jolly, handsome man, and I don't wonder his wife likes him. There has been a great deal of comment made about this match, but for my part I see no more reason why a lady of sixty-five may not marry a man of thirty-three, if both are willing, than a man of eighty, like Sir Julius Benedict, should marry a girl in her twenties, as I believe Lady Benedict still is.

SCOTTISH GALES.

Rescue of the Crew of a Bark. Anxiety for Fishing Vessels.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

NEW YORK, August 15. The Herald's London cable special says: This morning's news from the Scottish coast gives a thrilling account of the effects of yesterday's hurricane. The Norwegian bark Himalaya, bound for Furness with timber, was wrecked on the sands near Nairn. The crew was gallantly rescued by the Nairn life-boat, in face of a tremendous surf. The boats of the herring fleets were at sea and were caught by the tempest. As many as six hundred boats were at sea from Frazerbourg alone, and up to a late hour yesterday afternoon only four hundred had arrived. The utmost anxiety is being felt as to the safety of the remainder. Many disasters occurred in the endeavor to reach the land. One boat belonging to Stornaway was wrecked, and another belonging to Burghead ran ashore, but the crews of both were saved. Several fishing yawls were broken to pieces on the beach.

KEEPS A STIFF LIP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

HANNIBAL, MO., August 15. Dr. William Kemble, who shot and killed his neighbor, William Benning, recently, will have his preliminary examination next Monday at Palmyra. Kemble carries a bold front and claims that the killing was done in self-defense. He is rather talkative and nervous. He says he has been to Manitoba, but did not like the country. Every other man looked like an officer. It is evident from his talk that stings of conscience drove him to surrender.

IN GENERAL GRANT'S MEMORY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

BADEN, BADEN, August 15. The Rev. Mr. White, the chaplain of the English Church of All Saints, conducted a service today in memory of General Grant. The church was decorated with wreaths of immortelles. Many Americans were present. Mr. White delivered an earnest sermon on General Grant's career, comparing him to Wellington. The American visitors here consider the holding of the service a delicate and graceful act of courtesy on the part of Mr. White.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The firm of J. S. Martin & Son, wholesale grocers, 108 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, have suspended payment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Letters from Suakim say that the troops are dying like flies. The officials, however, will not report such a condition of affairs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The stock of the Nashville (Tenn.) Saddlery Company was injured by fire the other night to the amount of $65,000; full covered by insurance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The French revenue returns for the past seven months, recently made public, showed the protective legislation had failed to exclude foreign sugars.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A case of leprosy was reported at Hong Lee's laundry, Chicago, recently. On inquiry for the leper, the Chinamen in the house said he had gone away, they did not know where.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Frank and John Donahue were buried beneath a fall of earth in a stone quarry at Youngstown, Ohio, recently. The former was disemboweled and lived only a short time. The injuries of the latter were believed to be fatal.



Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Ninety young ladies took the veil at the Mattenckrodt Convent, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, one morning recently, under the direction of Bishop O'Hara. The ladies were from different towns and cities in this country and Europe.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Union Pacific Railroad issued an order on the 11th reducing the number of working hours from ten to eight hours a day and cutting down work on Saturday to four hours a day. A strike was thought to be imminent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Greenwood Iron Works, operated by the Parrott Iron Company, at Greenwood, New York, shut down the other night. The liabilities are said to be from $100,000 to $200,000, with assets of $500,000. Five or six thousand dollars are due the employees.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The family of Daniel Ashbaugh, Jr., near New Philadelphia, Ohio, were poisoned recently by eating toadstools. One boy died and the mother and a young child were not expected to live. Two girls named Richardson from the Dayton Orphans' Home, who were visiting the family, were also in a critical condition.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The United States Treasury Department has authorized the American Express Company to receive the baggage of passengers from Europe upon arrival in New York to be forwarded immediately in bond without examination to the principal ports of entry in the United States and Canada, where the duties, if any, will be assessed. The express company gives a bond of $1,000,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Montreal Local Board of Health has declared the small pox epidemic in that city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

United States Senator Coke inaugurated the anti-Prohibition campaign in McLennon County, Texas, on the night of the 13th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Cotton crop reports from nearly every section of Texas indicate considerable damage from drouth within the past few days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

An obnoxious tenant on a farm near Clonkerry, Ireland, was terribly beaten the other night by raiders who fired pistols on their departure.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

George and Henry Martels, aged twenty-one and twelve years, driving in a wagon, were run down by an express train at Hoboken, New Jersey, and both killed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Hop, Kee & Co., of San Francisco, the largest wholesale Chinese manufacturers of boots and shoes on the Pacific coast, have failed. Their liabilities are $110,000, their assets unknown.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

News from Guayaquil, Ecuador, of July 23, is to the effect that the volcano of Cotopaxi was again in a state of eruption. One hundred houses had been destroyed. The loss of life was not known.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Prof. Riley has received information from Montana Territory that grasshoppers of both the migratory and non-migratory species are swarming in that section, and that they are about moving East in large swarms.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

General DeLauncy telegraphs from Anam as follows: "We have fixed our headquarters at Hai Phong during the prevalence of cholera. There were seventeen deaths yesterday from cholera in Hai Phong and sixty-six persons are down with it today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

At a meeting of the Associated Bessemer Rail Manufacturers at Long Branch, recently, it was unanimously agreed to reduce the production of steel rails so as not to exceed the demand, and enable manufacturers to make rails at remunerative prices next year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Near Ithaca, New York, recently, a gang of four laborers on the Cayuga & Lake Shore branch, during a heavy rain, sought shelter under an overhanging bluff, when a land slide fell upon them and buried Mike McManus, Pat Mahon, and Mike Fahey, all of whom were killed. The fourth man escaped.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The British Wabash bondholders at a meeting in London on the 13th resolved to institute foreclosure proceedings under the terms of the general and collateral mortgages, and appointed a purchasing committee, in which all property after the purchase shall be vested. The scheme is to re-purchase the property and operate under a new corporation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Moses, ex-Governor of South Carolina, was again arrested at Boston for obtaining money under false pretenses.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Captain Couch recently gave orders to dissolve the Oklahoma colony. He was satisfied the administration intended to act fair to all parties.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Gorsuch, the Anarchist, addressed the strikers in the public square of Cleveland, Ohio, again on the 11th. The red flag was waved and the use of dynamite recommended.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Smith court martial at Washington completed its work and on the 11th the court was temporarily adjourned. The findings would be sent to the President for his approval or disapproval.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Dysentery was reported becoming epidemic at Bridgeport, a mining village of Pennsylvania. The disease was due to famine and filth, most of the laboring population being out of employment.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

The Social Purity Society, of London, was agitating recently for a new trial of Mrs. Jeffreys, for the purpose of securing a public disclosure of the names of politicians and noblemen who frequented her house.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Colonel Angel Rodriguez, of the party of Limbano Sanchez, and six bandits belonging to the party of Torre Jiminez have been shot at Matanzas. They were captured while negotiating for outward passage.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Acting Secretary Fairchild recently directed that a supplemental competitive examination from the American Consul at Guayaquil, Ecuador, saying that he had positive information that Santos had been liberated. No details were given in the telegram.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A very heavy rain fell in Kansas City and vicinity on the 11th, amounting to 5.29 inches, within the space of eighteen hours. The fall was unprecedented, and it was estimated that $150,000 damage was done. Several buildings and foundations gave way in the city and bottom lands in the country were flooded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

S. S. Cox, United States Minister, has been especially instructed, it is reported at Constantinople, to resume negotiations with the Porte for modification of the Turkish tariffs on American imports.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

[MANY OF THE NEXT ITEMS ARE ALMOST OBLITERATED BY WHITE SPACES RUNNING DOWN THE MIDDLE OF NEWSPAPER COLUMN. WILL TRY TO GET SOME PRINTED THAT I CAN READ.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

C. P. McVey, a farmer living near Oak Grove, Missouri, was shot from ambush the other morning, but was not dangerously hurt, the shot being only a flesh wound. Much bad feeling exists in the neighborhood and more bloodshed is expected.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Advices from St. Paul de Luanda, West Africa, under date of July 15, report that a petty king, Coahama [?] Huilla, died recently, and the natives attributing his death to witchcraft of the whites, massacred twenty Europeans, including three French missionaries.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

Henry Johnson and James Rodger, employees of the new Reading & Pottsville Railroad, were killed recently at Reading, Pennsylvania, while attempting to board a moving train. Charles P. Duston, another employee, had his head blown off by a flying stone from a blast.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 20, 1885.

A caving in of the lower levels in shaft No. 5 of the Republic, Michigan, mine recently, caused the instant death of Samuel Darlington, and the serious injury of Francis Bartele. [Rest of article obscured.]

THE WINFIELD COURIER

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, AUGUST 27, 1885.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official and Social Notes as Gathered by

Our Regular Washington Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Secretary of State will have the sympathy of all Americans, and especially those who have traveled abroad, in his efforts to improve the tone of our consular service. But the radical evil and only be remedied by Congress. At present, salaries in that branch of our service are absurdly small. The consequence is that the occupants fall into three classes. First, the impecunious, who are glad to take anything; second, rich people, who are desirous of social distinction, and are willing to take place for whatever honor may go with it; and third, ignorant persons, who imagine that there is much more money and glory in a consulate than the facts warrant. A fourth class might include invalids who have an idea that a particular climate may benefit them; and who take office in order to have a livelihood and easy occupation in their search for health. Out of these four classes our foreign consular service is mostly recruited, and must continue to be, until Congress sees fit either to abolish the system or attach proper and sufficient compensation to the offices.

The rapidity with which Assistant Postmaster General Stevenson is removing Republican postmasters and filling the vacancies with Democrats is causing some anxiety among the mug-wumps. But it is not reasonable to expect the Democratic party to let fifth thousand postoffices of the country remain in Republican hands. These offices are not covered by the civil service rules, and it has been announced that the administration will not extend the scope of the rules at this time. Theorists who go to extremes may denounce a policy that looks like compromising with "spoils," but great reforms move slowly, and they can only move at all when sustained by public sentiment. If it appears that the classified civil service has survived a change of party and is established on a basis that lifts it above the mutations of politics, that will be an immense stride forward.

But whatever may be the ultimate policy of the administration towards the small postoffices, it ought not to surprise anybody, that the cases to attract speedy attention are those of a party character. It may be that, after the postoffices have been divided with some fairness between the parties, the department will adopt a more conservative policy. But reasonable men will not criticize the administration harshly for seeking to establish something like an equilibrium in this matter.

It is a familiar trick of politicians and others to sign all applications for office presented to them, even if they know the office-seeker is unworthy, and then resort, if need be, to private representations in order that the appointment be not made. By this means they avoid making an enemy of the candidate, and, at the same time, secure the failure of his hopes. To judge from the stinging rebuke which President Cleveland administers to one of this tribe, he regards such duplicity as a heinous crime, which should, by rights, bring one to the penitentiary. Doubtless the President has suffered greatly in the way described, and so writes with feeling.

The State department may now have another Kelley on its hands in the person of James Whalen, who was recently appointed consul at Fort Erie, opposite Buffalo. Whalen, it appears, was an active Fenian in the 1866 episode, and on that account is very obnoxious to the Canadian government. A British diplomatic agent has been working on the case, and, it is said, he has advised Whalen's rejection on his record. In that case the State Department may have a delicate task ahead of it. Whalen is a Buffalo man, a personal acquaintance of President Cleveland, and well esteemed in the community.

The clerks in the government departments after some hesitation have begun to ask for their annual leaves of absence, and are now going away in great numbers. Very few leaves were asked for up to the first of the present month, but since that day they are granted with no hesitation. The apprehension that existed in regard to sweeping changes is not so manifest as it was, and in consequence the clerks are following the usual custom in regard to annual leaves.

The special delivery service which goes into operation on the first of October should prove a great public convenience. In most cases it will shorten the delivery of letters a whole day. The new undertaking trenches somewhat on the field of private enterprise, but it is clearly within the legitimate functions of the department. The success of the scheme from the revenue standpoint is doubtful, but the leading motive on the postal service is not profit to the government, but the public convenience. L.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The true inwardness of Lord Coleridge's coming marriage with an American lady is said to be that one of his sons is to stand for parliament at the coming elections, and his lordship remembers what Lady Churchill did for her husband at Woodstock recently. There is going to be a big demand for American girls among young Englishmen aspiring to enter the house of commons.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Lord Randolph Churchill absented himself this year from the customary Tory pilgrimage to the tomb of Disraeli. He said that he was a greater man than Disraeli anyway, and if the tomb wanted to see him, it could come around to the Indian office any day between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

In 1852 George B. McClellan, of New Jersey, discovered a vein of copper ore in New Jersey and this year he is preparing to develop it. At this mad McClellan rate of progress that mine will, more than likely, be in full operation before 1950.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The eastern Democratic press are now sneering at old John Roach because he shows enough assets to pay dollar for dollar his debts, and will have money left. Nothing short of his entering the poor house would have pleased them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

An Eastern mugwump newspaper defined a mugwump. It says that a mug-wump is a Republican who is "able to distinguish a pinchbeck statesman from the genuine article." But this does not explain why he prefers pinchbeck.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Inoculation proves not to be a preventive of cholera, if the inoculated persons get well. As the most of those who were inoculated died from the disease so contracted, perhaps the experiment did not have a fain chance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

People who buy wheat and provisions on account of a European war for a week may reasonably expect by that time to learn by authority that everything is amicably adjusted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A Georgia Congressman has signed the petition of sixteen men for the same office.

SOCIAL IRREGULARITIES.

A Winfield Lady Gives Some Solid Truths Worth a Remedy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

There are many things in this world of ours that I fail to understand. I cannot understand in what respect one man or woman is better than another save that one is more virtuous and more intelligent. I cannot understand the difference some people in society make in their treatment of those in their employ. Why is the girl who does the sewing in a rich family a degree more worthy of respect than the one who cooks, washes, and irons, and why is the woman who teaches the children in the same family more worthy of respect than either cook, sewing girl, or shop girl, provided their goodness and intelligence are the same, and suppose, as is often the case, that their intelligence and culture is equal, if not superior, to those of their employers, why cannot they enter and mingle in the same society? Surely one kind of labor is as honorable as another, and in idleness only is there disgrace. Then why treat laboring men and women as machines only to be viewed from a distance except when engaged in the performance of some task for them which needs their direct superintendence, or, if they deign any notice at all, who do so in such a patronizing way, as if they were doing the kindest thing imaginable in thus stooping from their high estate to smile upon them? There are bad men and bad women in almost all the walks of life--men and women whose wickedness or ignorance should debar them from all society save their own kind. Yet, if these be possessed of wealth, they can move in what is known as the first society in the land, while those who earn their own living in some quiet, honorable way, who read the best books, are able to talk on all the leading topics of the day, can never enter the so-called first society, while the gay, shallow minded persons are welcomed to its ranks if they but possess the one requisite: gold. Again, I say I cannot understand why these things are. But this I do believe, that when merit is recognized whenever found, when true men and women are recognized as such regardless of the occupation in which they may be engaged, the professions will be less crowded and more people will be contented with their lot--more ready to do their duty which lies next to hand without murmuring. We are told that there is no respect of persons with God. Then what are we that we set ourselves up to show respect unto those whom this world has already favored, leaving those who are just as worthy, to go their way?

A friend to the working class, O. M.

WINFIELD ON TOP AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Board of Trustees of the Methodist College met in this city Thursday to adopt plans and employ an architect and superintendent of the new college building to be erected immediately, on College Hill, this city. Plans and sketches, according to the propositions of the Trustees, were submitted by Willis A. Ritchie, Winfield; George Ropes, State Architect, Topeka; and S. A. Cook, Winfield; Hopkins & Holland, Topeka; W. R. Parsons & Son, St. Louis; E. M. Hale, Denver; Willis Proudfoot, Wichita; and John Barton, Independence. On the first presentation of plans, none were accepted. On the second, most of the architects came up with new sketches. Willis A. Ritchie retained his first sketches and again presented them, carrying off the contract. His plans and bid were accepted over the others, and he employed as architect and superintendent of the construction of the building. His money consideration was not as small as some others, but his plans and location were considered better. This is a bright plume in Mr. Ritchie's cap--beating some of the best architects of the west. He came here but a short time ago from Lima, Ohio, to plan and superintend the construction of John A. Eaton's residence and bank building. His ability as an architect was at once recognized and such encouragement given as has secured his permanent residence. He has planned the new school building and has the superintendency of its construction, with other prominent buildings. He is a young man, but a thorough architect, with the pluck and energy that always win. The College building, as now planned, will cost $60,000. The contract for excavation and foundation will be let during the first of September, work to begin at once. Its superintendency by a Winfield architect will be a big card for home contractors and home laborers. Mr. Ritchie is retained on much other work that will be done this fall and next spring.

HIS LAST ACT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Jap Cochran's last official act as Street Commissioner was a good one--the filling up and leveling of Riverside avenue between the depot and Park. This, the principal boulevard of the city, has been the meanest one to drive over, gulches and bumps in "cussed" profusion. Jap, during his reign of our streets, has done some good work--in fact, about the first really effective work that has ever been done on them. And it has been largely paid for by the property owners along the improved streets. Winfield undoubtedly has the finest streets, now, of any city in the west. Of course, there can yet be improvement, but comparatively they are way up. Speaking of Riverside avenue, it should be macadamized. The entrance to both the Fair Grounds and Riverside Park, should be made as solid as the rock of ages. Macadamized its full width, it would be perfect and need no more "monkeying."

DIED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

On the 16th inst., at her parent's home, on Mansfield street, corner 12th avenue., No. 1118, Winfield, Kansas, Mrs. Laura C. A. Zetzer, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Black. The deceased moved with her parents from Preble County, Ohio, to this city, July, 1884. She was born in Preble County, July 20, 1851. At the time of her death she was aged 34 years and 17 days. She leaves two little sons, her parents, one sister, and a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn their loss. She was a kind mother, a loving daughter, and a warm friend. During the last years of her life, she was a great reader of the word of God. She was a woman of prayer and did not fear death. Her funeral services were held at her parent's home on the morning of the 17th inst., conducted by J. H. Reider, pastor of the Baptist church of this city.

THE HOLINESS CHOIR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Music and religion always go hand in hand. Brother Kinney again opened up his gospel horn in front of the sanctum Thursday. Before he could find his text, the choir, in the gallery, over the Winfield National, opened up also. The musical director and Brother Kinney had failed to pre-arrange the services to avoid conflict. The reason for this is probably because the choir persisted in using the "fiddle" and "gitar," which grate very hard on the ear of a Holiness exhorter. "Tweedle, twee went the fiddle," in its incessant squeal, mingled with a dozen male voices, until Brother Kinney was completely drowned, and drove off to other pastures. It was real mean, boys. As you are now on the mourners' bench, the afflicted denizens of the public square will forgive you. THE COURIER has an ear for music--one insatiable.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Recently the Wichita Eagle stated that Nellie C. Bailey had eloped with a man named Sorrels, who left a number of unpaid bills. The fair Nellie is again at home, however, and says she was only at Topeka to see about her book and that she does not know Sorrels except slightly. Further, she says the report has injured her very heavily in a pecuniary way, by stopping sales of her book, and that the Eagle must make it satisfactory to her or stand the consequence--which means a libel suit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The wife of Fred Newcomb sends us a card from Independence asking the publication of her lost husband, whose mind is supposed to be deranged. He wandered away from home and can't be found. He is 23 years old, rather tall, light complexion, blue eyes, short moustache, blue shirt, black vest, and light-gray striped pants, and brown derby hat. Used to be in business at Caldwell and Harper.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Whoever wrote the following did it well. "It is not what people eat, but what they digest that makes them strong. It is not what they gain but what they save that makes them rich. It is not what they read, but what they remember that makes them learned. It is not what they profess but what they practice that makes them righteous."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A basket meeting will be held by the Beaver Center Christian church at Smalley's grove, half mile west of Tannehill, on Sunday week, August 27. Preaching by Elder W. W. Hopkins, of Mulvane.

A CUTE FORGER.

He Forges a Check for $300 and Gets Out With the Cash. An Expert.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

On Thursday or Friday of last week a man who had been working for Mrs. S. DeFaulk, east of town, went into the First National Bank and presented a check to Geo. W. Robinson purporting to be drawn by Mrs. DeFaulk in favor of John Ludlow. It called for $300, and as this same man had presented checks from the same person, which had proved all right, and this check appearing perfect, it was honored. Nothing more was thought of it until yesterday, when Mrs. DeFaulk was in town and said the fellow had quit working for her, she owed him nothing, and never drew that check--knew nothing whatever of it. Then an examination took place. The check was a perfect facsimile of those drawn by Mrs. DeFaulk--so perfect that she couldn't pick it out of the bona fide checks, without looking at the amount. It was impossible to detect anything wrong on the face of it. Ludlow had found her check book, drawn the check with her pen and got the number all right. He is evidently an expert. He had been picking blackberries and doing other work for Mrs. DeFaulk, and among her check vouchers were three or four she had drawn for him. Ludlow is a German and a peculiar looking fellow. He is about thirty-five years old, light complected, sandy hair and beard, small burnsides, is near sighted, and wears gold, ear-hook glasses over blue eyes, weights about 135 or 140 pounds, has protruding cheek bones, with unassuming, but very eccentric make up. His forgery accomplished, he went to Hand & Gary's livery barn and secured Capt. Gary to drive him to Seeley, where he took the train. He has a week's start, and is very likely in the far west. Sheriff McIntire has scattered descriptive cards all over the country, offering a large reward for the forger's capture, and he will likely be taken in sooner or later. Ludlow is undoubtedly no new hand at the game, however.

BRACE UP, MISTER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A man who will borrow his neighbor's DAILY COURIER when it only costs the small sum of fifteen cents a week, is n. g.--absolutely too penurious for an enterprising county like Cowley. Yet we have a number of these. We know of a number of papers that are read by different families in the subscribers' locality, thereby getting the news at their neighbors' expense. So familiar have these borrowers come, that the heads of the families stand around and wait for the carrier boy to deposit the paper in the box, when they make for it, and sit right down on the sidewalk, devour its contents--regular robbery--while the man who pays for it and has some independence and public spirit, wears out the dome of his pants waiting a chance to get a squint at the paper he pays for and owns. Oh, be men. If you haven't got fifteen cents, don't sponge off your neighbor. But you have got the fifteen cents, most of you, you old misers. Don't loan your paper to anybody. It costs money to make THE COURIER, your copy cost you money and is your property. By robbing you, the borrower also robs us: a double robbery. Of course, every guilty man will get made at this expose, and declare to never support such a blanked measly sheet. Brace up, have public spirit, and hand in your lucre instead of sponging. You get value received twice over, and you know it. Let your neighbors' paper alone, or we'll shoot you again.

HOME AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A. F. Hopkins, Addison Brown, Gene Welsh, and Claud Rinker got in today from two weeks rusticating and sight-seeing in the western counties. They went as far as Lakin and Garden City, Finney County, nearly to the Colorado line. They went out in Claud Rinker's wagon, camping out all the way, hunting and having a fine time generally. They didn't go quite far enough for deer and antelope. They wore regular cow boy outfits, lived on hard tack and returned as brown as the noble redskin of the forest, corpulent and buxom. This side of Garden City, on the return, Claud got a good offer and sold his outfit, when the boys took the railroad for home. Their two weeks' vacation was immense, giving a good view of the country and great hunks of fun. They killed two plovers and a cotton-tail rabbit.

WORTHY OF RECORD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A lawyer is seldom downed. He carries everything by force, and it's a mighty brave man who can stand up against a disciple of the "statoots." But one of our lawyers is in sackcloth. Last winter an individual came to him for advice and got it. The charges were five dollars. The client failed to come to time. The other day our lawyer sued in Buckman's court, filing his own case, being his own lawyer, but declared that the Blackstone man was to have his case provided in came to suit and he never agreed to pay him anything otherwise for the advice--the lawyer took the probable case as a guarantee. The lawyer lost the case and twelve dollars costs. He threatens vengeance, or we'd give his name.

BAD BOYS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Some mischievous boys roped one of Tony Agler's little long-eared burros the other night and pulled him up on the flat roof of D. F. Best's stable, and tied him there. The animal looked very heavenly, but when it came to taking him down, it was hades with a great big H. Tony called in a force and worked for a half day, trying every conceivable plan to keep from crippling the little mule; and at last succeeded, aided by words that put the "cuss-word" vocabulary to shame. Tony swears total annihilation to the first one of those kids he runs across. Bad boys! They ought to be turned over their ma's lap.

AWAY FROM OKLAHOMA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The weary and foot sore Oklahoma boomers have run aground and are lighting out for home. Six families, eighteen horses, cows, etc., camped near the cemetery Saturday going east, with the Oklahoma fever entirely eliminated from their being, though on their wagon covers still floated the old moto, "Our liberties we prize, our rights we will have--on to Oklahoma." They seem satisfied to let the administration take its own course--see the uselessness of kicking.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Our Democratic friends are in a squabble over the postoffice location. Henry Goldsmith refused to extend the lease for the present location, considering the postoffice a nuisance to his business, which it is, and P. M. Rembaugh leased the rooms now occupied by the express offices, with the stipulation that all partitions be taken out and a twelve foot extension, with large arches, be put on the north. Then began the trouble. Some of the Dems. wanted it in the north end of town, offering a stock company to build on the Jennings-Crippen lot, corner of 8th Avenue and Main. Others wanted it put on Ninth Avenue, and a stock company offer to buy the Fahey building, where the Ninth Avenue Hotel now is. The house is divided against itself and numerous caucuses fail to bring peace. George is immovable, and will put the postoffice where he pleases, in conformity to public convenience and general satisfaction, regardless of the postoffice location cranks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Don't try to best the present whiskey law, boys. You can't do it--It is set down that the druggists are the only legal dealers in that commodity, and the law will be enforced. It is not profitable to be yanked up, fined, and thrown into jail every six weeks, for the fun of selling a few drinks of something that does no one any good. The druggists are not kicking about it, but others are. The safest plan is to desist. A decision is expected in a few days in the Supreme Court that will make the owner of the building in which whiskey is illegally sold responsible for all fines and costs taxed against the vender of the truck. This will be pretty rough on the innocent real estate owner, but the law backs it up and there is no escape from it. Shut up shop, boys, and try something else. Caldwell Journal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A report was circulated in Burden recently that the City Council of that place was about to pass an ordinance compelling all heads of families to attend church regularly and hold family worship. The good people of that city were sorely troubled until informed that such an ordinance could not be enforced. Udall Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

It is reported that some of the boys that were supposed to have died of cholera over on the Arkansas were opened and found to be full of web worms. They had been running in a field of late corn and were probably killed by getting these worms in their stomachs.

Udall Sentinel.

FAIR GROUNDS IMPROVEMENTS.

New Exposition Building. Amphitheater Extension and Other Improvements.

Cowley's Fair Grounds Clear in the Lead.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

We piled into a rig Thursday with D. L. Kretsinger, Secretary and General Superintendent of the Cowley County Fair and Driving Park Association, and took a spin to view the new improvements now progressing on the Fair Grounds. The main exposition building, which is just being finished, looms up from afar. The new building, joining together the old wings, is 40 x 50 feet in size, two stories. It has an "A" ventilation roof and four ornamental and ventilating towers. The roof and towers have scroll work decoration and give the building a splendid finish. The light and ventilation are perfect. Two stairways, ascension and decension, are in the center of the main building, the opening being surrounded by a neat railing. The second story will be the fine art department. At the west and east doors are substantially railed hand stands, or verandas. The entire building, old wings and all, has a smooth, hard-pine floor, with pillar supports in the main part. The lower floors will be for Agriculture and Horticulture, and general display, a better room for which can't be found in the State. The Exposition building, as now extended, has over seven thousand feet of display room, and is airy, convenient, and neat. The building excels that of any county Fair in the State--just about such a main building as the one at Bismark. The amphitheater will be extended sixty-eight feet, out to the gate, and a band stand put in the center. This will make it one hundred and seventy-five feet long. These improvements are all being done under the personal supervision of Secretary Kretsinger, with the mechanics employed by the day, formanized by S. H. Crawford. The work is first-class. The association is putting into these improvements all its past profits and more. No dividends will be declared until the grounds are complete. The Cowley County Fair Grounds are already famous for their fine track and many superior conveniences and will gain in fame as its accessories advance. The enterprise and pluck of the Fair Association will meet its reward. Everything indicates that this year's Fair, from September 21st to 25th, will be the best ever held in the county. The crops are good and the fine stock increase large. Then these increased accommodations will be a big impetus. Secretary Kretsinger's "git-up and dust," will put our Fair Grounds in perfect shape for the coming Fair. Let everybody determine on exhibiting something. Cowley hasn't a farmer or stock raiser that can't exhibit something a credit to our splendid county.

COULDN'T FIND THE MOUND.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

About 12 o'clock Friday night an individual who is sensitive over the mishap and we won't give him away--the boys all know him--stalked into the sheriff's office and said: "Hic--I saw a light here an' thought I'd drop in. Where's the (hic) mound. I've been tryin' to find it for (hic) an hour. I took my damsel out ridin' and since depositin' her home, I hain't (hic hic) knowed nothin.'" Sheriff McIntire happened to be there--his better half being away, he keeps late hours--and was about to invite the fellow to a seat when the individual seemed to take in the vice he had run into and said: "I (hic) well, guess I'd better go--you hain't no use for me here." But the Sheriff invited him to a cell and kept him overnight. The victim of liquid refreshments made the heaviest "lost" this morning--twenty-five dollars fine. He left the earnest request that the elongated COURIER man be told nothing about it. And we weren't. The Sheriff was as still as a mouse. We got the facts from the elevated source of instinct. The victim of this item will have his girl take him home after their next buggy ride. The Sheriff's office is an expensive light house.

DEATH AT WORK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Miss Stella Fiddler, the daughter of Mrs. J. G. Eddy, died last night at her home on east 8th Avenue, in the Gilliland brick. She was fifteen years old--just verging onto womanhood, a beautiful girl of splendid accomplishments and sweet disposition. Last Sunday she was attacked with typho malarial fever, and rapidly failed to the last. The Episcopal minister of Wichita was telegraphed for, and services were held at the house this evening. The body was expressed to Beardstown, Illinois, over the S. K. this evening, accompanied by relatives.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

'Twas midnight; dark and silent, save the feline serenade gay Tom was pouring from his soul. Scarce had the faint note ceased its reverberations, when a figure clad in snowy whiteness glided swiftly and silently past the window where alone sat Eascalapine meditating upon--hist! It stops! Where! By that window, yonder! Ah, it speaks! Listen! A silvery voice sings, "I Miss Thee, Little Bud." Ere one could twenty count upon the hand, it went as swift and silent as it came, and now a bog of darkened gloom o'er spread the place where just before an immaculate spirit (?) stood.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A waiter in the Occidental, named Dora White, on Monday attempted to shuffle off by taking the morphine road. The desperate girl swallowed four grains of the deadly drug, and had fallen into a comatose state before her condition became known. Dr. Acker was hastily summoned, who, with difficulty, recalled her to consciousness, and administered an emetic; which had the effect of relieving her stomach of its dangerous contents, thus saving the use of the stomach pump. An unfortunate love entanglement is said to have been the cause of this attempt upon her life. A. C. Traveler.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A kind word, a pleasant smile, a cheerful greeting, a gentle pressure of the hand, or even a familiar nod as you pass on the street--that's all; but you have sent a ray of sunshine into some sorrowful heart, and touched that invisible chord of human sympathy which trembled in sadness, and caused it to vibrate with joy. Let us be social; it costs but little, and carries with it so many blessings, the value of which we have no means of estimating.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

W. A. Croffutt makes the following statement and prediction: Roach & Son are going ahead to finish the contract (as ex-Secretary Chandler predicted they would), Mr. Whitney imposing no new conditions whatever. And this is the man against whom some partisan papers launched infamous charges only a fortnight ago. It is understood that the Dolphin is to be presently accepted by the Government too.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Judge Buckman tied a connubial knot for George Jackman and Ross Mater Thursday. The Judge is Old Persimmons in the connubial business, and ties a regular double-bow, extra-concentrated knot. George and Rosa are excellent young people, and will no doubt live happy and prosperously down to the nineteenth year. The Judge is happy, the victims of Cupid are happy, and the scribe is happy. He has smoked.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

John A. Eaton's new residence corner of 9th Avenue and Menor Street, is progressing rapidly. Messrs. Warner & McIntire are the contractors. It is modern in design, convenient, and handsome. It contains fifteen or more rooms, with statuary arches and fine embellishment. It will represent about twelve thousand dollars and make one of the city's handsomest and most creditable residences.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

H. W. Buchug, of Minor, and R. P. Blaney, of Tuscola, Illinois, Sundayed at the Central. They are prospecting and will probably invest in our county.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The citizens of Oxford and vicinity have organized for mutual protection against the depredations of horse thieves. The charter of "The Oxford Horse Thief Detective Association" was filed, the other day, with the Secretary of State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Stephen W. Norton, brother of H. G. Norton, has got an appointment of clerk in the post office department at Washington and goes there forthwith. Good for Stephen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Sam Platt, the foreman from the office of G. M. B. Knox, a Kansas City architect, is now located in Winfield, having accepted a similar position in Architect Ritchie's office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Juvenile Band will order new uniforms at once. They will probably be of navy blue, gold trimmings and Knights Templar caps.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Republicans of Vernon township will meet at Vernon schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, at 7 o'clock p.m. T. Thompson, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The little city of Iola gets the two best Federal appointments in Kansas: Collector of Internal Revenue and United States Marshal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

P. H. Albright and Grant Stafford purchased the property of W. P. Hackney, where P. H. Albright's office is. Price paid: $3,000 cash.

BILIOUS CHAUTAUQUA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

T. J. Harris came in Thursday from Chautauqua County. He says things are getting very bilious regarding the D. M. & A. bonds, which are to be voted on the 25th. Wednesday evening he attended a railroad meeting at Wannetta, which was presided over by Chas. C. Black, secretary of the D., M. & A., and Ben Henderson, County Attorney of Chautauqua. The matter was at fever heat on both sides. The committee of fifteen who had gone to Topeka on free passes to consult with the Santa Fe officials brought back a guarantee that the Santa Fe would be extended from Independence west to Caldwell and from Howard to Sedan, if the D., M. & A. bonds were defeated, with a Santa Fe guarantee of $50,000. The committee put out workers at once for the Santa Fe, but the majority catch on to the Santa Fe's game. They know it only wants to hold its monopoly. What would $50,000 be to the Santa Fe if it can hold its grip on all Southern Kansas, through the S. K.? Only a drop, and could easily be forfeited. They want the bonds defeated, that's all. But the Santa Fe has some hot workers, and if their arguments are not shut off, many credulous will be duped. Charley Black telegraphed last night for all the men Winfield can send over, and the war will be sultry. The people of Chautauqua want the D. M. & A.--know it to be far superior to the little Santa Fe branches, but the long delay of the D., M. & A. gives them the fear of having their hands tied. The Santa Fe's action is a big guarantee that the D., M. & A. is a surety; a lively robust fact that is liable to knock the wind out of the Santa Fe's monopoly.

SLICK THIEF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Joe Church, deputy sheriff at Dexter, took in one James Whitehead, a lad of nineteen, who had stolen a saddle and supposedly a horse at Dexter. Thursday afternoon he started to Winfield with him. Whitehead claimed that he got his horse and saddle at Wichita and a trip to that place would give evidence of his ownership. Church expected to go to Wichita to look this matter up and didn't want to bring his team to Winfield. Mr. Hockett, a stockman, was coming over on the hack and consented to bring the prisoner, Church coming in with W. A. Lee's agent in a buggy, expecting to follow along close to the hack. Having to wait for the commitment papers put Church half an hour behind. Arriving at Ferguson's stable, Hockett and the prisoner got out, and Hockett--absent-mindedly, he says--went up town and left the prisoner at the stable. Church soon met Hockett, and said: "What did you do with your prisoner?" "Why, I left him down at the stable; he's looking for you." "Looking for h l," said Church, and hauled up at Ferguson's to find the thief non-est--skipped for safer pastures. Our officials searched the country Thursday night fruitlessly. Some think it a put up job between Whitehead and Hockett, one man saying that the latter said to the thief at the barn, "Well, good bye; good luck to you." However, this is only hearsay, and Hockett proclaims innocence. There is no doubt that the fellow stole the outfit three miles from Dexter. He went northeast from here on foot.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

SKIPPED TEN "ADS" ON FRONT PAGE: EVERYTHING FROM HANDLING PILES TO BOWEL COMPLAINTS, COLIC, ETC.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of People at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Robt. Allison is just up from a severe illness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

D. Taylor, East Ninth Avenue, is sick--flux and malaria.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell and wife, of Geuda Springs, were at the Brettun Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Walker Jones lies ill with malaria at the Central Hotel, taken down Friday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

H. V. Rice, of the Fort Scott Monitor, was in the city Saturday and fell in on THE COURIER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Wm. H. Day was down from Atlanta Friday. That infant is developing magically and is already a town of no small dimension.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

County Surveyor Haight has executed a beautiful plat of Atlanta, which he framed. It is on exhibition in THE COURIER sanctum.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Henry Goldsmith has torn away the unsightly wood stairway that has led to the postoffice heaven for years, and put in its stead a neat and substantial iron stairway.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Capt. Haight and State Architect Ropes set the stakes for the Imbecile Asylum Thursday and the excavation commences Monday morning. Dave Dix is now digging the well. At twelve feet he had to begin to blast.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

James McDermott and Walter Seaver went over to Chautauqua County last Friday, loaded with D., M. & A. documents and a zeal to make the bonds carry on the 25th or bust. C. C. Black has been there for several days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Prof. B. T. Davis is home from a boyish trip to Junction City--a bran new boy who looks like his pa and can crow twice as loud. The Professor is recovering, though the smile on his phiz will not disappear for several days yet.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A. H. Hyde has on exhibition in THE COURIER sanctum a bunch of White Niagara grapes, a variety of which he has sold numerous roots to parties here. The bunch is a beauty, heavily laden with as plump and luscious grapes as ever tickled the palate.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. F. E. Haughey received a letter this week from his mother in Appanoose County, Iowa, which states that grasshoppers have appeared there in large numbers and are destroying the crops badly. They were hatched from eggs laid last year and do not appear to be of the traveling variety known to residents of Cowley in 1874.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Father J. F. Kelly passed through on the S. K. from Wellington Thursday, going to Independence, and shook hands with numerous friends at the depot. His new charge, at Osage City, thirty miles out from Topeka, between the Capital and Emporia, is one of the best in the State--fine church building and large membership and congregation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Judge Byron K. Elliott, of the supreme bench of Indiana, and his son, Will Elliott, city attorney at Indianapolis, are now taking in Winfield and surroundings. They are stopping with Captain Huffman, an old friend. Would it not be in order for our folks to have the Judge tell us his opinion of Kansas and Winfield before his return?

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. M. L. Read has left us a branch of the peculiar Hydrangea that adorns the beautiful grounds of his residence. It has a large bell-shaped blossom, alabaster white. The bush is several feet across and has one hundred and twenty-five blossoms. Mr. Read's residence grounds are filled with many rare flowers and shrubs, whose special care is his continuous pride.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

C. B. Lee and H. M. Viele, of Wellington, called Friday morning in company with John A. Eaton. They are experienced home and sign painters, with shops at Wellington, Harper, Anthony, and other places. They are very highly pleased with our city and will likely enter business here, making Winfield their headquarters. They are pleasant gentlemen of intelligence and enterprise. The surety of an unprecedented building boom here is attracting many first-class mechanics.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A crazy tramp was lodged in the cooler Sunday night by Constable Girard, and sent on his way rejoicing the next morning. He had been lurking around the elevator for a couple of days, and is a crank of a peculiar stripe, reminding us of the lunatic in the "Hoosier Schoolmaster," who imagined that one side of his head was composed of potato. This man was under the impression that one side of his head was in some way connected with a telephone, and that he could always hear when other people talked about him. According to his say so, he has been shot by a telephone, and is now trying to escape from his telephonic enemies. He is continually talking to himself about telephones, and from what he told the Marshal, it would seem that he sunk about $5,000 in the telephone business, which is the probable cause of his madness. He claims to have escaped from an asylum in Colorado; also, from one in Iowa. The Mayor knew nothing about the matter until the man was gone. Had he known it, he would have detained him until convinced that he was not wanted elsewhere.

Udall Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Farmer Overstreet was up last week looking after his crops and making improvements about the place. Samuel, though an attorney by profession, is an enthusiastic, theoretical agriculturist. He informs us that the fondest ambition of his life is to lift the agricultural profession above the level of common drudgery and place it in a position to call forth the best efforts of inventive genius and develop the noblest attributes of the soul. He tells us he is convinced that the principal trouble with farmers is that they don't try experiments. He is preparing to try experiments which he is confident will be a dazzling success. Among this is a project to cross the milk weed and the common Irish potatoes. He is confident that he can raise at least 200 bushels to the acre of potatoes with milk gravy. He is also preparing to graft a number of crab apples on his cucumber vines and thinks that in the course of five years he can raise more than enough vinegar pickles to supply this market. He is also breaking up a large quantity of his best land, which he will sow in dried apples next spring. The seed will be selected with the greatest care. He tells us that after careful investigation, he has come to the conclusion that the reason the present crop of dried apples is so wormy is because no care is used in selecting seed.

THE BOGUS CATTLE KING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Wichita Eagle tells of one Benjamin Bradley, who came to that place a few weeks ago, representing himself to be a big cattle king of the Chino Valley, Arizona, and the owner of a big ranch with thousands of cattle. He kept rather quiet a few days, taking in the lay of the land, and then started out to buy all the fine teams and vehicles in town. The Eagle called him Honorable so and so, a Bonanza capitalist who had determined to make Wichita his home, etc. The other day he skipped, leaving everybody waiting for the cash on his purchases and the return of the $600 or $1,000 in cash he had borrowed. He was about fifty-five years old and of genuine oil finish. He was the biggest bogus the Eagle has yet struck, and it will hereafter be very careful about receiving foreign notables as residents with their vast "pile." Bradley represented that his son had sold $60,000 worth of cattle and he was daily expecting the draft.

TOO MUCH FOR OUR FEATHERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A citizen of Tisdale township sends us a very pretty little Bantam egg, with the inscription, "See if you can hatch it." This is the opposite to our big egg--the one laid on our table a short time ago--double, two in one, as big as the old hen herself. We are tired of hatching out egg stories, too many people take them to be eggs-aggerations. We might remark that this egg is as large as a pin-head. Were it the golden egg of fame and fortune, we would study a long time before settling down on it to hatch out these acme ambitions. The one who sets on anything to hatch it out, always gets a Bantam. Nothing but an old hen ever made anything by setting. We are continually confronted with the stern reality that to hatch out successful results in any sphere, a fellow must shake his feathers and use his claws with a vim that brooks no defeat. We "lay" this little egg away for someone who wants to hatch Bantams. We don't.

HORRIBLE TRAGEDY.

A Woman and Whiskey the Cause.

J. P. Smith the Victim.--Mowry, Murderer.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Friday evening after THE DAILY COURIER had gone to press, the news came by telephone that a double murder had been committed at Arkansas City. A COURIER reporter was immediately dispatched to the scene of the trouble. Arriving at the City all was confusion and excitement. Groups of men were congregated on the corners talking in suppressed but earnest voices. In the back part of Houghton's building laid the body of James P. Smith, with the whole side of his face shot away. In the back room of the Occidental hotel was Henry Mowry, Smith's murderer, with a bullet in his groin, while at her humble home on a bed of sickness, surrounded by her two babes, laid the wife of the murdered man, mourning and wailing as if her heart would break. After carefully sifting the thousand rumors on the street, the reporter ascertained the facts to be about as follows. Henry Mowry and O. F. Godfrey had been friends and partners. Mowry had been living at Godfrey's house, but at Godfrey's request, left there and went to boarding at the hotel. On the morning of the shooting, Godfrey went to Mowry and forbid him ever coming about his house again. Mowry went down to the house, however, after dinner, and had a talk with Mrs. Godfrey, and she also forbid him the premises. He then went away and came back with his shotgun, and after some parleying went off again. Then Mrs. Godfrey sent for her husband. Soon Mowry returned, and standing on the sidewalk, shot twice through the bedroom window over where she had been lying. He then ran north, crossed Main street, and then ran south through the alley. By this time quite a crowd had gathered and were following him, crying out, "Stop him!" "Catch him!!" He carried his double-barreled breech-loading shotgun in his hand and had put in fresh shells after running away from Godfrey's house. As he ran down the alley past a new building which was just being erected, the murdered man came out and joined in the chase. He was in the lead of the others and ran up on Mowry rapidly. Mowry then whirled, brought his gun up, and commanded Smith to stop. He halted, Mowry dropped the gun, and started on. Then Smith surged forward after him again, when Mowry turned, and at a distance of from ten to twelve feet, fired. The entire charge took effect in Smith's neck; he fell forward on his face and soon died. Mowry then ran on followed by citizens and the officers, firing at them as he went. He drew up behind a fence, pulled down on Deputy Sheriff Rarick, and fired, the shot rattling around Rarick's head. Rarick then fired and Mowry fell, with a bullet in his groin. He was disarmed and taken to the Occidental hotel, where a strong guard was placed over him. The excitement was intense and strong talk of lynching the prisoner was indulged in. When Senator Hackney, acting county attorney, arrived on the ground, he ordered the officers to prevent mob violence at all hazards and to kill the first man who attempted to lay hands on the prisoner. The ball from Rarick's revolver struck Mowry's watch, glanced down, entering the groin, and lodged in the large part of his leg. It is only a serious flesh wound and will soon heal. Mowry was brought up this morning and now languishes in the bastille. His wound will be cared for by County Physician, F. M. Pickens.

The tragedy is a terrible one. Mr. Mowry is a young man, has been raised in the vicinity, and until this occurrence has been highly respected. He has borne a good character and was never known to quarrel. He comes of a splendid family, among the oldest and best known of Arkansas City people. He is a brother of Al Mowry, of Bolton, and Will Mowry, of the drug firm of Mowry & Sollitt. The spectacle of his aged mother, her gray hairs bowed down with the terrible grief, shame, and horror of his deed, was a sad sight. Then the almost distracted wife of the victim, on a bed of sickness, her husband snatched away from her in a moment, with her little, helpless children about her, was certainly enough to make strong men shudder and swear vengeance on the perpetrator.

There has been much speculation on the motive which prompted Mowry to act so. The general theory is that he was desperately enamored of Mrs. Godfrey, and his advances being repulsed, he resolved to kill her rather than give her up. That he went to the house and fired where he thought she was and believed when he was fleeing that he had killed her. The trouble between them had been brewing for some time, and it had been working strongly on Mowry's mind. It appears he had also been drinking for several days and was intoxicated when he went to Godfrey's house the second time. He had no doubt made up his mind not to be taken alive and killed Smith to keep from being caught. It is a strange and terrible affair in its inception and in its results.

CORONER'S JURY.

The following jury was impaneled by Coroner Marsh: E. P. Greer, R. C. Howard, S. C. Lindsay, Chas. Bryant, Ira Barnett, and J. B. Nipp. The inquest opened with the testimony of Mrs. Belle W. Godfrey: I am 28 years of age, and acquainted with Henry Mowry. I know the deceased. I saw Henry Mowry today. Saw him three times. The first time this afternoon not long after he came to bring some wheat for the birds. Wanted to know if he could come to the house Sundays. I told him no, I didn't want him to come any more. We had some trouble before. He told me he cared more for me than he had ought to. I told him that didn't make any difference, he must stay away and if he didn't, I would tell my husband and he would make him stay away. That made him angry, and he said he would make me trouble. I told him to leave the house. He then went away and came again the second time. I saw him coming through the alley with his shotgun. I was frightened and ran in the bedroom, closed and locked the door. He wanted me to come out and promised he wouldn't hurt me, so I came out. He said, "This has got to be settled," that he wanted me to promise not to tell Mr. Godfrey. I told him I would not if he would promise to go away and not come into the yard again. He said he would not promise but would make me all the trouble he could. He had been drinking and kept repeating it over, then he stepped out into the kitchen and said he would just as soon shoot me dead right there and didn't know but what he would before night. He raised his gun and pointed it at me. After he found out I was determined to tell Mr. Godfrey, he said he would tell him himself and started away. I then called my boy and sent him after his father. The next time I saw Mr. Mowry he was coming up to the gate. My husband saw him coming and sent me out into the dining room and stepped out by the partition. He called to him not to come into the yard. Mowry then shot through the front bedroom window. My husband and I were behind the partition. The range of his shot was toward us. Between the first and second shots, I stepped to the back door and called to some men nearby to come. Mowry then shot again and ran. He did not want me to tell my husband that he had come there and threatened me. I had told him at previous times not to come to the house. It was fifteen or twenty minutes before he came back the second time.

Oscar F. Godfrey was sworn: Am 34 years old. Saw Henry Mowry today at my house. He fired two loads of large shot through my bedroom window. First saw him coming toward the house with a shotgun. He came within thirty feet of the house, fired two shots and ran.

Richard B. Hutchins, sworn: Saw a man shoot. He was standing right opposite the steps of the cellar to Houghton's building. He shot north. Ran upstairs and saw the deceased on his knees. He said, "Catch that man." The deceased was about ten feet north of where the man stood when he shot. The man who did the shooting then ran south down the alley. He said "Stop! Stop!!," just before he shot. I followed him a step or two. He ordered me to stop and I did so.

Jacob Hite, sworn: Was working at McLaughlin's house. Heard a shot about 4 o'clock. In a couple of minutes heard another shot. Went out and heard a woman calling for help. Ran down to Godfrey's house. Mr. Godfrey came to the door and said Mr. Mowry had shot through the house. While he was talking, I looked down the street and saw Mr. Henry Mowry running north loading his gun. Told the boys to run after him while I notified the officers. Mowry crossed Summit street near Aldrich's lumber yard. Saw him cross Central avenue. Followed up Summit street and saw Mowry in the alley west, in the rear of Mowry & Sollitt's drug store. Saw him draw up his gun, take aim, and a man whom I afterwards recognized to be Mr. Smith, the deceased, advancing upon him. Mowry called, "halt," then fired, and Smith fell forward on his knees.

J. M. Aldrich, sworn: Was in the back door of Howard's hardware store. Hank Mowry fired the shot. He seemed to be walking backward from deceased, who was following him. He commanded deceased to stop, then drew the gun to his face and fired. Mowry was about abreast of the southwest corner of Houghton's building and deceased was about ten feet north of him. Saw Mowry going north on Summit street some time before the shooting, walking leisurely, carrying a gun in his right hand, and muttering something to himself and shaking his head.

Austin Bailey, sworn: Saw Henry Mowry coming up the alley. Heard him say, "Stop!" Saw a man advancing on him. Mowry called twice, then shot, and deceased fell. They were ten to twenty feet apart.

L. C. Rice, sworn: Saw Mowry leave the Occidental Hotel, about 4 o'clock, with his double-barreled shotgun. He said he was the best man in Arkansas City. He seemed somewhat intoxicated.

A. G. Lowe, sworn: I met Mowry down the alley. Told him he had better give up or he would be killed. He said he would kill anyone who followed him. Several shots were then fired, and he whirled and fired on me. I then ran up on him and took hold of him.

Capt. Rarick, sworn: Am deputy sheriff of Cowley County. Knew Henry Mowry. Was in the City Clerk's office when I heard shooting. Ran down Summit street south. Someone told me as I ran that Hank Mowry had shot someone in the alley. As I turned the corner, I saw Mowry running south in the alley. He pulled his shotgun down as though he was going to shoot, but didn't. He ran about halfway down the next block, then whirled, and fired. On the corner of the next street south, he took aim from behind a fence and fired two shots before he was shot. He was shot near the groin on the right side. He ran eight or ten steps and fell. He was then taken in a spring wagon to the Occidental Hotel, where I now hold him as a prisoner.

Dr. J. W. Parks, sworn: Examined deceased after he was shot, and before his death. He was lying on his face. Made a hurried examination of the wound, and found the left side of the face crushed in from the effect of the shot. He lived about two hours.

Drs. Sparks and Westfall then held a post mortem examination and testified that deceased came to his death from the shot fired by Mowry.

Jury returned a verdict finding that Jas. P. Smith came to his death from a shot fired by Henry Mowry, feloniously and with intent to kill and murder.

A RACY LETTER.--DR. DOWNS TO THE FRONT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Policy and good sense would lead me to continue to ignore the manifold insinuations touching my character and reputation, and the notorious lies published by one of the dirtiest sheets that ever disgraced Cowley County, but when there are so many credulous individuals ready to accept and magnify any report, I feel I can do myself no harm, and endeavor to show to the people the motives that dictated my actions. I strove to do my duty, not only to myself but to society. I thought if divulging what I knew would reveal to the proper authorities the guilty party, it was my duty to do so. Had I desired to keep the matter concealed, it would have been impossible, for in the moment of excitement, when none suspected, all was disclosed. I made no more mention of the affair until a paper was circulated to remunerate Crabtree for his loss--my friend was thrown out of his position without his pay, and intimations made that he was the guilty party. The sympathy of the people was with Crabtree because of his loss and he was making capital of the same. I still feel as I did then; and were it necessary, I would do the same again.

Let honest people ask themselves what they would have done under the same circumstances. Of my friends, some believe fully--others think me honestly mistaken. Crabtree's constituents believe, but dare not assert, that I am guilty of a fraud. Could all but see what I saw and have seen more than they, that for me to be mistaken would be an impossibility. I dare say that one of the loopholes through which the defendant in this case escaped was by knowledge gained semi-legally, and then disclosed to the friends of the accused before the preliminary examination. The one thing needful to reveal the true inwardness of the testimony of the defendant's witnesses was a rigid examination on the part of the prosecuting attorney. U. S. District Attorney is excusable on the ground that he and Major Crowell both felt sure, because of the preponderance of testimony on the side of the government that the accused would, without a doubt, be bound over. I would like to terminate these remarks by asking the people a few pertinent questions.

Why was Crabtree so anxious to sell and leave Salem? Why did he offer to take fifteen hundred dollars for his property, if it was worth over two thousand? Why did Crabtree have his policy in his pocket, and why did he pay the extra one-fourth centum the very evening of the fire? Why did the lamp not explode or someone burn the building previous to the night of having the policy adjusted? Why did he come from Martin's by the most direct route and a way he never came before, and a way no one else would think of coming after night? Why did he get to the fire so soon after it commenced? How could he leave Burden at 10:30 and be seen one mile from Salem at 10:50? How could he be seen four reliable persons two miles on this side of Burden before ten o'clock and be in Burden after ten? How could his witnesses recognize him a distance of thirty yards, when it was impossible to recognize a man ten feet? Why did Crabtree advance the theory that the lamp exploded? Why did he say to several parties that his insurance was but five hundred dollars? Why did he not say it was fifteen hundred? Why did he not come to me when he learned that I had seen someone in the building just before the fire? Why does he not get his insurance? Why does he not sue for justice? O! Why are people so blind and why is the law so futile? L. S. DOWNS.

A COUNTRY VISIT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A. D. Speed secured Deacon Smith's horse and buggy Friday for a ride six miles north to see his country cousins. Arriving there, he jerked off the harness and turned the bay loose in the stable. He forgot to close the door--in fact, was so preoccupied that he thought very little about his chances for getting home until a notification came that the steed had taken in the situation and with nothing but his halter on, lit out. To say Speed was nervous wouldn't have express it. He paid a neighbor a handsome price to scour the country for the animal, and getting a fresh scent, started afoot, hoping to find the bay before he got far. He pulled into town last night about 2:40, mounted on Shanks Old Mare, his coat on his arm, and two tubs full of perspiration on his brow. He tried to keep the matter still, but it moved too much for that. John Pomyea and Lobdell, coming from Douglass, ran across the Deacon's nag, recognized him, and brought him in. Speed has had his shoes half soled and will come out all right in time.

A FEMALE WAR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A romance was enacted on the Opera House stairs Friday night as the crowd was coming away from the show. As usual, the jam on the stairs was a little oppressive. A white girl was being crowded by a colored one, when she turned around and said, "You 'coon' there, quit crowding me." The "coon" proceeded to slap the white Miss with a vengeance, and the alabaster darling let in on the colored girl. They had it hand over fist, in wool and out of wool, for a few seconds, creating a furor and a stampeded, when E. C. Seward put his pretty frame between the belligerents and quelled the war. It was a terrible shock to E. C., but he is better this morning and his physicians hope to bring him through. The girls are fighters from long taw, and would draw a big crowd in the prize ring. The colored girl said, "I'm a 'coon,' am I?" as she played her finger nails in the vicinity of her antagonist's phiz. She didn't propose being called "coon," and we admire her grit. Do it some more.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Tuck Southard, the same auburn-haired Tuck so well known in early days as a salesman in the N. Y. Store of Baird Bros., was over from Independence Monday. His many friends here were glad to see him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Alf D. Johnston, a prominent young insurance agent of Lima, Ohio, is in the city, the guest of Architect Ritchie.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

A BLOW AT BAYARD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The New York World says: "Some persons are insisting that the gross blunder of Kelly's appointment shows our diplomatic service to be "a useless humbug." These people think that the United States government has no occasion to be represented at foreign courts, and would be glad to see the entire service abolished. This is absurd. Our diplomatic service in its present form, instead of being "a useless humbug," is of great value and importance. Like every branch of the government, it can be rendered valueless and discreditable by improper appointments, such as that of Mr. Kelly's and others have been made by the state department. It was hoped that the flunkeyism would go out with Republicanism, and that under a Democratic administration greater earnestness, simplicity, and independence would be imparted to the diplomatic service, as to all other branches of the government. These hopes have been disappointed through the blunders and ignorance of the state department, to which the president, in pursuance of a settled policy, left the selection of our ministers nd consuls. But because bad appointments have been made by Mr. Bayard, it does not follow with the whole diplomatic service is "a useless humbug" which ought to be abolished. It might as reasonably be urged that the office of secretary of state is "a useless humbug" because President Cleveland made an unfortunate choice of the head of his cabinet.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Assistant Treasurer Jordan has directed the assistants at the bureau's sub-treasuries in the country to send to the treasurer's office in Washington all the one and two dollar bills now on hand, and not to pay out any more bills of these denominations. The purpose of this order, it is believed, is to force into circulation the standard silver dollars, of which there were in the treasury vaults on the beginning of the present fiscal year, July one, $3,029,002. The order further requires that all one and two dollar notes hereafter received shall also be sent to Washington. The amount of these bills now on hand will reach $10,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Visitors numbering thousands visit the tomb of General Grant daily. A New York dispatch referring to this crowd on the 16th inst. said: "As early as 9 o'clock this morning people began to gather in front of General Grant's tomb, and from that time until dark the plaza and drive were covered with people. It is estimated that between 30,000 and 40,000 visitors passed in front of the tomb. The visitors filed past four abreast, the line extending across the plaza and some distance down the drive. Large numbers of out-of-town visitors were in the line."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Cowboys must surely be at a premium in the Indian Territory. The cattle owners are demanding their services because they have to have their cattle driven out of the Territory in a few days, and the cowboys are making each other scarce in the Territory by killing each other off. The Indian Territory would seem to be a good place for the unoccupied of the virile sort in the states just now to go to get employment and good wages.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The census of St. Paul and Minneapolis has at last been completed. It has been a lively race between the rival cities. Minneapolis comes out winner. She claims 129,200 population, which is an increase of 82,313 in five years. St. Paul has 111, 397, an increase of 67,924. The two cities have together 240,596 people. As no one is allowed to go behind the returns, these figures will have to be accepted by the public.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

When Kelly gets home he can be entered as one of the planks of the Democratic Virginia platform. The old dominion stands squarely by Kelly. The Richmond Dispatch says: "Mr. Kelly has superior diplomatic qualifications." Some of these old monarchies don't seem to know a good thing when they see it.

TURNING THE RASCALS OUT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

We do not doubt that Cleveland has turned out a real rascal or two who were holding office under Republican rule, but probably he has had the fortune to turn in about ten much worse rascals to everyone he has turned out. Among the rascals he has turned in, we can begin with Meier, who was appointed a consul, and when he was looked up to be given his commission, he was found in the city lockup in Washington, sleeping off a drunken debauch. Meade, of Hazelhurst, Copiah County, Mississippi, was appointed a postmaster, and Meade, as we know, was the accessory to a murder of a man because he pleased to vote the Republican ticket, before and after the fact. A man named Judd, credited to Colorado, was appointed a timber inspector. Judd's fitness for protecting government property has become to be doubted, since it has transpired that he is a chronic horse thief, and has served in the penitentiary for being too fond of other people's horse flesh. Following his appointment the postmaster at Sioux City was removed as "an offensive partisan," and his place was given to an ex-convict of the Dakota penitentiary. An embezzler has been appointed postmaster at Lincoln Center, Maine, and we have all been made aware of the fact that two of the custom house employees in Cincinnati have "done time," one in the workhouse and the other in the penitentiary for the larceny of a watch. Another instance is furnished from Indianapolis, where one of the newly appointed pension employees has just been discovered to be under indictment. We may refer also to Higgins, whose reputation as a rascal is pretty well known, who was placed at the head of an appointment bureau and would probably help as many rascals to get in as any other man who could have been selected, and also to Mr. Kelly, who was appointed first, minister to Italy, and after being fired by that government, was appointed minister to Austria and again fired as being too much of a rascal to be recognized by that government. These are a few of the most prominent blunders of the present administration. Now we give Cleveland the credit of intending to appoint only good and honest men, but he cannot personally know everybody, and unfortunately, there are far too many rascals prominent in the party on whom he depends for the necessary information of the character and qualifications of candidates. Now we do not insinuate that Democrats are necessarily rascals. We consider the majority of the Democrats honest but, among the leading and influential men of that party there are far too many who do not consider honesty as a necessary qualification for an important office, but only the faculty to work up party success. So they will recommend a rascal to the president for an important office as readily as they will an honest man, provided that the rascal has influence, skill, and power enough to control votes or cheat at the ballot box. That is what is the matter with the Democratic party.

A MEAN ATTACK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Our transient e. c. has been giving our county commissioners "fits" for appraising damages for right of way of the K. C. & S. W. railroad too low, and accuses them of being bought up by the R. R. Co. If we were to make criticism on the action of the commissioners, it would be that we think their appraisals have been invariably too high. It is true that some ten farmers along Timber creek, have, under the advice of an attorney who seems to be particularly in want of fees, foolishly appealed from the awards of the commissioners. They were awarded about a hundred dollars an acre for land not worth more than thirty to forty dollars per acre, and probably in each case the farmer is better off with the road built by way of Burden and Tisdale. If we had owned the farm which the road will damage most, and if the location of the road down that valley had depended upon our giving the right of way through our farm, we would have given the right of way, and we presume some of the owners of farms cut by the railroad would have felt in the same way. But the road is being built and a sure thing and now the general sentiment is to get out of the company every cent possible. Corporations are considered free plunder and the sympathies of the people are always with the individual against the corporation. Our County Commissioners seem to have been deeply imbued with this sentiment, so much so that it seems to us to have warped their judgment into awarding too high damages, damages three to five times as high as were ever before awarded for right of way for any railroad in this county. Of course they meant to be just, but particularly meant to give each man all the damages that could be justly claimed. We do not expect that the appellants will get as high damages in the district court as the commissioners awarded them, but if they do and even a hundred dollars each in excess of the commissioners award, it will be a losing game to them after feeing lawyers and the trouble and expense of the suits. Our e. c. doubtless made the attack on the commissioners because it would be popular to do so. We suppose this article will be unpopular, but we believe it to be justly due the commissioners and the railroad company.

The insinuation that the commissioners are bought up by the railroad company is simply outrageous. No sensible man would believe such a thing even though it were a fact that some of their appraisals were too low, but would attribute it to an error in judgment at worst, or more probably, to a difference in judgment with others who are at least as liable to err as they. It must be a person of very low moral tone who cannot conceive of a man being just and fair to both parties whose pay is taxed to one of the parties; who would insist that a justice of the peace in a suit for damage must necessarily fix the damages too low because the defendant must pay his costs, or who insinuate that commissioners cannot be just toward the individual because a railroad company is taxed to pay for their services.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Kansas City has packed more hogs during this season than have been packed in Milwaukee, Indianapolis, St. Louis, and Cedar Rapids, Iowa, put together. Cincinnati, once famed as the Porkopolis of the country, ranks eighth in the list of pork packing centers. Kansas City ranks second, with 580,000 hogs scored to its slaughtering credit so far this summer.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Canada was too far from Texas, so Banker Nichols suicided to escape the consequences of his defalcations. The New York banker has an advantage over those of the rest of the country, or has the promise of an immunity none others enjoy on account of the proximity of Canada.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

While there is a disposition quite largely, or widely manifested, to experiment with free trade in this country, the European powers, not excluding England, having experimented, are resorting to protective measures of some sort to restore the business confidence free trade has impaired and depressed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Louisiana state prohibition convention held at Shreveport, the other day, did not favor making their work a separate party matter. Nor did the prohibitionists of other southern States. They believe in working among the people of all parties, and strengthening public sentiment in that way.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A responsible contractor offered to build the Bartholdi pedestal in New York for less than one-half it has cost the committee which has it in charge.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The odor arising from the coal tar put in the pollywog pools along Ninth avenue is almost strong enough to lift one's hat, and can be distinctly recognized at a distance of two or three blocks. "The remedy is worse than the disease" for the time being, but in a short time the tar will become hard and effectually do away with one of the nastiest places that has from time immemorial been a disgrace to our fair city, if enough of the tar is used. But don't, like the Dutchman trimming his dog's tail, cut off a little at a time, but cut it all at once and let us have done with it.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official and Social Notes as Gathered by Our Regular

Washington Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

It is said at the Post Office department that the appointment of the messenger boys in the new special letter delivery system, about which some question has been raised, will be made by the postmasters in the towns, with the approval of the Postmaster General. The rules regulating this service, which were recently issued by the Postmaster General, state that the boys are to be appointed by the postmasters, and lists are to be sent to the department. The Acting Postmaster General, Colonel Stevenson, has written to the American District Messenger Co., in Philadelphia, declining their offer to furnish boys for this purpose for the office in that city.

Fears are expressed lest the Swatara, which is to bring a cargo of silver dollars from New Orleans to this city, may be overhauled by pirates and despoiled of her treasure. But such alarms are idle, for it is doubtful if even a pirate would take the cartwheel dollar unless it was forcibly dumped on the deck of his rakish craft and he was given no option.

There is a contract in existence between the Treasury department and Adams Express company, made during Secretary Sherman's term, by which the department agrees to employ that company as its exclusive agent for the transportation of money from the sub-treasuries to the Treasury at Washington and the reverse. It is stated that the Adams Express company hold that the project to carry $5,000,000 from New Orleans to Washington in the Swatara is a violation of this contract, and that they will probably bring suit against Treasurer Jordan. Thus far, however, Mr. Jordan has not been notified of any suit. This position is that the contract gives the Adams Express company over all other companies, but does not preclude the government's transporting its own money to government vessels. Moreover, it is thought that the contract might be open to objections on the ground that it is against public policy.

President Cleveland, in his purpose to keep the public good in his eye, manages to run against a large assortment of private interests. The ocean steamship companies cannot have their subsidy, the cattle barons must get out of the Indian lands, and must pull down their fences; the land grant railroads must not impose on settlers; political bosses are kept from looting the offices; and the army and navy pets must take their share of service. The latest sufferer is the express company, which claims that the government it taking fat contracts out of its mouth by transporting coin in a government vessel instead of sending it as freight. This style of administration may not be popular among those who feel the shoe pinch, but in the historic words of Gen. Bragg, the people ought to love it for the enemies it makes.

The Secretary of the Navy will soon issue an order to navy officers similar to that recently issued by Secretary Endicott, with relation to army officers on detached duty. The navy regulations require that officers shall serve three years at sea and three on shore, returning at the end of the latter period to sea duty. Complaint has been made by some officers that they did not receive their full time on shore. To remedy any such evil that may exist, two officers, one from the line and one from the staff, will probably be detailed at an early date to keep record showing the kind of work officers are employed on and the length of time that they have been engaged. When three years of shore duty have elapsed, the officers will be sent to sea. It is said at the Navy department that if such an order is issued, there would not be more than ten or twelve officers affected by it.

The acting commissioner of the general land office, Mr. Walker, has changed the rules in regard to leaves of absences for employees so that only thirty days instead of sixty days are allowed for sick leave. The regular annual leave has not been changed and the clerks are allowed thirty days, the commissioner exercising the right of determining when and for how long a period the leave shall be given. Many of the leaves now granted are for less period than thirty days, the amount varying in the individual cases. This has given rise to the idea that the usual number of days allowed has been reduced. Mr. Walker states that this is not the case, and that each clerk will be granted the full thirty days' leave if entitled to it under the rules as they have heretofore existed. L.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A sister of Mrs. John Weakley is visiting her at present.

Quite a number of Bethelites took in Winfield Saturday.

Lon Bryant is the first to thresh wheat in this neighborhood.

J. A. Rucker and his brother are putting up a nice lot of hay.

Two of Winfield's fair ones made a visit to Mrs. Foose's, since our last.

Mrs. Joseph Hassell, with her two nieces, spent a day with Mrs. Clark Bryant, recently.

Lon Bryant carries a very sore arm, but for all that he made a good hand cutting corn last week.

Frank Weakley was at Winfield Saturday and purchased a buggy--so look out girls. Also a new wagon.

Two of Mrs. Della Hassell's brothers stayed all night with them last week. They were in search of a stock farm, but did not look in Cowley. They went farther west.

NOCTURNAL SCARE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mrs. J. C. Fuller was disturbed and frightened Tuesday night about eleven or twelve o'clock by noises like someone trying to force an entrance into the house. It happened that no one except herself, her boy, James, and her girl, Estella, were at home, so she was badly frightened. Their rooms are on the second story and Mrs. Fuller called from an east window to Senator Hackney for aid. The Senator, clad in the garments of the night, rushed out of his house and proceeded to investigate. He found no one and soon retired again. Later Mrs. Fuller called to him again. The noises has been repeated and more violently, seeming to be on the roof. The Senator again investigated with the same result and again retired. Still later the noises were repeated, and Jimmy fired a pistol out of the window three times. There was no more sleep in that house during the night and the disturbance affected the inmates of Mrs. Platter's house about as badly. The senior heard the first calls, but as the Senator got the start of him in rushing to the battle, he kept out of range and slept the sleep of the just.

CHAUTAUQUA O. K.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Senator Long got in from two days in Chautauqua County yesterday, confident that the D. M. & A bonds were carried yesterday, though nothing definite is yet known, Sedan being some miles from the telegraph. The Senator put in some big licks in his old county, and said that sentiment changed wonderfully in favor of the D. M. & A., against the Santa Fe's greased scheme, and the leading men of the county were confident of the bonds carrying. The majority will probably be several hundred.

WOOLEN AND COTTON FACTORY.

An Enterprise Sprung of Vast Import to Winfield and Cowley County.

The Safest of All.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. A. H. Jennings spent July and part of August in Ohio. While absent, always having an eye peeled for the advancement of his home, he had an interview with the hosiery manufacturing firm of J. B. Mercer & Co., Zanesville, Ohio, whose desire for a more expansive location had slyly reached his ears. He found this to be one of the busiest manufactories he was ever in, but running on a smaller scale than the firm's trade demanded and the proprietors were able to carry. They employ about two hundred hands, some sixty-five of them women, and turn out two or three hundred dozen hose daily, woolen and cotton. The articles were of the very best and had big sales, the cotton goods largely in the west and south and the woolen in the north and west. Their orders were then two hundred behind. The firm buys its cotton in St. Louis and its wool all over the country. Wool costs them 29 to 35 cents per pound--here it would cost only 15 to 20 cents, and cotton can be shipped from St. Louis here just as cheaply as to Zanesville, and our railway export facilities will be equal to Zanesville with our two new lines. This firm is composed of three practical workmen. They are desirous of moving their factory where facilities for extending it to the manufacture of all kinds of goods are better. The first point in their eye was Kansas City. Mr. Jennings laid the superior advantages of Winfield before them, situated in a great wool-growing country, a good stream for dyeing purposes, no competition in the section, with a broad, fruitful territory for their wares. To work up this matter among our businessmen, a meeting of the Enterprise Association was held at the Court House last night. Dr. C. Perry presided, and H. G. Norton recorded. Mr. Jennings laid this enterprise before the meeting--its great importance to our industrial welfare and the substantiality of our county, with the certainties of success. The probable subsidy needed is between five and ten thousand dollars. The matter was received favorably by our businessmen, and A. H. Jennings, B. F. Wood, J. P. Baden, Col. Whiting, and J. B. Lynn were appointed a committee of correspondence and further investigation, said committee to confer with Frank Manny regarding the purchase of his brewery building for this manufactory. W. W. Andrews offered to donate grounds for a factory building. The committee will pass one of this woolen mill firm to Winfield that he may look over the ground. We have now struck an enterprise that means big benefits. Let us all brace up. A little of the zeal and public spirit displayed in gaining enterprises in the past few months will secure this one. Make a strong pull, a big pull, and pull altogether. Barring the twenty experts Mercer & Co. must bring with them, this mill insures labor for 200 or more persons and a big enhancement of our wool industry.

COWLEY'S TEACHERS.

Who Will Shoot the County's Young Ideas the Coming Winter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Cowley's first extensive examination under the new law formulating the questions in the State Board of Education, shows 105 certificates out of 155 applicants--5 in the first grade, 41 in the second grade, and 50 in the third grade, as follows.

FIRST GRADE.

Albert, H. F.; Norton, S. W.; Norton, H. G.; Overman, S. F.; McClelland, A. J.

SECOND GRADE.

Alderson, P. S.; Akers, Martin; Andrews, Hattie; Angerman, W. E.; Beach, Cora B.; Bliss, Celina; Bradshaw, J. C.; Bringle, Jennie; Chapin, Amy; Clover, William T.; Craven, Mrs. F. E.; Dalgarn, Mollie; Finfrock [?Finefrock], P. H.; Fuller, O. P.; Green, Clara; Haughey, F. E.; Hutchinson, Libbie; Marble, A. D.; Martindale, J. C.; McClelland, Frank; McKinley, Fannie; Overman, R. B.; Olmstead, Bertha; Pierson, Maude M.; Owen, H. A.; Phelps, Laura; Pickering, Sadie; Strong, Lida; Robbins, Emma; Trezise, H. A.; Stiverson, E. E.; Utley, Hattie; Turner, M. F.; Wallace, H. S.; Walch, C. I.; Weigh, W. F.; Wallis, Bertha; Wing, C. J.; Wheeler, Allie; Wilson, Lizzie; Williams, W. F.

THIRD GRADE.

Anderson, E. M.; Arnett, M. R.; Baker, Thornton J.; Baker, Annie; Bertram, Belle; Brown, Hattie; Bryan, Harry; Bush, Belle; Coonrod, Mollie; Coombs, Villa; Cronk, M. R.; Craddock, W. F.; Darnell, Hattie; Earhart, Henry; Ewing, E. W.; Garrett, E. M.; Garrett, W. H.; Gillett, S. E.; Hite, Lucy; Holland, W. B.; Hosmer, George E.; Howard, Lida; Jacobus, W. P.; Johnston, Ella B.; Kerr, Joseph P.; Kinney, Maggie; Krow, V.; Littell, W. B.; Manser, Mary; Mark, Anna; Merydith, Mettie; Miller, Mary E.; McKee, Emma L.; Miller, Alice B.; Nelson, Stirling; O'Neil, Lizzie; Perkins, Cyrus F.; Powell, C. W.; Preston, E. B.; Powell, H. F.; Plunket, Carrie; Page, Belle; Ramage, D. W.; Randall, Mary; Robertson, Anna; Rowell, Cora; Smith, J. R.; Snyder, John C.; Stevenson, Etta; Sumpter, Flora; Taplin, Linnie; Taplin, Hattie; Taylor, Lida; Walton, Lillie; Taylor, M. A.; Warren, J. W.; Wilkins, Alonzo; Wing, A. W.; Wilkins, Lottie.

A FINE RESIDENCE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Among the handsome and truly home-like residences of our city, that of Mr. J. W. Johnston, on the corner of Eleventh Avenue and Mansfield Street, is prominent. It is just finished and will be beautifully furnished and ready for occupancy in a few weeks. S. A. Cook was the architect and superintendent. In exterior appearance the structure is very neat, though plain, crowned with a low pitch roof, with Finial ornament. The main entrance is on Mansfield street, under an artistic portico. It opens into a roomy hall, adorned by a handsome stairway of hardwood, black Walnut pillars, and beautifully carved rail. The hall is a white-oak, grain finish, with natural Walnut ornament. To the right of the hall is the commodious double parlor, splendidly lighted and ventilated, finished in black Walnut, ebony, straw, and gilt. The bay window has an unique feature, opening to a tastefully railed flower and shrubbery balcony, several feet wide, extending clear around the window. The parlor is one of the most desirable and spacious in the city. Doors lead from the parlor into both dining and sitting rooms, which are appointed with an experienced eye to convenience. The side entrance, on 11th Avenue, leads into the hall and sitting room, under a neat porch. The parlor and sitting room both have elegant recess grates. The kitchen is supplied with hot and cold water, butteries, and all conveniences. The house throughout is piped for water and gas. The second story is divided into six large, bright rooms, with a wide hallway. Every room has a closet. At the rear of the building is a splendid bathroom. The ceilings are high, the entire house perfectly ventilated and arranged with every consideration for comfort. Under all is a good cellar, while the kitchen has a nice adjunct in a lattice porch, on which is the well, a few feet from the door. The entire structure contains some fifteen or more large rooms, all bright and cheery. It is a perfect home, and Mr. and Mrs. Johnston can well be proud of it. Willis & Son had the contract of construction and C. D. Austin the painting, both of which are unexcelled.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Frank J Hess et al to Joseph H Criger, lot 7, block 8, Hess ad to A C: $60

Amanda Malone and husband to William D Allen, lots 21 and 22, blk 62, A C: $147

Stacy Matlack et ux to Thomas D Richardson, lot 24, blk 64, A C: $60

Calvin A Acker to B A Tisdale, lots 7 and 8, blk 27, A C: $137

W M Sleeth et al to Thomas J Harden, lots 3, 4, 5 and 6, blk 50, A C: $250

Thomas J Harden et ux to Elizabeth McClaskey, lots 3, 4, 5, and 6, blk 50, A C: $300

Mary C Ford and husband to Jas Hill, lots 3 and 4, blk 60 A C: $1,225

Virginia Walton to Alvah J Myers, lot 2, blk 50, A C: $50

Stephen Searcy et ux to A Gilkey, ne qr and se qr 25-34-5e, 320 acres: $1,600

Charles Sandstrum et ux to Ellen Sandstrum, se qr 14-30-5e: $675

Read & Robinson to Owen Shivers, e hf sw qr and s hf se qr sec 26 and nw qr ne qr sec 35 and w hf sw qr sec 26 and n hf nw qr 85-32-6e: $7,000

Geo E Gray et al to Geo E Gray, lots 10, 11, and 12, blk 4, Moffitt's ad to Udall: $150

Mary Banta and husband to W H Gray, lot 3, blk 2, Moffitt's ad to Udall: $35

Jesse M Wright et ux to Sallie V Vawter, lots 12, 13, 14 and 27, blk 78, A C: $2,500

Burton J Downing, s hf ne qr 14-31-3e, q-c:

George F Graves et ux to T M Lane, ne qr 2-30-7e, Cowley, and se qr 35-29-7e, Butler: $4,000

John A Douglas et ux to Jacob Ruppert, sw qr sw qr sec 2 and nw qr and w hf and se qr ne qr and n hf se qr and n hf se qr and nw qr sw qr sec 11 and s hf ne qr 14-31-3e: $5,200

Jacob Ruppert et ux to Burton J Downing, s hf ne qr 14-31-3e, q-c: $1

Jesse P. Ouster et ux to D Tooman et al, nw qr 17-34-7e: $1,000

Mary J Cupp and husband to M L Robinson, e hf ne qr and nw qr ne qr and ne qr nw qr 32-31-8e: $2,000

Randolph Allison et ux to William K Stone, lots 21, 22 and 28, sec 18, and lot 5, 19-33-8e: $200

Martin L Kerns et ux to George E Knickerbocker, ne qr of 20 acres, e hf nw qr 5-31-3e: $250

Elijah H Tyner et ux to Walt M Limbocker, s hf ne qr of 20 acres, e hf nw qr 5-31-3e: $2,500

George A Orvill et ux to Eliza F Orvill, nw qr 22-30-5e, q-c: $50

Samuel N Holliday et ux to Daniel Fetter, n hf sw qr and sw qr sw qr sec 29 and ne qr se qr 30-33-5e, 160 acres: $900

John B. McKain et ux to Isabel E Brotherton, lot 7, blk 285, Thompson's 3rd addition to Winfield: $400

J M Alexander et ux to John B Kain, lot 7, blk 285, Thompson's 3rd addition to Winfield: $390

College Hill Town Co to William N Rice, lots 7, 8 and 9, blk 15, C. H. ad to Winfield: $334

Henry Mowry to Alvin Mowry nw qr 12-35-3e: $3,500

P H Albright to Rickard E Rogers, ne qr 21-32-3e, 160 acres: $8,500

James R Russell et ux to Andrew B Woodruff, lot 3 and s hf ne qr 6-30-6-e, 120 acres: $1,200

J W Kirkpatrick et ux to L A Richards, lots 17, 18, 31 and 32, 7-31-8-e: $850

Jno W Leach et ux to William Ford pt nw qr 35-31-6e: $1,500

James T Cooper et ux to Jesse W Hiatt, lots 4 and 13, 18-31-8e, 80 acres: $800

New Salem Town Co. to John Rodgers, lots 3 and 4, blk 18, New Salem: $500

G B Rowland et ux to John C Rowland, lots 3 and 4, blk 167, Winfield: $1,500

Edgar C Mason et ux to Annie Maltbie, lots 27 and 28, blk 75, Hess ad to A C: $380

M C Copple et ux to Chas B Crow, lot 15, blk 100, A C: $400

John Bobbitt to Fannie E Bobbitt, lots 11 and 12, blk 163, village of Northfield: $250

Alonzo T Stewart et ux to Wm S Houghton, 426 acres in sec 11, 13, and 14, 35-5e: $3,200

Abraham Stedman et ux to J P Long et al, e hf se qr and sw qr se qr sec 4 and ne qr ne qr 9-32-8e: $500

Benj F Carrington to Joseph P Long, sw qr ne qr e hf nw qr sec 10 and se qr ne qr 9-32-8e: $200

Mary R Stewart to A T Stewart, 160 acres in 13-35-5e and 160 acres 14-35-5e and 106 acres 13-35-5e: $1.00

Mont Anderson to Isaac Eldridge, lots 27 and 28, blk 144, A C: $600

E Grosscup to D L Newman, lot 2, blk 164, Leonard's ad to A C: $300

Henry C Farrar et ux to John A Starr, lot 7 and 8, blk 26, A C: $100

George C Moloney et ux to Annie Tyner, lots 24 and 25, blk 54, A C: $1,250

Harvey C McCaleb et ux to A V Snow, w hf se qr 36-31-6e: $1,000

D S Haynes et ux to Geo F Walck, nw qr ne qr 16-30-3e, q-c: $32

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Katie, the little three-year-old daughter of Mrs. James Holloway, who is visiting in the family of THE COURIER senior, wandered off Wednesday without a guardian. The little one was see here and there, but seemed to move with a confidence that betokened no danger though her head was bare, so no one stopped her. The family and friends were out in force to find her, and after several hours hunt E. F. Blair, who was hunting in his buggy, found her in the care of a family across the S. K. railroad, who had picked her up. Katie had picked up a pocket-book and started out shopping, she said.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Wanted. Three good families to raise three boys aged 6, 8, and 11. Apply at this office or address box 252, P. O.

NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Recap. Notice of Attachment. Before G. H. Buckman, Justice of the Peace, City of Winfield. W. A. Lee, Plaintiff, against A. W. McMillan, Defendant. August 19, 1885, order of attachment for the sum of $75 per annum (from July 16, 1885) was issued against the goods of defendant. J. F. McMullen, Attorney for Plaintiff.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Notice! All persons having colts from French Dick, foaled in 1885, are requested to bring them to my farm on the first Friday in October. I will give two premiums, for best colt, $15; second best, $7.50, judges to be picked by exhibitors. My own colts will not be shown, in this competition. B. W. Sitter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Recap Notice by Charles C. Hammond, Administrator, Estate of James D. Hammond, deceased. Final report and settlement to be made at 1:00 p.m., October 4, 1885. McDonald & Webb, Attorneys.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Sheriff's Sale by G. H. McIntire. M. M. Rutherford, Plaintiff, vs. William F. Wise, Lafayette Wise, and Eliza Wise, Defendants. Public sale to be made September 28, 1885, between the hours of 1 and 2 p.m., at South door of Court House in Winfield, for cash in hand to real estate property.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

[Skipped "Winfield City Markets" Report.]

LITTLE LIZZIE IS GONE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

All that remained of Little Lizzie, the sweet five-year-old daughter of Judge and Mrs. E. S. Torrance, was laid away Tuesday afternoon in Union Cemetery--hidden forever from earthly sight. The funeral ceremonies were solemnized at the residence by Revs. Kelly and Stone, the Presbyterian choir singing beautiful requiems. The cortege was very large and impressive--unusually so considering the fatal disease, diphtheria. Yes, little Lizzie is gone: the jewel of a happy household. All the hopeful words of loving parents and sympathetic friends could not lift the pain of the last farewell. It was inevitable. There is only left the sweet, sad hope that the revolving years will return to the parental arms and hearts, in some divinely beautiful mansion of paradise, their Lizzie, all radiant and glorious with immortality, with never-failing childhood beaming from every feature. There is no other place or thought or hope to which to fly. But there

"The soul, secure in her existence smiles,

And stars shall fade away, the sun himself

Grow dim with age, and nature sink in years;

But thou shalt flourish in immortal childhood

When time is a forgotten circumstance."

A QUEER BULLET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Johnnie Davis, clerk at Bob Farnsworth's lunch counter, was in two inches of eternity the other day: about twenty-eight feet closer than he ever wants to be again. A nail had been sticking out of the refrigerator's side for a long time, and every time he got near it, he tore his pants, shirt, or something else, and this time the tear brought sure action. He grabbed a two-pound scale weight and struck the nail a fearful blow. It went in with a flash, followed by a loud explosion like a pistol shot. Men rushed in from the street, expecting to see a "dead corpus." John was paralyzed for a minute, when a post mortem was held on the refrigerator. In the charcoal between the outside and the zinc lining, a thirty-eight cartridge had, by some hook or crook, got lodged. The lick exploded it. The bullet came through, struck the weight, and glanced back. John's posture put his abdomen square in range, and if that weight hadn't glanced the bullet, we would have headed this article, "A Terrible Accident!" The charcoal of that refrigerator has been thoroughly overhauled.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

And now the butchers are meeting with a new source of trouble. The dudes and dudines of the city are growing pale and careworn. The juicy steak that melts in the mouth of the too utterly too too has no staying effects, for the slumbers of these aesthetic members of the busy, humming world are all broken up by the incessant clapper of the four a.m. bell of the kindly butchers, who not only dispose of their meat at a great sacrifice, but deliver it C. O. D. warranted sound, juicy and sweet sixteen. The city will soon be petitioned to put a stop to this early and unnecessary daylight upheaval of man's better nature. This only applies to single dudes, the double ones can train their better halves to rush out and paralyze the butchers. Oh! Butchers, have mercy. Were you ever a dude? You may be. Go it slow.

"Tell me not in mournful numbers,

Life is but an empty dream,

For the soul is dead that slumbers

And butchers are not what they seem."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Horticultural Society will hold its regular meeting in Curns & Manser's building on Saturday, Sept. 5th, at 2 p.m. This will be an important meeting as it will be the last previous to the Fair. A large exhibition of fruit is expected at the Fair, and the Society will give all the aid and information possible to this end. Jacob Nixon, of Kellogg, is secretary of the society, and also superintendent of the fruit department of the Fair, who will gladly favor all asking information.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

All persons who are afflicted with any chronic disease, please notice Dr. A. P. Turner's ad in this paper, and read it carefully. On his former visits, both here and Arkansas City, he treated successfully a large number of cases mentioned in his ad. He guaranteed to treat any case he accepts with success. Consultation free; at Central hotel, Winfield, September 1st and 2nd; Arkansas City, Leland hotel, September 7th and 8th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The fall passenger traffic is beginning to set in and it is not unlikely that the S. K. will run the passenger now stopping at Independence through to Kiowa. This would be proper. We need an extra train badly, and would rejoice in an immigration that would again put it on. And we'll have it. Cowley and all the counties along this line will undoubtedly have the largest fall immigration they have ever seen. Let 'em come.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Southern Kansas Normal School and Business Institute will open Sept. 7th, 1885. The first term, which closes Oct. 30th, especially adapted to prepare teachers for the quarterly examination. J. A. Wood and Prof. I. N. Inskeep, principals.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A matchless bargain for everybody. Several thousand yards of ribbon including all the wider numbers, such as 9, 12, and 16, and comprising all colors and shades at the uniform low price of 5 cents per yard. You can find them only at M. Hahn & Co.'s.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The fine front stairway and portico put in by Henry Goldsmith on the south of his building are a vast improvement and the city should have more such. It is truly metropolitan and in harmony with Winfield's air of progress.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The furniture for the Southern Kansas Normal School and Business Institute has been ordered from St. Louis and is expected here this week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Watermelons are a drug on the market--have laid their victims low. You can soon get enough for five cents to create a cyclone in your interior department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Republicans of Fairview township will meet at the Akron schoolhouse Saturday, September 12th, at 2 o'clock p.m. J. L. Foster, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

To make room for the fall stock, August Kadau will give better bargains than ever before. Call and see him and convince yourself.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The boom has commenced. Fuller & Mullen sold Monday three houses and lots to Mr. Workman [? Wortman], a capitalist of Springfield, Illinois.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

My stock of misses and children's shoes is complete. Come and make your selection.

J. P. Baden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Before borrowing money on real estate, call at the Farmers' Bank and get rates. No delay in closing loans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

H. T. Shivvers will loan money on good real estate security at as low rates as can be had in the State.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Shaving 10 cents; hair cut 25 cents, at Foultz Bros., next to English Kitchen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Glass fruit jars at reduced prices for the next 30 days at McGuire Bros.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

John Rogers will have a sale at Solomon Ferguson's on Sept. 10th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Now is your time to get bargains in men and boys' suits at Baden's.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

W. L. Rigdon was over Tuesday from Torrance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Constable Church was in from Dexter Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Dr. A. S. Capper was down from Seeley Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

C. R. Mitchell and wife and A. T. Hall and E. E. Wade were over from the Saratoga of the west Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Joe Finkleburg came up from A. C. Tuesday with a number of others, to join the Kiowa excursion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. M. L. Yocum and family returned Tuesday from McPherson County. Mr. Yocum will re-open his roller skating rink in a few days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Joe Shaffer, who forged an order on Smith & Zook for a $6 pair of boots, some weeks ago, plead guilty before Judge Buckman Monday and was given thirty days in the bastille.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

M. L. Wilson, one of the substantial men of Silver Creek, made THE COURIER a pleasant call Tuesday. He says Burden had a magnificent rain yesterday and the corn crop is assured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Lincoln Shaffer, formerly one of Cowley's best teachers, but who has resided at Wichita for the past year, has returned and will follow his old avocation. He says Cowley is good enough for him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Beeny are home from a very enjoyable six weeks vacation in Denver, Middle Park, and other places in Colorado. They are very highly pleased with the trip and return greatly refreshed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

M. L. Robinson, J. E. Conklin, J. L. M. Hill, and Ed P. Greer left on Tuesday to visit the new Stanton County town, Veteran, of whose town company they are members, and to look after other schemes they have in the west.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Meril [? Meriel] & Co. will start a news depot in the building north of Sam Myton's store. They will keep a full line of papers, periodicals, and cigars. As these gentlemen are well known here, they will no doubt build up a good business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Chief Engineer Wingate, of the K. C. & S. W., let the contract for the stone abutments for the Timber creek railroad bridge Monday morning to Charley Schmidt. Charlie will rush the work as fast as he can get men to do it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Prof. Inskeep and wife are on their road to Winfield, where the Professor will soon enter upon his duties in the Normal and Business Institute. He comes highly recommended, and Winfield extends to him and his estimable lady a hearty welcome.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

George Jennings collared a small boy at Arkansas City yesterday with pretty pond lilies and brought a number home for ornament. They are among the most beautiful of the flower kingdom--of velvety, creamy, bell-shaped blossom that is charming to appearance and odor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

James Vance, A. B. Taylor, J. H. McClellan, George Lierman [?Liermann], H. M. Zimmerman, Frank L. Crampton, John Craine, and Wm. Palmer, of the Odd Fellows Lodge, of this city, went over to Burden today to cross bats with a nine composed from Burden's Lodge. Will Kirkwood and others went along.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Nathaniel L. Poe and Cazety Billings, and Edward Shrely and Miss Kempton were sent off on the crooked path of matrimony Saturday by Judge Gans. We don't know any of the parties, but hope they may "leaf long and been haby," as remarked the antiquated Rip Van Winkle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. E. E. Hunt, of Constant, called on us Tuesday. He has a curiosity at home in the way of a cow who is bringing up three pigs, nursing them in the regular way, and treats them as her own offspring. They in return regard her as their mother and feel more tony than other swine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

William Cayton and Capt. Dressie took an overland trip to Arkansas City Monday, and returned today, the Captain much the worse for the wear--the end of his nose battered off by running against the bed post. The buggy was full of rotten peaches that Mr. Caton had robbed some granger of. They report a good trip.

[The first time paper has Cayton; the second time it has Caton.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Nelson Utley, the new Superintendent of the County Poor Farm, has got things straightened around and took the nine paupers off Tom Blanchard's hands. The inmates now have comfortable quarters and will be put to work. Cowley's poor farm is one of the best in the State and will improve from year to year and soon be self-supporting.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

M. Thompson, of London, Ohio, has a small steamer he wants to bring to the head of navigation, Arkansas City. He writes to Mayor Schiffbauer that if the people of Arkansas City will give him "a welcome and stick to him" he will come. With feed and moderate cargo, his boat draws twenty inches--light, fourteen inches.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Marshal McFadden has his hands full now--having the street work since Street Commissioner Cochran resigned. Two hundred and twenty-two men still owe poll tax. The Marshall will give them one legal notification only, and if they don't come up, will put the law to them. Whack up, or hire somebody to do your day's work.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire came in Monday with Whitehead, the Dexter horse thief who got away from Constable Church last Friday while bringing him to the bastille. Our Sheriff surmised that Whitehead would go to Greenwich, up on the 'Frisco, where he had friends, and Friday last McIntire went up and gobbled him. Whitehead's examination will come off before Justice Hines, at Dexter, one day this week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Hon. James McDermott returned yesterday morning from Chautauqua County, where he had been canvassing for a week or two for the D., M. & A. bonds. He has borne the brunt of one of the biggest fights on record against powerful odds led by the sharpest spirits in the state and if he has won, as he thinks he has, in the election of yesterday, it will be another bright feather in his cap.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

J. H. Land was fined in Judge Snow's court yesterday, one dollar and costs, twenty-six dollars in all, for an assault on F. M. Freeland, some time ago. The onslaught was rather mild, but an assault all the same. It originated over an accusation of throwing the ball game between the Cyclones and Borders. Land was extremely touch on that point just then.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Sheriff George McIntire, of Cowley County, never gets left. He arrived here night before last as stated in the Eagle; left yesterday morning for Greenwich and got back on the 6 p.m. train that evening with his man, Jas. Whitehead, a noted horse thief, whom he lodged last night at the hotel de Fisher. For a staid old county, Cowley has a sheriff who is a dandy at his business. Wichita Eagle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Frank Robinson, of Winfield, a college chum of Edmund Frantz and Will Burke, came over yesterday on a short visit and returned this morning. Frank is a member of the Phi Delta Theta college fraternity at Bloomington, Illinois, and is a jolly boy. Five of his "brothers in the bond" met him at the depot and took him in charge. They spent the day pleasantly talking over their college days and singing a few of the old songs. There are quite a number of "Phi boys" in this vicinity and they talk of establishing an Alumni chapter at this place.

Wellington Press.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A very enjoyable social gathering occurred last evening at the pleasant home of Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Taylor, corner of Tenth Avenue and Mansfield street. Those present were members of Mr. Taylor's Presbyterian Sunday school class and a few members of Mrs. E. D. Garlick's class, with their best girls. After a social chat all around, the company was regaled on the festive watermelon, accompanied by grapes, musk melon, and other refreshments. The party dispersed at about 11:30, with renewed appreciation of the agreeable entertainers.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. J. W. Millspaugh, of Vernon, dropped in on THE COURIER today, in company with his old friend, Mr. J. R. Hopkins, of Creston, Iowa, who, with his wife, is visiting here. Mr. Hopkins was conductor on the C. B. & Q. train that struck a broken rail last winter, and went off a bridge, thirty feet down, at Cromwell, Iowa. He is yet incapacitated from labor by his injuries at that time. It was one of the most terrible railroad wrecks of the age, as will be remembered. Mrs. C. Armstrong, Mr. Millspaugh's only sister, is also visiting him from Mount Pleasant, Iowa.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Curns returned this morning from Ottawa, where they attended the Kansas National Prohibition Party Convention. Rev. W. H. Bool and wife, of New York, were present, he being the principal speaker, of the camp-meeting, which preceded the convention. St. John was attending a convention at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and couldn't be present. The Harrisburg convention sent its greetings, which were responded to. Van Bennett, Jennie Newby, A. M. Richardson, and other prominent third party apostles were present. About 200 delegates were in attendance and the usual resolutions were passed. The platform was similar to the National one of last year.

A BAD UDALL CASE.

M. S. Williams Pays $100 for Brutally Beating His Adopted Chid.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Judge Snow's court was novelly entertained Monday. M. S. Williams, a grass widower of Udall, was up on complaint of Hattie M. Williams, his adopted child, charging him with unmercifully beating her. She is eighteen years old and not very bright. She had some big scars on her head, where she said chairs, pokers, sticks, etc., had held high carnival. She also swore that to the best of her knowledge, she was Williams' legitimate child. She said he exercised himself frequently by playing on her frame with a blacksnake and the weapons aforesaid. Neighbors swore that she came to their homes with her shoulders and back all lashed and black and blue. She is not a bright girl--as wild as a deer, just allowed to grow up with no education whatever. Williams said she was incapable of education. She was terribly hard to manage, but Williams swore that he never struck her cruelly with anything--never whipped her with anything heavier than a switch. The evidence failed to convince the jury of this and he was found guilty and fined $100 and costs. The neighbors conceded her wildness, but have no palliation for his treatment of her, and some accuse him of worse things than the outward abuse of her person. The girl is not bad looking and has a fiery snap in her eyes, with short curly hair. When Williams was testifying that he never abused her she, sitting back in the court room, yelled, "That's a lie," making the old gentleman very nervous. This girl was the daughter of Williams' wife' sister, who died when the girl was a year old. Williams had just married and at request of his wife, they took this girl to raise. A son, now fourteen, was their only fruit. Seven years ago, Williams and wife separated, since when Hattie has lived with Williams and son. Last spring, after one of their household furniture matinees, Hattie left Williams and went to the neighbors. She fell into bad hands and was soon turned over to the county poor home. Blanchard soon found she was pretty tough, and locked her upstairs. She threw her bed out of the window, jumped out on it, and skipped. Since then she had been drifting on the mercies of the public around Udall. She will now be sent "over the hill to the poor house," to remain. She is out on the world, a simple, friendless girl, with little natural sense and no experience: a continual public charge. And many blame it largely to a cold-hearted, unrefined guardian, who raised her as he did his horses, only to work.

THE A. C. HOMICIDE.

The Murderer in Bad Shape--Other Minorities of Interest.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Henry Mowry, the murderer of J. P. Smith at Arkansas City, Friday, is in bad physical condition. The wound is all right, doing well, but his nerves appear to be shattered. He has fully awakened to the reality of his terrible crime and for forty-eight hours he didn't close his eyes in sleep. Dr. Mendenhall has been employed by the brothers, Al. and Will, who have been at the jail with Henry most of the time since Saturday. Sunday morning Henry had a dozen or more spasms, his frame in a perfect rack, and he had to be held in bed. During these spasms and struggles, his mind ran on his enamorer and he said, "Give me my child; she'll get away with it!" "Yes, you'll go back on me after getting down on your knees to me, will you?" Opiates only seemed to string him up until last night, when he relaxed and got rest. This morning his mind is clear, but he was too weak physically for an interview. His relatives take the terrible affair with deep distress. Jennings & Troup, of this city, and Hon. David Overmyer, of Topeka, will be the attorneys for the defense. The excitement at Arkansas City has quieted down, though public opinion is yet loud against Mowry. Mrs. Smith, wife of the murdered man, signified her intention to bring suit for damages. To avert this, Mowry has put his property, $4,000 worth of real estate and stock, into other hands. The woman in this case, Mrs. O. F. Godfrey, is fine looking and keen in conversation. He is not prepossessing either in looks or converse. He seems to have been completely infatuated, and it is thought the matter had been weighing heavily on him some time before the tragedy. It is thought to be a more complicated case than the surface indicates. The defense will try to stave the trial over the September term of the District Court. The preliminary examination will probably be waived. Having killed an innocent man, whatever may be proven in the woman matter, will not relieve him from the penalty of cold-blooded murder. His only hope seems to be the insanity plea.

A CUTE YOUNG THIEF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The confession of James Whitehead, the nineteen year old youth whom McIntire brought in from Greenwich Monday, shows a cuteness becoming a much older head. Jim stole a fine horse from Col. Ridgway, at Dexter, one night, rode him to Grenola, and there left him in a pasture. He took the train and came back to Cambridge and that day turned up all right at Ridgway's and went to work. Four days after he went to Grenola, got the horse, rode him to Wichita, and traded him for another, bringing the new horse back with him, claiming to have been off on a visit and to have bought the horse. A slight suspicion, however, lurked in Ridgway's bosom that all was not right, and accordingly he was taken in by Constable Church. The evidence was very meagre, but Jim, getting away from his custodian so cleverly was evidence that the scent was good. He showed a boyish spirit when the iron door of our bastille shut him in yesterday, and he called the sheriff in and told him all, amid tearful penitence. He was working for Ridgway, his folks being out of this county. He says it is his first offense and can hardly explain what prompted it.

AN EXCELLENT SUGGESTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

EDITORS COURIER: As your interest in the prosperity of our inhabitants is not confined to the city, would you bring before the School Commissioners a question that affects many who live outside of Winfield. Many farmers of this county have families who have got beyond the three R's of our country school. They long for something beyond, but prosperity has brought increased taxes, and education in our county towns becomes an additional tax which is doubled or trebled, and the poor farmer is unfortunate enough to be well supplied with ambitious children. Why could not the tax for one insure an education for more if desired, and not make him feel that the size of his family is a misfortune instead of a blessing? Now give the boys a chance who have struggled side by side of their father in toils and hardships of pioneer life, and may their intelligence and culture contribute as much as their industry in making Cowley County the banner county in mere virtues than one.

COURIER SUBSCRIBER.

POSTOFFICE LOCATED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The postoffice change of location is finally settled. As no particular location can possibly be satisfactory to all the unterrified, George has finally hit upon a plan that will be sure to suit. He has rented the old Short building lately occupied by Harter's drug store, now in the street and on wheels, and has engaged Fred Kropp's mules to haul the postoffice about town everywhere any Democrat wants it. It will receive and deliver the mails at the depots and then roll off around town. This plan seems to satisfy everybody except Arthur Bangs. He is kicking like a Texas steer, for it will "bust up" his mail carrying business.

AN EX-POLICEMAN KILLED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

C. H. Crone, proprietor of the Rio Grande saloon, received a dispatch from Arkansas City, Kansas, this morning, announcing that J. P. Smith was killed there yesterday and that the remains would arrive in this city tomorrow. J. P. Smith was a member of the police force for many years, resigning three years ago. His wife has been out in Arkansas City with him. Smith has a brother living in the city, Benj. Smith, and a sister, Mrs. Jos. Temperley, who resides on a farm three miles southeast of the city. No particulars have arrived as to how he was killed. Kansas City Star.

NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

I will receive sealed bids until August 29th for the building of two stone approach walls to the Timber creek bridge, walls two and one-half feet at bottom, eighteen inches at top, six feet high, and thirty feet long each. Also five hundred linear feet of grade near S. E. Burgess farm, as per specifications now in my possession. Right received to reject any and all bids.

J. C. ROBERTS, Trustee, Walnut Township.

[Yes! Statement was made Right "received" rather than "reserved."]

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Fall and winter clothing must be sold for I am going out of the clothing business. J. P. Baden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

It is the hard cash that commands now-a-days; the best value for the money and with this medium in hand our Mr. Hahn is now doing the eastern markets in order to buy a very large and choice stock of Fall and Winter goods. The old maxim of "goods well bought are half sold" will be a convincing fact to an intelligent public. Mr. Hahn & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

M. M. Scott crossed the lower Tunnel Mill ford on Tuesday, just below the Walnut whirlpool. Going back he missed the ford and got too high up, plunging into the center of the pool. The team was large and good swimmers and by a scratch brought the spring wagon and M. M. out all right. He was scared out of fifteen years growth and is over two feet tall now.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Butterick's catalogues and fashion sheets. These mute but helpful friends should be in everybody's household. Call and get one, or both, free of charge of M. Hahn & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Secretary Kretsinger is billing the county with beautiful colored posters announcing the third annual Fair of the Cowley County Fair and Driving Park Association at Winfield, Kansas. The bills are attractive, as pretty as a blooming maiden of sweet sixteen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Hutchinson has its first daily paper, the News, conducted by the Easly Brothers. It is a neat little sheet. We hope its blossom is everlasting and of entrancing and profitable odor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

My full line of Clothing at net cost. J. P. Baden.

PROF. ROSDALE'S LECTURE.

A Trip From Joppa to Jerusalem--Much Historic Instruction.

Arabian and Jewish Habits, Etc.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The lecture of Prof. Rosdale, the converted Jew, at the Methodist church, Monday night, was full of historic instruction and bright witticisms. It was descriptive of Palestine and its inhabitants--their habits, dress, and general life. Though the Jews are rapidly returning, according to prophecy, to their native land, the major population is Arabian. Their lives are crude, very primitive. They eat from one vessel, sitting on the floor around it, all dipping their hands in the same mess. Spoons, plates, etc., are unknown. The women are slaves. They are born to, exist, and die in the lowest ignorance. They never eat at the table with men: wait on the men and boys and subsist on what is left. When a boy is born, all is happiness; a girl brings remorse and disgrace. No woman in Palestine can tell her age. In America this is fashionable, on the turn of twenty-five, but there it is pure ignorance. No rain falls from June to October. Irrigation gives moisture. Like in America, the people "scratch for a living," but in a literal sense. To retain the earth's moisture, the ground is merely scratched with a crude wooden plow, just enough to cover the seed. The old cows usually pull the plow. If the tiller hasn't two cows, the mule fills out the team; if he hasn't the mule, then a woman is hitched up. The biblical saying that the land flows with milk and honey is yet true though the country is under a curse. A single bunch of grapes weighing forty pounds is no rarity and other products likewise. The bible has been terribly misinterpreted. Go to the scenes of its origin and all is as clear as day. There are no drunkards in Palestine. The people are largely Mahometans, and the law of Mahomet is death on drunkards. To be drunk means death. Coffee houses are as thick as American saloons. No shows or like entertainments are ever seen. The main amusement is around these coffee houses, where men congregate to tell funny stories and drink coffee. These stories are childlike and crude. The people are ignorant and infantile in belief. All is superstition. Everything has a spirit. Every disease seeks its cure in fire. The Saturday before Christmas, the people go to the sepulcher of Christ, owned by the Roman Catholics, an elaborate, diamond and gold studded place, and put themselves into the fire of the Holy torches, which they think comes down from heaven. Mothers hold their children in the flames, naked, until their skin is blistered, the child yelling fearfully. She believes this will make him a holy man. At another place are huge alabaster pillars looking as though they had been green wood and in seasoning had cracked, leaving large openings. These openings contain hundreds of decayed human teeth. When a tooth is lost, the loser takes it to these pillars, gives the priest a dollar--with which he claims to buy oil and incense, but oils his own pocket--and leaves the tooth in a crack, with priestly assurance that they will have a new tooth in a year. It don't show up in that time. They go to the priest about it. He tells them it is their own fault. "You sinned." And they believe it. Everything there is sold by measure: chickens, eggs, grain, and all. Grain is sold by the head of an ass: measured in a turbaned hat, called "the head of an ass." Beef and mutton are the principal meats eaten. Pork is abominable to a Jew. They would rather die than eat it. They are very queer in diet, though in that country, like the Arabs, have no idea of cleanliness. No Jew, anywhere in the world, ever has any of the nasty diseases of other humanity. In specially prophesying their spiritual protection, the Lord seems to have blessed their temporal welfare. The Palestine government robs the people--has all in its own despotic hands and takes what it pleases--all or a portion, keeping the people down. If Americans could all visit that land and realize the privileges they throw away in the U. S.--see the horrible condition of those people, they would return satisfied with the grandest government and happiest people in the world. In Jerusalem many of the streets are arched over: narrow and dark. Dead animals are thrown in the streets and live ones act as scavengers, eating up the offal. The people are not much for business, though there are many rich residents. Olive and other oils are the principal sources of revenue. Agriculture is marvelously luxuriant. A big family, servants and all accessories, can live there for a dollar a day and have some left. One hundred eggs can be bought for 20 cents, 6 pounds of grapes for cent; bushel oranges for 4 cents; sheep 10 to 12 cents apiece; chickens 24 cents a bushel (this, however, is more than some of the crow-bate chickens in this country are worth). There are a great many old people there and they are the incubators. They hatch eggs in a manner to make the old hens blush. They have large, thick, wool and fur-padded wraps, which they fill with eggs and sit around until they are hatched, which isn't long. The people, like those of all nations, are children of example. The styles and modes of living are the same as in ancient times because the people have been taught nothing else. They have no dudes or dudines to pattern after as to fashion, so their garments are loose and primitive. There is nothing figurative in Christ's command, "take up thy bed and walk." The bed was nothing but a loose outer garment, worn all the time. Half is put under and half over the person at night.

The lecture throughout was full of important instruction, all applied biblically, establishing bible history.

HENRY MOWRY AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Henry Mowry, principal in the terrible Arkansas City tragedy, has recovered from his nerve shock and is now all right--his mind perfectly clear and his physical condition good. This morning he was walking around in the jail with the other prisoners smoking and talking. The wound in his groin only makes his leg a little stiff and is more slight than at first supposed. The brothers have told him to keep his mouth shut regarding the homicide, and forbid the officials allowing any newspaper interviews. So his story of the affair will remain under seal until the preliminary hearing is concluded. It was to be held in Arkansas City, or waived entirely, but Henry refused to go to Arkansas City, so they concluded to bring the witnesses up here. The examination will be held this week.

MEAN TRICK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Many have noticed and commented upon the little old shed building placed alongside R. S. Wilson's splendid new residence on East Eleventh Avenue, almost ruining its beauty. We have made inquiry and if the facts as presented to us by the neighbors and others are true, it exhibits one of the most contemptibly mean actions we have yet been called upon to record. In fact, we did not imagine that Winfield contained a man so low down as to do a thing of the kind. We suggest that the matter be fixed up. If it isn't, THE COURIER will feel compelled, in the interests of public decency, to ventilate someone.

NOTICE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Republicans of Otter township, Cowley County, Kansas, are hereby requested to meet in caucus at the Otter Schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, 1885, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of selecting delegates to the county Convention, to be held September 19th, 1885, at Winfield, and to elect a township committee. By order Committee.

H. B. GRAVES, Chairman.

CONFESSED ALL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Whitehead, whom we mention elsewhere, as having been recaptured by Sheriff McIntire, has confessed all--melting after the iron door of the bastille clamped on him. He said he did steal Ridgway's horse. He is a lad of nineteen. He hasn't explained yet how he claimed to steal it, but says it is his first offense. He will get a year or two in the "pen."

LITIGATION'S LONG LIST.

Trial Docket Cowley County District Court,

September Term, 1885, Commencing Sept. 1st.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

CRIMINAL DOCKET.

360. State vs Burton, Elias.

371. State vs Burge, W. I.

376. State vs Knowles, Newton.

377. State vs Knowles, Newton.

378. State vs Knowles, Newton.

381. State vs Clark, John.

382. State vs Clark, John.

383. State vs Brumine, William.

384. State vs Brumine, William.

404. State vs Baxter, James.

409. State vs Jerry Doe, real name unknown.

417. State vs E Kimmell.

424. State vs R R H McGinnis.

425. State vs Charles Roupe.

426. State vs C Lewis and Alice Jeffers.

430. State vs John Wilson.

431. State vs John Kennedy and F L Milligan.

435. State vs Frank S Ridgway.

436. State vs John Otto.

437. State vs John Cooley.

438. State vs Edward Ellendow.

439. State vs Abner Carson.

1786. Henry Hansen vs Joseph Davis, Jennings & Troup, attorneys for plaintiff; W. P. Hackney for defendant.

1794. Elizabeth McQuain vs Nancy A Baldwin, et al, W. P. Hackney for plaintiff; Joe O'Hare and J. D. Pryor for defendant.

1812. Mary Stokes vs J. S. Hunt, County Clerk, Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; Joe O'Hare and J. D. Pryor for defendant.

1819. Houghton & McLaughlin vs John Brown, A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff; W. P. Hackney for defendant.

1858. Dwight Ripley vs D A Millington, Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

1869. Winfield Bank vs William A Hybarger, et al. J F McMullen for plaintiff; D C Beach, McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

1871. William M Null vs Neil Wilkie and J F Greer. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1885. The Southern Kansas R R Co vs I B Stone, Co Treas. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff.

1891. Assignment of Conway Bros., Joseph Oldham, assignee.

1899. James Jordan vs Winfield Twp., et al. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; Joseph O'Hare for defendant.

1998. Bliss & Wood vs C C Harris et al. J. Wade McDonald for plaintiff; Joseph O'Hare for defendant.

1922. J A Field & Co vs Brotherton & Silver. D. C. Beach for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

1923. C E Foss & Co vs Phillip Sipe. D. C. Beach for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

1929. School Dist. No. 13 vs School Dist. No. 133. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1937. Bartlett & Co vs A T & S F R R Co. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; Hackney & Asp for defendant.

1958. Schuster, Tootie & Co vs G B Sigler. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff.

1959. Smith Frazee & Co vs G B Sigler. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff.

1960. Stout & Wingert vs S S Baker, sheriff, et al. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1961. Stout & Wingert vs S S Baker, sheriff, et al.

1964. Nannie C Fuller vs Board Co Comm, et al. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff; Joe O'Hare, Jennings & Troup for defendant.

1970. O M Stewart vs Davis A Merydith, et al. McDonald & Webb for plaintiff.

1972. B L Weger vs City of Winfield.

1979. James Jordan vs Elihu Wade. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

1980. F W Schwantes vs C A Bliss et al. S. D. Pryor, W. A. Tipton, Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

1983. M Ingram et al vs P Fouts et al.

1988. M L Reed vs J E Parkins et al. McDonald & Webb for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

1989. Appeal of R B Waite. S. D. Pryor, W. A. Tipton for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1990. Appeal of R B Waite. S. D. Pryor for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1991. Appeal of Henry S Ireton. S. D. Pryor for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1992. Appeal of Henry S Ireton. S. D. Pryor for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1993. James K Shapper vs David Hahn. W. F. Hackney for plaintiff; J F McMullen for defendant.

1994. Appeal of F W Schwantes. S. D. Pryor, W. A. Tipton for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1995. Appeal of F W Schwantes. S. D. Pryor, W. A. Tipton for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

1997. Marshall Lambert vs Hiram Blenden. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; Hackney & Asp for defendant.

1998. H S Bixly vs William Cohagan. Dalton & Madden for plaintiff, D. C. Beach for defendant.

2014. Lewis Conover vs Pink Fouts. McDonald & Webb for plaintiff, Mitchell & Swarts for defendant.

2017. John S. Mann vs Tanebaum, David & Co. J. Wade McDonald for plaintiff; J. D. Houston for defendant.

2021. B H Clover et al vs Charles H Elliott. Henry E. Asp for plaintiff; J. F. McMullen for defendant.

2026. Ada M Rice vs Lewis M Rice. W. P. Hackney, McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2032. Jeremiah Weakly vs Burton D Guinn et al. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2033. Frances M Mallett vs Burton B Gui8nn et al. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2034. Wesley Mallett vs Burton D Guinn et al. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff; McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2041. O C R Randall vs D D Branson et al. McDonald & Webb for defendant.

2046. E S Brown, receiver, vs W J Pointer and C M Pointer. A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2048. Winfield Bank vs W F Dorley. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2052. Isaak L Newman vs William H Speers et al. Mitchell & Swarts and Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

2053. C M Scott vs H P Farrar et al. Mitchell & Swarts for plaintiff; A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2056. Wm Wilt and Martha Wilt vs The Mutual Benefit Life Ins. Co. et al. Leavitt, McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

2057. W A Lee vs W R Branson. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff; Mitchell & Swarts for defendant.

2058. B W Matlack vs Geo W Gray. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2059. B W Matlack vs John N L Gibson et al. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff; Mitchell & Swarts for defendant.

2061. B W Matlack vs Alice M Weeks. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2062. B W Matlack vs Frank J Hess. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2063. B W Matlack vs R M Hess. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2064. B W Matlack vs William Vansickler. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff; A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2065. Ben Bartlow vs D P Hurst et al. Dalton & Madden for plaintiff; Hackney & Asp for defendants.

2069. Andrews et al vs R Gates. Dalton & Madden for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2071. A H Doane & Co vs Co Commissioners. Jos. O'Hare for plaintiff; Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2073. Sarah Cardiff vs Michael Cardiff. C. M. Leavitt for plaintiff.

2075. G. B. Shaw & Co. vs Irwin D Franklin et al. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; D C Beach, S. D. Pryor for defendants.

2076. Edward Barnes vs M L Robinson. C. M. Leavitt for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2078. W R Branson vs W A Lee and J W Love. Mitchell & Swarts for plaintiff; J. F. McMullen for defendants.

2079. City of Arkansas City vs D F Best, no attorneys.

2081. Abel Oharra vs Jennie Oharra. O. C. R. Randall for plaintiff.

2083. Martha A Iliff vs Lemuel Iliff. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2084. A E Kirkpatrick vs Herman Trefleck et al. Wm. M. Jenkins for plaintiff.

2086. John Buckley vs John Bevens et al. Jos. O'Hare for plaintiff; J. F. McMullen for defendant

2087. Winfield Gas Co vs City of Winfield. Jos. O'Hare for plaintiff; J. F. McMullen for defendant.

2088. Henry Stix et al vs John G Shelden. Mitchell & Swarts for plaintiffs.

2094. Amos K Jones vs George Heffron. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; J. F. McMullen for defendant.

2095. H M Basham vs George E Hasie, et al. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2096. Winfield Bank vs J B Nipp, Co. Treas. McDonald & Webb for plaintiff; Hackney & Asp, McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2097. The Wichita & Southwestern R R Co vs G H McIntire, Sheriff et al. A. A. Hurd, Robert Dunlap and W. P. Hackney for plaintiff; H. E. Asp, Jennings & Troupe and C L Swarts for defendant.

2098. Catherine E Hodgson vs William H Crawford et al. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2099. Permelia H Emley vs Wm Emley. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2100. S M Jarvis vs Elijah E Craine et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff; McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2101. R R Conklin vs John M Jarvis et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2104. R R Conklin vs John H Hicks et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2105. The New Hampshire Banking Co. vs James Loper et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2107. S B Riggs vs Camilla Bigler et al. Kellogg & Sedgwick for plaintiff. Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2108. Wm H Hibbard vs S D Pack et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff. Hackney & Asp for defendant.

2111. J Cairns vs Louisa Jones et al. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2112. J W Hinton vs The Wichita & Southwestern R R Co. J. W. Ruggles for plaintiff. Houston & Bently for defendant.

2113. Justin Hollister vs Board of Co Com. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff; Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2114. John Reinhart vs Cynthia J Reinhart. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2115. James Bruington vs Board of Co Com. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff; Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2116. Geo W Cunningham vs M C Shivers. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff; Wm. M. Jenkins for defendant.

2117. Marie F Pearson vs John S Bryant et al. D. C. Beach for plaintiff.

2119. Francis I Whitson vs James Fahey et al.

2120. David C Beach vs Sarah C Murphy et al. Dalton & Madden for defendant.

2121. Hiram D. Kellogg vs Emily Sweet et al. Henry T. Sumner for plaintiff.

2122. Jane F Pack vs Samuel D Pack. Hackney & Asp, Saml. J. Day for plaintiff.

2123. Daniel Bunnell vs Sarah C Bunnell et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2124. J N Harter vs Board of County Com. Jos. O'Hare for plaintiff; Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2126. Frankie Morris vs The Equitable Life Insurance Society of U. S. A. A. Hurdt, Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; Geo. J. Barker and J. W. Green for defendant.

2127. Frankie Morris vs The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. A. A. Hurdt and Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; Geo. J. Barker and J. W. Green for defendant.

2128. A W Patterson vs J A McIntire et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2129. Rosanna J Roderick vs Harvey J Roderick et al. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2130. The City of Winfield vs J M Sayman. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff; McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2131. D D Branson et al vs W. A. Lee.

2132. Eli Brock vs John Lane.

2133. J Weil & Co vs Wert Bro. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2134. N M Persing et al vs Oscar Henderson et al. Saml. J. Day for plaintiff; McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2136. A H Green vs D F Best et al.

2137. Josephine Willis vs Geo W Willis. Turner & O'Hare for plaintiff.

2138. R R Conklin vs William H Frank et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2139. Peter McCush vs Seaborn, Moore et al. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; McDonald & Webb for defendant.

2140. Thomas McCampbell vs John Deffenbaugh et al. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2141. Alfred Rice vs Ella J Rice. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2142. H C Stivers vs Mary N Stivers. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2143. R R Conklin vs John E Mayse. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff; S. D. Pryor for defendant.

2144. S M Jarvis vs Alonzo Johnson et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff; D. C. Beach and John A. Eaton for defendant.

2145. R Emily Kinney vs John C Armstrong et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2146. Lawrence Dawson vs The Kans Life Association. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2147. Savilla M Stucker vs Eli J Stucker. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2148. Edward Grady vs E C Mason et al. W. M. Jenkins for plaintiff; A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2149. J A Kendall et al vs Lemuel Lafayette Wise et al. Dalton & Madden for plaintiff. McDermott & Johnson for defendant.

2150. Edward G Maitland vs Malvina A Maitland. Randall & Swarts for plaintiff; Sapp & Sapp for defendant.

2151. Assignment of Shriver & Co. Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2152. City of Winfield vs J C McMullen. W. P. Hackney for plaintiff.

2153. City of Winfield vs W A Lee. W. P. Hackney for defendant.

2154. Mary B Seabridge vs Levi Seabridge. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2155. Adelia A Kibbe vs Lyman S Kibbe. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff; Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2156. John Windell vs John H Hicks et al. A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2157. Morrison Implement Co vs Hiram Brotherton et al. D. C. Beach for plaintiff. Jennings & Troup for defendant.

2158. Turtullas R Ray vs Mary C Ray. D. C. Beach for plaintiff.

2159. Nicholas Belveele vs The Kansas Protection Union. Hackney & Asp for defendant.

2160. J E Hayner & Co vs G M Gardner. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

2161. Elijah Tyner vs Anna Tyner. Henry T. Sumner for plaintiff. A. J. Pyburn for defendant.

2162. Frank J Barton vs Susan A Barton. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2163. Ellen Pollard vs Laura J Gillespie et al. W. J. Patterson for plaintiff.

2164. Delia Derusha vs The City of Winfield. Dalton & Madden for plaintiff. Jos. O'Hare for defendant.

2165. J C Fuller vs Chas W Izzard et al. F. F. Leland for plaintiff.

2166. Leonard Farr vs Archibald F McClaren et al. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff.

2167. Amos I Allison vs Sylvester T Hocket. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff.

2168. Henry Goldsmith vs Jerome E Beck et al. A. J. Pyburn for plaintiff.

2169. James S Sterrett vs Joseph W Calvin et al. G. H. Buckman for plaintiff. J. F McMullen for defendant.

2170. Mary H Buck vs Whitfield D Mathews et al. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2171. John A Reihl et al vs Joseph Likowski. Jetmore & Son and Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

2172. Geo Heffron vs W A Lee.

2173. Louisa Galbreth vs W H Gatbreath. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2174. Alexander Hoel vs John A Cochran. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2175. Alexander Hoel vs George C Taylor. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2176. Chas W Frith vs Alfred P Cochran. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2177. Chas W Firth vs George C Taylor.

2178. Hannah Smithey vs S B Smithey. O. M. Seward for plaintiff.

2179. Jas F Monical vs Martha E Monical. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

2180. Ella Marley vs Alvia Marley. D. C. Beach for plaintiff.

2181. J W Ross vs A B Glass et al. Samuel J. Day and Samuel D. Dalton for plaintiff.

2182. James A Craine vs Lizzie Craine. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff.

2183. Alice V Matson vs John Matson. Hackney & Asp for plaintiff. H. T. Sumner for defendant.

2184. Ellen Riley vs Theodore Fairclo et al. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff.

2185. John E Doyle vs Anna E Maidt et al. H. T. Sumner for plaintiff.

2186. Levi Weimer vs Board County Commissioners. McDermott & Johnson for plaintiff. Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2187. William Blizard vs Frank L Thompson.

2188. May J Bethel vs George W Bethel. McDonald & Webb for plaintiff.

2189. M G Troup vs Mary C Zall. Jennings & Troup for plaintiff.

2190. John Lowry vs Board County Commissioners. Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2191. Jamison Vawter vs Board County Commissioners. Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2192. G H Buckman vs Board County Commissioners. Henry E. Asp for defendant.

2193. Kathrina Esch vs J S Shipman et al. J. F. McMullen for plaintiff.

2194. Mina A Taylor vs W L Taylor. W. T. Madden for plaintiff.

SO! SHOT TODAY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Wednesday morning a couple of men began to erect a scaffold on Main street. The curiosity of the bystanders was aroused to fever heat and crowds stood around waiting for developments. We looked for the victim, the hangman, and the noose. Pretty soon a cannon was mounted on top; then we saw the criminal was to be severed by a shot, and we pitied him from the bottom of our big heart. Pretty soon a little gun was put in position, and we thought if the big one don't get him, the little one will. In a few minutes a long, lank granger came along and anxiously inquired, "what was going to be done?" The operator informed him they were going to shoot the "sun." "Whose son," inquired the granger, "What has he done?" Why don't you hang him? I'm against shooting him. Give him a trial and find out if he is guilty." By this time the Granger was on to it, and trading the operator a pumpkin for a squint, looked through the cannon at the sun in all its glory.

ATTENTION FARMERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The celebrated Gladden Hawkeye wire for sale by Berkey & McGregor only.

A DEEP CUT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

We offer one hundred and forty-three pairs of good jeans pants at the low price of 95 cents a pair. This is much less than the cost of material and trimmings. M. Hahn & Co.

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

160 acres of land, good apple and peach orchard, good stone house, all fenced, for less than one can put the improvements on. Address Box 48, Maple City, Kansas.

FOR RENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A new hotel now being built in Ashland, Clark County, Kansas. Will be completed September 15, 1885; contains twenty rooms conveniently planned. Will rent unfurnished for one or more years. Inquire of Brown & Coffman, Anthony, Kansas.

AUTUMN STYLES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Butterick's new patterns arrived on time; they are acknowledged to be unrivaled in perfect fitness, elegance and accuracy. M. Hahn & Co.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

P. H. Albright & Co. loan money on city property for any length of time--from one day to three years.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Root, father and mother of our W. C., have taken up their residence here, residing on East 9th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Who says advertising in the DAILY don't pay? Cooper & Taylor put in a local in regard to brick. Hardly had the paper got cold when parties commenced to come in for brick. They have a rushing trade on brick now. We inserted a small ad to rent two rooms yesterday. The party hadn't time to eat his supper before renters began to pour in. It is a fact, a little "ad" will do the business. If you don't belief it, try it and be convinced.

FARMERS, THRESHING MACHINE MEN HOLD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Do you know that we have the largest and best stock of brass goods, pipe fittings, hemp, and rubber packing, machine and cylinder oils, waste, and, in fact all kinds of supplies this side of Kansas City. Call and see us and get anything you may want at low prices. Ostrander & Stayman, Foundry and Machine shop, N. Main st.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A good Hapgood Sulky, taken up on a debt, for $52.00. A bargain. W. A. Lee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

If you want a good, substantial fence, go to Eastman & Cochran, the slat and wire fence manufacturers. They make all lengths, from 30 inches to four feet. South Main St., rear of Bullen's lumber yard.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

For Sale. My farm in Richland township, within a half mile of the proposed new town of "Wilmot," on the K. C. & S. W. railroad, consisting of 320 acres. Also my stock--55 head of 1 and 2 year old heifers, in calf by imported Galloway bull. Also 28 head of half-blood Galloway calves by their sides. The farm is fenced with wire, and good, perpetual running water. A. T. Holmes, Wilmot P. O.

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Recap: In District Court. Lilly Carter, Plaintiff, against James H. Carter, Defendant. Divorce proceeding to be held September 25, 1885. Plaintiff asking for the custody of minor child, Charlie Carter. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for plaintiff.

FIRES AND FIENDS.

Six Old United States War Vessels Burned to the Water's Edge.

A New York Murderer Suffers the Extreme Penalty of the Law.

A Number of Arkansas Convicts Make a Bold Dash for Liberty and Seven Escape.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

PORT WASHINGTON, L. I., August 22. A fire causing a loss of over $100,000 broke out on board the steamer Colorado, lying off Plum Beach, near here, last evening. The flames spread from the Colorado to the following ships, all of which were burned to the water's edge and sunk: Minnesota, Susquehanna, Congress, South Carolina, Iowa, Lottie Grant, and Fair Play. All with the exception of the last two formerly belonged to the United States Navy. They had been condemned and were bought from the Government by Stannard & Co., who were to break them up for the old iron and planks they could get out of them. The fire broke out on the forward deck of the Colorado, where men were at work burning up planks to get the iron spikes. On the right of the Colorado was the Susquehanna, to which the flames spread rapidly, and before either it or the Colorado could be towed out, the flames had spread to the other boats. They all burned. [Next sentences almost obliterated. Impossible to read clearly.] They all burned so fiercely that within three hours nothing was left of the once defenders of the United States but a few charred planks and floating timbers. The hulks sank at once to the bottom, going down with a hiss and a gurgle, amid a cloud of steam from the water as it swept over the burning wrecks. The Colorado was the first to sink, and as the water closed over her, a mast from the Minnesota toppled over on the Congress, and together they sought the sandy bottom of the sound. The Susquehanna burst loose from her moorings, and at one time the various fishing crafts anchored along the shore appeared to be in danger. She floated about fifty yards from shore, and after trembling for a minute, keeled over and sank. The South Carolina and Iowa followed her to the bottom in short order, but before going down the flames spread from the Iowa to the Lottie Grant and Fair Play, two schooners lying near the shore, and they, too, sank. Who the owners of the schooners are could not be ascertained, as the crews became so mixed up in the crowd of spectators that they could not be found. Mr. Stannard said: "The loss to me is not less than $100,000, as it was only for the iron in them that I bought them. Had they been serviceable, the loss would have footed up in the millions." The loss on the schooners will not be less than $15,000.

SUFFERED THE PENALTY.

AUBURN, N. Y., August 22. Franz Joseph Petemkey yesterday morning suffered the extreme penalty of the law for the murder of Mrs. Paulina Froitscheim on August 1, 1883. The crime was discovered when the husband of the victim returned to his home after his day's labor and found the mutilated corpse of his wife lying in a pool of blood upon the floor. Her brains had been beaten out with the blunt end of a hatchet. The examining surgeon testified that over twenty blows had been dealt with the weapon. The murderer was captured on the following day in Albany. The trial lasted a week. The prisoner admitted having killed the woman and put in a plea of self-defense. He claimed that she had sought an interview and urged him to elope with her; but upon learning he was already married, flew into a rage and drew a revolver upon him. He defended himself with the hatchet. After the commission of the crime, he rifled the house of everything in the shape of jewelry or money; and the theory of the people was that he went to the house merely for the purpose of robbery, but upon being confronted by the woman, he felt compelled to put her out of the way. The murderer was originally sentenced to be hanged March 21, 1884, but the law's delay lengthened his lease of life until yesterday. His last night was without incident. The Rev. Father Ulrich prayed with him until eleven o'clock, when he retired to rest and slept. The death warrant was read in the cell at ten o'clock and shortly afterwards the prisoner stood beneath the gallows. He appeared unmoved when asked if he had anything to say. Father Ulrich replied, saying the prisoner wished to confess that he was justly punished for the crime. He asked forgiveness of all whom he had scandalized or caused pain and died willingly in the hope of salvation. The noose and black cap were then adjusted and at 10:23 the weight fell. The neck was dislocated and at 10:45 the physicians pronounced him dead. Petemkey left instructions as to the disposal of his body and the burial took place in the Catholic cemetery this afternoon. About 300 persons witnessed the execution.

BOLD ESCAPE OF CONVICTS.

LITTLE ROCK, ARK., August 22. At the Arkansas penitentiary, between six and seven o'clock last evening, there were forty-seven convicts working at the brick kiln under guard of eleven men armed with Winchester rifles and double-barreled shot-guns. Nothing was noticed until the time for work to cease approached, when George D. Anderson, a notorious convict serving a three years' term for grand larceny, suddenly snatched a shot-gun from a sand box where it has been secreted, and leveling it at the guard said, "Jim, I don't want to kill you, but unless you drop your gun, I'll do it." The guard let his gun fall, at the same moment two convicts named John Vest and Thomas Kelly produced guns and pointed them at the guard Lange. The other guards ordered the convicts into the stockade and the order was observed by all but seven. Of these Anderson, Kelly, and Vest, white men, stood with their guns drawn, while four colored convicts joined the party. Anderson took the leadership and arming two of the colored men, marched the seven convicts outside of the walls when they hastily disappeared. A posse is after them and a bloody battle is expected, as all the convicts are desperadoes and it is thought will never be taken alive. Bloodhounds have been put on their trail, but they succeeded in killing one of the dogs.

INDICTED FOR MURDER.

BISMARCK, D. T., August 22. Marquis des Mores, the millionaire cattleman, has been indicted on the charge of murder by the Grand Jury now in session at Mandar. The charge has been hanging over the Marquis for more than two years. When the Marquis first settled in the Bad Lands, he fenced in a large tract. The cowboys objected, and bad blood was engendered. While in Bismarck one day, the Marquis received a dispatch warning him against cowboys who had threatened to kill him on his return to the Little Missouri. He returned, but stepped from the north side of the train while the cowboys awaited his arrival on the south side. He succeeded in getting home, but the cowboys surrounded the premises. The Marquis and two friends crept through the woods to a safe shelter and awaited their opportunity. When the three fired, one of the shots killed one of the cowboys. It is now known whose shot killed the man, but the Marquis was arrested, given a hearing, and discharged. Marquis de Mores is a son-in-law of Baron von Hoffman, of Wall street, New York. The Marquis left this city for New York last night.

KILLED HIS WIFE.

PITTSBURGH, August 22. Patrick McKeever, of No. 265 Second avenue, was arrested tonight and charged with murdering his wife. About three months ago McKeever and his wife had a drunken fight, during which he struck her on the back with a stone. She died three weeks afterward, but it was not until today that the police were acquainted with the facts. McKeever is about fifty years of age.

OVER TWO HUNDRED LIVES LOST.

BERLIN, August 22. The report of the wreck of the German corvette, Augusta, is confirmed. Her crew of 238 officers and sailors were lost. Her value was $1,750,000. She was lost in a cyclone in the Red Sea.

A SERIOUS CHARGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

SEDALIA, MO., August 22. William Unser, a German farmer living seven miles south of Sedalia, was arrested yesterday for incest. About a year ago his wife died and since then his niece, Maria Hoffart, has kept house for him. Last week they were married, the girl being about to become a mother. Unser was released on bond. He formerly lived in Lexington, and is a hard-working but ignorant German.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.



ROOM WANTED!

S. Kleeman

Is in the Eastern markets buying a large stock of DRY GOODS for fall trade, and wants room for his store house to handle them, and in order to make room for New Goods, we must move the summer stock. To close out the summer stock we will make prices that will move them.

We will pay no attention to cost or closing out sales, but will give our customers bargains to suit the times and our wants.

In Ladies' Muslin and Gauze underwear we can give you your own prices.

Ladies' Shawls and Scarfs at a sacrifice.

Parasols too cheap to mention.

An elegant line of Silk Gloves and Mitts that must go.

It is necessary that we dispose of Ladies' Neckwear and Hosiery.

White Goods and Lawns almost given away. A few White Embroidered Robes bought especially for [last two words garbled].

It will astonish you to price our Summer Silks.

Call and examine our goods and prices and be convinced that we can save you some money.

S. KLEEMAN,

812 Main Street.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

New Book Store.

The City Book Store at the "Red Front," on Main street, is now open for business. A first-class stock of Books, Stationery, School Supplies, Blank Books, office, will be kept in stock. Also curtain goods, poles, and a fine line of late styles picture mouldings, from which frames will be made to order at price of moulding. None but the best goods carried in stock, and I hope by moderate prices and fair treatment to merit a fair share of your trade.

I will receive subscriptions and furnish at the City Book Store, any paper, magazine, or periodical published, at publisher's price, for any length of time.

North Main Street.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

For Sale. An excellent stock farm of 160 acres, well watered. Well improved, with fine grass, all under fence. Also 160 acres of land 8 miles northwest of Winfield. Will sell at a bargain. F. N. Strong.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

H. T. SHIVVER'S

Real Estate Agency,

Over McDonald's Store.

CITY AND FARM PROPERTY.

[Thirteen items were listed. I did not copy.]

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A jury found Chief Poundmaker guilty of treason-felony and Judge Richardson sentenced him to three years in the penitentiary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

William John Thomas, the antiquarian and since 1863 Deputy Librarian of the House of Lords, died recently. He was born in 1802.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

General Middleton, of Canada, has been created a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George for services rendered in the Northwest during the rebellion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Near Meeker, Colorado, the other day, the cabin of Patrick, James, and Robert Regan, brothers, was blown up with dynamite by unknown parties. James and Patrick were instantly killed, but Robert miraculously escaped.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Advices from Zanzibar state that Dr. Reychard, the sole survivor of the German International Exploring Expedition, is reported to have been killed while fighting the natives during the progress of the Ugozo expedition.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Experiments were recently made at the torpedo station at Newport, R. I., with a movable 15,000-candle power electric Zasch light for use at sea. It was found to work perfectly, minute objects being discernible at a great distance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Mary Ellen Williams, colored, was committed to jail at Yorkville, South Carolina, recently, charged with administering poison to her family in the bread at breakfast. Her husband and two step-children died, and another child was not expected to recover.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

E. E. Knott, of Toronto, Canada, a real estate and insurance agent and a director of the Central Bank of Canada, has fled to New York, leaving large liabilities. He succeeded in borrowing several large sums of money before leaving, having been considered financially sound.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

In Union County, Kentucky, recently, the dead body of Lydia Burnett was found on the roadside near Boxville with her throat cut. A medical examination proved that the unfortunate girl had been outraged. A farm hand living in the vicinity has been arrested on suspicion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

C. W. Patton, a patent-right agent of Kentucky, was arrested at Sedalia recently, charged with incest and seduction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Democrats of Mississippi have renominated Governor Lowry for another term.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

In a difficulty, recently, with Jerry Ferrel and John Crittenden, in Livingston County, Kentucky, Mathew Rogers was brutally beaten with a hoe and was finally shot and killed by Ferrel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Thieves entered the room of William Flatman, an American cotton merchant, at a Liverpool hotel the other night and robbed him of a large sum of money and some valuable jewelry.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

An action for libel has been begun against the leading foreign newspapers in China for alleging the reported sale of the Chinese merchant fleet, to an American firm for 5,250,000 taels at the outbreak of the hostilities with France. It was a bogus transaction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

It is announced by a high official of the British Foreign Office that the reports of an alliance, offensive and defensive, between England and China are untrue, but that England, China, and Japan have arrived at a satisfactory understanding as to the course to be pursued by each power in the event of war between England and Russia.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Ella Morrison, a young lady, ill with typhoid fever at the Huron street hospital, Cleveland, left her room during the absence of the nurse the other day, and fell or jumped over the railing in the upper hall. She fell a distance of thirty feet, striking on a steam heater. Her skull was crushed and both arms broken, and death ensued shortly.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Rev. Father Jardine, of Kansas City, created a sensation on a Missouri Pacific train the other night by taking an overdose of chloroform. The belief generally prevailed among the passengers that he attempted to commit suicide, but the reverend father denies this, and says he took the drug to produce sleep, as he is troubled with insomnia.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The striking street car drivers at Memphis have returned to work having accepted the terms offered by the company.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

All the Peoria whiskey detained in Philadelphia by direction of Commissioner Miller of the Internal Revenue Bureau has been released.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

It was reported the other day that the British ship Haddingstonshire ran on the rocks off the coast of California and eighteen lives were lost.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

A dispatch was received at Washington recently confirming the report that Aufdemorte, the New Orleans defaulting Sub-Treasury clerk, was arrested at Monterey, Mexico.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Lyndon Center, Vermont, is a village of three hundred inhabitants and is about one hundred years old. The first fire since its foundation occurred the other day. The loss was small.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Ed Corrigan's famous horse, Freeland, after winning two victories from Dwyer's mare, Miss Woodford, was defeated in a race at Monmouth Park the other day amid the wildest excitement.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The resignation of W. H. H. Llewellyn, agent for the Apache Indians at Mescalero, New Mexico, has been accepted by the Secretary of the Interior. He has been there for several years, and was wounded twice in controlling the Indians.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The Bureau of Contagious Diseases state that the nature of the illness of Otto Roah, of New York City, who was removed from a house in the Bowery recently, is not yellow fever, as was thought, but intermittent fever and jaundice.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Hon. D. J. Morrell, General Manager of the Cambria Iron Company, and for many years Representative of the Seventeenth Pennsylvania District in Congress, died recently at Pittsburgh.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

The report of the wreck of the German corvette Augusta was confirmed. Her crew of 238 officers and sailors were lost. Her value was $1,750,000. She was lost in a cyclone in the Red Sea.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

King Alfonso instructed the Spanish Ambassador at London to proceed to Berlin and entreat Emperor William to delay the occupation of the Caroline Islands. He feared that he would be deposed by his subjects.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

Six old United States war vessels, the Minnesota, Susquehanna, Congress, South Carolina, Iowa, Lottie Grant, and Fair Play, burned to the water's edge of Long Island recently, causing a loss of over one million dollars.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

William T. Hudson, of Bosque County, Texas, was arrested at Fort Worth recently, charged with swindling V. T. Randolph, of New Jersey, out of $30,000. Hudson contracted to deliver to Randolph 5,500 head of cattle, but it is alleged failed to deliver a single head, notwithstanding the advance payment of $30,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

State Senator John P. Rogers, of Union County, Kentucky, was arrested recently charged with violating the United States revenue law, and given a hearing before United States Commissioner Green. Mr. Rogers is a prominent member of the Maynardville, Tennessee, bar. He was appointed United States Commissioner by Judge Baxter in 1882. He was elected to the Legislature, and in 1884 elected to the State Senate.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

[Could not read next item.]

ALMOST BURIED ALIVE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

DETROIT, MICHIGAN, August 22. Tuesday morning the infant child of Charles Sullivan, of this city, apparently died and was prepared for burial. Fifteen hours after death, while the family were gathered about the casket, the baby cried, frightening nearly everyone from the house. The father retained his senses and took the child from the coffin; and it has since been in better health than for some time.

ACCEPTED THE REDUCTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

PITTSBURGH, August 22. Miners employed at Watson [?] & Co.'s in the third pool have accepted the reduction offered by the firm and are resuming work this morning at two and a fourth cents per bushel. This action was not expected. The price for mining has not been as low along the Monongahela for years. In the fourth pool a number of miners [?] working at one and three-fourth cent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, August 27, 1885.

[Above item hard to read. Reason for [?] showing up. Next two items almost eradicated by white space running through middle of column. Could not make sense of them.]