THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1885.

MRS. WALKUP.

She Appears in Court, But on Advice of Counsel, Declines to Testify.

Walkup's Partner Declares She Bought Arsenic.

Walkup's Suspicions of His wife.

A Strange Story From New Orleans That Walkup Was Poisoned by His Physicians.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

EMPORIA, KAN., August 29. Long before the hour appointed for the re-assembling of the Coroner's jury in the Walkup poisoning case yesterday, the court room was densely packed. Many ladies and persons of prominence were present. It was expected that Mrs. Walkup would take the stand, and the prisoner's youth and great beauty, combined with the air of mystery surrounding the case, had served as a two-fold incentive to attract them. At 2:30 the jury took their seats. As the hands on the big clock indicated 2:35, the door leading from the hallway to the court room opened and immediately a low murmur ran through the assembly of "Mrs. Walkup, Mrs. Walkup." She entered the room in charge of Deputy Sheriff Worster. She wore a black brocaded silk dress, a small, close fitting lace bonnet and tiny white veil. Her face was as colorless and fair as a lily, with the exception of a spot of vermillion on either check, which came and went at intervals. Her large lustrous brown eyes gazed upon the crowd fearlessly and calmly as she wended her way down the aisles.

BEFORE THE SEA OF FACES

the Deputy led her to the witness box, and bowing slightly to the lawyers and jury, she seated herself. She removed her veil and gloves, and County Attorney Feighan arose, and addressing her, said: "Mrs. Walkup, are you ready for the examination to proceed?"

Before she had time to reply her counsel, W. W. Scott, stepped forward, and addressing the jury, said that at his suggestion Mrs. Walkup would not give her testimony there, and possibly not before the jury at all. He wished to have it understood that this action was solely his own and that he would abide the consequence. At the close of his remarks, the prisoner and the Deputy left the court room and drove to the former's residence.

Dr. Filkins, in his examination, said he had been Mr. Walkup's physician for several years; that two years ago he was taken with an illness similar to the one with which he died; that last summer he was affected in exactly the same way.

Mr. J. R. Graham, editor of the Daily Republican, was called and corroborated these facts. Several other witnesses were called, but their testimony elicited nothing new.

Dwight Bill, Mr. Walkup's business partner, in his testimony said: "Went up to Mr. Walkup's house the day before he died; met Mrs. Walkup at the door; told her I would like to see him on business. She said, 'What do you think is the matter with Mr. Walkup?' I said, 'I think it a case of peritonitis.' She said, 'Do you think the doctor thinks so?' I said, 'I do not know, but that was my impression.' She said, 'Don't they die very suddenly of peritonitis?' She asked, 'You want to tell him what is the matter with him?' I then passed upstairs; told Mr. Walkup I did not want to hurt his feelings, but was going to talk very plain to him. He said, 'You can say anything you wish.' I then told him that the doctor and some of the rest of us had strong suspicions that he was poisoned. I said further that 'we mistrust your wife.' He spoke up and said: 'I have mistrusted her, too.' I asked him why he mistrusted her. He said, 'because she told me a week or ten days ago that she bought strychnine to take stains from her dress.' I said, 'your wife bought twenty-five cents worth of arsenic of Ben Wheldon yesterday afternoon.' He said: 'My God, is that so, let us have her arrested.' I said, 'No, we do not want her arrested until we find something further, but we want, if possible, to save your life--we do not want you to take any more medicine from her.' He said he would take no more medicine, or even water from her. When I said 'We want to save your life,' he said, 'I want to live.' As I went downstairs the hallway door was open, and Mrs. Walkup said, 'Mr. Bill, you did not tell him what the matter was.' Mrs. Walkup, when we spoke to her of poison, talked quietly, showed she felt the shock, but declared her innocence."

The jury then adjourned till eight o'clock today.

In an interview Mrs. Walkup appeared to still feel the confidence possessed by her at the beginning in her being found innocent. Apparently she does not seem to comprehend the grave nature of the charge against her, for as she says: "I am innocent; I cannot force myself to act other than natural; why should I not feel quiet?"

During a two hours' interview with Judge Houston, immediately after the coroner's jury, he said: "The testimony of Dr. Filkins and Mrs. Graham is of great importance as corroborating the theory that Mr. Walkup died from natural causes. If, however, the report of the analysis from Kansas City shows the finding of arsenic in appreciable quantities as the result of the majority of the tests, the theory of death from natural causes would be no longer tenable. Even if it is shown that he died from poison, it may yet be shown that he received the poison from hands other than those of Mrs. Walkup or through some accident. Judge Houston says the case is as much a mystery to him as to anyone else; that if Mrs. Walkup would commit so atrocious a crime, she would not hesitate to deceive him; that she has told him that she is entirely innocent and he is disposed to believe her statement until the weight of evidence precludes its further credence. Judge Houston was satisfied Willis had nothing to do with the crime, if crime there was, as there is no evidence to show that he had even a knowledge of the purchase of poison by Mrs. Walkup.

NEW ORLEANS BLAMES THE DOCTOR.

NEW ORLEANS, LA., August 29. The testimony of the physicians before the coroner's jury in the Walkup case, given yesterday, and particularly that part of the evidence of Dr. Jacobs, in which he said he had given sub-nitrate of bismuth to the deceased gentleman, created considerable talk among chemists and physicians in this city. The Times-Democrat interviewed a number of chemists and druggists today, with the result of an unanimous declaration that many preparations of sub-nitrate of bismuth contain large quantities of arsenic and a general acquiescence in the probable correctness of the theory that the drug administered to Mr. Walkup by Dr. Jacobs caused that gentleman's death.

Mr. Eugene May, one of the largest druggists and most prominent pharmacist in the city, said: "After a careful perusal of the dispatches detailing the strict examination of the physicians attendant upon Mr. Walkup, we must conclude, almost beyond a question of successful contradiction, that the source whence that gentleman obtained the poisonous principle culminating in his death, was a large dose of sub-nitrate of bismuth, which he had been taking as a corrective and anti-acid."

The sequel of the examination conducted by the physicians in attendance and the chemists would appear to prove most conclusively the correctness of this view.

Dr. John H. Pope, an old experienced druggist and ex-Vice-President of the American Pharmaceutical Association, was very pronounced in his opinion on the Walkup case. He says that in his experience the sub-nitrate of bismuth manufactured in the West is a very inferior article, and the physicians of this city will use no other than the French; the Western drug gives off heavy nitrous acid fumes and produces the very feeling of the throat complained of by Mr. Walkup. Arsenic is associated with bismuth in its natural state, and has to be eliminated in the manufacture of the sub-nitrate which is used as a medicine. In careless or cheap manufacture, this is not entirely eliminated. The fact that the doctor persisted in giving these powders, notwithstanding the complaints of the patient, speaks little for his knowledge of remedies when others could be given that would not contract the throat.

The doctor is satisfied that an analysis of the sub-nitrate of bismuth administered to Walkup would show that it is an inferior drug and contains arsenic.

KIOWA EXCURSION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

In answer to many questions, and for the benefit of those that could not avail themselves of the opportunity of taking in the excursion of Kiowa, I will try and give a few outlines of the trip. On Tuesday morning, August 25th, we boarded the 10:40 train, hearing that the regular excursion train from Kansas City, which was 20 minutes behind the regular train, was full, we boarded and started for Kiowa, which is located in Barber County, and at the terminus of the K. C. & S. K. Railroad. At Kellogg several parties joined our company. Among them was our friend, W. P. Gibson, of Protection, Comanche County. When we told him we were going to Kiowa, his face was almost as long as a fence rail, and he felt sorry for Protection. At Oxford a number of her citizens joined us, and so on at every station we passed until we neither had sitting nor standing room on our train. We arrived at Kiowa at 3:30 p.m., and the other train 20 minutes later. The citizens of Kiowa met us in grand style at the railroad. I won't say depot for they have none yet; but they were there with all the buggies, carriages, and hacks they had in town, together with the Wellington Band, which had gone over the day before. We unloaded right in the midst of the worst prairie that a great many of the excursionists has ever looked upon. We were now about half a mile from what they called New Kiowa. We started on the march, headed by the Band. We marched up through Main street, and there, let me tell you, we saw wonders to behold such as we never will forget. As they marched us into the town, they said they proposed to show us the production of their county, which they did to perfection. Across Main street they had erected an arch about forty feet high in the center. This was handsomely decorated from base to base with all the cereals of the soil, such as none but Kansas lands can produce--corn, wheat, millet, beans, cane, melons, cotton, pumpkins, etc. This they claim was the production of 1885, and the production of their county for 1884. They had on exhibition the bear, cayote, wild cat, deer, and numerous others too numerous to mention, and to go back as far as 1881, and to show to this grand excursion party--especially to those who had forgotten the production of these past years--they had on public exhibition, with doors wide open, seven saloons and gambling houses, selling whiskey and beer over the bar by the drink, as they did of olden times. I must confess that this seemed to be the most lively part of the exhibition. On top of the arch they had a stuffed beef hide. There it stood natural as life, 40 feet in the air. After passing through this arch, we filed right and were brought to a halt in front of the Hardwick House, a fine, large two-story hotel, fitted up for all contingencies, with a bar and billiard room on the first floor, with all the necessary conveniences about a first class hotel on the second floor. After some very fine music from the band, the excursion party started for the four corners of Kiowa. I want to tell you some of them saw the elephant before morning, but I am not going to tell you who they were. Ask J. J. Johnson and Sam Phenix about it. The first place I saw these two gentlemen in the morning was crawling out of a stockade that had been bedded with sand the night before for shipping Texas cattle. Of course, we did not know whether the people of Kiowa would give us a free lunch or anything of the kind, but it was suggested by some of the party that it was such a great cattle region that they would as much as have a roasted beef anyway. When we all got off of the train and beheld that beef standing forty feet in the air, the whole party thought it was a sign of a roasted beef. It was a sight to see the greedy eyes feasting on that stuffed beef as we passed under it; but we were to be pitied as the train had stopped nowhere for dinner, and we had eaten up all the roasted and unroasted peanuts that the peanut vendor had on the train. You may know what a hungry looking crowd we were, but we did not see any roast beef nor have a barbecue. I think if that striped animal had fallen off of the arch in the crowd, it would have been devoured in less time than a gang of cayotes could devour a buffalo carcass. But we got full--that is, we all got plenty to eat by paying $2 for our supper, bed, and breakfast. We were glad of the accommodations, even at that price. When you visit Kiowa, you don't want to care for expenses.

After supper the crowd was called together--all that could get together--at the Hardwick House and after some very fine music by the Wellington band, the excursionists were addressed by Mr. Dobson, mayor of the city, in which he stated that he was completely surprised to think that 1,500 people would drop down on them at one time just to see their little city. He said their town was only six months old and had already about 1,000 inhabitants. Judge Reed, of Wellington, also addressed the crowd, making some fine remarks about the southwestern country. Some gentleman from Kansas City also made some remarks in which he said there were three great cities. First, the city of Chicago; Kansas City; and, last, but not least, the city of Kiowa. Then the chairman suggested that after some more music from the band there would be a free dance on the platform adjoining the hotel, and those who had no place to stay "could dance all night and go home in the morning." The platform was 40 x 100 feet. They had fine music and the Kansas City, Wellington, Winfield, Oxford, and Kiowa people all joined hands and had a jolly old time by the sweet, silvery light of the moon.

My object in taking this trip west was for my own satisfaction and to see if all reports were true that we had been hearing. I had been told by many that they had been having much more rain than we had and that the crops were much better. Now, after seeing with my own eyes, I emphatically deny the reports. I do not think they have had any more rain than we have had. I saw some pieces of corn that were green and nice yet, and some that were dried up, some were well eared, and some had no ears at all on it, just the same as in this county. The early corn is good, but the late is a failure. Some say the soil is just as good out west as it is here. Now I can deny this. I paid particular attention to the crops and soil and want to say right here, I would not give a good quarter section of Cowley County soil for any section of land I saw west of a little town called Crystal, about fourteen miles west of Harper, for agricultural purposes. At this place and on west the soil is a deep red, with not an inch of black soil to be seen. The water that stands in pools is a red color and did not look even fit for stock to drink. If the soil was only a Mulatto color with a little black mixed in, I would think it better for agriculture. I did not see any grass west of Attica that was tall enough to cut. I noticed that there was not much fall plowing done, on account of the dry weather. The ground is just as dry out there as it is here. I examined some ground that had lately been plowed and it looked as though it has had no rain on it this summer. I think that country, to make a good farming country, wants a rain every day in the week and one on Sunday for a change. Between Attica and Chrisfield we passed through quite a valley, which A. J. Thompson called "Wild Horse Valley," as there was a herd of Texas ponies running away from the train, and he took them for a genuine herd of wild horses; but he was informed by someone that they were only Texas ponies. Between Chrisfield and Hazelton we ran into the prairie dog towns and Jap Cochran thought they were pigs following the cattle until he was told better by some bystander, who informed him that they did not raise hogs in that country.

Among the excursionists from Cowley, I noticed the following persons: J. J. Johnson, New Salem; F. M. Fall, Cambridge; J. Hiatt, Cambridge; S. Phenix, Floral; J. Finkleburg, Arkansas City; N. T. Snyder, Arkansas City. From Winfield: A. J. Thompson, Walter Denning and wife; Uncle Billy Moore and wife; Jap Cochran and mother; Barnthouse, the soda man; Sol Fredrick; John Eaton and wife; C. W. Stolp and son; Jake Goldsmith; Sam Stivers and brothers; and Gray, of the Telegram.

We left Kiowa at 12:30 and arrived home at 5:30, all except Jap Cochran. I think he got off on the way to get some of those pigs. I don't think there was an investment made out of the whole party on account of the high prices. A. J. Thompson don't value lots out in Kiowa like he does in Winfield. They tried to sell some lots at auction the day we left, and Thompson bid $100 for a lot on Main street, but I think one of the town company over-bid him and he did not get it. Now if anyone that was on this grand excursion can give a better description of the trip, I am ready to hear from them.

T. J. HARRIS.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A man's leg was found this week between Attica and Harper and is now on exhibition at Harper for identity. It was cut off at the knee joint in anything but a workman-like manner. It is a mystery and no clue has been discovered.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

[?]. F. Johnson exhibited in our office Friday cabinet photograph scenery on his farm just across the Arkansas from Tannehill. One exhibits the neat house, surrounded by leafy verdure; another, his barn and his $500 Herford bull; and another a fine lake and his herd of fine [? __aded] cattle, skirted by a background of big corn and the timber of the Arkansas. Mr. Johnson has one of the most desirable farms in the county, and will be a heavy exhibitor at our Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The excavation for the Imbecile Asylum is nearly finished and the walls will soon loom skyward. [Note: Last two items partially obscured on the left side by streaks.]

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religions Transpirings as Gleaned by the Scribes of the Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

METHODIST CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The church was crowded Sunday. The usual announcements were made for the week, including quarterly meeting next Saturday and Sunday, Bro. Audas presiding. Monday evening an official meeting will be held. Rev. Kelly preached a lengthy sermon from Psalm 37:31. "The law of his God is in his heart, none of his steps shall slide." The following is a brief synopsis. The words refer to the righteous man. The text explains the course of a righteous life. The laws of man and God are different; the blunder of the two has been the course of wrong. Man needs law to meet emergencies. God requires no such laws. The law of God is full of love. I think the divine code, the divine law, and the word of God can be summed up in two words--Be happy. Many people think happiness is in having a good time; in a worldly sense, plenty of fun. That in order to be happy it is necessary to be in possession of worldly goods. The scriptures say, "Blessed are the poor in spirit; blessed are the humble, etc." The basis of genuine happiness is God's blessed word planted way down in the heart. Love the supremely good. Supremely good is the basis of a religious life and the source of happiness. The requirement of the word of God is to love God with a love that is paramount. The great mistake in loving God is that it is not paramount. It is only the man that loves God better than his life that has the true religion. The divine law should be the ruling law among men. The speaker referred to the small percent of Christians that read the law of God. As a man thinketh in his heart, so is he. The thoughts in a man's heart, if shown to the world, were alluded to. The supreme law we should give to God was dwelt upon and the relation of the conscience and God's love. The law of God was shown to be the law of liberty. At the close of the sermon two persons were admitted into the church.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

Rev. Sloan preached from John xii:33. "And if I be lifted up from the earth will draw all men unto me." During the last three years of the life of Christ, the work of his ministry and the infallibility of his miracles drew many to listen to and believe in him. Among the Jews the word Greeks in that age of the world included all persons outside of the Jewish religion, and were in this sense idolaters and heathens, but were as susceptible of the exercise of faith, and were found ready to proclaim Christ on his triumphal entry into Jerusalem. But all the results of his teachings, during his life, had not the efficacy of his death in drawing humanity to him. He saw in the willingness of the Greeks to pay him homage the first truths of his gathering the heathen nations. For many years after the death of Christ the growth and purity of his religion was checked by the outgrowth and superstition of idolatry, as was manifested in the tendency to worship him by symbols, crucifixes, and incantations of saints and such outward representations. This has taken centuries for instrumentalities of God's providence and teaching to clear away, and now in the nineteenth century, man has been drawn to Christ by his lifting up or having been crucified. Men are better notwithstanding the cries of sin and man has greater reason to have confidence in man than ever before. Sectionalism is taking a back stand, magnanimity of temperament and toleration and investigation of views and doctrines and the success of Christ's kingdom is fast becoming the universal object of Christendom.

THE BAPTIST CHURCH.

Rev. Reider's morning subject was pure and undefiled religion described, based on Jas. 1:27. "Pure religion and undefiled before God, and the Father is this." Religion must produce self-government, freedom from corruption. Faith in God is not all that constitutes religion. Devils have believed, but they were no better off for their belief. Faith must be accompanied by a zeal to be and do good: a determination to raise humanity around you. Pure religion does not mean a renouncement of the world. We are all social creatures, and sociability is the greatest mode for doing good. It is by mingling good precept and example with the world in general that is put on a higher plane. More sins are committed by omission than commission. Church members, by neglecting the good at hand to do, commit grave sings. Do you want to live long in the hearts of men? Then spread your influence over the world: care for the suffering, help the erring, and make the afflicted lives around radiant with hope. The true christian is constantly working for others. Temporal means should not be for self-happiness alone, but the means of casting sunshine on less fortunate humanity--for the better carrying out of the Christly religion you profess. Pure and undefiled religion means to do the will of God. This is all. Study well his requirements and do them.

UNITED BRETHREN.

In the United Brethren church services were held in the morning. The pulpit was filled by Rev. Dr. Lee, pastor of the Mt. Zion circuit. Rev. Snyder filled the Doctor's pulpit at Hackney. The text for the discourse was Mathew v:16. "Let your light so shine before men that they may see your good works," etc. We are not placed upon the earth merely to pass away time and occupy space. Our life does not consist merely in trying to gain heaven. He that has no higher motive is selfish and the fartherest from heaven. Everyone has a light peculiar to himself. God requires us to do our work and to look to him for the results. We are not to be discouraged if others do not notice our work, or order our ways so as to drive the people from the Lord. Avoid austerity. Do not draw the lines of obedience so as to make duty difficult. Some persons are so constituted, have been so educated that they can perform some acts without doing harm to their conscience, while the same acts to others would be harmful and wrong. We are not to hide our works so that they may not do good, yet we are not to make a show in order to create notice. Men are influenced to good or bad lives by what they are. The sermon was a plain, practical, and highly appreciated one. The usual announcements were made. The members of the society were requested, as far as possible, to give their presence at the morning services.

'RAH FOR CHAUTAUQUA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

J. C. Long received a dispatch Thursday announcing a majority of 527 for the Chautauqua County D., M. & A. bonds. The fight was a bitter one, but the D., M. & A. advocates won the argument. Once explained, it was easy for the people of that county to see the Santa Fe scheme to defeat the bonds, forfeit its $50,000, and leave Chautauqua County for an unlimited time under the same monopoly she now endures. The D., M. & A. will force the Santa Fe to move into that county to save itself, and will gain two roads, instead of a non-competing bob tail. This county about fills the breach. Nearly all the other counties or townships along the line have voted bonds. The Santa Fe's action is another big surety, in addition to the lively dirt throwing at Belle Plaine, that the D., M. & A. is a mighty big, loud certainty that will blow its whistle all along the line as soon as men can accomplish the result. The first sub-let contract, sixty-one miles west of Belle Plaine, is a very active scene, all the men and teams at work that can be secured.

MARRIED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

At the residence of the bride's mother in Beaver township, Wednesday afternoon, August 26th, Jabez B. Tannehill and Mary E. Pearce. Rev. J. H. Snyder of this city performed the ceremony. The young people went the same evening to their own home, where they pleasantly entertained many of their friends.

WATER MILLION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The melon wore an inviting smile

As it lay in the market place

And joy loomed up in the doctor's heart

Till it beamed upon his face.



The undertaker passed that way

And thought of his coming luck,

With satisfaction he chaffed his hands

And chuckled a ghastly chuck.



The small boy smacked his hopeful lips

As he passed that melon by,

And watched till its owners back was turned

From the corner of his eye.



In the deep dense shade where no eyes could see

He enveloped that melon fine.

He swallowed the seed and drank the juice

And encroached upon the rind.



The hide on his abdomen was stretched

Till it stood far out before,

But the doctor's aid was never called

And the small boy wanted more.

UDALL SENTINEL CLIPS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Wichita Eagle is puffing and blowing at a terrible rate trying to make people believe that Wichita will be the important city of Southern Kansas. Wichita will make a very pretty little city, but the big city of this part of Kansas will be Winfield, in this county. Don't forget to make a note of this and also that the railroad systems in Cowley County will make it one of the richest in Kansas.

The Winfield Tribune, of last week, makes some dirty, uncalled for slings at the County Commissioners and County Attorney in its insinuation that the Commissioners were in the hire of the railroad company when it condemned the right of way for the K. C. & S. W. road. The Tribune man has likely been talking with some crank or sorehead, and is anxious to gain some cheap notoriety by espousing a cause that all intelligent, enterprising businessmen would kick into kingdom-come on account of its insignificance. Such breaks as that and the uncalled for insult spewed at Hon. Wm. Hackney will not help any paper.

Any farmer that buys agricultural implements, cloth, or machines of any kind from traveling agents or salesmen instead of buying from their reliable home merchants deserve to be duped, as they generally are. Men do not travel about the country for nothing. No, they are after suckers, and judging from the cry that goes up after they leave, we should judge that they found plenty of them. Show us a traveling peddler or agent, and nine out of ten will prove to be rascals and cheats, although at the time they will make you believe that they are almost white-robed angels just out on a furlough from paradise. Deal with home men and you are safe. Don't forget this.

Cowley County promises to have one of the finest railroad systems to be found in Kansas. By consulting a map you will see the truth of this assertion by noting the north, south, east, and west markets that are being opened for the products of Cowley's fertile soil. The D., M. & A. will open a direct route to Memphis and Denver, two great markets for flour. The Santa Fe, with Chicago, Kansas City, and Denver as feeders. The K. C. & S. W., carrying produce to Kansas City and St. Louis. All transporting, both ways, what we sell and buy. And more than this, the Santa Fe and K. C. & S. W. will likely build into the Territory ere long. These roads will do wonders for our rich country. You will live to see it.

RATHER UNSOPHISTICATED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Very funny incidents often occur at our hotels, accounts of which never reach the public eye. The one however that happened the other day is most too good to keep. A young man, apparently from the country, entered the dining room of one of our hotels, and after bashfully surveying the surroundings, seated himself at one of the tables, placing his hat carefully in his lap. One of the ever attentive and courteous lady waiters approached and called the bill of fare. The young man reluctantly listened, remarking at the same time: "I don't care to talk; I'd like something to eat!" The waiter brought him in a fine dinner, and when he had heartily partaken of the substantials with apparent great relish, the waiter again approached and asked: "Will you have a change?" "Oh, yes!" and down went his hands into his pantaloon's pockets, bringing forth a lot of silver, part of which he proffered the waiter. The latter individual smole a broad smile, and explained that she wanted to know what further he desired to eat, and for him to settle in the office for his dinner. The young man had satisfied his hunger, and picking up his hat went out. Pretty soon he was back again, sitting quietly in a chair as if expecting someone. The waiter again approached him, and desired to know what he wanted. "Well," said he, "I thought I'd come back and tell you that I gave that change to the man in the other room." "All right," laughingly replied the waiter, and the young man disappeared.

A PLEASURE BOAT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

And now Winfield sports a pleasure boat--not exactly a presidential yacht, but one nearly as tony. It arrived today from Cedarvale, where it has been plying the Big Cana. It is owned by T. S. Cramer, is twelve feet wide and twenty-four long, a stern wheel propeller, run by a little infant engine of three horsepower. It draws only four inches of water, light; loaded, six inches. It is neatly covered with canvass, with seating capacity for fifteen or twenty. It was hauled over on a wagon, the wagon backed off into deep water below Bliss & Wood's mill, the engine started, and the little craft run down to Riverside Park. It will carry pleasure parties up and down the river from the Park and your best girl will give you no peace until she gets a ride on that boat.

DIED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

On the 20th, inst., at the home of his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Hahn, Mr. Silas Parker Hahn, youngest son of David and Elizabeth Hahn. Silas was born in Miami County, Indiana, August 15, 1857, and was, at the time of his death, aged 28 years and five days. On May third, 1885, he was married to Miss Ida Chapson, who survives him. The funeral services were held at the Mt. Zion church on the 21st inst., conducted by Rev. J. H. Reider, of Winfield.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Of all the hideous, disgusting appendages to a woman's wardrobe, the bustle of today caps the climax. Just why a really handsome well formed woman wishes to disfigure herself with a hump that would make a dromedary laugh himself into spasms, is too deep a problem for our system of metaphysics. It is rumored--mind we give it as a rumor only--that the bustles of the period are stuffed with sawdust, corn husks, cotton batts, and newspapers. Whether that is true or otherwise, the Great Religious Daily, which prides itself on its truthfulness, is not prepared to say. But whether true or false, the sooner the ladies discard these ridiculous monstrosities, the quicker their natural attractions will be appreciated. In the interests of form and reform the great American people should arise in its righteous wrath and snatch the bustle bald-headed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Do not go around or approach any occupied house in this city between 10 o'clock p.m. and 6 o'clock a.m., for if you do, you may catch a bullet or two. The citizens are arming themselves and we expect they will shoot. If you must arouse one within the above houses, do it at a distance that he may discover who you are before he shoots. We would also advise inmates of a house to keep to their rooms during these hours, so as not to get peppered by their protectors by mistake.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Wichita will soon have a union depot, which is a curse to the laboring men of any town. Scatter your depots and hundreds of men are given employment transferring baggage. With the depots scattered, the hotels catch hundreds of transients where they wouldn't catch dozens with a union depot. These men who stop over, see more or less of your town, and are given an impression that will advertise you. Wichita will make a mistake in a union depot. They are no good excepting in Kansas City, Chicago, or such cities.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Some new corn is appearing on the street. It sells for thirty cents a bushel, eighty pounds. A load raised on A. J. Thompson's place just east of town was as fine as can be produced. It goes seventy bushels to the acre and is the large yellow variety.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

N. Rice was up from Pawnee agency Saturday. He is a full blooded Pawnee, writes well and talks fluently, and is in every way a gentleman. He has been one of the post traders, and is worth considerable. He bought a team here for $286, to take back with him. His case is convincing that something can be made of a Red Skin.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A certain physician of this city, whose long black coat, side whiskers, silk hat, and black tie, says the Joplin Daily News, would indicate that the business of the owner was dispensing spiritual rather than medical advice, was accosted on the street the other day by an innocent appearing young man and led to a retired spot around a corner and there confidently informed that a marriage, in which the informant was to play the leading role, was to come off that evening and that he (the clerical appearing gentleman) was wanted to perform the ceremony. The astonished man of medicine informed the would-be husband that he, being a doctor of physics and not of divinity, was not authorized to officiate at weddings and that in well regulated family circles his presence was not professionally required until some time after the happy event of the knot-tying ceremony.

A FINE FARM FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A GOOD BARGAIN.

One of the best grain and stock farms in the county, 240 acres fine bottom land, 230 acres under plow, 40 acres timber, 200 acres of upland pasture, timber and pasture enclosed with barbed wire fence, fine running water and several large springs, house 16 x 26 story and a half, stone barn 21 x 33, sixteen foot walls, room for ten head of horses, granary room for 3000 bushels, necessary out-buildings, corrals, etc., peach orchard 1 miles to schoolhouse. This place will be sold, if sold soon, on very reasonable terms. Inquire of or address THE COURIER, Winfield, Kas.

A CHANGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Quite a change has taken place in our carriage factories. The two have been consolidated and will continue to do business in the shop heretofore run by Monfort & Rogers, under the firm name of Monfort & Bishop, Mr. Rogers and Githins retiring from the business. Messrs. Monfort & Bishop are both men of undoubted business integrity and will meet with the success they deserve. By the consolidation of the two shops, they will have a wider field of demand for vehicles and will give them all the work they will be able to do. They are invoicing the stock today preparatory to the change.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A couple of the dusky families of the south part of town are into each others wool: making things very sultry. The "younguns" were the onslaughting parties. The old heads took up the cudgel and hades was to pay yesterday afternoon. Stove-wood, pokers, bedsteads, and every available weapon about the place held high carnival on dusky heads. Marshal McFadden and Assistant McClain had to fly to the rescue, and if things are not quieter on the Potomac, the police court will have another family case.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Magnetic needles point at right angles to electric currents. Such needles point north and south, hence we know the electric currents flow east and west. Lie, when you sleep, in the direction of these currents and you are robed in a measure of your electrical supply. Lie, when you sleep, with your head to the north, and your sleep will be sweet and calm, provided your conscience is clear and your liver in good order. Extra nervous people take notice.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Kiowa comes up with the latest b-l-o-o-d, last Wednesday night. A. W. Patterson, Arkansas City's wild and wooley "Pat," is running a house of sportive shape out there. He had sold out one den and was just opening another, when a festive gambler bored a soldier from Dodge, laying him out instantly. Cards and whiskey the cause.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Kingman Courier contains eighteen announcements of persons who want to fill some of the five offices to be voted for in Kingman County this fall. Sumner County has fifteen candidates. Cowley shows more sense than both of them. Only six candidates. When a whole county runs for office, it certainly needs a guardian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Farmers Institute meets in the real estate office of Curns & Manser on Saturday, September 5th. The subject for discussion will be "The preparation of wheat ground and its seeding," with additional subject, "Fall plowing for corn."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

There will be a Republican primary election held at the Dexter schoolhouse September 12th, 1885, to elect seven delegates and seven alternates to attend the Republican County Convention to be held at Winfield, September 19th, 1885.

S. H. WELLS, Chairman, Township Committee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Residents on east 8th avenue are complaining a good deal about the horses of delivery wagons being allowed to nip the young trees in that neighborhood. This is wrong and should be stopped. There is an ordinance against this, and if not stopped should be enforced.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Squire Norman was down from Udall Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

H. P. Standley was up Thursday from the Canal City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Capt. Maidt was up from the Terminus Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Hon. John D. Maurer was over from the Grouse Valley Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Wm. M. Jenkins, one of Arkansas City's bright young attorneys, was up Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

H. G. Fuller moved his real estate office just south of the Lindell hotel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mrs. C. Strong is off for a month or more at her old home, Sheboygan, Wisconsin.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge Pyburn and son, Walter, and Ed G. Gray, came up from Arkansas City Saturday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

G. C. Wallace's store now has a merchandise elevator, put in by Case Bros., running to and from the cellar.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

H. G. Norton has the principalship of the Torrance schools for this winter. He had charge of the Torrance schools last winter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Ben Herrod and Hank Paris have the contract for excavating the Eaton-Short cellar on the corner of Ninth and Main. They are making things hum.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Maude, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Cooper, fell down stairs Thursday night, head over heels, thump, thump, bruising her face badly.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

S. Kleeman got home Saturday from a month's eastern purchasing tour. He bought a very fine, large stock for his dry goods emporium, which will roll in soon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

W. C. Root returned from McPherson Friday with his wife and family. They go to housekeeping here at once. Mrs. Root's many friends are glad to welcome her back.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

J. W. Tull, of Cambridge, one of the early and prominent citizens of Cowley, was in Winfield Thursday. He has been in good feed evidently and is portly and handsome. Glad to see him again.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Garth Billingsley, after a two months' visit with the Spotswood family, returned to St. Louis Wednesday. He is a son of R. L. Billingsley, St. Louis wholesale commission merchant, Mr. Spotswood's former partner.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Jim Connor & Son are whooping the New Central school building up with a rush. Twenty men are at work now and the force increasing. The walls are Rough Ashler, like those of the old building, to make uniformity.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Billy Kersands is on the front of Reed & Oliver's paint shop--as natural as life, with his ivory shining from a yawning chasm. These gentlemen are daises in portrait painting, like in everything else.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

R. S. Craybill, one of Tisdale townships best young men and the owner of a fine farm there, returned Friday from a three weeks' visit with his parents at Mount Joy, Pennsylvania. R. S. says he is still single and in the matrimonial market.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mrs. Josie Roberts and nephews, Bennie and Clarence Roberts, arrived Friday from St. Marys, Kansas, for a visit with her sister, Mrs. J. E. Vanleys. She will remain a month, when Mrs. Vanleys will probably accompany her home for a visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Ezra Meech and sister, Miss Jessie, left Wednesday for Michigan, Ezra having almost entirely recovered from the terrible accident that made a week in his life a blank. His friends rejoice at his recovery, and regret the family's permanent departure.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We had the pleasure of taking a squint through Dr. Fitch's big gun at Mrs. Moon in all her glory. It is well worth the price charged. The moon is brought up close; the surface is rough, broken eruptions, having all the appearance of a volcanic eruption. If you desire to be enlightened, take a peep.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mrs. J. P. Smith, wife of the man murdered by Henry Mowry, at Arkansas City, will stay with relatives in Kansas City until the shock of her husband's sudden death subsides, when she will return and settle up her affairs. She endures the terrible affair with true womanly fortitude.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mrs. A. Lawrence died at 3 o'clock Friday night, of consumption. She had been an invalid for two years. The remains were shipped this evening to the old home, Champaign, Illinois. The funeral was held at the residence at 1 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Reider.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Mamie Garlick is visiting friends in Eureka before commencing her school at Augusta, the first Monday in September. Miss Ella Garlick will also visit in Emporia and Lawrence till Wednesday next, when she will accompany the Kirkwood family to Minneapolis, to enter McAlister College.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Tom Quarrels and wife came in Friday, having been pardoned from the penitentiary by the State Board of pardons. They were sent from Cowley, she as an accomplice of her husband, for two years, for stealing Hurd's horses and buggy. Their term would have expired next May. Tom says he will remain here, and proposes to go to work for reputation and fortune.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. T. P. Carter, of Silver Creek township, accompanied his niece, Miss Nellie Smith, to Colorado, two weeks ago. She was low with consumption and the trip was taken hoping for relief. Mr. Carter sends us a card that she died last Saturday evening. She was but eighteen years old, and a bright girl. Her remains will be buried at her home near Burden. The trip to a high altitude was probably too sudden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

J. H. Lorey, two and a half miles northeast of town, has left on our table two elephant ears of corn. One ear is about fourteen inches long and the other a foot, both immense in circumference. It is the Mammoth yellow variety, and the seed was planted March 15th. We have hung them alongside of our Editor's Club and will knock the first man sky high that wants to know who "writ that piece."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

T. P. Carter, of Silver Creek township, was in the city Friday, returning from Colorado, where he took his consumptive niece, Miss Nellie Smith, a few weeks ago. Nellie was but eighteen, and died a short time after arriving there. Her uncle resides in Colorado and a brother went out a few years ago, seeking a cure for the same disease, and died. Nellie was laid by his side.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Joe Black, the gambler who murdered the soldier at Kiowa the other night, was lodged in the Wellington jail Saturday. The soldiers, two companies from Ft. Riley, camped at Kiowa, attempted to string Joe up. It was a cold blooded homicide, the soldier having done nothing to provoke it. The affair was in A. W. Patterson's den, where Al. Terrell, well known here, manipulates the bar.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The excavation for the new Farmers Bank block is progressing right along. Paris & Harrod are throwing the dirt. Architect Ritchie gave us a glimpse of this block this morning. It will be the champion block of the city. The first seventy-five feet will be three stories, with Mansard roof and crested cornice. The corner entrance is artistic. The stairway entrance is central, from Main. The block is metropolitan in everything, with beautiful interior and exterior finish. The construction contract will be let next week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Peter McCosh [McCush or McCuish?] and C. Kelly were raked in by Watchman McClain Thursday, found in a state of bad booziness. After cooling off in the cooler, they appeared before Judge Turner this morning. Chas. said he was full, and paid $12.25 for the luxury. Peter said he was not full, but evidence downed him, and he got a ditto assessment. Both are broad Scotchmen. Peter was in the jug a week, a month ago, for a plain drunk, and his friend Kelley got him out. Now their miseries are equal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge E. S. Torrance and family left on Friday for Manitou. The trip is taken on recommendation of the family physician, Dr. Graham, for the health of the three little children, who have just passed through a terrible stage of diphtheria, and will yet be in danger for several weeks. The Judge will not return until the little ones thoroughly recover. The September term of the District Court will likely be postponed until his return. The bar will hardly elect a judge pro tem.

THE BOOM COMMENCED.

New Buildings, Residence and Business, Spring Up All Over the City.

Their Owners, Style, Cost, etc.--A Resume of our Improvement Boom!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The reporter started out Friday to take in the city, and to see what was going on in the building line. We were surprised to find so much work and improvements in process. Winfield is beginning to take on the fall boom. The laboring class need not be wanting for work, but we have no need of any more. We have plenty of work coming for those here, but anyone coming here to seek work will be left, for there is only work enough for the ones here.

Laycock & Hedges are putting up a gothic cottage, one and one-half story, of five rooms, three rooms below, a parlor 12 x 14 with bay window 3 x 6. Leading from the parlor is a bedroom 10 x 10. East of the parlor is a kitchen 12 x 14, pantry, and two closets. There are two rooms above 12 x 14 and two closets. This is a very tasty house, on East 10th, and will be for sale.

H. H. J. Johnson is just commencing a fine residence near the East ward schoolhouse, 28 x 28, with an ell 14 x 14. It is two stories full, of nine rooms, and will be built so as to be supplied with water, gas, etc. There are four rooms below and a hall 8 x 24 and one above 6 x 24. The parlor and sitting room are 14 x 14 with sliding doors between. A bay window in front of the house from top to bottom. There will be porches around the south, east, and west. The dining room and kitchen are just back of the sitting room. The rooms above are 14 x 14 and a bathroom over the kitchen. This will be a very pleasant and delightful home. Mr. Johnson is doing his own work. The cost will be $3,500.

Fred Cochran is about completing a neat residence in the Torrance addition. The building is 30 x 30 with six large rooms, a square top to the house, and a tin roof. The three ground floors are 15 x 15 each. The parlor is on the north side of the house. Back of this is the dining room and kitchen. A bay window on the east side of the house. The cost of this house will be $2,500.

Mrs. Silliman will soon finish her elegant residence on South Loomis street. The building is 38 x 45 consisting of seven rooms besides closets, pantries, and bathroom. The house has a mansard roof set off with a tower. At the entrance to the ground floor is a vestibule 5 x 7. This leads into the hall 8 x 16. From this the stairway ascends and two doors from the hall leads into the parlor and sitting room. The parlor is 13 x 15, with sliding doors between it and the sitting room, which is 13 x 17. A bay window on the south side of the sitting room, which may be shut off by sliding doors. Sliding doors lead from the sitting room into the dining room, which is 13 x 15. In this room is a marbleized mantle grate. The bathrooms open out of the dining room, also a china closet opens into the pantry. The kitchen opens out of the dining room and sitting room. There is a sink in the kitchen connected with the pump, as is the bathroom. A cellar-way leads out of the kitchen. At the head of the stairs is a hall opening into every room above. At the head of the stairs is a square closet, where is the entrance to the tower. Just east of the head of the stairs is a bedroom 13 x 15. South of this is a bedroom 13 x 17 with a large closet. West of this is a bedroom 13 x 15. There are double windows in all the bedrooms as well as parlor and dining room. The finish on this house will be a moulded casing with a heavy band mould. I. W. Randall is the architect and L. Van DeWater, the contractor. It certainly is a fine residence; cost, $3,500.

H. E. Silliman is at work on his residence just south of his old house, which will be a counterpart of his mother's, with the exception of the finish, which will be in Eastlake. Will cost some more than $3,500. Mr. Van DeWater will do this job also.

J. M. Warner, of Vernon township, is just commencing a neat residence in the Second Ward, on South Millington. It will be a two story frame 22 x 28 of seven rooms and hall: three rooms and hall below. The parlor will be 14 x 14 with folding doors leading into the sitting room, which will be 14 x 14. The kitchen is 12 x 13; also a dining room the same size. There will be four bedrooms above 14 x 14. Probable cost $2,000. Howard & Turner, contractors.

Judge Turner is also commencing a residence just west of Mr. Warner's.

Mrs. Carmine has just moved into a pleasant house of five rooms in Third Ward.

Mrs. Prichard has her residence, south of the Presbyterian parsonage, under headway. It will be 58 x 34, containing fourteen rooms, and is built in the Gothic style. This will be an elegant residence costing not less than $5,000. Bates & Wells are the contractors.

R. S. Wilson is pushing his residence to completion on East 11th Avenue. This house is 40 x 30, containing ten rooms. The parlor is 14 x 16, connected with the sitting room by folding doors. From the sitting room you can go out on the porch or into the dining room; back of the dining room is the kitchen 14 x 18, which will be supplied with water pipes. There is a bathroom back of this 6 x 7 and a pantry 6 x 6. There are six bedrooms above. Probable cost: $3,000. R. S. Wilson, architect; R. S. Spencer, foreman.

H. B. Schuler is finishing up his dwelling in Highland Park, which is 44 x 32, two stories, with eight rooms besides closets and pantries. It fronts east and south with two porches. From the east you enter the parlor, then are folding doors between the parlor and sitting rooms. The parlor is 14 x 16; the sitting room 14 x 14. The family bedroom opens out from the sitting room, 13 x 14, with recess and closets. The dining room is back of the sitting room; north of this is the kitchen, which is supplied with a zinc [? sink] connected with the pump. There are three large bedrooms upstairs. S. A. Cook is the architect; Howard & Klauser, contractors.

H. G. Buford is putting up an elegant brick residence on East 7th Avenue of sixteen rooms. It will probably cost $4,000.

Mr. Bassett, formerly of Bertram & Bassett, is erecting a four room cottage home, costing a thousand or twelve hundred dollars on east 7th Avenue. It contains six rooms; is located in the pleasant residence portion of the city, and will make an admirable little home.

The Farmers Bank building, on the corner of Main Street and 9th Avenue, will be by far the best building in this part of the State. It will be built of the gray stone, with blue stone trimmings, and will have a galvanized iron cornice, crestings, and dormer windows, with a slate roof, mansard and gothic front on the third floor part of the building. The building will be 50 x 115 feet, of which the front 50 x 75 feet will be three stories, and the 40 x 50 feet at the rear, fronting on 9th Avenue, will be two stories high, but will have the same style of finish and general appearance of the front part except the mansard front. Mr. Eaton's part of the building (25 x 75 feet of the corner) will have two good basement store rooms, well lighted and ventilated, with a fire-proof vault for each. The first floor will contain the Banking rooms, with Mr. Eaton's law office with side entrance at the rear, and a large burglar and fire-proof vault for the bank. Two broad, easy stairs will give access to the second floor rooms of the building; one stair in the center of the Main Street front, the other near the center of the 9th Avenue front. The second floor of this building will contain three suites of offices of three rooms and a closet to each. Mr. Short's part of the building will have a good cellar, but no basement rooms. The first floor will have three good store rooms with a rear light and entrance to each. The second floor will have ten suites of offices of two rooms each, connected by wide folding doors. They do not contemplate finishing the third floor at present; but when done, it will make at least six good office or sleeping rooms. This building will be the "Office Block" of the city, and will contain thirteen suites of the best lighted and ventilated offices in the city. The building will cost $20,000. A fine drawing of the building will be completed soon and will show what it will be when completed.

The addition and alteration in the Central school building will make us the most convenient and prettiest schoolhouse in Southern Kansas, provided the bonds are voted next Monday to complete the building according to the plans and drawings. The addition will contain four schoolrooms with a cloak room for each, a broad hall running through the center, connecting with the hall in the present building, with an easy stairway in the hall starting near the front entrance; a superintendent's room on the second floor, and folding doors so arranged as to throw the two rooms on the second floor into one large hall. The appearance of the building may be better understood by looking at the drawing of the building hanging at the postoffice door than could be from any description of it. The improvements as contemplated (with fence, seating, etc.) will cost about $14,000.

John A. Eaton's new home residence, on the southeast corner of 9th Avenue and Mansfield Street, will be of modern Eastlake style, bordering on the Queen Ann. It will contain twelve rooms on the first and second floors, with pantries, closets, cupboards, and book cases built in the house. The front hall and stairs will be of the latest designs, and will be one of the most pleasing features. Verandas and balconies, artistic dormers, gables, cresting, and slate roof, and stained glass windows, etc., will make the exterior of one of the most modern stylish residences in the west. The building will be finished in first-class style throughout, and will cost, when completed, about $10,000.

Among the prominent business buildings going up is the Winfield National Bank extension. It will be two stories, three store rooms below and three suites of offices above, and when completed will make the Winfield National Bank building one of the most imposing and creditable blocks of the city.

We have given only an outline of the city's present improvements. It was impossible to mention the smaller ones. Many residences are receiving additions and other enhancements. All over the city is a general air of advancement. The impetus given our city by the many public enterprises secured during the past year is showing itself. But the boom has only commenced. Many fine business blocks and residences are projected, and the middle of September will show a building progress that will excel any boom the city has ever experienced. No town in the west has higher prospects than Winfield. Confidence is established. All are satisfied that this must be an important metropolis, and our own capitalists are spreading their wealth while many others are coming in seeking investments. The next year will give Winfield an advance that will put her in the lead of any city in the Southwest.

THE MORRIS POISONING AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge H. D. Gans has been absent for several days in Chicago. His mission was one connected with the Frankie Morris poisoning case, Reno County. Senator Hackney, attorney for the defense, determined to re-examine the body and have it examined by a Chicago expert. Judge Gans consented to take the stomach to Chicago. Friday last, the body was again taken up. A special to the Globe-Democrat says: "Considerable excitement was occasioned here yesterday by the exhuming of the remains of Nancy J. Poinsette, poisoned to obtain the insurance on her life. Frankie Morris, her daughter, was convicted of the crime the first of the month, and an application for a new trial has been made, and will be argued on September 4. No notice of any movement of this kind was given until early yesterday morning, when such a rumor coming to the ears of the attorneys representing the prosecution, they went out to the cemetery where Mrs. Poinsette's remains had been deposited, and found Senator Hackney, Mrs. Morris' attorney, the Probate Judge of Cowley County, and several physicians, two of whom were present at the former exhuming, when the parts were taken to be turned over to the chemist of the State University, and identified the body as that of Mrs. Poinsette. Dr. Barker, the dead woman's attending physician during her last illness, was also present and removed a large part of the remaining portions of the body, and turned them over to the Probate Judge of Cowley County. The attorneys for the prosecution made a proposition to Mrs. Morris' representatives that the Sheriff accompany the Probate Judge, which was accepted. The parts of the body removed were taken to Chicago, where a chemical examination is to be made. Prof. Bailey, of the State University, in the former analysis, said he found a little over three and one-third grains of arsenic in the liver, heart, and stomach, two and one-half being sufficient to produce death. The representatives of the insurance company, who are interested in the result of the analysis on account of the effect it will have on the civil suit for the $15,000 insurance on Mrs. Poinsette's life, made a proposition to Mr. Hackney that they employ a chemist, and that he for Mrs. Morris do the same, and that the remains be turned over to them and both sides abide the result. This proposition was declined by the defense and all attempts to agree to some concerted action failed." The suit to recover the $15,000 will come off in the District Court of Cowley County in September. The Judge will be home Wednesday, but nothing regarding the result of the trip will likely be known until it is used as evidence.

OUR FELLOWS ARE ELI'S.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Wednesday was a big day for Burden--in the sporting line. Two base ball games, glass ball shoot, foot races, and other things too numerous and diversified for mention. The leading event was the game of base ball between the Odd Fellows of Winfield and those of Burden. Winfield got there of course. She always does. The score was fourteen for Winfield and eleven for Burden. It was a very fine game, for amateurs, and drew a large crowd of spectators. Our nine was composed of James Vance, A. J. McClellan, A. B. Taylor, Frank L. Crampton, Israel Martin, Will Kirkwood, A. F. Hopkins, George Lierman [? Liermann], H. M. Zimmerman, and Mr. Wagner; one or two of whom were out of the I. O. O. F. fold: proxies. E. A. Henthorn and John Ledlie were the principals in the Burden nine. John sat on a chair and had a small boy run in his balls--yet very few balls got past his corpulency--a perfect "stop" anywhere. Enos took in all the flies--none too high. He was dressed in ornamental tights, high water pants, and female hose, and presented a very fine appearance. Like Banquo's ghost, he wouldn't down--always up seven feet two. Frank Crampton pitched and A. J. McClellan caught for our fellows. Our nine are elated over the splendid entertainment given them. Burden will return the game in two weeks. A second game followed yesterday between Burden's Clippers and Grenola's club, the former getting there with a score of twenty to ten. Capt. Nipp was champion on glass balls. It was a "circus day" all around and the town was full of amusement lovers: ladies and gentlemen.

K. C. & S. W. DAMAGES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The County Commissioners have condemned and allowed damages on the right of way of the K. C. & S. W. to Winfield. The damages from the north line of Walnut township, the extent of our last publication, were allowed as follows: W. W. Limbocker, $62; Mrs. M. A. Mock, $78; W. W. Limbocker, $461; Joseph Parr, $2; R. Ehret, $542.40; H. G. Buss and C. A. Buss, $196; S. M. Deal, $847; G. W. Yount, $897; Mrs. Cochran, $37; John C. Burkey, $600.25; J. F. Graham, $300; Mrs. M. A. Andrews, $1,125; M. M. Wells, $325; B. B. Van Deventer, $530; D. F. Clark, $250; David C. Beach, $240.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

John Gordon, of Cedarvale, writes to know whether his daughter, Vada, and John Davis have pulled up at the Probate Judge's office for marriage. They were elopers, and were married on the 17th by Judge Gans, and eloped on west. John is twenty-two and Vada sixteen. He swore that she was under age, but that he had the necessary parental consent. The old gentleman seems to be badly disgusted, but is a little too late with his inquiry.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

And now comes Gen. W. Robertson, of Pleasant Valley, and lays an egg on our table: another Bantam egg. He says nothing about our sitting on it to hatch it. It is a very cute and queer little egg. One end has the appearance of having concluded to form egg number two and after it got a good start, gave up the job. Bring on another egg. We are bad on hen fruit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge Gans filled his regular monthly appointment at the schoolhouse last Sunday, morning and evening, to large and attentive audiences. His forcible and aggressive style of preaching attracts and holds the attention of the hearer, while the logic and arguments furnish food for reflection not very likely to be wholly forgotten in a day. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Sunday was a perfect day, calm, cool, and bright, and all humanity seemed at joy's zenith. The temperature didn't go above ninety. Dame nature seemed to nod her happiest nod. Everybody was out for an airing--after church and Sunday school. The man who couldn't be happy on such a day, with the watermelon season to boot, ought to be fired out of the world.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Prof. A. Gridley is home from Kingman, having closed the Kingman normal, which he conducted.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

THE OPINION OF A RADICAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

If there is an ardent, uncompromising, use-nothing-but-the-genuine Prohibitionist on earth, it is Mrs. Helen M. Gougar, of Lafayette, Indiana. She has fought and suffered in the cause until she, if anybody, has a right to be fanatical about it. Mrs. Gougar has been in Kansas, has traveled all over the State, and has been an intelligent observer. She records the result of her observations in a letter to the Chicago Inter-Ocean.

Mrs. Gougar objects to the present law, that it allows men who are not druggists to sell liquor, and says she found reputable druggists opposed to the law. Another objection Mrs. Gougar states in these words:

Another weak point in the law is in allowing the Probate Judge the 5-cent fee; it is asking considerable of poor, weak human nature to revoke that which pays a salary of $200 per month for the simple act of putting four seals to four oaths of four druggists, as was the case in one county, or to ask a judge to forego the $95 for so little service as that at Beloit; either the fee should be forbidden or the revoking power removed from the officer who gets the fee.

In the face of a dozen Kansas newspapers which devote most of their space to declarations that this State is full of drunkards, and daily growing worse, it is pleasant to copy the opinion of an outsider. Mrs. Gougar says:

I spoke at thirty-six different meetings. Many of them were out-of-door gatherings, ranging in attendance from 300 to 5,000 persons, and I did not see one person that appeared to be under the influence of intoxicants. In no "regulation or license" State in the Union could I make such a statement--no, not at religious camp-meetings. I did not see the sign "saloon" in all my travels, Wichita and Topeka even being free from these pest-houses.

The social feature of the drink habit is almost entirely done away with, both seller and buyer being severely punished for an infringement of this phase of the law; no drug store has its crowds of hangers-on drinking, and one never hears upon the streets, "Come, let's have something," or "Let's take a smile." If there is drinking, it hides itself from gaze, as crime and vice always do unless "legalized" and "protected."

Go where one will at any hour of the night, in such towns as Beloit or Salina, and nowhere can be found drunken carousals or crowds of maudlin men and boys; women are as safe on the streets at midnight as at midday.

If a member of a family has acquired the habit of strong drink, any other member can forbid the sale to such an one, which amounts to practical prohibition. A wife told me she had availed herself of the law, had forbidden the sale to her husband, and as he did not go out of the place where her ban could not reach him, she had made a sober man out of an habitual drunkard. Whenever a woman has the nerve, or force or character sufficient to use the law, she can break up drunkenness in her family in almost every instance. Many do this.

At none of these gatherings did I see the fringe of bad boys, tobacco-stained, foul-mouthed, lop-sided, shuffling specimens of youth that I see in anti-prohibition States of all gatherings that are free.

Mrs. Gougar has read the history of the State for the past six years, and thus applies the moral:

I can but look with great concern upon the action of the "Third party prohibitionists" as a State party in Kansas. I believe these good friends to be honest, but mistaken. The Republican party has been pledged to the hearty support of prohibition and has made its pledges good so far as public sentiment would sustain it. It has led rather than followed public sentiment. The Democratic party is openly pledged to annul and disobey the law. In this condition of affairs it appears that if the friends who are impatient for complete success draw away from the Republican party, Democratic rule and ruin are inevitable. Kansas trembles before mistaken zeal. Champion.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

There seems to have been an ex-convict appointed to a postoffice in Kansas, Brown County, by the present administration. We know the Democrats are few and far between in Kansas, but then thee ought to be enough to fill the offices without calling on the penitentiary to furnish them. This case, added to the appointment of a Dakota ex-convict to the postoffice in Sioux City, Iowa, an embezzler to the postoffice in Lincoln Center, Maine; Judd, the horse thief, two ex-convicts to places in the custom house in Cincinnati, and so on, would seem to prove that the convicts are meeting with more consideration even than confederates at the hands of the administration. We expect to hear from the St. Joseph Gazette on this if "he" be in the humor. K. C. Journal.

Geo. Rembaugh will resign for fear of being believed a horse thief.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

O'Donovan Rossa wants the dynamite war renewed in England. There is need in this connection of a crank with an aim more accurate and a heavier revolver than Mrs. Yseult Dudley had.

THE EMPORIA SENSATION.

Evils of a Fine Complexion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We have been reading the very voluminous reports in the Emporia Dailies of the death of J. R. Walkup of that city and the large amount of evidence produced before the coroner's jury hearing upon the charge of poisoning by his young wife, and ourself and family have constituted ourselves a jury to try the case on the evidence reported as above. We now render our verdict of "not guilty," and recommend the young woman, so terribly afflicted by the dreadful accusation and the unfortunate circumstances which have raised the presumption of her guilt in a community in which she was so recently a stranger, to the tender sympathies of the good people of Emporia. The fact that she bought strychnine at a drug store nearby, signing her name to the application for the poison just before her husband was taken sick and the fact that she bought arsenic in the same way just before his relapse, together with her explanation of the purposes for which these poisons were purchased, are to our mind evidences of her innocense instead of guilt. She certainly is not specially ignorant and has sense enough to know that in case of her husband's death with symptoms of poison, the fact of her purchase would be known at once and be held as evidence of her guilt, as it now is, and that an examination of his stomach would follow and reveal the presence of the poison administered. It is evident to us that when she bought the poison, she had no thought that her husband might die with symptoms of poison. Had she anticipated such an event, she would never have bought the poison in the manner she did unless she was excessively ignorant, to the verge of idiocy.

She is represented as a young lady less than 18 years old, of rare beauty and the fairest of complexions, and that, as is usual in such cases, she took great pride in her complexion. She says she bought the arsenic for her complexion. It is altogether probable that she had been in the habit of taking arsenic in very small doses for that very purpose. It is known that all or most of the exquisitely fair complexions of the country are made so by the use of arsenic in that way. It is a suicidal habit but yet it exists and among young ladies entirely innocent of any thought of crime, whose worst fault is this craving for exquisite beauty of complexion. However great the folly of this habit, it is not morally different from numerous other dangerous habits which prevail among other people and re not taken as evidence of depravity or even of laxity in morals.

Her explanation of the purchase of the strychnine, that she got it to remove stains from her clothes, is in no wise improbable. She is represented as being very neat and tasteful with regard to her dress, and such ladies resort to all sorts of experiments to remove obstinate stains. Poisonous substances are frequently tried for that purpose, and it is highly probable that her wardrobe had stains difficult of removal, and that she would try almost anything that had been recommended to her, even by a negro woman in New Orleans, for their removal.

All the accounts of her actions, words and demeanor in this trying, and to her, terrible ordeal, are such as to us, tend to establish her innocence. She seems to have tried bravely to meet her dangers and the dreadful circumstances with which she is surrounded and of course her appearance is more or less constrained and unnatural, covering up her almost ungovernable distress and alarm by a forced attempt at calmness, but this is to her credit rather than an evidence of guilt.

The analyses so far as we have seen have not proved the presence of arsenic or strychnine in the deceased. If he had died of either arsenical or strychnine poison, recently administered, we would think the Emporia chemist would have readily detected it in the stomach and have known positively what particular poison it was. He would not have needed to have sent it to Kansas City for further analysis.

Of course, it is possible that further evidence may be discovered or brought out that may be inconsistent with her innocence. In that case we shall have to revise our verdict.

CHARTER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The following charter was filed Thursday last, in the office of the secretary of state.

"The Geuda Springs, Caldwell & Western Railroad Co." Places of business, Winfield and Geuda Springs, Cowley Co.; and Caldwell, Sumner Co. The purpose is to build and operate a railroad of standard gauge through the counties of Cowley, Sumner, Harper, Barbour, Comanche, Clark, Meade, and Seward, in the state of Kansas. Capital stock $5,600,000. Directors for the first year: Alonzo Stephens, Chicago, Illinois; Wm. Gostlin and C. N. Towle, Hammond, Indiana; Wm. D. Carey, E. P. Greer, N. M. Powers, D. A. Millington, and J. C. Long, Winfield; and C. R. Mitchell, Geuda Springs, Kansas.

LITERARY NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A superb albertype portrait of General Grant, from a life photograph, will be bound in as a supplement to the September Wide Awake, and will be accompanied by a peculiarly interesting article, containing personal reminiscence, by Mrs. Jessie Benton Fremont.

The death of Mrs. Helen Hunt Jackson, better known as "H. H." and "Saxe Holme," gives special interest to two connected stories, among the last of her literary work, which will be published in the October and November numbers of Wide Awake.

A new and complete life of General Grant, by E. E. Brown, author of Life of Garfield, will be published immediately by D. Lothrop & Co.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Indian boys and girls in our various institutions of learning show themselves to be apt scholars. But the experience is that as soon as they are returned to their tribes, they don the blanket and adopt the customs of their fathers and mothers. One of the government officers on a recent visit West asked several intelligent young Indians the reasons of this. They invariably replied, "We have no encouragement to do otherwise." One replied, "The white people have no use for us, and we cannot afford to be classed among our people as Indian dudes."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The New Orleans exposition seems to have been unfortunate for two prominent Kansans. There is Bacon, who has been politically dead since his participation in the ovation to Jeff Davis during the exposition, and there is Walkup, who is dead as a door nail on account of a wife whom he picked up while visiting the exposition. Still Kansas took the prize on apples and for having the best agricultural exhibit at the World's fair. K. C. Journal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

It really does begin to look as though the D., M. & A. railroad is considered of some consequence in railroad circles. A company has been formed of good A., T. & S. F. men to build a railroad from Great Bend due west on the D., M. & A. line most of the way to the west line of the State. It is a good scheme for the Santa Fe.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

At a picnic of socialists near Chicago 300 kegs of beer were drunk, and a banner displayed with the inscription, "Our children cry for bread." The sequence is natural.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The first volume of Grant's "Memoirs" will not be given to subscribers before November 1, and the second will follow in a month or two.

A BIG CORPORATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

An Eagle reporter was informed last evening that 100 teams went to work on the D., M. & A., in Kingman County yesterday morning, and that the grading would be done from Belle Plaine to Kingman by October 1st. Notwithstanding that no big corporation is known to be backing this road the townships and towns along the road have faith in the enterprise. Eagle.

The Eagle seems to think that the big corporations like the A. T. & S. F. and C. B. & Q. are the only companies that should be allowed to build roads. When the A. T. & S. F. was as young a company as the D. M. & A., it was not half as able to build a road as the D. M. & A. is now, did not have half the money at its command. There are none of these old companies backing the K. C. & S. W., but it has got thirty miles of railroad built and paid for all the same and cash enough on hand to build as much more, besides plenty more where that came from and has not yet put a mortgage bond on the market. Within five years it will be one of the "Big corporations" which the Eagle allows to build railroads. So will the D., M. & A.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Prohibition candidate for governor of Ohio, Dr. Leonard, has replied to the charge that he drank a bottle of ale in the brush near a camp meeting. He says that he did not drink the ale, but soaked bread in it and ate the bread. This is about as satisfactory as his answer to the charge that he is helping the whiskey Democracy in the Ohio campaign. He says he is not trying to help the Democrats, but is doing his best to defeat the Republicans if possible.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having "Union Military Script," or script issued by any of the commissioners appointed to audit claims growing out of the "Price Raid" of 1864, should send the same to the secretary of the Price raid auditing commission, E. B. Allen, Topeka, Kansas, on or before the 1st day of October, 1885. Gov. Martin is chairman of the commission and Secretary of State E. B. Allen is secretary.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Those smart Iowa Democrats who though they would catch the Greenback vote by nominating a Greenbacker for governor may have made a mistake. Elias Doty, a prominent Greenbacker, announces that he will run for the governorship on the Simon-pure Greenback Independent ticket.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Emporia Republican says: "There are said to be about 3,000,000 acres of government lands yet open to homestead, pre-emption, and timber claims in Finney, Hamilton, and Seward counties in southwestern Kansas, and this land is being appropriated at the rate of 16,000 acres per day."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

An eastern newspaper suggests that a national appropriation ought to be made to help Mormon emigration. The people could certainly well afford to help the Mormons out of the country, but it is a question whether they ought not to be kicked out, instead of being paid to go.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

They say the scandal affecting the good name of Sir Charles Dilke will have no injurious effect upon his political prospects. If our British cousins had studied American politics, they could have found that out last November.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Secretary Lamar, having been born and raised in a county which has experienced such hot times as have made Copiah County, Mississippi, famous, says he will take no vacation. Washington is a good enough summer resort for him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Returns from the county fairs are coming in, and they show that the year has been by no manner of means an unsuccessful and unprofitable one, as croakers tried to make us believe awhile ago.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Democrats deny that story about a row between Cleveland and Tilden. A fight between the de jure and the de mugwump presidents of the United States would be amusing indeed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The present epidemic of smallpox in Montreal was introduced into the city by the porter of a sleeping car. This relieves the American colony of bank cashiers from a foul suspicion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

True to tradition, the Democrats of Iowa say in their platform, "Give us whiskey straight," or at any rate they declare against the adulteration of their favorite beverage.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

SOUTH BEND. "G. V."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

At the earnest solicitation of Star Valley "Duffer," I again seek space in the COURIER.

Mr. Peter Seacat is recovering from a severe spell of fever. For a time his life was almost despaired of.

Frank Taylor has gone to Indiana. His contract in the hay business was enough to send anyone east.

Andy Bryant has taken a box of collars and frying pan across the river to commence housekeeping on his own account--batching, of course.

At our last annual school meeting the ladies turned out bravely and voted their own ideas to the front in a manner that would shock some of our natives.

Our School Board has secured the services of Miss Celina Bliss for a 4 months term. These gentlemen were surely wise in their selection of a teacher.

Three Messrs. Carson, lately arrived from Champaign County, Illinois, and are at present with their uncle, Mr. Joshua Birdzell. They come with the intention of going into the livestock business.

Ye scribe recently scared away to Mr. Litter's residence to celebrate Mr. Jackson Litter's 20th year with a merry company of young folks. Ice cream and an abundance of most delicious culinary viands were dispensed with, and all enjoyed the occasion hugely.

We are waiting, sweetly waiting, to greet the K. C. & S. W. surveying corps within the boundaries of our own beloved bend. Now should this road fail to materialize in this precinct, we will send our swine and maize down to Dixie on the "Kansas Millers." We are willing to acknowledge our lung capacity, but if South Bend arises with all her civilized might, something will pop.

South Bend Sunday School is on the rocky road to prosperity under the efficient superintendency of Mrs. Elbige [? Eldridge], who was recently elected in that capacity. With an average attendance of about 50, we are really paying due attention to that cause. Ex-Supt. Holcomb had worked and watched as well as could have been expected of so offensive a partisan, but as business matters became pushing, he resigned.

TORRANCE ITEMS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. H. G. Norton will teach our school again this winter.

Mr. W. S. Rigden spent Saturday and Sunday in Winfield.

Miss Laura Elliott has been visiting in Winfield the last week.

Mr. Will Taylor left Tuesday last for Brainard to look at the country.

Several couples from here attended the picnic at Dexter last Friday week.

Quite a number of young men from Burden were in our town Sunday.

A number of our young folks attended a party over on the prairie Thursday night.

Miss Mattie Baxter, of Winfield, who spent two weeks visiting here, returned home last Wednesday.

Miss Beamer, of Missouri, cousin to Mr. Newman, spent several days this week with Miss Lottie Haygood.

Miss Occa Gibson, formerly of Parsons, Kansas, but now on her way to Medicine Lodge, stopped off to spend this week with Misses Lou and Mattie Wilson. Miss Gibson and the girls were all from the same town in Illinois, and it is quite a pleasure for them to meet again.

Misses Lyda and Alice Taylor, who have been spending the summer with their brothers, returned to their home in Illinois last Tuesday. They were jolly girls, and made many friends while here, who were sorry to see them go. They were accompanied as far as Cambridge by a number of our young people.

Last items above and almost the entire column that follows were marred by scratches and white spots...I put in [?] when I was not certain of a word. MAW

HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. "MARK."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Zack Whitson went down to the Nation the past week to look after his cattle interests.

A new barn is in process of construction at David Shaw's farm and will add to the attractiveness of his premises.

Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Snyder and their son, Gary, spent last Saturday and Sunday visiting J. C.'s brother at Arkansas City.

Ed Watt will attend school at Winfield again this winter, providing his father does not part with the old homestead in the meantime.

An old friend of J. C. Snyder from Abington, Illinois, is looking up a location in this section and will probably establish a lumber yard at our station.

James Albert leaves for Lecompton Monday to attend college a year. Jim is ambitious and determined to advance himself educationally. Success to him.

Miss [?] Gence Holland is prostrated on a bed of affliction. While horseback riding a few evenings ago her steed precipitated her with such force as to injure her knees.

The morning train north now takes twenty minutes for refreshments at the Hackney [?] Hotel. Mrs. Lewis Brown is mine host and seems to please the traveling public as a caterer to the inner man.

It must be humiliating to be compelled to make an unconditional retraction, privately, for the use of language reflects on the character of a noted personage. An open confession, "Neppie," is good for the soul.

The most important man in the neighborhood is Charles Ging. Notwithstanding the hardness of the ground, he persists in running his Cassidy sulky plow, though it requires the strength of five horses to do so.

Mr. J. C. Snyder has contracted to teach in District 10 for seven months. There was quite a demand for J. C.'s services as a pedagogue--no less than three school boards were after him. Merit and proficiency never goes begging.

The new style Cassidy sulky plow purchased by M. H. Markum is a decided improvement over the old make of this plow. In beauty of appearance, neatness of finish, lightness of draft, and excellency of work, it is superior to any other sulky.

Mr. Chinchbug is numerously frequent in the highways and byways as well as the corn and stubble fields. His rival, Mr. Hessian fly, is also on hand and ready to embrace the coming wheat crop. It will be policy to defer from seeding this fall from two to three weeks later than usual.

District 115 is still unsupplied with a teacher for the coming school term. However, from the numerous applications made daily, the district fathers cannot resist much longer making a choice. Sometimes it requires other influences besides that of a prospective father-in-law and an evanescent spirit of sanctimoniousness to "stand in" with the district.

Ed Garrett has secured the Centennial school in District 4. He will teach as long as he gives satisfaction: which means the whole term. The school board is too sympathetic and tender hearted to suspend a teacher, even though he accomplishes no good in the school room. We hope Ed possesses firmness of will sufficient to govern the school and crown his efforts with success. The very short time which country children can spend in the school room each year is too precious to be wasted by incompetent teachers. Better have no school at all than one which inculcates knowledge that is anything but beneficial to the pupils.

CAMBRIDGE. "H."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Sam DeBolt is able to be up but is gaining strength very slowly.

Hay harvest is almost over and corn cutting is the order of the day.

A Mr. Garnett, of Missouri, is visiting his cousin, Mrs. W. A. Weaverling.

A good rain visited this section Tuesday, but not before it was needed.

Mrs. Jonas Leedy spent Sunday and Monday in Burden visiting with her son.

Dr. Long and family have returned after a two weeks' visit at Cave Springs, Elk County.

Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Hill, of Udall, visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Palmer, last week.

Dr. S. Wilkins reports a boy, a late arrival at S. B. Sherman's. S. B. wears a broad smile all the time since his arrival.

Jos. and Miss Ann More have been visiting their sister, Mrs. M. J. Weaverling. They returned to Kansas City Tuesday.

The I. O. G. T.'s will have an ice cream social in Horsman & Lukens's new building Wednesday night. A good time is anticipated.

Henry Dyer has charge of the depot at this place and we hope he may retain that position for a long time, for we have not had a more pleasant and obliging agent than Henry.

School will open here the first Monday in September. Mr. Alberts has been employed as principal, at $65 per month. The primary teacher is not employed. We will have an eight months' term.

P. L. Koons, whom we reported in our last as being sick, died at his home in this place Monday, Aug. 17, after an illness of about four weeks. By his death Cambridge has lost one of her best citizens, the church a zealous worker, and his family a devoted husband and father. He leaves a wife, four children, and a host of friends to mourn his death.

The body of Joe Wager, who died in Colorado two weeks ago, reached here Friday morning, and was interred in the Weaverling cemetery in the evening. Before his friends in Colorado received the message to send the body home they had buried it, but receiving the dispatch, took the body up, embalmed it, and sent the lifeless boy to his now heart-broken mother.

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Health pretty good in this vicinity.

Peaches are scarce in this vicinity and of poor quality.

Will Schwantes and wife were over to her father's Sunday.

Mrs. Alex Shelton and her father were at Winfield Saturday.

B. D. Hanna's little daughter seems to be in very poor health.

Mr. Hotchkiss and family were out for a nice little drive Sunday eve.

As the cool weather approaches, we hope all will attend Sunday school.

Hay making still continues, but a prospect for farmers getting through this week.

Is Speed trying to rent the Widow Foose farm, and why does it take so many trips to make the trade?

S. A. Rucker and his nephew made a flying visit to El Dorado last week. S. A. thinks he will try Cowley for a while.

Lon Bryant says it will take all his crop to pay rent this year. We regret to hear it, for Lon has worked hard and ought to receive something himself for his hard labor.

Mr. Wm. Schwantes and wife, with Mrs. Ad. Rucker, were at Winfield recently in search of dry goods--found quite a variety of new goods, enough to satisfy the eye of any one.

NEW SALEM PENCILINGS. "OLIVIA."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mrs. Orand's baby is much better.

Mrs. Lucas, Sr., has been a guest in Old Salem recently.

Earnest Gilmore is still quite weak, but is around and gaining fast.

The Gilmore Bros. are now at home, but ill again seek the west 'ere long.

Mrs. McMillen is entertaining her cousin, Mr. Louis Dorfman, of Labette County.

James Calvert is putting up a neat shop for carpenter tools, work, etc., in Salem for himself.

Mc Hutchison paid a visit to his parents last week, but has again returned to Barbour County.

J. W. Hoyland has suffered intensely for two weeks with a large carbuncle on the back of his neck.

Miss Mary Dalgarn will hold the scepter in Crooked Elm district when the new schoolhouse is completed.

Whose boil did "Old Maid," of the Telegram, poultice recently? And where did she find disinfectant and soap?

[Above item hard to read. Next two impossible to read. Too much white-out.]

Mr. Haughey will teach the New Salem school while their late teacher, Mr. W. H. Lucas, will teach the Prairie Home youth.

Miss Dolly Gilmore has recovered from her recent illness and made a short visit in Old Salem last week, in the homes of Messrs. McMillen and Hoyland.

Mr. Robert Nelson also went west to see his claim lately purchased on "unsight and unseen," as some say. Also to visit his sister, Mrs. C. H. Miller.

Messrs. J. J. Johnson, W. H. Lucas, and Dr. Downs went west on the excursion train to view the beauties of the western lands and came back highly delighted; think the west is certainly grand.

The young people had an excellent time in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Shields last Thursday evening, and their little sister, Miss Kaster, entertained them nicely. They sing praises of the delicious lunch served them by fair hands. Miss Kaster will be sadly missed when she leaves for her home in Wisconsin, as she anticipates doing soon.

In my last I told about little Ettie Douglass being sick. Medical aid and kind friends could not keep the little spirit from taking its flight to God, who gave it, and on Saturday, the 22nd, the little body was laid to rest in the Salem cemetery. Many kind friends and neighbors were there to sympathize with the sad father, mother, and little brother. Rev. Bicknell preached an excellent sermon from the text, "And a little child shall lead them." The singing was also good and touched the tender chords in many aching hearts. The sad hearted family left on last Tuesday for their home in the west.

But they left their idol sleeping,

Sweetly sleeping 'neath the sod.

But her spirit free from sorrow

Blooming in the home of God,

Heedeth not earth's tears and sorrow,

For no sorrow enters there-

In the home of the bright angels

Little Ettie finds no care.



Weeping parents look above you.

See! Your darling is at rest,

Safe the little lamb is folded

On the Savior's loving breast-

Calling you to one day meet her

Where the peaceful waters roll,

Where no sickness, pain or sorrow

E're can wound the blood bought soul.



You have now a priceless jewel,

In the home beyond the sky,

And if you are true and faithful,

You may claim it by and by-

Father, mother, of an angel

Oh, what name on earth so grand,

And the promise, "if thou art faithful,"

We'll unite the broken band.

WILMOT JOTTINGS. "JOT."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Corn cutting is the order of the day in this vicinity.

We learn that Mr. R. C. Zoner will begin work on his store building this week.

Our restaurant building is about completed and will be in running order this week.

The postoffice walked over to the new town last week, by order of the postmaster general.

The graders completed the side track at this place last week. It is now ready for the ties and rails.

Mr. Cottingham has leased his blacksmith shop to an experienced blacksmith from Shelbyville, Illinois.

We are daily expecting the advent of the train, as the track is already laid within a mile and a half of town.

The carpenter work is done on Mr. Norton's building. He is now giving it a coat of paint before being occupied.

Mr. Phenix has just returned from a trip to Sumner County, looking after his interests connected with a thresher.

Mr. McPherson has had a good trade the past week, making the old gentleman hop around to wait on his customers.

Elder Hopkins, pastor of the Richland Baptist church, is off on a month's vacation to the old haunts of early life, in the eastern states.

Since our last, Mr. Nathaniel Poe has deserted the pleasures of bachelorhood and taken to himself a better half. May joy go with them.

We notice that the committee have called the Republican primary of Richland township, to meet at Wilmot, on the 12th of September, 1885, at 2 o'clock p.m.

The Summit Temperance Society meets the second Sunday in each month at 3 p.m., at the Summit schoolhouse. The attendance is good and a general interest is taken in the cause.

Elijah Culbertson is again in the neighborhood with his thresher, threshing out the golden grain. Oats are making a good yield, from 40 bushels per acre up to 75. Wheat is a poor crop this year; rye is making a fair yield. The corn crop will only be medium this year, as a great deal of it was planted late and the web worm worked on it badly.

ATLANTA. "LARRY."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Dr. Cunningham, the old reliable, has a fine office here.

A public well is being sunk by Mr. Rankin, with a prospect of abundant water.

A good quality of rock is quarried in the immediate vicinity and furnished at low figures.

Work is progressing on a fine depot, which will be completed together with side tracks in a few days.

For Beauty and health our section can be matched against any in Kansas or any other State, which has been proved.

W. H. Day sold, last week, to a Mr. St. John, of Michigan, the west half of the northeast quarter of section 14 for $1,000. This tract was entered only a year ago.

A second drug store is being erected by R. R. Phelps, of Burden, and is nearly ready for the stock. A furniture store is also in process of erection.

Land can be bought in this vicinity at from five to twenty-five dollars per acre according to quality and improvements, and is fast appreciating in value.

The Methodist church have the money nearly subscribed for the erection of a church, which will be immediately put under contract and pushed to an early completion.

Dr. Maginnis, late of Mound Valley, a young man who comes with excellent recommendations, and Dr. Acker have charge of the material health of the community. Dr. Acker also administers to its spiritual wants.

The buildings, except livery stables, are all being neatly painted, and we hope in our next to record the fact that Messrs. Grant & West, our livery stable men, have also invested some of their surplus gains in paint.

The town company are holding no lots for speculation or are they selling lots to speculators, but have fixed reasonable prices and liberal terms and sell only to those who immediately improve them. Business lots are 25 x 140 and residence lots 50 x 140 with 20 feet alleys through the block. The streets are 80 and 100 feet in width.

Our "long felt want" (some six weeks), the weekly newspaper, is not yet established, although several propositions have been received from reliable parties. Our town is without a home advertising medium and we begin to fear that our businessmen and town company, although energetic enough in other things, are a trifle slack in this particular.

Atlanta naturally commands the trade of a large section of the country, being eight miles north of Burden, eighteen south of Leon, eighteen southeast of Douglass, twelve southwest of Latham, the new town on Rock creek, and fifteen northeast of Floral, about half-way between Winfield and Beaumont, and is starting right to make the finest town between these two points.

This new town is located on the southwest quarter of section 15 and the southeast quarter of section 16, 30 s 6 e, the center of Omnia township, in the midst of as fine and firm looking country as the sun shines upon. The town is about six weeks old and already contains two hotels, two livery stables, two groceries, two dry goods, grocery and clothing, and one hardware store, one meat market, one restaurant and boarding house, one drug store, one millinery store, one real estate office, one billiard hall with two tables, blacksmith shop, barber shop, and all without exception doing a lively business, one store having average sales of $200 per day for the past eight days. There have been but few residences erected yet as the hauling of lumber from Burden was considered too expensive a luxury in the light of the fact that a good lumber yard would be located here in a few days. Mr. Dicus, of Mound Valley, has a large stock of lumber on the ground and is fitting up his yard and building an office and extensive sheds, and proposes to duplicate the bills of any yard in Southern Kansas in quality and prices.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

8 x 11 inches, with over 3,500 illustrations--a whole Picture Gallery.

GIVES Wholesale Prices direct to consumers on all goods for personal or

family use. Tells how to order, and gives exact cost of everything you use,

eat, drink, wear, or have fun with. These INVALUABLE BOOKS contain

information gleaned from the markets of the world. We will mail a copy

FREE to any address upon receipt of 10 cts. to defray expense of mailing.

Let us hear from you. Respectfully,

MONTGOMERY WARD & CO.

227 & 229 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Ill.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A Sight Worth Seeing.

AN EXHIBITION FREE TO ALL.

The model Dry Goods House of S. Kleeman filled to the brim with the

Latest Novelties in His Line.

We ask but your inspection to prove our assertion of a few weeks ago,

that our New Goods would be TWENTY-FIVE PER CENT CHEAPER

than ever before offered in this market.

To say more is useless--to have you call is our greatest aim, feeling satisfied that we can save you money and supply your every want in our line. Yours, respectfully,

S. KLEEMAN,

813 MAIN STREET.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

MY NEW GOODS

-ARE-

ARRIVING DAILY.

-COME AND-

-Make Your Selections.-

-THEY ARE-

BOUGHT FOR CASH,

-AND WE CAN-

Undersell Any House

IN COWLEY COUNTY.

J. P. BADEN.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

CASTORIA

For Infants and Children.

"CASTORIA is so well adapted to children that I recommend it as superior to any prescription known to me."

H. A. ARCHER, M. D.,

111 So. Oxford St., Brooklyn, N. Y.

CASTORIA cures Colic, Constipation, Sour Stomach, Diarrhoea, Eructation, Kills Worms, gives sleep, and promotes digestion.

Without injurious medication.

THE CENTAUR COMPANY, 182 Fulton Street, N. Y.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

HENDRICKS & WILSON

-DEALERS IN-

Shelf and Heavy Hardware,

STOVES, TIN & SHEET IRON WARE

Plumbers, Gas and Steam Fitters

Hose, Reeds, Lawn Sprinklers, Gas and Water Plumbing at Lowest Rates and Satisfaction

Guaranteed.

West Side Main Street, between 9th and 10th avenues.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

THE MOWRY HOMICIDE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The preliminary examination of Henry Mowry for the murder of J. P. Smith at Arkansas City a few weeks ago, began yesterday before Judge Snow. The court room was filled with spectators, twenty-five or more being from Arkansas City. J. H. Fazel was appointed stenographer in the case. The first witness called was Mrs. Belle Godfrey, the woman in the case, whose testimony was substantially the same as that given in THE COURIER at the time of the tragedy. Senator W. P. Hackney, acting County Attorney, conducts the prosecuting, and Jennings & Troup and Mr. Stanley, of Stanley & Wall, Wichita, are for the defense. The case will likely consume most of tomorrow. Tomorrow's COURIER will contain a resume of the evidence.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We take pleasure in copying the following from a Toronto, Canada, paper, as we always feel interested in the success of our Winfield friends, whether at home or abroad. This comment is on a concert by Prof. Farringer, so well known here. Miss Conrad is one of Winfield's musicians who is finishing her education in Toronto and is rapidly coming to the front.

"The concert given at the Horticultural gardens yesterday afternoon by pupils of the Ontario college of music was well attended by the music-loving people of the city. The entertainment throughout was a dulcet demonstration of well-trained talents. Several selections from noted composers were well rendered. Miss Nina Conrad's rendition of several difficult selections at the piano was highly creditable."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Horticultural Society will hold its regular meeting in Curns & Manser's building on Saturday, Sept. 5th, at 2 p.m. This will be an important meeting as it will be the last previous to the Fair. A large exhibition of fruit is expected at the Fair, and the Society will give all the aid and information possible to this end. Jacob Nixon, of Kellogg, is secretary of the society, and also superintendent of the fruit department of the Fair, who will gladly favor all asking information.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

At last the terrible matrimonial drouth has been broken. The first victims for a week sailed in under Cupid's arch, the door of the Probate Judge's office, and were granted a certificate by acting P. J., Jacob T. Hackney. They were Geo. A. Stevens and Battie May Parvin, both of Cowley. As they form the first oasis in the week's desert of our matrimonial reporter, we wish them all the unalloyed joy that can be crowded into a long life in a world of weal and woe.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Dr. Turner is doing a large and extensive practice; he has proven himself a scientific and extraordinary successful physician and surgeon. Independence Daily Reporter.

Will visit Central Hotel, Winfield, Sept. 21 and 22, also Oct. 12 and 13. On his former visits he has taken under treatment a large number of very difficult cases and so far all are giving complete satisfaction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We observe that our friend, E. H. Nixon, is a candidate for Register of Deeds in Barber County, and the Cresset gives him a grand and well deserved send off. He is perhaps as well qualified for the duties of that office by education and experience as any one in the State, and besides he is a thoroughly reliable gentleman. We hope he will succeed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Some dirty rapscallion is in the lowest thievery of all. Saturday the ivory rings were cut from the harness of Earnest Reynolds' team, and several others standing hitched on Main street. The low devil is spotted and the best thing he can do is to mosey around and fix the matter up as cheaply as possible, or get in the cold grip of the law.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The basket meeting at Smalley's grove in Beaver township, Sunday, was well attended, many going out from Winfield. Rev. Wright was presiding minister and other preachers were present. A big feature was the free distribution of a load of watermelons for afternoon lunch.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The lovers of scandal in Sedgwick City are rolling sweet morsels under their tongues just now. Ten married men have been so badly demoralized by the unruly member--the tongue--that they have formed a mutual protective society and have raised a fund of $200 to prosecute their detractors. There is evidently something in Denmark.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The town of Veteran is located in township 28, range 41, in Hamilton County. The town and county are being largely settled by old soldiers. The country is a fine one. The Arkansas river flows through the center of the county, and the Santa Fe runs through the county east and west. It will make a rich county. Cimaron Herald.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Republican voters of Beaver township will meet at Tannehill schoolhouse on Saturday, Sept. 12th, at 4 p.m., to elect 4 delegates and 4 alternates to the Republican County Convention, at Winfield, Sept. 19th, 1885. J. R. SUMPTER, Member Co. Cen. Com.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Southern Kansas Normal School and Business Institute will open Sept. 7th, 1885. The first term, which closes Oct. 30th, especially adapted to prepare teachers for the quarterly examination. J. A. Wood and Prof. I. N. Inskeep, principals.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Republicans of Silverdale township will meet at Silverdale schoolhouse on Saturday, September 12th, 1885, at 4 o'clock p.m. sharp, to select five delegates to attend the County Convention to be held in Winfield, Saturday, Sept. 19th.

L. J. Darnell, Chm. Tp. Central Committee.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Arkansas City Democrat and Republican kick on the Democratic Central Committee allotting three delegates to each ward in Winfield, and only two in each Arkansas City ward. They brand it a wrong to Democrats of southern Cowley.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The fireman's ball at McDougall's hall Monday night passed off pleasantly. The music was led by Will Schell and John Eastman and was good. Restraint was completely banished and everybody waded in for a gay time.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Preaching in the Prairie Ridge schoolhouse, six miles west of Dexter, by the Rev. P. S. Nellis, a southerner, on Sunday, Sept. 20th, at 11 a.m. All are invited.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Livery barn, two lots, and good house in Grand Summit, Cowley County, Kansas, to trade for sheep or other property. C. D. Murdock, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Republican caucus of Tisdale Township will be held at the schoolhouse at Tisdale on September 17th, 1885, at 3 o'clock p.m. By order of Com.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Dr. Houx, with laughing gas, pulls your teeth and you don't know it. Over Friend's store.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Dr. Houx, over Friend's store, pulls teeth without pain.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

O. N. Osborn was down from Douglass last night.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Cal Swarts, Arkansas City's auburn tressed attorney, was up Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

N. A. Rankin and Newton Hall were over from Dexter Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

E. Harter has bought out the Winfield House, taking possession Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

H. P. Snow was over from Burden Monday and reports everything lovely.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Anna Hyde has taken a position with P. H. Albright & Co. as copyist.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Russell & Files, of the South Main street feed store, have sold out to Stolp & Son.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

V. A. Beard is out with a white pony and a new wagon with red wheels. It is a neat outfit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

McDermott & Johnson have moved their law office to Ninth Avenue, next to Sol Fredrick's livery barn.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Monforte & Rogers are putting up an elegant barouche, all home made, even the irons. It will be a dandy job.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Lulu McGuire, accompanied by her sister, Lottie, left on Monday for a week's visit in Wichita with her many friends.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Capt. C. M. Scott was up from the Canal City Tuesday, accompanied by his friend, Dr. C. D. Brown, and fell in on THE COURIER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Hobart Vermilye's sister, Mrs. Rinchel, from Springfield, Illinois, arrived on Tuesday on the S. K., to make a visit among relatives.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Ed McLain, one of Burden's brightest young men, made the metropolis a visit today, to consult our merchant tailors. Not matrimony, exactly.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. John Walck, Sr., and wife, left for Wapakoneta, Ohio, their old home, Tuesday, for a visit with the mothers on both sides of the household and other friends.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

James Jeffres, husband of Alice Jeffres, who figures in our District Court this term, joined his wife here Tuesday. They are Brettuned and await action on her case.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Garnett Burks, one of Beaver township's best farmers and staunchest Democrats, has been appointed Deputy U. S. Marshal for this district, O. S. Rarick retiring.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mike Cogan and Albert Helman were raked in by Marshal McFadden Tuesday morning in a state of booziness. Mike got $12.25 and Albert got off on plea of not guilty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

W. P. Hardwick, Dexter, was in the city Monday. He was accompanied by G. N. Hardwick, of Berlin, Missouri, and Miss Julia Heppin.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Lou Varner and A. H. Snyder, who have been visiting Mrs. C. M. Leavitt, returned to Osage County Monday. Mr. Snyder will return in a few weeks to teach a winter school near Floral.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

J. R. Callison, of Spring Creek township, has left us a handsome Bartlett pear from his orchard--luscious, large, and perfect. His orchard is one of the best in the county, worthy the pride he takes in it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Fred Ballein is home from his purchasing tour, having laid in a large stock of dry goods, etc., for J. P. Baden's Headquarters. In addition to his purchases, he had a big time and returns with a metropolitan air.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mrs. J. L. Conklin, of Kansas City, and Mrs. Stanley Conklin and son, of Atchison, arrived here for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Conklin. Mrs. J. L. is Mr. Conklin's mother and Mrs. Stanley his sister-in-law.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Senior editor is off to attend the National Water Ways Convention at Minneapolis, Minnesota, to which he is one of the Kansas delegates. This convention is for the purpose of considering the condition of the various national water ways, for congressional action.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Hugh McLain, who raised the Lindell boarders Saturday night with a row in which numerous bedroom furniture took part, was found in a boozy condition again this morning and again languishes. His money is gone and he will likely try the bastille for several days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. C. M. Wood has been taking the school census in the city and reports 1,561 school children between the ages of 5 and 21. In going all over the city, he is surprised at the great number of good buildings and residences which are being erected all over the town. He says that the residence portion of the town is far ahead of the business portion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Miss Sarah McCommon spent several days of last week with Mrs. Chas. Hill, at Wellington, and her brother, Ira, at Caldwell. Mr. and Mrs. Hill returned to Winfield with her Saturday, to remain several days among relatives and friends. Mrs. Hill is a sister of W. O. and T. J. Johnson, and is well known in this city.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge H. D. Gans got home from Chicago Tuesday. The result of the examination of Mrs. Poinsette's stomach by the Chicago experts will not be made known until given in evidence at the time of arguing the motion for a new trial for Frankie Morris, the supposed poisoner. Senator Hackney is confident of its weighty effect.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The long looked for refreshing rain came Tuesday morning, and with it a desire for overcoats and fires--something unprecedented in this climate at this season. Doors were closed and humanity in general shriveled up from the first "cold snap." This promises to be an unusually cold autumn all over the country. A friend of O. J. Dougherty writes of snow three inches deep in southern Pennsylvania.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

George Dresser, our photographer, leaves us today to take temporary charge of the Stevens gallery at Arkansas City. Mr. Dresser is an artist of eleven years experience and stands high in the profession. He is associated here with D. Rodocker. Good work is his motto. Arkansas City can rest assured of obtaining a first-class artist in Mr. Dresser.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Central Hotel changed hands yesterday, Sid Majors and Ivan Robinson having bought out Frank L. Crampton. Sid can't keep out of the hotel business in Winfield. Frank Crampton will go west to grow up with the country. He has run the Central with satisfaction to all and we hope profit to himself. He is a young man of superior business qualifications and will succeed anywhere.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Mr. W. J. Whitford died Tuesday, at his home on South Main. He was about sixty years of age and leaves a second wife, aged thirty-five, and several young children by her, with three grown sons and a son-in-law residing here. The old man has been a city charge for several years, totally neglected by his sons. He was buried this afternoon by the city under charge of Marshal McFadden, Elder Myres [? Myers] conducting appropriate ceremonies.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Liberty township comes up with the latest case of misplaced confidence. Maggie Thompson, a girl of eighteen, has had Steven Carver arrested, charging him with being the father of her unborn babe. Constable Siverd brought him before Judge Buckman Tuesday, and the examination was set for the 14th inst. Steven is a young man of twenty-three, with some property. He don't look bad, but his reputation indicates differently. He gave bond for his appearance.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Dave Bright, who lives close to Salt City, arrived in town yesterday with a big load of watermelons, one of which tipped the scales at 58 pounds. Mr. Bright claims he has one that has worn the vines out, that will soon be up this way, that will go ten pounds better. McGuire Bros. are figuring on these whoppers. If they get them, we hope to get a chance to sit down under its shade and "carv dat melon."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Capt. N. A. Haight announces himself this week as a candidate for the Republican nomination for County Surveyor of Cowley County. The Captain has held this position for years, giving universal satisfaction. It would indeed seem queer to have another in the surveyor's office, and will yet be a long time before a change is made. The Captain will have no opposition this time, as of yore, and will of course get there as smilingly as ever, as he should.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Judge McDonald's flyers won several fine races at the Caldwell Fair, the latter part of last week. Rebecca won first money in three straight heats in the three minute trot, four entries; Caroline got second money in the free for all pace or trot, the first money being won by Black Tom, a 2:28 horse. Mastiff got second money in the "green" trot--for horses that had never before appeared in the ring. The Judge's horses are now at the Anthony Fair, where some good victories are expected for them.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We learn through Dr. Elder that the opening of the next term of school at the Kansas Institution for the education of deaf mutes of the State will be postponed on account of repairs and improvements necessary to be made. The next term will commence Wednesday, Oct. 14, 1885, instead of September, as heretofore. All pupils who desire to attend should be present Tuesday, Oct. 13th, to have their names entered on the roll. Parents should see that these unfortunate children do not lose this, their opportunity.

A BAD CASE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Some time ago Nathaniel Kautz appeared in the County Clerk's office from Otter township, and applied for admission to the county poor house. He was seventy-five years old and his form bent over a heavy cane. He told a pitiful story, mingled with anathemas, about his son turning him out of house and home on the cold world and the poor house was his only hope. This was all very pathetic and our faber was touched to a dissertation on "care for the aged." T. H. Aley was over yesterday and gave us the straight of this story, which makes it sadder still, on the old gentleman's part, but relieves his son, Dan, showing him to be a big improvement on his sire. The old man's disposition has always been lionish--couldn't get along with anybody. He came to Otter township in 1869, "well healed." But, using a dudish expression, he was "rapid," his habits had suffered from indulgence and once started his money began to fly to the winds. The wife and mother became very feeble and totally blind, when the old man refused to care for her, and Dan took her into his home. Dan's condition, in the early days, was far from good, but the old man refused to help him, sold his property, put the money in his pocket, and lit out, nobody knew where. The mother lingered two years and died. Dan happened in Sedan a few years ago, and was astonished to learn that his father was a pauper and in the Chautauqua poor house. He took him out, clothed him nicely, and too him to his (Dan's) home. The old gentleman had squandered $8,000, and his former robust frame was being eaten up by the diseases of profligacy. His chronically quarrelsome disposition soon vented itself. No persuasion would avail, and it was useless to argue forcibly. The old man wouldn't accept the hospitality offered and drifted around everywhere. Finally the son hit upon a plan and raised the money to pay a man, at a good home in that neighborhood, to care for the father. But the old gentleman wouldn't have it, and no persuasion could keep him from applying at the poor house, as a matter of revenge on the son. Dan has tried every plan to make his father comfortable in his old age, though the old man always treated him shamefully, but the father refuses all offers because he can't run things according to his own cranky notions. This case is indeed a sad one--bowed down with old age and a disposition so seared that an angel couldn't get along with him, the old man must go down to a disgruntled grave, from the poor house, while refusing the beneficence of his offspring. Though aged, the old man has much vim and when crossed flourishes his cane around with a vengeance. He is the hardest ward of the poor farm--satisfied with nothing.

COL. COPELAND COMES TO GRIEF.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Al B. Taylor's old home paper, the Huntingdon, (Pa.) Journal, contains an account of a scandal in which Col. Copeland, whose popularity in Winfield exceeds that of any lecturer who ever visited us, is principal. His fame is great over the country. His several visits to this city have acquainted him with many to whom this bit of news will read romantically, darkening the splendid reputation he gained here.

"Recently this individual put up at the Logan House, Altoona. Soon after, or perhaps at the same time, a lady registered as Mrs. Marian Rowley, Philadelphia. Copeland was allotted to room 64 and the lady was assigned room 78. One of the night clerks had reason to suspicion that all was not right in the neighborhood of 78, and taking another hotel employee with him, he opened the door of 64 by means of a duplicate key, but there was no occupant in the room. The proceeded to room 78, and after waiting until the lady occupant dressed herself, were admitted. Everything seemed to be all right, but after further examination, Mr. Copeland was found stowed away in a place where he thought he would be perfectly safe from observation. When asked what he was doing there, he replied that the lady had been taken sick, and having a little box in his hand, he added that he had gone in to administer some pills. The night clerk could not be induced to believe that Copeland was duly authorized to administer medicine to patients at that time of night, and both of the parties were summarily bounced. They next registered at the Central; he as Mr. Copeley, and she as Mrs. Beatty, he taking 29 and she 30. They remained at the Central until about 11 o'clock next day, when they took the next train for Tyrone. We have not inquired where they put up in town; but they probably registered at the Ward House under assumed names. One of the Colonel's popular lectures is entitled, 'Mistakes of Bob,' which he should at once change, and in the future deliver it as the 'Mistakes of Copeland.'"

CHRISTIAN BASKET MEETING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Last Sunday was pleasantly celebrated by the Christian church at Tannehill in holding their regular annual basket meeting in Mr. Smalley's grove, on the verdant banks of Beaver creek. The indications of the thermometer were low enough to make the day comfortable and the exercises enjoyable. It being the fifth Sunday of the month, many ministers from a distance who were afforded leisure by an "off" Sabbath, were present to add to the attractions of the hour. Among the visiting ministers your reporter remembers the following names: Revs. Wright, of Douglass, Butler County; Irwin, of Floral; Broadbent, of Geuda; Hawkins, of Vernon township; and Drennen, of Ninnescah township. Rev. Hopkins, of Mulvane, was expected to deliver the annual sermon, but a business call to St. Louis prevented him being present. Rev. Frazee, the resident preacher, was chief master of ceremonies, and at his request, Rev. Wright occupied the pulpit before and after dinner. The Reverend gentlemen delivered two very interesting discourses, which were attentively listened to throughout by the large assemblage of people present. Quite a large number of persons were in attendance from Winfield, Geuda, Kellogg, Hackney, Floral, and other remote localities. The exercises of the day were pleasantly and harmoniously adjourned to the Tannehill schoolhouse. The writer did not remain for the evening services, but wearily wended his way homeward ever and anon meditating on the subject whether or not it was possible for him to read his "titles clear to mansions in the skies," when members of different religious denominations are not quite positive that his brethren and sisters of opposite faith are presenting the proper route in their pilgrimage toward the "pearly gates." MARK.

MORE HOT SHOT FROM NEW SALEM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Notice was given in last week's Tribune that Crabtree had received an anonymous letter bidding him leave the county in sixty days. This is another infernal scheme concocted by the Crabtree clique to gain more sympathy and support. The nefarious article was smuggled to the press through one Hunter, in order to shield the sneaking coward who has the audacity to accuse me or my friends of writing an anonymous letter, when he is at the same moment clandestinely writing what he dare not own. Oh! You foul mouthed hypocrite, why don't you sign up like a man? Come see him fix the seal of his own conviction. "Such clandestined work is an evidence of cowardice of which no one of any honor would be guilty." This is a specimen of the majority. These are they to whom the good citizens of this place, must submit. Is not he the author of that "anonymous letter?" Give us your name now, like an honorable man, as you are, so all may know, from this on, who is mean and filthy minded enough to write an "anonymous letter." In closing I humbly ask all sympathizing souls to remember the poor, silly editor of the Burden Eagle. Thanking the people for their leniency, I shall endeavor to close these unpleasant communications with this, I trust, my last. Feeling my obligations to the press, I thank them very cordially for their liberality. Respectfully,

L. S. DOWNS.

DISTRICT COURT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The District Court convened at nine o'clock yesterday, Samuel Dalton, Judge pro tem, presiding. The docket was called. The case of Mary Stokes vs. J. S. Hunt was dismissed without prejudice, at plaintiff's cost. Henry Hansen vs. Joseph Davis--continued to next term. Elizabeth McQuain vs. Nancey Baldwin et al--decree modified according to petition. Burton L. Weger vs. City of Winfield--leave granted to file an amended answer. O. C. R. Randall vs. D. D. Branson--dismissed as per stipulation on file. W. A. Lee vs. W. R. Branson--case dismissed at cost of plaintiff, with judgment for plaintiff. Ben W. Matlack vs. George W. Gray--continued to next term. B. W. Matlack vs. Frank J. Hess--case continued to next term. W. R. Branson vs. W. A. Lee et al--case dismissed with prejudice. J. Carns [? Cairns] vs. Louisa Jones et al--dismissed at cost of plaintiff. Court adjourned to Monday next.

HEALTH AND EDUCATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Sisters of the Academy of the Visitation, Frederick, Maryland, are amongst those in charge of the education institutions who use Red Star Cough Cure and give it to their pupils. They write that they can heartily recommend it to their friends.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Senator Hackney left for Wellington last night and will land in Erie, Kansas, today, ready to argue the motion for a new trial in the Frankie Morris poisoning case. These are mighty rushing times for the Senator.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Disinfect your cellars and out houses with antiseptic powder. For sale at Williams' drug store. Price only 25 cents per box.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A nice, clean stock of groceries to trade for raw land, cattle, or hogs. M. C. PUGH.

UNCLE SAM'S COLD GRIP.

Ben Bartlow in the Toils for Sending an Obscene Letter Through the Mails.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire brought Ben Bartlow in from Hazelton last Sunday evening and lodged him in the bastille on charge of sending an obscene letter through the U. S. mails to Miss Katie Hixon, one of the dining room girls at Axtell's restaurant, who made the complaint. The circumstances seem to evidence that Katie went with Ben at one time and after he went to Hazelton, received several letters from him. They were rather unsophisticated and she showed them to some of the boarders, and brought out the laugh. Soon after she received this letter, indicating that he had hear of her exhibition of his letters--yes, it shows more, the most intense hatred. It is the most obscene letter ever penned, going into the lowest sum of the English language. The letter has no signature, and Ben will plead not guilty. The Hazelton post mark is on the letter, and Katie says she knew no one else there. The case hangs on the identification of the writing and surrounding circumstances, and draws a big crowd of band heads. The examination is set for Wednesday at 10 o'clock. The prosecution will be conducted by Hon. W. C. Perry, of Fort Scott, U. S. District Attorney, and the defense by Will T. Madden. The penalty, on conviction, is a fine of $100 to $5,000 or 1 to 15 years imprisonment, or both.

WHITE HEARD FROM AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

R. H. White, the terrible murder of whose wife shook up Cowley a few months ago, is again heard from. He writes to Marshal McFadden from Sharon, Barbour County, asking numerous questions. "Have you heard anything more of the bloody negro?" says White. "Do you know where he is and where is his wife and what she says about it?" Governor Martin told me he had some posters containing his proclamation offering $300 reward for the apprehension of and conviction of the murderer of my wife. Have you seen any posted up in Winfield? Has it ever been published in the papers? The officials seem to be working in the negro's favor. I don't know their object, unless they have been bought by the negro's friends." Then he goes on with a lot of driveling criticism--the most convicting thing that has yet appeared. It shows a haunted mind, that has a subject imbedded there that will not down, and he sees no good in anybody--his liver appears to be on a strike. The rewards offered by the Governor and the County Commissioners have been widely published, and our officials, without blate or blow, have hunted down every clue, to find them thin specters that always vanish under investigation, like the bloody negro business. There was never anything of it--only a ghastly get up of a morbid public.

Paper had two articles in same issue re death of Isaac DeTurk...

A TERRIBLE DEATH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The life of Isaac DeTurk, the sixteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. A. DeTurk, living in the Elbert Bliss residence, has been slowly but surely ebbing away. His death is one of the most terrible. A few weeks ago he was hauling water in a sled tank to the threshing machine on his father's Pleasant Valley farm. On top of the tank was a barrel on which he was sitting. A sudden stop threw him five feet headlong to the rough ground. The whole left side of his forehead was crushed in. The skull was raised and the splints taken out, but he gradually failed, though conscious part of the time. For several days past, the brains oozed out from the skull, a terrible sight, yet consciousness was occasional.

A SAD DEATH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Isaac DeTurk, of whose terrible accident we have made mention several times, died yesterday at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. DeTurk, in the Parsonage addition. He was but sixteen years old, a bright, ambitious boy, and his death is one of the saddest--a very hard blow to the family. It will be remembered that he was thrown from a water sled several weeks ago, while hauling water to a thresher, near the Grange Hall, south of town. He was either kicked by one of the horses or struck a projection with great force, as the skull of his left forehead was crushed in, making a hole the size of a silver dollar. The skull was replaced and everything possible done to relieve, but death was inevitable. Up to last Thursday he talked intelligently at times and hopes were entertained, then his tongue became paralyzed, though he was conscious most of the time up to a few hours before death. The brains oozed out of the aperture in quantities, and his retaining consciousness is a mystery. The funeral was held at four o'clock from the residence, conducted by Rev. Reider, and was attended by many sympathizing friends. Such a sorrow touches the deepest chord of every soul, causing it to reflect the kindliest words and thoughts of condolence. The remains were buried in the south cemetery.

A QUEER FRACAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Hugh McLain, a native of the Emerald Isle, was up before Judge Turner Monday for an assault on Albert Elman, a fellow Irishman. Three sons of Erin were in the same room at the Lindell Saturday night. Hugh was considerably boozed, and about twelve o'clock hauled himself from his couch and began to pound Albert, lying in another bed with another man. Picking up the unmentionable portion of bed room prerequisites, he soared it high in the air over Albert's head, as he laid on the bed. A crash, a splash, cussing that would sicken the common vocabulary, mingled with an odor betokening war. Albert was furious and Hugh was making another grab for his weapon when Marshals McFadden and McLain appeared on the scene and quelled the disturbance. The landlord was the maddest of all. Hugh paid $12.25 for his fun, languishing in the bastille over Sunday. Of all fights, this one took the pot.

A COWLEY PATENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The world has been flooded of recent years with patent car couplers, but Cowley County now steps to the front with one that outranks all others and will make its inventor a fortune, if he gets it introduced. It was invented by Dr. A. J. Chapel, of Arkansas City. It is an automatic drawbar, made of steel. It entirely does away with danger, and is very durable. It fastens clear across the end of the freight car, with automatic lever. Step up to either the side of the car or on top, lift the lever, and the cars are uncoupled. They couple themselves by slide bars. Three links and solid iron bumpers form the coupling, all link pins raising at once at the pull of the lever. A stock company of Winfield and Arkansas City men will likely take hold of this patent with the Doctor, and put it to the front.

DIED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

At her home, on Loomis street, 1618, on the 30th ult., Mrs. Sarah E., wife of Abijah Lawrence. For more than 15 years past she has been a great sufferer. Her disease was consumption. She was born March 28, 1839, in Ripley County, Indiana. She was the oldest daughter of J. M. and Elizabeth Hollensbe. Early in life she professed faith in her Savior and united with the Baptist church, of which she was a faithful member until the time of her death. Sept. 9th, 1860, she was united in marriage to Abijah Lawrence; to them were born four children, three of whom yet survive her. She longed for the time of her departure, knowing that for her to die was gain. Her remains were shipped to her former home for burial. The funeral services were held at her late residence, on the 30th ult., conducted by J. H. Reider.

MORE THAN A MILLION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

New Orleans, La. A reporter of the Times-Democrat, who recently completed a tour of this and neighboring States, visiting every city, town, and hamlet, states that he interviewed all the wholesale and retail druggists and storekeepers, as well as transportation companies, with a view of learning the volume of trade in certain articles. The statistics thus gathered show that during the past two years over one million two hundred thousand bottles of St. Jacobs Oil were sold in this section alone, and that this quantity largely exceeds the total combined sales of all other similar remedies during that period. He adds that dealers, as well as the public, continue unanimous in their praise of the wonderful pain-curing powers of this unapproached remedial agent.

QUARTERLY MEETING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The third quarterly meeting of Sheridan Circuit U. B. Church will be held at the Red Valley schoolhouse September 12th and 13th, 1885, beginning at 2 p.m. Saturday. The services on Saturday and Saturday night will be at the schoolhouse, and on Sunday in a tabernacle 2 miles north and 1 mile east of the schoolhouse. Everybody invited. Bring your baskets well filled. Rev. T. W. Williams, Pastor.

BURIED IN THE MOUNTAINS.

A California Letter to The Courier.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

DEAR OLD COURIER: In your next visit come to Soquel, California, instead of San Jose. We are buried in the mountains, yet more alive by a thousand per cent than when we left the dear friends of Southern Kansas--the Italy of America,--except in California; for when I left Winfield my poor, poor lung hurt me so and my limbs were so nearly paralyzed that I could scarcely walk. But now my lung has entirely healed, but is still weak, and my paralysis much better so that I feel to have a new lease of life for several years.

This is certainly one of the most remarkable countries in the world and its resources are not fully developed, even to show what they really are. To look at the red wood forests in this country one would think that we could supply the world with lumber for a thousand years. In many places the trees stand so close together that you can't ride between them on horseback and are from 250 to 300 feet high, and as straight as an arrow. The soil is most signally productive, producing all the succulents and serials, all the fruits and grasses in a most luxuriant and profitable degree. And now there is a manifest intention upon the part of capitalists to turn attention to mining again, more than ever.

My friends in reading this letter, will wonder why I gave it the caption, "Buried in the Mountains." Let me explain. Some of you know that it has been the ambition of my life to stand at the head of a universal Samaritan, or a health institute, and they will rejoice to know that at last I have reached the zenith of my ambition; for here in this wild, weird, romantic spot in the Santa Cruz mountains, I have charge of the Glen Haven Medical Institute. Let me describe this location as to its topography and wonderful adaptation to the purposes for which it is now employed. The building, a large and beautiful new house, stands on a natural mound in an alcove, catching the morning, noon, and evening sunshine. It is 750 feet above the sea level--far enough away and above the level of the sea to escape the cold fogs and bleak winds that arise from seaward and yet near enough to the sea to get the benefit of the ozone arising from the ceaseless dash of the ever rolling surf upon the beach, and near enough to enjoy sea bathing and most glorious carriage drives along the beach for fifteen miles. We are five and a half miles from the city of Santa Cruz; three miles from the village of Aptos; two and a half miles from Camp Capitola, one of the most popular bathing places on the coast, for the reason that there is not a particle of what is known to bathers as being exceedingly dangerous, called "under-tow." A many places a cable has to be fastened to the shore and to this bathers hold on as they go into the water. I have seen little tots not six years old and unattended bathing at Camp Capitola with perfect safety.

Since I came here I have learned the secret of what I wrote you in my last letter, touching our markets. I did not then know that so close to the cities of San Jose and Santa Cruz all such vegetables as potatoes, peas, turnips, lettuce, etc., grow all through the winter season. Yet in the summer it is peculiarly cool and delightful.

In our Institute we have the most delightful soft water brought in pipes from a grand mountain spring and nearby is a valuable sulphur spring. We shall have control also of a most marvelous water four miles distant, which I would be glad to describe, as the water has a very remarkable history, but the story would take up too much of your valuable space.

I will send a package of the mineral, through which the water runs, to the editor of THE COURIER and his readers will, no doubt, enjoy the peculiar properties of this water by testing the mineral through which it runs. It looks for all the world like pulverized slate and tastes like alum, yet here is no slate nor a particle of alum in it. This mineral is gaining a wide reputation and is being shipped all over the world as an almost infallible panacea for all cutaneous diseases of the internal and external skin. Thousands of ladies are using it for diseases peculiar to women with wonderful success.

So, taking all in all, I am really and truly of the opinion that persons intending to change locations for the improvement of their business or health could not do better than to come to California. Any information that I can communicate for the good of those living in the East, I will freely and gladly convey to them by letter if they write me. Very respectfully,

T. B. TAYLOR, A. M. M. D., Soquel, California.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

James T Gibson et ux to James M Hamil, ne qr sw qr and n hf se qr 5-34-7e: $350

Susan Neese to James M Hamil, sw qr se qr 5-34-7e: $600

Alfred H Dodd et ux to Isaac N Dodd, lots 8 and 9, blk 77, A C: $800

M D Stapleton et ux to Martha Brockett, tract in out lot 2, Winfield: $1,000

Jacob W Walck et ux to Andrew Walck, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 24, H P ad to Winfield: $1,000

A H Fitch et al to John F Huffman, sw qr ne qr 24-34-4e: $750

Ianthe [?] Berry et al to S W Stout, 1-7 ne qr nw qr 20-33-5e: $328

James M Corbin et ux to H M Corbin, n hf se qr 19-33-3e, 80 acres: $500

John Clifton et ux to Stephen Bibler, lots 1 and 2, blk 320, Dexter: $300

T W Emerson et ux to John F Teter, s hf ne qr 8-31-6e and 8 acres in n hf ne qr 8-31-6e: $1,700

James M Hamil et ux to Allison A Hamil, s hf sw qr 25-33-6e, 80 acres: $1,200

C W Passmore to Deborah Passmore, lots 18, 19 and 20, blk 7, A C: $250

James H Turner et ux to Hannah M Turner, s hf nw qr 19-31-3e, qc: $1.00

C W Jones et al to Ele Reed, 5 acres in nw qr 35-31-6e: $11,250

Christina Burton and hus to W A Smith, lot 4, blk 177, Loomis ad to Winfield: $375

D P Marshall et ux to C M Scott, lot 20, blk 28, A C, qc: $1

John Mott to Frank J Hess, lot 11 and 12, blk 50, A C: $800

Mary J Swarts and hus to Fannie E. Art, lots 26 and 27, block 193, Swarts' ad to A C: $24

B W Matlack to O C Daisey et al, lot 20, blk 146, A C: $1.00

Rachel Hines and hus to Robert C Hamil, w hf sw qr 24-32-7e: $400

William P Hackney et ux to P H Albright and Grant Stafford, lot 16, blk 128, A C: $3,000

James C Balon [?] and hus to Selora White, lot 15, 31:29, Butler County, and lots 6 and 7, 6-30-8e: $800.

[Comment: Something wrong with above entry: James and hus ???]

A H Jennings et ux to R R Hoopman, s hf ne qr 22-31-4e: $800

Samuel J Neer et ux to George M Troutman, s hf sw qr and s hf se qr, 35-30-7e: $785

Burden Town Company to T W and J H Wood, lot 31, blk 40, Burden: $25

Mary J Swarts et al to Mary F Arnett, lots 26, 27, and 28, blk 192, Swarts ad to A C: $35

Frank J Hess et ux to Adolphus G Lowe, lots 21 and 22, blk 50, and lot 3, blk 51, A C: $500

T F Blair et ux to James A Cisna, nw qr nw qr 18-32-7e: $500

Aaron Turner et ux to John M Holloway, lot 10, blk 132, A C: $100

Albert A Newman et al to Melvina Holloway, lot 8, blk 132, A C: $25

Chas H Holloway to Melvina Holloway, lot 9, blk 132, A C: $25.

Mary A Sanderson and husband to Elizabeth Young, lot 1 and e hf lot 2, blk 331, Winfield: $1,600

A B Taylor to W A Smith, lots 7, 8, and 9, blk 18, Highland Park ad to Winfield: $300

Anderson Walck et ux to John Walck, nw qr sec 15 and 162 acres in 15-30-3e: $6,000

Elisha H Long et ux to Viola G Crabtree, lots 10, 11, and 12, blk 4, Cambridge: $1,350

Robt B Hanna to Samantha Hanna, e hf ne qr 28-32-e--love, etc.: $1.00

Jesse Hines et ux to Willis Elliott, pt lot 19, blk 1, Dexter: $25

Harriet A Pratt and husband to W P Style et al, lots 4, 5, blk 85, Winfield: $3,000

Cambridge Town Co. to Martha Freeborn, lot 18, blk 4, Cambridge: $25

Thomas H Tyner et ux to George P Endicott, lot 9, 10, and 11, blk 182, A C: $200

Joseph H Gibson et ux to Owen S Gibson, lots 27 and 28, blk 139, A C: $500

Charles H Johnson et ux to Thomas H Sartin, n hf ne qr 28-34-8e, 80 acres: $1,500

I. W. RANDALL & CO.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

This new firm has fairly got started in the McDonald building, on South Main. They have spared no pains, time, or money in putting in a general hardware stock that will compare favorably with any stock in the county. Everything about the store and stock shows that the gentlemen composing the firm understand their business fully. The goods are of the best and latest make, bought as low as cash and judicious buying could get them in eastern markets. No old goods. I. W. Randall--our Irve, is well known in this city to be a fine businessman. J. S. Lyons, formerly with Horning & Whitney, is an expert in the plumbing and gas fitting business, and a number one hardware man. Everything in shelf and heavy hardware will be kept in stock. Plumbing and gas fitting will be a specialty. Call and see their stock and low prices and be convinced that this firm will sell the best class of goods very low.

COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The first monthly meeting of the Teachers Association will be held in Winfield September 19th. Arrangements were made at the last meeting for holding the first regular meeting September 5th, but owing to the difficulties encountered by the committee on course of study, their work could not be arranged for publication this week; hence the postponement of the first meeting. The work of this meeting will be principally given to discussion on the course of study, and arrangements for its introduction and use in the schools of the county, and it is hoped and earnestly requested that every teacher attend. Another matter that should not be overlooked is the completion of the arrangements for the Reading Circle. Those wishing books should be prepared to order them, and all wishing to become members should do so at once that the entire class may commence work together.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The citizens of Beaver, Pleasant Valley, and Liberty townships will soon be called upon by Mr. N. W. Dressie, of this city, who has the exclusive agency for the "Personal Memoirs of General U. S. Grant," written by himself. Other agents are now circulating a book in these townships which they claim to be this same book, but any careful observer can readily tell the counterfeit. It is written by a common historian and is far inferior to Grant's own book.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Smiles! Peace!! Happiness!!! are only a few of the many things it will bring to your household--the Jewell Gasoline Range, at Horning & Whitney's.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Fuller & Mullen can give you some bargains in houses and lots, vacant lots, and suburban property. Office north of Myton's store.

H. G. FULLER & CO.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We are prepared to make farm loans at as low rates and on as favorable terms as any firm in the county. Our office now removed to Main street, north of Myton's. H. G. Fuller & Co.

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

160 acres raw land enclosed with good wire fence 3 miles from railroad town, in Cowley County. Will trade for city or other property. Inquire of C. D. Murdock.

A DEEP CUT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

We offer one hundred and forty-three pairs of good jeans pants at the low price of 95 cents a pair. This is much less than the cost of material and trimmings.

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

160 acres of land, good apple and peach orchard, good stone house, all fenced, for less than one can put the improvements on. Address, Box 48, Maple City, Kansas.

DEATH AMONG CHILDREN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Professor Draper emphasizes the fact that 22 per cent of all children born die before they are one year old, one-third before they are five, and one-half before they are fifteen. The principal cause of this frightful death rate is the non-assimilation of food. Nursing mothers should understand that greens, gravies, acids, pastries, ice, and coffee, etc., change their milk. This gives the child pain, causes him to vomit or produces loose stools, or makes him feverish and constipated. Frequently he is given opiates like Paregoric, laudanum drops, or soothing syrups. Every such remedy is dangerous. Everyone of them contain opium in some form. Candid physicians everywhere now agree that there is known but one harmless popular medicine for children. Castoria, originated by the eminent Dr. Pitcher. It has been in use over thirty years and stands alone as a child's remedy. During this time Castoria has saved the lives of more children from three months to sixteen years of age than have all other remedies known to man. Mothers of the second generation are using it, with whom puny children are not seen. This testimony may be traced around the world. Millions of grateful mothers everywhere pronounce Castoria the children's panacea.

NOTICE OF PRIMARY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The citizens of Walnut township will meet at E. M. Reynold's place, the northeast corner of Highland Park, on Saturday, September 12, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of electing a set of delegates to the County Convention, and to elect a township committee.

John Mentch, Chairman.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

PUBLIC SALE. We will sell at Magnolia farm, 10 miles southeast of Winfield, on Wednesday, September 9, 1885, 45 head thoroughbred and high grade Short Horn cows, and 10 head of 2-year old heifers, all of which re in calf by Imported Galloway Bull; 9 cows having calves by their side, served by same bull; 5 yearling half-blood Galloway bulls; 9 half-blood Galloway bulls 4 months old; 5 yearling steers; 4 head 2-year-old mules, broke to work; 3 head yearling mules; 4 brood mares bred this spring. Terms of sale--A credit of ten months will be given purchasers giving bankable notes bearing 10 per cent per annum. A discount of 10 per cent will be given on cash sale. VERMILYE BROS.

Walter Denning, Auctioneer. Free lunch at 12 o'clock.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A good Hapgood Sulky, taken up on a debt, for $32.00 A bargain. W. A. Lee.

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Recap. Notice of Final Settlement. Estate of John Servis, late of the County of Cowley. James Kirk made administrator October 5, 1885. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for Administrator.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Recap. Notice of Final Settlement. Estate of Alfred Elliott Johnson, deceased. Date: October 5, 1885. William H. Johnson, Administrator. Jno. D. Pryor, Attorney.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Recap Notice of Attachment before G. H. Buckman, Justice of the Peace, City of Winfield. W. A. Lee, Plaintiff, against A. W. McMillan, Defendant. Date: July 10, 1885. Action will be heard before said Justice September24, 1885. J. F. McMullen, Lee's attorney.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Recap Administrator's Notice of Final Settlement. Charles C. Hammond, Administration, in the matter of estate of Jabez D. Hammond, Deceased. Date for final report: October 5, 1885. McDonald & Webb, Attorneys.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Sheriff's Sale by G. H. McIntire. M. M. Rutherford, Plaintiff, vs. William F. Wise, Lafayette Wise, and Eliza Wise, Defendants. Public sale September 28, 1885, of defendant's property. Notice given August 26, 1885.

NOTICES AND ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

For Sale. An excellent stock farm of 600 acres, well watered, well improved, with fine grass, all under fence. Also 160 acres of land 8 miles northwest of Winfield. Will sell at a bargain. F. N. Strong.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

C. W. ARMSTRONG,

NOTARY PUBLIC.

Collecting Agent.

Abstract of Titles a specialty. Office with W. B. Pixley, N. Main street.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

NOTICE!

All persons having colts from French Dick, foaled in 1885, are requested to bring them to my farm on the first Friday in October. I will give two premiums, for best colt, $15; second best, $7.50, judges to be picked by exhibitors. My own colts will not be shown in this competition. B. W. Sitter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

A. C. WEAVER. J. P. HELLER.

Ninth Avenue Blacksmith

-AND-

WAGON SHOP.

All kinds of blacksmithing and wood-work done to order and satisfaction guaranteed. Horse-shoeing a specialty. Give us a call. Shop on corner next to Hands & Gary's livery stable.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

NICK HURLY,

General Blacksmith!

Farm Work and Horseshoeing a Specialty.

I have an expert in horseshoeing and will guarantee first-class work.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

EVERY REQUISITE

-FOR-

Boys' School Apparel

Can be Had in Local Variety at

ELI YOUNGHEIMS,

Boys' Outfitting Establishment.

Experience has proven that nothing more surely gives a boy a relish for his books

than the same that is furnished by a brand New Suit.

ELI YOUNGHEIM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

G. B. SHAW & CO.,

-DEALERS IN-

Lumber, Grain and Coal,

523 North Main Street.

Keep on hand a full and complete stock of Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Sash, Doors and Blinds, Fence Posts and Pickets, Mouldings and Battens, Lime, Cement, Plaster, Hair and Building Paper. We also carry a stock of Hard-wood Lumber. Our stock of Ready-Mixed Paints are especially adapted to this climate. We have at all times a full stock of Hard and Soft Coal. We pay the highest market price for Flax-seed, Castor Beans and all kinds of Grain. Call and get our prices.

G. B. SHAW & CO.

W. O. JOHNSON, Local Manager.

FOREIGN LANDS.

An Explanation of Pain's Journey Through the Soudan--Believed to be Alive.

An Austrian Priest Gives His Bishop a Pounding--The Afghan Question.

Negotiations Proceeding Without a Hitch.

Arranging an Alliance With the House of Wales.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

NEW YORK, August 29. A London special cable to the Herald says: An Arab living in London, who was formerly El Mahdi's secret agent here, has made an important statement to the Peace Society, bearing upon the fate of Oliver Pain. He says that he arranged all the details of Pain's journey from the British lines to the Mahdi's camp at El Obeid, by the Mahdi's express command. Pain was provided with an ample body guard, to insure his safety during all portions of his journey. The Arab says that Pain was just as safe in El Mahdi's camp and on his way to and from El Obeid as he would have been by British soldiers, either with or without special orders, and must have occurred north of Dongola. These statements have strengthened the belief which has been steadily maintained by many persons here that Pain is still alive. A meeting of Frenchmen residing in London was held this afternoon in Leicester Square to consider the Pain incident. The result of the meeting was the adoption of resolutions denouncing Rochefort for needlessly creating bad blood between France and England.

A LIVELY PRIEST.

PESTH, August 29. A clerical scandal is reported from Potski, in the Province of Croatia. The Roman Catholic Bishop of that place took occasion to rebuke the priest of his diocese for allowing himself to be a candidate for election to a public office, claiming that his conduct was unpriestly, and he was getting beyond his calling and violating vows by mingling in political affairs. The priest became so incensed at the Bishop's remarks that meeting the latter on the street, he at once proceeded to administer a castigation. The Bishop fled to his lodgings, where he was followed by the infuriated priest and beaten unmercifully.

PROCEEDING WITHOUT A HITCH.

LONDON, August 29. Final arrangements between England and Russia in adjusting the disputes arising from the Afghan frontier question are progressing without the slightest hitch. Telegrams and messengers are sent daily to Lord Salisbury at his chalet in Dieppe, France, where he is spending his holiday, conveying the latest information with regard to the negotiations between England and Russia. The Russian ambassador, Baron de Staal, is in daily receipt of dispatches from his Government, and in consequence is prevented from leaving his post even for a short holiday.

ARRANGING A WEDDING.

NEW YORK, August 29. A London cable to the Herald says: Despite denials from the Swedish Court at Stockholm, there are persistent reports at Copenhagen that a marriage is being arranged between Prince Oscar, of Sweden, and Princess Louise, the eldest daughter of the Prince of Wales.

WHAT IT MEANS.

BERLIN, August 29. The Zeitung, commenting on the reported Anglo-Chinese alliance, says: It means the loss of Manchuria to Russia in the event of war.

CHOLERA.

MADRID, August 29. Three thousand five hundred and seventy-five cases of cholera have occurred here during the past week and 1,190 deaths.

A NOVEL ELECTION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

DALLAS, ILL., August 29. Much interest is being manifested in a meeting which is being held here this afternoon to elect a candidate for postmaster. The following printed call has been numerously and largely displayed during the past two weeks. "The Democrats of Dallas City and the surrounding country are hereby requested to meet at the town clerk's office on Saturday afternoon, August 29, for the purpose of electing a Democratic candidate for postmaster at Dallas City. All persons who voted the Democratic ticket, or any part thereof, at the last national election, and who are legal voters and patrons of the Dallas City post-office are entitled to participate and are cordially invited to be present."

A DILAPIDATED TRACK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

OLNEY, ILL, August 29. A mixed train, composed of a passenger and four freight cars, bound east on the Indiana & Illinois Southern Railroad, met with a disastrous accident near Newton, Illinois, yesterday morning at eight o'clock. The track is in a dangerous condition, and at the point where the train left the rails, the wooden ties had rotted almost away. Seventeen persons were more or less injured by the cars rolling over twice in their descent down a steep embankment. Mr. Love, a prominent grain buyer of Newton, Ill., it is thought will die from his injuries. Three ladies and a child were also badly injured.

KICKED TO DEATH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

HANNIBAL, MO., August 29. William Emery, a farm hand in the employ of Samuel Spencer, living in the Sny bottoms in Illinois, a few miles from this city, was found laying in a barn, dead, Thursday night. It is supposed from the nature of the wounds on his head and breast that he was kicked to death by a vicious horse. An inquest was held and a verdict rendered in accordance with the above facts. The deceased was unmarried and was about twenty-eight years old. He came here from Iowa, where his parents reside.

G. A. R. REUNION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MISSOURI, August 29. Quite a large detail from Justin Post, G. A. R., of this city, left last night on a special train on the Cape Girardeau Railroad to attend a camp fire at Squire Wells', four miles east of Bollinger Mills, in Bollinger County. At the reunion there will be veterans from Louisville, Marble Hill, Fredericktown, and quite a large number of ex-confederates from this and Bollinger Counties. The meeting holds one day only.

CONFEDERATE CHARITABLE ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

CHICAGO, August 29. There will be another meeting here this evening of the ex-confederate soldiers who propose to form a social and charitable organization. The report of the committee on organization will take strong ground against any political tone being given to the body and strongly recommends the acceptance of the offer of the Grand Army Hall as a place of meeting.

TRIBULATIONS OF A PUGILIST.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

CINCINNATI, August 28. At eleven o'clock today a constable went out to Chester Park to arrest Sullivan. The arrest was made by the law and order league.

A NOVEL CASE.

Nevada Indians Agree to Submit a Dispute to Trial.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

TUSCARORA, NEVADA, August 29. Last spring Tom Naches, a brother of Chief Naches and the Princess Sarah Winnemucca, died at Pyramid Lake reservation, where he had resided some years. He had a ranch on the reservation, several horses, and three houses. Naches and Sarah Winnemucca claim two of the houses, alleging that they furnished the money to buy the lumber used in building them. Tom's widow denies their claim and refuses to let them remove their houses to their ranch on Big Meadows. Naches applied to Agent Gibson, who suggested that three Indians be chosen by the respective parties to try the case. This was agreed to by Naches and Tom's widow, and two weeks from next Thursday the trial will take place at the reservation. Each of the parties re expected to produce evidence in support of their claim to the two houses in dispute, after which the judges will decide to whom the property belongs.

COLLINS HANGED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

BOWLING GREEN, Missouri, August 29. Samuel W. Collins was hanged here yesterday for the murder of Owen Utterback, Monday, September 24, 1883. Collins killed Utterback near the latter's barn in Pike County, Missouri. Collins walked nine miles from home, secured a good position to shoot from, and drew a bead. He then called to the victim. When the latter looked up, he fired. After Collins' arrest, he confessed he had gone to Utterback's place the day before intending to kill Utterback. He changed his mind, but returned Monday and carried out his intention.

ABANDONED AT SEA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

PROVIDENCE, August 29. The schooner Anna Frye, with a cargo of fish and pickles from Portland, Maine, to Philadelphia, sprung a leak sixty miles south of Montauk Point, Wednesday afternoon. The crew, six in number, were transferred to the steamer [article was never finished after last line].

NATIONAL NOTES.

Pension Agent Norris in Hot Water With the Department Over a Technicality.

Judge French Comes to the Defense of the Court of Alabama Claims.

Army Officers Express a Decided Objection to Rejoining Their Regiments--Will

Resign First.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

WASHINGTON, August 29. It is stated at the Treasury Department that A. Wilson Norris, late Pension Agent of Philadelphia, is causing the accounting officer of that department no little trouble because of his failure to forward his accounts for the month of June last. Mr. Norris was removed July 7, and according to the Treasurer's report, had up to July 21, failed to account for advances amounting to $176,117. Judge Williams, Third Auditor of the Treasury, has several times requested the agent to forward his accounts for examination, but so far Norris ha not taken the slightest notice of his letters. In making his last formal request, the Third Auditor called Mr. Norris' attention to sections 3622 and 5491 of the Revised Statutes, which require that all officers who hold public funds for disbursement shall render a monthly account within ten days after the expiration of each successive month, and provide that officers who fail to comply with this requirement shall be deemed guilty of embezzlement and subject to fine and imprisonment. This letter, it is said, has produced no better effect than its predecessors, and the department officers are in somewhat of a quandary as to how to proceed. There are no imputations against the official integrity of Norris.

NORRIS' CLERK.

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., August 29. Colonel Norris, ex-pension agent, being out of town, Mr. Huckle, his clerk, who has been preparing the accounts of the pension office for the last month of his chief's occupancy of the place, was seen last evening, and said that only one letter had been received from the department since Norris left his position, and that within a few days. "The $176,117 referred to in the dispatch," said Huckle, "never has been in the possession of Colonel Norris, nor could he draw against it. The money, as the people at Washington know, is at the present moment in the Treasury Department. It is there to Colonel Norris' credit, but he could not now nor at any time since his removal draw against it. The money is to his credit as disbursing officer, and as he is no longer such, he has no power over it. Of course, until the accounts are all in, this money remains technically to his credit and cannot be covered into the Treasury until the accounts are presented and audited. The delay in presenting these accounts is owing to the fact that they are being made up by Colonel Norris' own clerks and are very tedious. They will be sent down in a few days."

THE COURT OF ALABAMA CLAIMS.

WASHINGTON, August 29. Judge Asa P. French, of the Court of Alabama Claims, arrived in the city today. Speaking in regard to the recent decision of Comptroller Durham, he said that the question as to the right of the court to employ the necessary assistants was considered when the old court was organized, and it was decided that they had the authority. The new court was modeled upon the old with the exception only that there were three Judges instead of five. Secretary Fish, and subsequently Secretary Frelinghuysen, Comptroller Lawrence, and the other officers having charge of the accounts decided that the court had the right to employ assistant counsel and clerks. Judge Creswell, the special counsel, says the question was thoroughly discussed and the authority of the court conceded. It was impossible, he said, for the court to do otherwise than employ assistant counsel to cross-examine witnesses in various parts of the country. He says Secretary Fish at one time decided that the United States Minister of Hawaiian Islands could receive fees from the court for services rendered as special counsel.

OBJECT TO REJOIN THEIR REGIMENTS.

WASHINGTON, August 29. But three of the army officers affected by Secretary Endicott's recent order, sending men on long detached duty back to their regiments, have complied with the Secretary's Instructions. These are Captain William M. Wherry, of General Schofield's staff, who has been on detached service eighteen years and three months; Lieutenant C. B. Schofield, of General Schofield's staff, on detached duty six years and nine months; and Captain J. S. Wharton, of General Hancock's staff, on detached duty seventeen years. Several of the officers who have not complied with the order have telegraphed here asking that exceptions be made in their cases, and their friends in Washington have replied that no exceptions will be made. It is reported that some of the officers who have been on long detached service will resign the army before they will rejoin their regiments.

CLAIM FOR SALARY.

WASHINGTON, August 29. A claim has been filed in the Court of Claims by John M. Langston, ex-minister to Hayti, for the balance alleged to be due him from the United States on account of salary. His petition recites that the salary of the position is properly $7,500, but that owing to a failure of Congress to appropriate the necessary amount, he received during the last three years and twenty-four days of his service only $5,000 per annum. He sues for the balance, $7,666.

POWER OF COUNTY JUDGES.

WASHINGTON, August 29. The Secretary of the Interior has decided that county judges of Colorado may admit aliens to citizenship. There appeared to be a conflict between a section of the federal statutes limiting this function to courts having a clerk and seal, and the Colorado statute authorizing the merging of the offices of judge and clerk in one person, but the Secretary holds that in these cases there is no conflict.

COMPROMISE ACCEPTED.

WASHINGTON, August 29. The Commissioner of Internal Revenue has approved the recommendation of the district attorney at Cincinnati that the offer of Maddux & Hubert to pay $45,000 in compromise of the Government's claim against them for the balance of the tax due on the spirits falsely gauged be accepted and the case is now before Acting Secretary Fairchild for final action.

LETTER CARRIERS.

WASHINGTON, August 29. Sixth Auditor McConville ruling in regard to letter carriers' leaves of absence, has decided that they are entitled to fifteen days' leave in each year, but that the time of the leave is at the discretion of the Postmaster at the office where they serve.

PENSIONS.

WASHINGTON, August 29. The Treasury Department has paid out about $10,000,000 on account of pensions so far this month. It is therefore expected that the decrease of the public debt for August will not be as large as usual.

COMMITTED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

LAWRENCE, KANSAS, August 29. Henry K. Goodwin, who shot Albert D. Swan yesterday, was arraigned in the police court this morning, charged with murder. In a clear voice he pleaded "Not guilty." He was committed to await the action of the grand jury.

NEWS NOTES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Butter & Peters' saw mill at Tallman burned recently together with a large stock of lumber and shingles. The loss was $80,000; insured for $30,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Fourteen lives were lost by the wreck of three Beaufort pilot boats, the T. W. Schoper, Walter Smith, and John Stoddard, in the recent storm off South Carolina.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

Texas fever has appeared near Kankakee, Illinois, amongst a herd of two hundred cattle owned by Hiram Goodwin. Six have already died and many others have the disease.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

It was reported in Madrid that Spanish men-of-war had arrived at Yap, the chief island of the Caroline group, and planted the Spanish flag, no German vessels being in sight.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

The Great Western Iron Boat Building Company, St. Louis, has filed a deed of assignment for the benefit of their creditors. The assets were listed at $36,530; liabilities unknown.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

William Rowarth [?], dealer in hardware at Central City, Colorado, dry goods at Pueblo, and cattle in various parts of the State, was attached recently for $12,000. The estimated liabilities, $90,000; nominal assets, $100,000; actual assets, unknown.

[Could not read the last two items: two much obliterated by white space.]

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 3, 1885.

E. TOOMAN. J. D. BROWN

TOOMAN & BROWN,

BLACKSMITHS.

General blacksmithing done in first-class manner. Charges reasonable. Horse-shoeing a specialty. E. 7th. Opposite Hudson's bath house.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS,

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, I885.

RECEIVING A NEWSPAPER.

And How It Effected a Winfield Bachelor Who Had Once Been in Love.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A young man in this city is in a mixed frame of mind over the mere receipt of a paper from an old sweetheart that gives a very graphic description of her present home. He thus relates the condition of his present feelings, and the causes that produced them.

"Well, you see, I need to think like other upstarts just big enough to put on a girl's overshoes without blushing, that I was worthy of some notice; but every girl I tackled would soon inform me of my mistake, and I soon had the fact pounded into my head that I had to hold up hard and do my best, on all occasions, to even be classed 'fair to middling.' Just at this time, however, there appeared in the little village that I called home a young lady on a visit to her relatives, and although these same relatives were the very crisp of the upper crust of our little village's elite society, they liked me and treated me with great consideration. It's the same old story, so often told in prose and poetry. I got an introduction, called, and called again; took many delightful moonlight rambles; stood on the old rude wagon bridge that was thrown across a rugged railroad cut, and the old brick church and decaying huts that stood nearby were pleasanter then to me than all the grand and splendid palaces I have since seen. That old cut, made through the most miserable earth nature's powers for the horrible could invent--a mulatto-colored clay--was the scene of more exquisite pleasure to me than I experienced at Niagara, Yosemite, or Minnehaha falls, and all the romantic scenery surrounding them. On and on I went, sinking deeper and deeper into a delicious thraldom of love's inner cell, where the walls were of Jasper and the prison bars of purest gold. What perfect bliss is experienced in such captivity; how easy are the chains to such a slave. But I must not bore you with such pleasant, though sad reminiscence, and will only relate (if you will keep me out of dream land) the simple facts. Her visit was soon over, and she returned to her home in a neighboring town. We corresponded regularly, and on every pretense it was possible to conceive, aided by an all absorbing love, I went to see her. From the Saturday afternoon until Monday morning how time did fly; and then, when I said good bye, until I saw her again, it seemed that every day would get into a rut of eternity, and Time, getting tired in its flight, had stopped for a rest. All this time her letters were more precious than everything else combined, and many a time have I walked out under the old elm tree, on an adjoining hill, and read and re-read them, over and over, until like a mental picture they were always with me. Rivals were many. It seemed to me, indeed, that all the world wanted to bear the position of suitor and fought, like only love can make men fight, to win such a prize. At last I timidly asked if I could try to win her hand, and before the evening closed, she had promised to be mine. You ask me if I was happy, but I cannot answer that question, for I do not know or could not then appreciate what my feelings were. Shakespeare, Burns, Byron and Moore, in all their power, have failed to coin language that even describes the salvage of my feelings. My heart stood still and every nerve and fiber of my being was convulsed with sensations as difficult to portray as the conversion of a human soul. From this time forward I lived in a land that was even better than Cowley County, interspersed, however, with fits of jealousy that would have made Alaska a summer resort or Sahara a flower garden by comparison. A change of business about this time took me from my quiet, unpretentious country home, and placed me in the metropolis of that portion of the country. The change of scene, acting upon me like it has many other silly fools, since and before, transformed my daily habits and manners to such an extent that I tried to convince myself that a love affair was silly. Everything around and bout was so cold, so distant, and so altogether different from what I had been accustomed to that I actually lived in another world. As I look back now to that time when I was 'the biggest fool in town,' (don't laugh, please, I know I have not improved), the disgust the idea gives me is enough to paralyze the appetite of a tramp. In time I came back gradually to reason and began to appreciate the fact that I knew less than nothing, and was fast losing the 'less.' I was doing ordinarily well, financially, but the proceeds went to 'take in the town,' and I was continually broke. A raise of salary, however, soon followed and the day was set. This is the time, you know, that brings the cold chills to a fellow's marrow, and from the shakes I felt, had I taken an invoice at that time, I believe I should have gone into the marrow business and put up a gold leaf sign announcing 'full stock and lowest prices at both wholesale and retail.' But here comes the secret link in the chain; as you are aware, I am not married. While waiting for the link to fill, I will answer your question, as best I can, as to 'what she looked like.' How can I, however, depict the looks of a person, who, to me, was perfection, when even inspiration fails to give that power to a sacred writer in describing Heaven. Imagine not the work, but the limitless visions of what Michelangelo hoped to accomplish in art, and you have a faint conception of what my sweetheart was in nature. Well, of course, I will come down a little from that, but not much, for since then it has been my good fortune to see many of the great beauties of the country and none of them even 'make up' well enough to allow comparison.

"'Well, tell us about the paper,' you say; and I will do so, but it seems to me you are a little rough about it.' When I saw the old familiar handwriting, my heart gave a jump, and the many different colored thoughts that flew like lightning through my brain would have made Belding's great color man green with envy, had he been in my mind and caught a glimpse of the shades. With a motion, quicker than thought ever made, I tore off the wrapper and found her name, Mrs. .

"Hold on fellows and don't go off with 'what you trying to give us about some old married woman?' for that's the link I was speaking of a little while ago. She is married and I am in Winfield--in fact, the train's off the track, and the link is broken. With wonderful curiosity I looked over the paper to see what was marked. Please sympathize with my mortified feelings and read for yourself.

"'Wanted--A good easy going, kind-tempered young man that can take care of children when the nurse is absent. Must understand gardening, know how to mow the lawn, clean the stable and take care of the horses, and, when needed, act as coachman. Wages moderate. References required.'"

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The Conway Springs Star gets off the following. It shows a terrible mistake. The poor devil had left Winfield to get a drink--none here. He looked very dry when he left and we'll bet at this particular period he was as emaciated as a ghost. No Winfield man, unless he was a ghost, would allow a measly druggist to knock him down in addition to refusing him Phillips' best liver regulator, for mechanical and judicial purposes.

"One day last week a gentleman from Winfield, who had been stopping at Howard City, Kansas, for sometime, trying to help the county attorney convict the druggists of that place by the role of a detective, stepped into the drug store of Dr. Lucas and asked the Doctor if he had some beer. The Doctor asked him what he wanted it for. He said there was nothing much wrong with him, but he wanted a bottle of beer. The Doctor seized the stranger up with the remark, 'You are the s of a b I have been looking for.' He then knocked him down and dragged him into the street."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

J. E. Eddy showed up on the street Friday with five monster squashes, measuring 27 feet in circumference. They were raised on Mr. Eddy's fine farm on Black Crook. He has thirty of these monsters on one vine. If anyone can beat Mr. Eddy, let him come to the front.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Judge Torrance will not open court in Cowley County until about October 1st. He is at this time absent with his family in Colorado on account of sickness. The bar unanimously favored his remaining with his family until that time. Wellingtonian.

IT IS SETTLED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A good Democrat informed us that the post office matter was settled. George has concluded to put it in the Ninth Avenue Hotel. The plan of putting it on wheels has been given up on account of the many heavy weights among the Democrats and the necessary travel it would take to follow up the caravan. No doubt there will be some dissatisfaction among the ones who were in favor of having it in their front yards. But all can't be pleased.

THE MOWRY EXAMINATION.

The State's Evidence Presented Before Judge Snow.

Nothing New. Mowry Remanded Without Bail.

The Judge's Decision. Other Particular in Evidence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The preliminary examination of Henry Mowry for the murder of J. P. Smith at Arkansas City on August 21st, began at 2 o'clock Wednesday before Judge Snow. The court room was crowded with eager spectators, largely from the Terminus. The prosecution was conducted by Senator Hackney, acting County Attorney, and the defense by Jennings & Troup, of this city, and W. E. Stanley, of Wichita. The Judge appointed J. H. Fazel stenographic reporter. The evidence throughout was almost verbatim to that given at the coroner's inquest and published in full in THE COURIER. Mrs. Belle Godfrey, the woman in the case, was the first witness called by the State. She is a lady of considerable attraction--a sweet face, neatly clad form, and apparently winsome disposition. She told her story without hesitation, in a straight forward way that won friends.

She said: "On the day of the murder, Mowry came to our house to bring some bird seed, and asked me if he couldn't come to our place Sundays and read. I told him it wasn't best. If you think so much of me, it will only make the matter worse to come around. You had better stay away. He went away, and in a short time returned with a shot-gun. I saw him coming and concealed myself in the dining room. He told me to come out, I won't hurt you, and I came. He said, 'This has got to be settled! Are you going to tell Godfrey what I said to you?' I responded, 'I am; it has gone as far as it can.' 'You'll tell him, will you! I'd just as soon shoot you dead, and may before night. I'll go and find Godfrey.' 'Yes, you coward, you'll meet him on the street and kill him while he has no arms.' 'Don't call me a coward!' he replied, and raised the gun. I said, 'Go away from the house,' and he went. I went to the back door and called my little boy, and told him to hunt up his father and tell him Hank had been down here with a shot-gun and to come home quick. In about twenty minutes he came. The shot-gun was standing behind the organ in the sitting room and he got it, loaded it, and laid it on the carpet in front of the folding doors going into the dining room, and sat down in front of the front door. I sat by the window. Soon Hank returned with his gun. My husband said, 'There he comes!' and taking the gun, waited till Hank got to the gate and then said, 'Don't you come in, Hank! Get away as soon as you can.' Hank replied, 'I don't have to.' I jumped in front of my husband, saying, 'he'll shoot you.' Godfrey pushed me out into the dining room, and when Hank fired through the window from the gate, thirty feet off, he jumped back behind the wall with me and baby. Hank shot again and ran. Several times before this day he had professed affection for me. I told him he must quit coming to our house, for it only made him unhappy. He boarded six or eight months with us, having a room and eating in the house. He and my husband often went chicken hunting together last fall and several times since."

O. F. Godfrey, husband of the former witness, was then called. He is a man of no pronounced impression--of apparently little impulse. He has full black whiskers, appears about thirty or thirty-five years of age, with prominent nose and slim face. He said: "Mowry came up to me about 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the murder, and said he wanted to speak to me. We went up to Hank's room in the Occidental hotel, where he said, 'I suppose you know your wife and I haven't got along very well lately.' I told him I had heard of it. 'She's got a story to tell. You go home and hear her story and then come back here. Don't come prepared for anything.' I went home, and my wife told me all about his visit and the trouble, then I went back to the hotel. After going to his room the second time, I found him there. 'Well, she told you her story, did she? Said Mowry. 'What was it?' I said, 'I don't care to repeat it. You and I have been warm friends, but you must keep away from my house.' 'You must hear my story,' he replied. I told him I didn't want to hear it. He got very angry and I left. I next saw Mowry coming to my house with a shot-gun. I didn't anticipate any shooting, but thought I would be prepared and slipped a couple of cartridges in my shot-gun."

(His evidence regarding the shooting at the house was the same as Mrs. Godfrey's.)

"I never knew of any trouble between Mowry and my wife 'til he told me that day in his room, when he said, in anger, 'I will ruin you and your family. Will that make us enemies?' I answered, 'No!' He said he liked my wife and would not give her up."

Jacob Hite, J. M. Aldridge, R. B. Hutchins, Allen Spickerd, Austin Bailey, Wm. Bamber, and A. G. Lowe were witnesses of the shooting of J. P. Smith, which occurred at the rear of O. P. Houghton's store. Smith was the only close pursuer. Mowry was running pretty fast, though seemingly out of breath. Mowry whirled and yelled at Smith to stop. Smith stopped, and instantly went on when Mowry started. Mowry again whirled and said, 'I told you to stop; halt!' Smith again halted a second, and made another lunge forward, when Mowry whirled, raised his gun, and fired. Smith fell over, saying 'Catch him! catch him!!' The shot almost pulverized with No. four and eight shot the left side of Smith's face and neck. He lived but a short time.

A. G. Lowe was the most important of these witnesses. He was a particular friend of Mowry's, and ran up a back street and headed Hank off. Confronting him, he said, "The officers are after you and will kill you if you do not stop."

Lowe continued. "Mowry didn't stop and I pursued. Mowry reloaded his gun and turning, fired, some of the shot grazing the calf of my leg. A big crowd was by this time pursuing. Mowry shot four shots in quick succession, when Deputy Sheriff Rarick shot him in the groin. Mowry then dropped and said, 'I'll give up; I'm shot! Send for my mother and my brother!' Some told him he wasn't dangerously hurt. As we put him in a spring wagon, someone yelled, 'Served him right!' Mowry tried to break loose, saying, 'Who said that? I will kill him! Let me out at him!!'"

Dr. Parks testified as to the location of Smith's wound and that it caused death.

THE DEFENSE

introduced no evidence. The main point of the preliminary, on the part of the defense, was to make a bailable case, and draw out the State's evidence as a gauge. It was argued at length whether or not the case was bailable. W. E. Stanley opened the argument. He presented the impossibility of malice or premeditation on the part of Mowry in killing Smith. Smith had no warrant and no right to pursue. Stanley held that nothing could be made of it but manslaughter, with as light bail as possible. Senator Hackney argued for the prosecution, showing that the offense was murder in the first degree and nothing else, and consequently not bailable. Mowry did not shoot in self defense. Smith had no visible weapons, and could not harm Mowry, and the intervening between the three times Mowry hollowed halt allowed plainly premeditation. He stopped and went on twice before he shot. Senator Jennings, for the defense, then closed the argument, and the case was submitted.

DECISION OF JUSTICE J. E. SNOW.

"The evidence in this case is all that I can be governed by. The fact of other cases and other parties charged with the crime of murder having been admitted to bail in this or any other State, would have no particular bearing in this case. There is no dispute but that on the 21st day of August, 1885, in this county and State, James P. Smith was killed by means of a gunshot wound, by, and in the hands of this defendant, Henry Mowry. The doctrine as laid down in our Constitution and Statutes in regard to what would be determined as premeditated, with malice aforethought, undoubtedly means that there should be a sufficient time elapse in order to show that none of these conditions, laid down in the constitution, should exist. The evidence shows in this case that the defendant went to Godfrey's house the second time, and took with him a shot-gun. It is not argued that he was not in his right mind, possessed of all his faculties; was a man always intent to do what he ultimately accomplishes. The fact that he took his gun is evidence that he had a purpose in it, whether to frighten someone or for some other end, is not clear. But he had an intention in taking the gun there. On the third visit to the house, the evidence is that he approached from the southeast corner, and was first discovered by Mrs. Godfrey. The evidence is that he came in front of the door. The circumstances of the wife coming between the door of her husband and the defendant does not disclose whether he could see her or not. But the wife was soon placed in the back room; and she testifies that she simply looked around the door and saw the defendant standing north of the gate post. Godfrey testifies that he saw him fire. It is also in the evidence that the location of that window, and the point at which the shot came in contact with the wall of the northeast bedroom, shows that it would pass in a direct line through the room close to the door or within three or four feet of it. It is also testified that when Mowry found them, Mrs. Godfrey was in that room. Before going further, I have this to say in regard to the cause of the shooting. Of course, no reason has been assigned for shooting into the empty room, and as council has remarked, it must be surmised, or to use a common expression, 'guessed at!' But that he should shoot there, knowing no one was there, I cannot presume he did it merely for pastime.

"He came up the street and turned west, crossing Summit street, and down to the alley and then going north, the crowd gathering, and then the report of the shooting having been heard. The crowd gather after him. There is no evidence to show that up to the time of the shooting there had been any demonstration of violence to the defendant. The simple gathering of a crowd of men would not of itself be sufficient cause for the defendant or any party to expect that bodily harm would be done unless that party was conscious of having done some crime previously, to justify harsh treatment. There is no evidence to show there were any firearms used with which bodily harm might have been inflicted. The defendant, of course, taking for granted that with his age and experience, he knew what an arrest was, knew that unless some crime had been committed, there certainly would be no cause or occasion for violence to be used. In regard to the time and occasion to premeditate, the courts have given no rule about the time which should elapse in which to premeditate. The fact that Smith had no shot-gun would indicate that he could do him no great bodily harm. The most probable thought that could occur to his mind was that he would not be taken. He simply proposed not to be taken. He called on Smith to stop, and he didn't stop; there is no evidence to show any indication of surrender before he was shot. There were no shots fired until after the killing of Smith. But the fact of the condition of mind he was in, saying he died game, goes to show there was at least animus in his mind at that time. That he intended to shoot the officers shows he was not innocent of some feeling of vindictiveness. There is no evidence of the time which elapsed, but it was probably not long. It is not the length of time between the intent to kill and the execution of it that makes any defense. If I should absolutely raise a weapon against Mr. Troup there, and then follow it up by shooting him, it is a premeditated act. Of course, it may be aggravated by long premeditation."

A question was asked by Jennings: "If this is not a bailable case, will the Court please state what is one?"

The Court replied: "I have not yet said that this case was not bailable. I may say it, but haven't yet."

Justice Snow continued. "To proceed. If only a few moments elapse, the council cannot say this was an accident or that he did not point the gun at Smith, that there must have been some premeditation some time, and that it was accomplished. Just what that deliberation might have been, it occurred between the time of running and the time of shooting. His acts down at Godfrey's house have no bearing upon his premeditation. I am of the opinion that the case does not come sufficiently within the rules and provision of the law, to admit the defendant to bail."

MOWRY'S APPEARANCE.

A touching thing of this preliminary was the mother of Mowry, a good looking lady of large form and very motherly features, who sat by his side and was frequently moved to tears. Al Mowry, the brother from Bolton township, was also present. The mother was bowed with a grief that can never be lifted. Hank is not a bad looking man. His countenance would never impress you with any prominent trait. That he takes this tragedy very hard is evident. His eyes were riveted on the floor most of the time yesterday, and his looks were wearied and emaciated. He limps yet from his wound, but will soon be free from that. He is a bachelor, and about thirty-five years old. He seemed much affected while Mrs. Godfrey was testifying.

A MODEL TRAMP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Among the army of tramps that continually infest the county, you occasionally strike a piece of manhood. The first essence of this ingredient has reached our ears. Wednesday morning a tramp bombarded a residence in the east part of the city for some "grub." He didn't look as seedy as the average disciple of the road. He shocked the lady of the house by the inquiry, "Have you some work I can do to earn something to eat?" The lady thought a moment and said, "Well, now, I can't think of any work I have for you to do, but I'll give you something to eat. Your wanting to earn it is commendable and extremely unusual, astonishes me, and is worthy of recognition. Come in and I'll give you a good meal." "No, thank you," said the tramp, "I'll go on till I can find something to do to pay for it." Heavens, what an innovation on trampdom! This item will instigate an immediate assembling of tramps, to pass brimstone resolutions firing this honest member from the ranks. And he won't stay among them long. A man with an honest desire to work don't have to tramp long in this enterprising Republic. Indolence makes all our tramps--it makes all our disgraceful, licentious renegades. It is the dead sea that swallows all virtues--the self-made sepulchre of a living man.

DON'T BLAME HIM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A cute subscriber takes exception to our "Slick Thief" article of last week, relating to the escape of Jim Whitehead, who stole Col. Ridgway's horse near Dexter. It will be remembered that he was left, for a few minutes, at Ferguson's stable, while his custodian absent-mindedly (?) went up town, to find his man non est on his return. Whitehead was recaptured by Sheriff McIntire, and is now in jail. He will probably corroborate the following.

"Your article is a misnomer. A prisoner would be a green specimen if he did not go when turned loose. Any common thief would step out, if put up at a livery stable--unless he had very good provender. Nobody blames the young man for going under such treatment. If he had been put up at a first-class hotel and had his board paid, he would have been inexcusable. But the thought of being boarded at the 'Hotel de Hoss,' was beyond endurance."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Bring up your children to joy. Give them just as much as they can take without intoxication and without reaction. If you take too much of any one essential, you cheat some other. Equipoise of the various elements of our being is what we want.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Ben Bartlow, in the toils for sending obscene letters through the mails to Katie Hixon, gave bond of $500 Friday and is breathing the pure air of Heaven once more. His trial comes off on the 11th inst., before U. S. Commissioner Webb.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Wichita appears to have the twin of a Winfield firm--the counterpart to our H. G. Fuller & Son. The Eagle says: "Mr. Charles Fuller, of the firm of Fuller & Son, left yesterday morning for a pleasure trip to California."

COWLEY COUNTY FAIR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The annual fair of this association will be held September 21st to 25th and promises to be a meeting of unusual interest and importance. The central exposition building, two stories high, has been erected and is now receiving the finishing touches of the painter. The two wings of the exposition building have also been floored and the interior rearranged for the fruit and other departments. The completion of this building gives 7,500 feet of floor space and altogether it is not only ornamental but will give ample space with every pleasant facility to exhibit all entries to the best advantage. The second floor will be devoted to the ladies' departments and textile fabrics. Fifty stables and stalls have also been added to the stock department, which insures ample room for all exhibitors in this department. The amphitheater is being enlarged and other improvements are in progression.

Nothing in the power of the Board will be neglected that will add interest to the occasion. Many of the premiums, especially in the stock departments, have been greatly increased. Relying on the patronage of an appreciative public, the Board has assumed the liability of paying these enlarged premiums, and there is the most flattering prospects that its desires will be fully realized in thus attracting the largest display of the best stock ever shown in this part of the State. Bear in mind that the Board has adopted a rule that when an entry is made for a premium on horses, mules, cattle, sheep, and hogs and there is no competition (there being but one entry) that if, in the judgment of the awarding committee, the animal is worthy, the blue ribbon will be attached, and second cash premium paid. This will obviate one of the complaints heretofore justly made.

All entries for butter, bread, cake, and pie should be made on the first day of the Fair, but none of the articles should be brought for exhibition and examination by the committee until Wednesday morning, not later than 10 o'clock. By giving this attention, all these exhibits will be brought alike fresh and at the same time. A glass case will be provided for the above exhibits, which will exclude the dust as well as curious hands.

Special attention is called to the liberal special premium of Mr. P. H. Albright, being $30 for the largest and best corn. Also, attention is called to the regular premium of $55 for the largest and best display of products grown this year on a single farm. The Board, in the spirit of public enterprise, has provided liberal things and all things are now ready, so come and aid and encourage in this good work.

The Cowley County Fair under the judicious management of the Board has become of great importance to the general interest, not only of Cowley County, but of Southwestern Kansas, and is such an enterprise that every citizen may feel justly proud. Let the people of Cowley County, especially the agricultural class, arrange, if possible, to make Fair week a week of holidays. The relaxation from care and labor to the husband, wife, and children will be beneficial. If possible, take something for competition and if successful, it will aid in paying your expenses. In any event it will pay to spend the time in examining the best products and animals, learning the best methods, comparing notes, meeting friends and new acquaintances. In many ways you will become better yourselves and help others to become better.

For premium lists address D. L. Kretsinger, Secretary, or

J. F. MARTIN, President.

THE ERIE IN OREGON.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mark A. Miller, traveling agent for the Erie Railroad, writes from Portland, Oregon, that an attack of pleuro-pneumonia left behind it a severe and painful cough. After trying several remedies without success, he began using Red Star Cough Cure, and upon taking one bottle found himself on the road to rapid recovery.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Our eastern exchanges give some heart-rendering accounts of the failure of crops in Kansas this year. One enthusiastic writer in his paper says: "The crop prospects in Kansas are indeed very gloomy, the heavy rains in that State having ruined the wheat and drowned out the corn." Another is in agony over the "continued dry weather burning up the corn and destroying the grass."

In the face of these discouraging reports of drouth and rain, our farmers struggle along year after year and manage to build large and commodious church edifices and schoolhouses, fine residences, barns, granaries, etc., invest in thoroughbred stock, and lay by a penny or two for a drouthy or rainy season. This year of drouth and rain, Kansas will crib about two hundred million bushels of corn, and can spare a few bushels to her less fortunate neighbors of the eastern states. The farmers of Kansas have become so accustomed to drouth and rain the past few years that they rather enjoy it, and are growing rich and independent; in fact, their prayers are that the "gloomy prospects" of the past few years may still continue to afflict them. We would advise the starving thousands of the east to emigrate to this land of "drouth and rain" where peace and plenty will crown their energetic efforts. Come to Cowley County and revel in milk and honey and general prosperity among the grandest people on earth.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Horace Greeley is credited with saying: "If you want to keep a town from thriving, don't build any more than you can occupy yourself. If you should accidently have an empty house and any one should want to rent it, ask three times the value of it. Demand a Shylock price for every foot of ground God has given you stewardship over. Turn a cold shoulder to every mechanic and businessman who seeks to make a home with you. Look at every newcomer with a scowl. Run down the work of new workmen. Go abroad for wares rather than seek to do business in your midst. Fail to advertise or in any way to support your town newspaper, that people abroad may know whether business is going on or not. Wrap yourself with a coat of impervious selfishness. There is no more effectual way to retard the growth of a town than those above mentioned."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The new special delivery system of U. S. postoffice department includes ten cities in Kansas--Atchison, Emporia, Fort Scott, Lawrence, Leavenworth, Ottawa, Parsons, Topeka, Wichita, and Wyandotte. At each of these offices, after October 1st, a messenger will be kept to deliver immediately to the party addressed all letters containing the extra ten cent stamp. This system includes only such towns in the United States as had four thousand inhabitants by the census of 1880.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

J. M. Vanderpool, a young man of twenty-nine, who had both legs and an arm taken off by the cars, in Fort Worth, Texas, in 1878, was on the street Friday soliciting aid. He failed in getting damages from the railroad, his paper says, and is left the last alternative--to hobble over the world on his knees seeking the beneficence of a charitable public.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

"How is it, my friend that you never buy your goods from me? I have been in business nearly a year, and you have never patronized me."

"Well, John, you see that I am very sensitive."

"What has that to do with it?"

"A great deal. You never advertise and I haven't the cheek to go where I am not invited."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The petition for admission to probate the last will and testament of William Litchworth, deceased, was filed in the Probate Court Friday afternoon. He was one of Grouse Valley's oldest landmarks, having settled on the creek in Windsor township in 1869.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Jesse James is at large again! Tommie Gill, the ward of Jailor Finch for several months past, was discharged this morning. He was being held as a witness against John Wilson, a colored man of twenty-one, who was charged with putting Tommie Gill up to stealing five dollars from the Lindell Hotel money till, last March. He was sentenced to three months more in jail. Tommie is the lad who has tried to imitate Jesse James on several occasions. The discipline of the jail brought him out greatly, though he is yet a good case for the reform school, where he will land if he has any more of his wild episodes. He's as bright as a gold dollar, and with watchful care and parental persuasion, would make a man of no small ability.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The Newton Republican is developing into a witty paper. In answer to a scientific journal that cholera microbes are found in melons this year, the Republican says: "Bring your melons to this office and have the microbes destroyed free of charge."

THE RIGHT RING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

"Eastern people sometimes amuse themselves by scoffing and ridiculing what they are pleased to call the untutored and uncivilized west," said a gentleman to our reporter yesterday. "How very much mistaken they are! That there is less caste distinction in the west than in the east is a fact, but this is because that spirit of cupidity and selfishness and meanness that is so often found in the east, to a great extent, is wanting here. Taken as a whole, western people are superior to eastern people in intelligence and adaptability to circumstances and in patriotism and liberality they far surpass them. It seems that the broad and fertile prairies of the west have given to western people a broad and generous character and independence which are almost unknown in the east. The true American spirit lives west of the Allegheny mountains. It would so some of these scoffers a great deal of good to come and sit at the feet of the great west and imbibe of this spirit."

SMALL BUT CUTE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The prisoners at the jail were given a watermelon feast Thursday morning. Jailor Finch sent in an old case knife for them to eat it with. He forgot the knife when the debris was brought out and it remained in the jail until this morning, when Frank asked the prisoners where the knife was. None knew a thing. A search found it, but not the innocent little knife it was. It had been made into a saw and put to practical use. In the dark corner of a cell, the boys had made good headway and would soon have had a sufficient hole to play the Lewis game of tunneling out. The jail contains fourteen prisoners, among them one woman. No clue to the one who conceived the case knife scheme could be found. All were mum.

COURIER HEADQUARTERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

THE COURIER is arranging to give the fullest daily details of the Fair. It will have a large tent next to the Secretary's office, prominently labeled "Courier Headquarters," where our reporter can always be found and where any special news can be communicated, and Dailies containing full details of the Fair obtained. We expect to make a pleasant and convenient place to receive THE COURIER's friends, and thus insure a publication of everything of interest. Indications are that Cowley's Fair this year will excel any exhibition she has yet held, and nothing worthy of note will escape the columns of THE COURIER.

A FINE FARM FOR SALE.

A GOOD BARGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

One of the best grain and stock farms in the county, 240 acres fine bottom land, 230 acres under plow, 40 acres timber, 200 acres of upland pasture, timber and pasture enclosed with barbed wire fence, fine running water and several large springs, house 16 x 26 story and a half, stone barn 21 x 33, sixteen foot walls, room for ten head of horses, granary room for 3000 bushels, necessary out-buildings, corrals, etc., peach orchard 1 miles to schoolhouse. This place will be sold, if sold soon, on very reasonable terms. Inquire of or address THE COURIER, Winfield, Kas.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The new town of Veteran, in Stanton County, founded by Winfield men, is making magic strides. Capt. Nipp received a telegram this morning announcing plenty of water at a depth of from forty to eighty feet. New business buildings of all kinds are springing up and Veteran will soon be a full fledged city and be putting on metropolitan airs. It is in the heart of a beautiful, rich soiled country, and only twenty miles from the Santa Fe railroad, Syracuse being the supply point. M. L. Robinson, W. R. McDonald, J. A. Cooper, and others of the town company are now there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Not so bad, Mr. Udall Sentinel. The burglars have taken a rest, but we publish your soliloquy for the good it will do, should the jimmies try it again.

"The citizens of Winfield have been so worked up over recent burglaries, murders, and assaults that they have all armed themselves, and in approaching a neighbor's house after sundown, a person has to step out of shooting range and notify them of their coming or they are likely to stop a 44 colt's bullet. It is as big a nuisance as to have to call out: 'Does your dog bite?'"

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Judge Day moves his Ft. Scott Evening Herald to Anthony this week, and will start a morning paper. The Judge is the right man to run a daily in Anthony. He is a capitalist.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

M. S. Evans was over from Torrance Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A. W. Kirtley was down Friday from Atlanta.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. P. McCommon were over from Burden Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Henry E. Asp and Ed P. Greer went up to Wichita and eastward Thursday on business connected with the K. C. & S. W.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

And still Abe Steinberger drifts. Now he has bought the Oswego Republican and again relinquished his Grip on Howard. Abe will never down.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

G. F. Hargus, the big Wellington miller, has made an assignment. His indebtedness contracted in buildings and improvements were too heavy a load.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Kate Rogers left on Friday to finish her course in the State Normal School. She will be absent all winter, with probably a home visit during the holidays.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. F. C. Sanford was here from Cherryvale to see Lewis, who was so badly hurt by a caboose jolt on the S. K. here a few weeks ago. Dr. Sanford is S. K. physician and surgeon.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Hon. Bob Mitchell was over from Geuda Friday. Geuda is keeping up its Saratoga reputation right along, and will be a great health resort when she gets a railroad, for which Bob is putting in good licks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Walter W. Davis left Wednesday for a course in the State University at Lawrence. Walter is one of our brightest and sturdiest young men and we are glad to see his ambition for a thorough education pointing to realization.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Alonzo M. Dumay, of Rising Sun, Indiana, and Miss Mamie E. Merrill, of Brunswick, Missouri, were granted the document to join "two souls with but a single thought, two hearts that beat as one," Saturday by the Probate Judge.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mrs. Leroy Stidger, nee Miss Etta Robinson, arrived Friday from Moundsville, West Virginia, with her bright little boy of five months, to spend several months with her relatives, the First National Bank folks. Her many friends here give her a warm welcome.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Frank Chambers and Emma Gassaway, of Arkansas City, were granted a certificate of wedded bliss by Judge Gans Saturday. Frank will have to learn a sad lesson with such a wife. When she wades in on you, Frank, don't say a word: just let 'er Gassaway.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

County Superintendent Limerick and Sid Cure got home Thursday from a three days' recreative trip to the Territory. They only caught one little minnow and shot a poor little cotton tail, but had "dead oodles" of fun, and return feeling corpulent and buxom.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Albright & Co. are chuck full of business. Miss Belle Linn has taken a chair in this institution as shorthand reporter and correspondent and Miss Anna Hyde as copyist. Besides this force is George Stivers, Grant Stafford, P. S. Hills, and the old man himself, P. H. Albright.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

V. A. Beard bought 61 watermelons Thursday of Dave Bright, who resides near Salt City, that weighed 2,620 pounds. This would average nearly 43 pounds. The largest weighed 60 pounds and the smallest 25. How is this? If you think we are lying, Beard can show you the figures.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The wife of George Melville, well known in Winfield in early days, died at Durango, Colorado, a few days ago, and was buried in Wichita Wednesday, her home when Mr. Melville married her. George is a brother of W. H. Melville, residing southeast of town, and a brother-in-law of Tony Boyle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mrs. W. R. Kirkwood and sons, Sam and Will, left Wednesday afternoon for Minneapolis, Minnesota, to reside. As our readers are aware, the Doctor takes the chair of mental philosophy in McAlister Presbyterian College there. Miss Ella Garlick joined them at Emporia and will enter McAlister.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

James Toole, another railroad paddy, was found full of "mechanical purposes," by assistant Marshal McLain, Friday, and on plea of guilty and a lack of $12.25, was sent back to the cooler to have several days to cool off. He thought it tough punishment for only a few drinks of cider and bitters for consumption and female complaints.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

It is said that Sam Jones, the southern revivalist, is now desirous to imbrue his hands in the blood of a luckless printer. In one of his sermons he said, "Next to a pretty woman, I love a fast horse." In getting the sentiment in type, the sentence got a little mixed and the feelings of the Reverend Samuel were outraged to read: "Next to a fast woman, I love a pretty horse."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Hon. W. P. Hackney--more familiarly known to our readers through late introductions as "Bill," came over from the fool school town Thursday, to look after a little business in the District Court. After spending a few hours in the court room, he departed on the afternoon train for Erie, Kansas, to argue the motion for a new trial in the Frankie Morris case.

Wellingtonian, 4th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Secretary Kretsinger has everything in readiness for the Fair. The last clean up around was made today. The new improvements are all finished and the grounds in the finest shape of any in the west. The conveniences are grand for as young a county as Cowley. Krets is a rustler from the word go. Nothing looking to the success of our Fair this year has been omitted. Sept. 21 to 25 will be gala days for Cowley.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Marcus S. Evans and Lillie B. Raymond were tied in a matrimonial knot at the Commercial hotel parlor Thursday. Rev. B. Kelly pronounced the ceremony and Noble Caldwell gave the groom away and kissed the bride, while our reporter sat back in the corner biting his lips at Noble's good luck. But 'twas ever thus. The groom is manager of G. B. Shaw & Co.'s lumber yard at Torrance, while his bride is one of the sweetest little ladies of that vicinity. May the ghostly convenience of a divorce court never have charms for them, as they live on in peace and prosperity forever and ever. Amen.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

John Green and Rosa E. Brown, Sidney Cochran and Belinda Burt, Andrew O. Anderson and Anna Jensen, were granted certificates of unalloyed bliss September 2nd and 3rd. The matrimonial business is looming up, bringing a smile to the visage of Judge Gans and the hungry men of news. The last couple have mixed up romance to a large degree. Seven years ago Andrew won Anna's heart in Scandinavia. Both were poor. He determined to come to America and earn a home, a regular little cottage in which love is supreme. He has made the home, near Burden, this county, and his loved one will arrive one day this week and wed her ideal. She can't talk a word of English. A girl whose love will hold like that is worth something.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Elder J. S. Myers is home from several days at Atchison. The Champion published him as going to locate there, which is a mistake. If the Champion man could hear the Elder comment on Atchison's forty-two open bar-rooms and general "cussedness," it would say no more about his moving there. He is now satisfied that for law and order, intelligence, and all that go to make desirable citizenship, Winfield is way ahead of any city he saw while away--a heaven compared to Atchison. That saloons make business, the Elder says is a very apparent failure in Atchison, which he pronounces lifeless for a city of such pretensions. Mr. Myers never had any intention of leaving Winfield. He is suited, his congregation are suited, and our people in general are suited. The Champion will please get back on its base.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

H. J. McNulty, representing Barry, Van Vliet & Co., Chicago cigars, was here Wednesday. He had an exciting episode in the cowboy's paradise, Caldwell, night before last. He caught a customer that evening and having sold his bill, about 11 o'clock, started for the hotel, a grip in each hand. Suddenly two men jumped in front of him, saying "Hold up your hands, and deliver up!" he held up his hands, but not to "deliver up." The grips fell and at the same time the holdups each got a diff that knocked them sprawling and in an instant they were covered with a revolver. McNulty yelled for help and a crowd gathered like magic--too magically, for he withdrew his gun, and in the darkness and excitement the thugs slipped away, nobody knew how. Other traveling men have lately been held up in Caldwell. McNulty's pluck saved him quite a sum and gave him a "rep" among the boys. The only thing that downs him is that the devils got away.

ABOUT THE SUN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Do the sun spots affect our atmosphere? This is a question that is becoming very common, and a few facts in regard to their nature and influence may be of interest to the readers who possess a scientific turn of mind. In the first place, the body proper of the sun is, according to the best scientific authorities on the subject, a non-luminous body of intensely heated matter, and is surrounded by three distinct atmospheres, the central one, or photo sphere, having been found by the aid of the spectroscope, to be composed of many of the metals known to us in an incandescent form. The enormous quantities of gasses thus generated find vent through the outer covering in the form of immense volcanoes on a scale of magnitude which the mind of man can hardly comprehend. Through the openings thus created and which are sufficiently large at times to admit of several worlds like ours at once without touching either each other or the sides of the yawning abyss, are vomited forth volcanic matter, with such terrific force as to reach the height of a hundred thousand miles and in comparison with which the entire convulsion of a world such as ours would sink into utter insignificance. While these eruptions are transitory, and irregular in their nature, sometimes appearing on the western limb of the sun and continuing in view till its axillary motion carries them beyond our vision, and undergoing, during their transit, more or less changes in size and shape, their locality is, nevertheless, confined to a territory about thirty degrees each side of the sun's equator, and have a maximum period of five and one-half years increase and the same number of years decrease. These spots, or as we shall now more aptly call them holes in the luminous atmosphere of the sun, are surrounded by a shadow like margin called a "penumbra," and which is determined to be the result of falling back again into the sun of the denser particles of matter, opaque gasses, etc., that were thrown out by the violence of these explosions. Then again we have the "faculae," an appearance as of billows or clouds of fire, several degrees brighter than the surrounding surface, and which always appear in advance of solar disturbances and accompany them till they either subside or are carried beyond our vision on the eastern limb of the sun. Now it has long been well known in scientific circles that an intimate connection exists between the agitation of the sun's surface and our electric current, as often evidenced by the Aurora Borealis, or northern lights. Apparently but little if any use has been made of this knowledge, however, to turn it to account that we might be better able to read the signs of the weather in the countenance of the glowing "orb of electric light." This much we do know, that whenever there are rapid and violent changes taking place in the sun's atmosphere, our own is more or less disturbed, and electric storms, cyclones, etc., are almost an immediate and certain result in some quarter of our globe. For the past six months the sun spots have been unusually numerous, and our storms and electric displays have been existing in a corresponding degree and almost without a parallel. And what is strange about it is that it is now about two years past the time when they should have been the most frequent, and yet they show no signs of abating as yet.

What is before us in way of atmospheric changes, who can say? New spots are now approaching, making a continuous belt for the past ten days, and new developments will be anxiously awaited. F.

BE CONTENT WITH YOUR LOT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

What a wild, discontented, and roving army the human family is. Go where you will throughout this grand and enterprising republic, you will see the restless crowds passing to and fro in a grand panoramic stream, with scarcely a face before your view that does not show vivid lines of trouble and care or discontent. Some are preparing to leave for new pastures just a little further on, where they hear times are good, and they are hurrying thither to better their condition, while others are just arriving to take their places, and so the world goes on from day to day. To a close observer, who studies the question, it is plainly to be seen that the grains of pure happiness allotted to mankind are few and slippery, and are soon buried in oceans of real or borrowed trouble. A man's earthly possessions do not alter the fate of his race. Let him be worth millions of gold, or a forsaken tramp despised by his fellow man, his misery is just the same, only in a different form. This question has been the study of philosophers for ages past, and will be until the end of time. Just why men, whom the Supreme being, it is said, created after His own image, should prove to be such miserable failures in nature and disposition is beyond the comprehension of the reasoning power of man. The nature of man is contrary in many respects to divine teachings, and always has been since the palmy days of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden, and it is not within the power of mankind to change their natures, any more than the leopard can change his spots.

FOUND DEAD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Last Friday a little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Braden, of Silverdale township, disappeared from home, and along in the evening search was made for her, but she could not be found. About dark many of the neighbors turned out and the search was continued until nearly morning when the little one was found in a pond of water about three hundred yards from the house. She had evidently fallen into the pond early in the day (Friday), as it was evident that she had been dead some time when found. The little girl was between four and five years of age and the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Braden. The sadly bereaved parents have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community. It was a sad shock to the neighbors and friends, and casts a shadow of gloom over the entire community. A. C. Democrat.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Among the hard money taken in Friday for DAILY subscription was a twenty-five cent piece, marked "China Tea Company, Bangor, Maine," dated 1857. This piece is a long ways from home, and probably will never see its native shores again. Tomorrow the local will just put it into the Sunday school contribution box for foreign missions, and it will hie away to China. Some mandarin will string it around his neck, unconscious of its travels in Sunny Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Such days as Friday make a reporter feel like committing "suisenside with a meat ax." Scarcely a romance, not a dog fight, man fight, or woman fight--everybody at peace with all the world. Not a riffle to gladden the heart of the hungry man of news. Nothing left but to fall back, with a dull thud--with an illuminated T--on a gigantic brain, with its Great Aggregation of Colossal resources. Such days are exceedingly "scace" in Winfield, and we are glad of it. Friday is always our dullest day.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Willis Adams and Mary Collins; Marcus S. Evans and Lillie B. Raymond; Willis M. Beck and Zaanan A. M. Alexander are the latest matrimonial victims, according to Judge Gans' record. Matrimony is becoming a prominent commodity on the market, taking its former rank. The recent depression is ended. No wonder Miss Zaanan A. M. Alexander was tired carrying her name. Six marriages for one week, and one day left, isn't bad. No wonder Judge Gans again exercises that omnibus smile with such alacrity.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mr. Kretsinger, secretary of the Cowley County Fair, requests all stockholders to call at his office for their tickets at once. Stockholders failing to call will find their tickets at the ticket office outside the grounds, on and after the first day of the Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The following towns are embraced in the circuit of the new telephone line, about to be built: Derby, Mulvane, Belle Plaine, Wellington, Geuda Springs, Oxford, Winfield, Arkansas City, and Wichita.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

B. B. Vandeventer, an early day resident of Winfield, and owner of real estate here, is at the Central, from Brown County, Illinois. He was former owner of Highland Park.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Our Carriage Works have consolidated, sure this time. Monforte & Bishop are the new firm. Rogers & Githens retire. Rogers' old shops is the place of business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A Wellington stock company has subscribed $25,000 to bore for coal at that place.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The recent rains put Cowley in clover up to her knees. It insures a heavy yield of the late crops and puts the soil in grand condition for fall seeding.

OUR INVALIDS AGAIN.

How Much "Medicine" It Took To Drive Off August's Malaria.

Nearly Five Barrels of Whiskey and 607 Bottles of Beer. Still Very Sick.

Our Monthly Hospital Record.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Again are we brought face to face with Cowley's invalids. We almost forgot them, so little fuss do they make until their "medical" record serenely presents itself at the portals of the Probate Judge's office. Then we are in shape to know how much medicine it takes to keep the county's interior department status quo; then we are in shape to know who among our medicine venders have the bovine by the horns--the biggest number of sickly customers. Beer appears to be losing its health-giving qualities. The record for August stands only 607 bottles against 1390 in July--less than half. But old "rot gut" still holds the field, stronger than ever. In July the county invalids consumed--we shan't say "gulped," for some druggists kick like bay steers on that word--1502 pints of whiskey, not quite four barrels, while in August they consumed 1853 pints, nearly five barrels. In July Winfield druggists sold 368 pints of whiskey, but thirty-three bottles of beer and 338 pints of "other drinks," representing 741 statements. The August record shows 922 bottles of beer and 564 pints of various mechanical and medical purposes. Winfield, though showing a little advance over the previous month, is not making a bad record. It indicates that our druggists are doing as near the square thing as possible, considering the fearfully thirsty pressure that is brought to bear on them. Arkansas City shows very little change--in fact, the miasma arising from her canal appears to be standard gauge, about the same all the time. Her July record showed 1484 statements, for 821 pints of whiskey, 596 bottles of beer, and 207 pints of other drinks. In August she comes up with 1472 statements, representing 840 pints of whiskey, 151 bottles of beer, and 183 pints of various bitters, wine, etc. We commend Arkansas City for her drop in beer. It shows an improvement in her condition that is very encouraging indeed. S. F. Steinberger is still the medicine lion of Arkansas City. In July, he filed 536 statements, representing 275 pints of whiskey and 355 bottles of beer. His August record shows 485 statements, for 331 pints of whiskey and 24 bottles of beer. This fall off, if he has filed all statements as he swears, if creditable--is most gratifying to THE COURIER, which has given him gentle punches monthly for some time. Burden's record is also gratifying. In July, with but one permit, her filing showed 355 statements, for 96 pints of whiskey and 388 bottles of beer. The record for August, with two permits, shows but 342 statements, for 112 pints of whiskey and 97 bottles of beer. Considering her big territory, the record shows a careful consideration for the law that is at once apparent.

[Skipped the breakdown for August: Winfield, Arkansas City, Other Towns.]

Druggists in Winfield: Williams, Glass, Harter, Brown.

Druggists in Arkansas City: Steinberger, Fairclo, Mowry & Co., Eddy, Kellogg & Co., Brown.

Druggists in other towns: Avery, Grand Summit; Woolsey, Burden; Roberts, Udall; Martin, Udall; Rule, Cambridge; Phelps, Dexter; Phelps, Burden.

Every druggist appearing in the above record, with uplifted hand, swore before Judge Gans and the Almighty, that his filing represented every particle of liquors that had gone over their counters in August. We have no reason on the face of it to say that their returns are not honest. Taking them as true, the significance is great. It knocks into nothingness the chronic growl among anties that the new prohibitory liquor law would make a saloon of every drug store. It means further, that Cowley's prohibitory record is a matter worthy of pride. Very little liquor is drunk in Cowley County. Drunk men are a rarity, a curiosity--men howl about the non-enforcement of the law, but the proof in plain drunks is mighty scarce. In saloon days a drunk man could be seen on our streets at most any hour and every Saturday evening the cooler was full of them. Not so now! If anybody does get drunk, he conceals it remarkably well--keeps himself in the back alley, cellar, or some other place from the disgrace sure to follow public gaze. A man with a glass eye can easily perceive the grand effects of prohibition in Winfield and Cowley County. And the lack of saloons makes no lack of business. The Queen City's strides forward are greater than ever--her prospects greater than those of any other town in the fair west. Everybody is happy and prosperous--no disgraceful sots and bloated sluggards.

[Note: The Courier often got a name wrong! The Arkansas City druggist, murdered by Armstrong, was "James Riely," not "James Riley." Once the Courier started to spell a name wrong, they "stuck by their guns" from thence on. That is why it is so difficult to determine sometimes which newspaper was giving a name correctly. The article below states that the murdered man was Armstrong's best friend. That, too, is wrong!]

FREE ONCE MORE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Tom J. Armstrong, whose terrible tragedy, resulting in the murder of James Riely, the Arkansas City druggist, in 1881, created one of the biggest sensations of Cowley's history, came home from the penitentiary yesterday, having been freed by the State Board of Pardons. His sentence was for fifteen years, four years of which he had spent. His freedom makes him one of the happiest mortals on earth--gleefully happy; so happy that at first it seemed to him all a dream. He was one of the top-ground coal shafters. He had got an inkling that his Arkansas City friends had placed his case before the Board of Pardons, but hope was so dim as to scarcely flicker, though while there is life there is hope. Last Thursday morning the officer in charge of his ward came up to his cell with a paper in his hand and said: "Let's see; what is your name?" "T. J. Armstrong," was readily responded. "This is your name, isn't it?" said the officer, holding up a paper. Tom saw it and said, "Yes," as his heart went down into his boots. He thought he had been reported for a misdemeanor, and this was the precursor of punishment. "Come with me, then," was the sequel, and Tom was marched into the Warden's office and told that he was a free man. The stripes were taken off, a new suit of citizen's clothes given him, with the three cents a day allotment during the four years, and he was again in the world as other men. Joy danced all over his countenance as he related his feelings to our reporter. He could eat nothing all that day and slept none that night. The next morning he realized all soberly and lit out for home. The circumstances of the murder are fresh to all old settlers. It was simply the old story of whiskey. Crazed with drink, he killed his best friend. These simple facts, a world in themselves, secured his pardon, after four years remorse and solitude as punishment. Never again will Tom Armstrong, he says, touch whiskey. The lesson was bitter and life-long. He went down to Arkansas City Saturday, where he will again make his home.

A YOUNG LIFE GOES OUT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Peter Miller, the bright fifteen year old boy who has been messenger for the S. K. telegraph office here, died Friday night at 11 o'clock at the home of his parents, on east 5th Avenue. He had thrown off a siege of typhoid fever, but in his weakened condition, a relapse came and with it death. His familiar face will be missed by those whom he saw often with some important word. Honest, ambitious, and apt. he was a boy of bright promise. But so goes the world.

Life's but a walking shadow; a player,

That struts and frets his hour upon the stage.

And then is heard of no more.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Wellington is clamoring for gas. It is all gas now--a little more would blow it away. Winfield has been lighted with gas for years, and of course it is in order for Wellington to follow up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The village of Hackney, in Pleasant Valley township, is now the breakfast stop for the north-bound freight on the Santa Fe. Meals are dispensed for twenty-five cents.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

Editorial Correspondence.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

KANSAS CITY, August 31, 1885.

Left Winfield with wife Sunday evening, August 30, 5:19, for St. Paul, to attend the Water Ways Convention of September 3rd, and to visit other points of interest. The Kansas Southern runs smoothly and is a pleasant road to travel over, especially in the night if one has a berth in the sleeper coach. Before arriving at Olathe the train was delayed two and a half hours by a damaged freight train. The four coaches were pretty well filled. Arrived at Kansas City this morning at 8:19. Met Judge Gans here just returning from Chicago on business for Senator Hackney. Elder Rains was here on his way to Topeka where he is now located and dispenses the Gospel. We took a fifteen mile ride all over Kansas City in a hack today. It is wonderful the amount of building going on this year, more probably than in any former year. Kansas City is truly metropolitan and if she has not a hundred thousand inhabitants, as she claims, it cannot fall very far short. I think it must have double the population it had in 1880 by the U. S. census. It is probable that she gains this year more than in any former year. We start this evening at 6:40 on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific for St. Paul by way of the Albert Lea route; will probably arrive there tomorrow evening late. I shall have a day to look around and take notes before the convention. The Walnut river navigation business must not be neglected.

----

Awoke near Columbus Junction, Iowa, on the morning of the 1st, at which place we changed cars for the north. Hon. C. R. Gifford, of Clay Center, and Hon. Vinton Stillings, of Leavenworth, were the only delegates from Kansas we found on board. The country from Columbus Junction north past Cedar Rapids, Vinton, Waterloo, and Cedar Falls is "just too lovely for anything." The beautiful groves, cultivated fields, fine meadows, smooth rounded hills and fair plains, make up a landscape which is indescribably charming. Cedar Rapids is a large, bustling, business, manufacturing, and railroad town, which packs more pork than Cincinnati. The only other noticeable towns on our route before reaching Minneapolis are Vinton, Waterloo, Cedar Falls, and Albert Lea. All the others are mere hamlets. Some of those in Minnesota look old and have a queer European appearance. From Albert Lea to Minneapolis the country is again inexpressibly charming, but different from Iowa, in that there are more wooded hills and higher, deeper valleys, and frequently beautiful lakes along side of the track. The wheat fields are all harvested and we saw hundreds of recently made stacks. The corn looks well, green and in the roasting ear, but it is very small, as compared with the corn of Southern Kansas. There were in the sleeper in which we had seats, about a dozen portly, dignified gentlemen from Missouri and farther south, at whose expense we Kansas fellows were disposed to be merry, expressing the fear that the car would break down or that we should be late, carrying so much dignity, and perhaps money bags. But later in the day we got introduced to some of them, and in conversation we found them to be very intelligent gentlemen and delegates to the Water Ways Convention. We have taken a general view of both Minneapolis and St. Paul today, but will now merely remark that both are surprises to us, and reserve the particulars until we have seen more. We have seen but few delegates yet whom we know. Probably this evening we will see more of them. St. Paul is full of delegates from other states. The convention meets tomorrow at 11 o'clock. We are enjoying ourselves hugely.

----

The Waterways Convention opened at the Exposition building this morning at 11 o'clock. Gov. Hubbard, of Minnesota, called the meeting to order and named Gov. Bross, of Chicago, for temporary chairman. A considerable sparing followed, growing out of the rivalry between St. Paul and Minneapolis, in which the author of Atlantis, Ignatius Donnelly, figured conspicuously and was rather worsted in the outcome. There was a considerable fun and amusement made out of the bad blood of the local quarrel, and finally the organizing committees were appointed and the convention adjourned to half past two o'clock. Kansas was represented on the committees as follows: Credentials, Col. T. A. Scott, of Wyandotte and Hon. V. Stillings, of Leavenworth; permanent organization, Hon. J. D. Barker, of Girard, Prof. Frank A. Fitzpatrick, of Leavenworth; Resolutions, D. A. Millington, of Winfield, Hon. C. E. Gifford, of Clay Center, and Dr. John Arthur, of Wyandotte.

Illinois came overburdened with the Hennepin canal scheme, and from the speeches delivered, the temporary organization and the tone of proceedings thus far, we, of Kansas, concluded that this was being run as a Hennepin canal convention, and concluded that something ought to be done in the permanent organization that would recognize the Missouri river. It was understood that Gov. Bross was to be the permanent chairman. The originators and getters up of the convention had informed Deacon Bross that he would be the permanent chairman and he had prepared an address for the occasion and had it printed ready to read to the convention, and had distributed copies to the metropolitan newspapers to be published immediately after delivery. The Kansas delegation fixed upon Maj. Warren, of Kansas City, for permanent chairman and went to work for it. Kansas always "get there," and the committee on permanent organization reported Maj. Warren for chairman and he was elected to the surprise of nearly the whole convention, and the great conundrum of the convention, the newspapers and the people was, how it was done, who did it, and what for? Among the vice presidents of the convention will be found the Kansas names of J. D. Barker, C. E. Gifford, and your humble servant.

The committee on resolutions was composed largely of brainy gentlemen, such as Gov. Pillsbury and Senator Rice, of Minnesota; Gov. Stanard, of Missouri; Henderson, of Illinois; and Price, of Wisconsin. The questions discussed in the committee were very intricate and the debates on what to say and how to say it elicited many heavy and brainy arguments and speeches. And now, midnight, the committee is still in session, having accomplished very little since noon when they commenced. Too much brains. We now sneak out of the committee room and retire to our gentle couch.

ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA, September 4, 1885.

The committee on credentials continued their work until noon today, resulting in the formation of a ringing set of resolutions which I enclose herewith for publication when we have room in THE COURIER. The convention assembled this morning on time and in waiting for the report of the committee on resolutions, heard speeches from several gentlemen present. Mayor Chase, of Omaha, read a long compilation of statistics of the country bordering on the Missouri river, showing some wonderful facts, but the convention got weary of facts before he got through and choked him off.

A Minnesota delegate, H. S. Gordon by name, who seems to be the T. Brower Peacock of Minnesota, got himself invited to address the convention. By way of introduction he read some of the puffs which the press had given some of his poems and then launched out into a new poem addressed to the delegates, which he read in a sonorous and stentorian voice. It commenced with, "Onward rolls the royal river." "Bully for the river," shouts a delegate. "Let'er roll," says another, and the poet did "let'er roll," in spite of all the remarks that could be thrown in by the delegates. But it finally became so monotonous that the jokes at his expense became such an uproar that he was choked off. Ignatius Donnelly was then invited to address the convention and took the stand. "Give us Atlantis," called a delegate. "No more poetry," called another. The speaker remarked that he had forgotten to bring either of the books he had written. His ready wit and sharp retorts amused the house and kept it in the best of humor until he closed. Several short speeches were heard and well received, and the convention adjourned for dinner.

In the afternoon the committee on resolutions reported and the resolutions were adopted by the convention, unanimously, and with great enthusiasm. After the transaction of other and supplementary business, the convention adjourned to the call of an executive committee, which was provided for with Maj. Warner, as chairman. Maj. Warner is one of the best presiding officers we ever knew. He held the convention under complete control, and did it easily and pleasantly. He was equal to every emergency and his clear voice was distinctly heard in every part of the room, while others, who spoke louder, could not be understood by those in the more distant seats. Gov. Bross was somewhat deficient in these particulars.

There is now an excursion of the delegates to visit the fair grounds, but I concluded there would be too many in the crowd to make it pleasant and am writing this instead.

This evening there is a grand banquet given by the city and citizens of St. Paul to the delegates, at the Ryan House, at which we are stopping, and I shall attend.

This hotel, the Ryan, is the most magnificent building in St. Paul, and is one of the best hostelries in the nation. It is said to have cost a million dollars. Anyway, it is as fine and as well kept as anyone could ask or perhaps imagine. Our room is on the seventh floor, is large and richly furnished, and being near the elevator, more accessible and handy than are most rooms on the second floor. The rates are $2.50 to $5.00 per day, according to size and location of rooms.

We have taken a drive all over town, and find very many exceedingly fine and costly residences, business blocks, and public buildings. Tomorrow we propose to "do" Minneapolis.

WASHINGTON LETTER.

Political, Official and Social Notes as Gathered by Our Regular Washington

Correspondent.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The New York World recently contained a humorous editorial declining thirty-two quarts of wheat, which the editor was notified were at the Agricultural department subject to his order. In conversation with Commissioner Colman, the other day, he asked, "Don't you understand how the notification came to be sent?" He was answered, "Mr. Pulitzer, editor of the World, is a member of Congress, and it is my duty, under the law, to apportion the wheat, and notify the members that it is subject to their order."

There are at present in the service of the pension bureau about eleven hundred examining boards, and the same number of single surgeons for examining applicants for pensions, making a total of twenty-two hundred. In many localities a single examining surgeon is appointed because the pension business of the locality is not sufficient to call for a regular board of three. Where the population and pension business justifies it, a board is appointed. Up to the present there have been five hundred and fifty-eight changes made in the examining surgeons. Of the new appointees, two-thirds are Democrats, and one-third Republicans.

The Rhode Island manufacturers notify Secretary Manning that they do not care to reply to his circular on tariff reform because all they want is to be left alone. They say business is picking up a little at last, and that it would interfere with this improvement to have the tariff agitation resumed. There is much to be said on this side of the question, especially if the surplus falls off, as it did for August, to a small margin.

The dreadful rumor comes from New York that the silver currency will not circulate. This is sad but not unexpected. People do not like to take their money around in a wheel barrow, when they go shopping, or be continually repairing their pockets, and no amount of Treasury devices can inveigle them into the habit. The world has simply outgrown the use of lumps of mineral for money.

The latest advices received at the Interior Department show that the lessees of the Cheyenne and Arapaho reservations have no idea of resisting the President's proclamation directing the removal of their cattle. The officer representing the Government down there reports that the cattle are moved off with more facility even than was thought would be practicable, and that in a short time the Indians will have the reservation to themselves. A great many, if not nearly all the herds, have already moved out.

Richard Board, of Kentucky, was appointed a clerk in the Railway service about July 1st, on the recommendation of Controller Durham, and others, who seem to have been imposed upon. The citizens of Harrodsburg wrote to Controller Durham, and to the Postmaster General, stating that Board was under three indictments for forgery and obtaining money under false pretenses. Board had been assigned to duty, and as soon as the facts came to Postmaster Vilas' attention, he ordered his dismissal. Board was promptly discharged; but since then has been arrested for stealing a money order, valued at $163. He is now in jail awaiting trial.

The White House as at present circumstanced is only a public office or department, with rooms attached, which the President is compelled to inhabit, like the store-keeper who lives either upstairs or in the back part of the shop. There should be no shop about the presidential household. He should have his offices and home apart, so that his life might be permitted the comfort and privacy which can only be maintained by entire separation from business and its obtrusions. No cabinet officer or bureau official would relish living with his family within the walls of his department. The cares of office are identical with the cares of business. When a merchant or businessman closes his day's work, he goes to his home, and it is the home life that gives him solace and enables him to meet the trials of the day succeeding. The President finds home life rather hard to obtain when combined with the intense pressure of official business. In fact, he has no home, and never will have one until it is made a separate establishment by Congress.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Samuel H. Hine et ux to Montford Anderson, lots 3 and 4, blk 77, A C: $6,000

Leander D Rorick to F M Hathaway, lot 2, 1-34-5e, 40 acres, and lots 3 and 4 and sw qr nw qr sec 1 and se qr ne qr 2-34-5e, 159 acres: $2,200

W S Houghton et ux to Julia Reynard, lot 10, blk 89, A C: $50

J M Alexander et ux to Any J Saunders, tract in Alexander ad to Winfield: $100

Elias A Harvey et us to John G Myers, lot 4 and n hf lot 5, blk 176, Loomis ad to Winfield: $550

Thos Gray et ux to M S Austin, lot 2 and sw qr ne qr and lot 3 se qr nw qr 5-31-8e: $750

M B Kirkpatrick et ux to John Love, lots 26, 27 and 28, block 87, A C: $3,000

Mary J Rogers and husband to S G Bishop, lot 13, blk 127, Winfield: $1,250

David G Weimer to David M Gerard, 46 acres ne qr 36-34-3e: $7,000

Susanna Wagener and husband to Michael Busch, s hf nw qr 23-30-3e, 80 acres: $500

James T Dale et ux to Udall Milling Company, lots 13 and 14, blk 30, Udall: $550

Samuel A Bryson et ux to Peter Workman, lots 14, 15, and 16, blk 220, Andrews ad to Winfield: $1,170.

Minerva L Young to John W Fell, ne qr ne qr 9-31-6w, 40 acres: $100

Ella B Preston to B F Bryson, n hf nw qr and sw qr nw qr 20-32-8e, 120 acres: $750

Alfred Daniels et ux to Jamison Vawter, e hf lot 28 blk 78, A C: $50

Alfred Tyrrell et ux to William McCoy, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 113, A C: $240

Burden Town Company to Henry Quier, lot 5, blk 34, Burden: $25

Henry Quier et ux to J A Henthorn, lot 5, blk 34, Burden: $350

William M Sleeth et ux to Robt B Baird, lot 26, blk 68, A C: $660

Miles S Williams to John N Boyle, lot 6, blk 50, Williams ad to Udall: $75

John Runyon et ux to Lucinda Gordon, e 3-8 lots 1 and 2 and s hf ne qr 3-33-5e: $650

G W Bishop et ux to John T J Stinson, w hf e hf sw qr 12-34-5e, 40 acres: $600

College Hill Town Company to Jas S Tull, tract out se qr 22-32-4e: $133

Aaron J Rex et ux to Jas S Rothrock, tract in 28-32-4e, Loomis' ad to Winfield: $710

George E Johnson et ux to B F Whipp, lots 3 and 4 and s hf nw qr 2-34-7e: $400

Highland Park Town Company to James P Gardener, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 9, Highland Park ad to Winfield: $350

College Hill Town Company to Joseph M. Rorrine, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 15, C. H. ad to Winfield: $300

T. D. Combs et ux to Walter H McPherson, lot 4, blk 102, Torrance: $90

Emma Howey to Francis M. Howey, lot 6, 26-34-3e, 136 acres, $35

John P Lawyer et ux to Andrew Bell, e sw 24-32-7e, 80 acres: $1,200

Leander F Harris et ux to Elisha H Long, lot 27, 18, 19, 20, and 21, blk 12 inches: $500 [Note: This entry makes no sense to me at all!]

Samuel Greenlief et ux to E H Long, hf lots 17, 18, and 19, blk 12, Cambridge: $500

Albert A Newman et al to Archibald C Gould, lots 8, 9, and 10, blk 11, McLaughlin's ad to A C: $150

C M Scott et ux to Herman Trafflick, lot 20, blk 129, A C: $50

C M Scott et ux to P V Healy et al, lots 25 and 26, blk 107, A C, qc: $10

Huldah A Parker et ux to Wm S Houghton, tract in nw qr 29-34-4e: $600

A RACY LETTER.

The Wild West and the Queen City of Southern Kansas As Viewed by a Newcomer.

The Indian Maiden's Beauty a Myth.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

We find a very interesting letter in the Shelbyville, Illinois, Union, from a Winfield boy, Phil. S. Kleeman. Phil. has only recently located with us, from Shelbyville, and jots his impressions in a manner evidencing keen observation. We extract.

"Having come 'west to grow up with the country,' I thought, perhaps, some of the experiences of a young man would be interesting to the readers of my old home paper and would remove some of the erroneous ideas that the people of the far west--as this is called--are of the rough, uncultured classes, the "riff-raff" of the older States. On arriving in this country, one is forcibly struck with the ideas he may have gathered from newspaper accounts written up, by what the small boy calls, "a crank." We find here a beautiful city of almost 700 inhabitants, as good society as one can find in the east, a class of businessmen with as much vim as found any place, and when we stop to think that fifteen years ago this country was the home of the "Noble Red Man" and was considered a part of the "American Desert," we can hardly believe that a city like Winfield can be so far ahead of our fifty-year-old eastern cities. Winfield is supplied by as fine a system of waterworks as can be found in the United States, the streets are lighted by gas, which shows up fifty miles of stone sidewalk like a net-work of the finest Parian marble; surrounded by a country where is produced, as the New Orleans Worlds Fair decision proves, the best fruit, and the Winfield City Mills the best flour in the world. All these are our immediate surroundings, while within one half day's travel will be found the much persecuted Aborigines in all their splendor. "Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these." I had heard much of the beautiful Indian maiden, but, alas! had never seen one, and when first my eyes rested upon her noble physique, I became dizzy and grew sick at heart. Returning to my place of abode, I took a drink--of water (prohibition state)--and gradually felt better, but my brain wandered--were all the stories of the lovely Pocahontas to be thus blotted out? Were these stories only base fabrications of some imaginative mind? The beauty of Pocahontas--the generous impulses of the Indian of her day, as history and legend have taught us, are lost traits of the Indian of today. The Indian maidens of today, from the workshop of nature, without the touch of the modern dressmaker, the fashionable milliner, or the despoiling hand of the hair-dresser with shears, chignon, or bangs; or Warner Brother's Coraline to encircle her waist; nor the latest style tooth-pick shoes with silken hose to encase her tender feet, is beheld in her natural loveliness at once glance. I think the poet makes a decided mistake when he says "beauty unadorned is adorned the most." Sure am I that the Indian maiden is not as represented and I think it is a plain case of "obtaining popularity under false pretenses."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The citizens of Beaver, Pleasant Valley, and Liberty townships will soon be called upon by Mr. N. W. Dressie, of this city, who has the exclusive agency for the "Personal Memoirs of General U. S. Grant," written by himself. Other agents are now circulating a book in these townships which they claim to be this same book, but any careful observer can readily tell the counterfeit. It is written by a common historian and is far inferior to Grant's own book.

PIOUS DOINGS.

Sunday's Religious Transpirings, as Gleaned by the Scribes of The Daily Courier.

Spiritual Pointings, Worldly Truths, Etc.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.

We were unable to get a report of the morning sermon at this church, but following is a synopsis of the evening discourse: The subject was the "Conversion of the Eunuch." The sermon throughout was the best and most practicable it has been the writer's pleasure to listen to for many a day, and if more such sermons were delivered by the ministers of our different churches, it would tend to better results. Life is worth living for, and why? Because beyond the grave there is a land and an immortal haven wherein to anchor and rest peacefully and without end. The mind of man is immortal; it never dies, but lives after the frail tenement it inhabits has crumbled to dust. We should endeavor to attain perfection in our short existence. We look at the mountains and valleys, and therein see the works of God and his perfected attainments--nothing left undone, all the acme of perfection. On the other hand we look at the attainments of man and what is presented to our view? We see wrecked lives, humanity without manhood and womanhood; humanity without any higher aspirations than debauchery and the deepest and most loathsome dissipation. Parents are in a measure responsible for this. The impressions of childhood are final and lasting, and their parents allow them to gain these impressions by reading light literature and fictitious fabrications. They find heroes and heroines in this kind of literature that are suited to their untrained minds, which poisons and blights their life long existence. If we want to teach our children courage, tell them the stories of the martyrs of Christ's time, and if obedience, virtue, love, or any of the good qualities that go to make a true christian man or woman go to the same fountain of knowledge. The bible is the source from which can be derived most thorough and explicit instructions for all accomplishments. Be guided by the teachings and you will never be found astray, and will find peace beyond this shiftless and tempestuous vale.

METHODIST CHURCH.

Sunday was the occasion of the regular quarterly services and love feast and Rev. Thomas Audas, presiding elder, preached a sound sermon from the epistle of Paul to Timothy, ii:13. "Looking for that blessed hope and the glorious appearing of the Great God and our savior, Jesus Christ." Ever since the world began, the Lord has appeared to humanity continually in various ways. We have no really correct idea of his spiritual existence. Man is a spirit and knows very little of himself spiritually. We know that our perceptions arise from the soul, but what the soul is we don't know. We have no positive idea as to what God is--as to his existence. As we look all around us and see Him in nature, see his attributes as manifested there, we must recognize His power and wisdom. When we realize that our eyes, feeling, and every faculty is exactly adapted to the object for which it is used, we must recognize some great supreme creator, who knows all things. He is in all nature to lead men to a conception of an invisible God. Logic is the result of sin. Were there no sin, we would stand continually in the very presence of truth. Jesus is coming again--not as the babe in the manger, or a man with not a place to lay His head, but in triumph and glory. And then will be vengeance to those who obey not the gospel. This pulpit was filled in the evening by Rev. Reece, of the St. Louis Conference. The choir had new accessions in Mrs. Shaw and Miss Bertha Wallis.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.

Sunday was the day of quarterly communion. Rev. Stone's morning sermon was on "The Transfiguration of Christ," based on a portion of Mark ix. He showed that the temporal and spiritual worlds are not far apart. There is no sleep between death and the resurrection. Moses and Elias were active, intelligent beings and talked to Christ about his approaching the crucifixion in the presence of Peter, James, and John. The recognition was probably made through the description given in the Old Testament. Moses and Elias knew each other, notwithstanding their lives were several centuries apart, and had business relations in the spirit land, pertaining to their brethren on earth. They were sent by the Father on these errands. This makes the spiritual world closed only by a veil, as when Elijah was in Samaria surrounded by the hosts of his enemies when he prayed that the eyes of his servant might be opened and the servant was made to see angels ready to defend them, causing him to exclaim, "They that be for us are mightier than they who are against us." It was a change of vision that the servant might see the inhabitants of heaven. When we are convinced of these facts, they rob death of its horrors and make religion glorious.

THE BAPTIST CHURCH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The usual announcements for the week including the W. C. T. U., which meets with Mrs. Elder Tuesday evening. The Aid Society meets with Mrs. Spencer Bliss, Friday, at 2 p.m. The subject to be discussed at the prayer meeting will be, "I'm really ready to work for Christ." Rev. Reider discoursed from Gen.iv:9--"Am I my brother's keeper?" I very much question whether we comprehend fully the meaning of the text. The depravity of men cannot be fully comprehended by man. The evil fruits of man's heart is seen everywhere. Adam and Eve's fall and Cain's sin was vividly portrayed by the speaker, and show that the same evil spirit was in the human family today. Satan, in destroying man, employs all kinds of stratagems. Sin works its way step by step. God has made you your brother's keeper. The attitude of Cain before God was shown, and the power of sin in bearing Cain up. The same is in the world today. Guilt and falsehood are inseparably connected. Men ask themselves today the same questions as Cain. "Am I my brother's keeper?" We stand united. I am your keeper; you are mine. I have need of all the christian influence you can bring to bear. You have need of all I can bring to bear upon you. The duty of everyone to be a christian was plainly shown. Every sin has a voice and brings punishment upon the head of the one sinning. Man stands not alone in the world. He lives not for himself alone and will not die for himself alone. The train of influences for good or bad does not end with temporal life.

UNITED BRETHREN.

Owing to the bad weather and Rev. Snyder's rheumatic prostration, there were no services at this church Sunday.

AMERICAN DETECTIVES KIDNAP AND BIND A DEFAULTER AND

BRING HIM ACROSS THE LINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

WINNIPEG, MAN., September 8. A sensation has been created here by the kidnaping of Lawrence Brainerd, President of the St. Albans (Vermont) Bank, who is charged with robbing the bank of many hundred thousands of dollars, and who two years ago decamped. Six months since he and his wife came here, registering at the City Hotel under the name of Jackson. Three months later a detective from Wiggins & Woods' agency, Boston, named Davis, came here but concealed his identity. Later another detective came, and together the two men shadowed Brainerd. One was introduced to him, and cultivated his acquaintance, finally informing him that he too was crooked. The intimacy ripened and they frequently went on excursions together. On Saturday Davis proposed a duck-shooting expedition and the pair drove into the country, five miles from the city in a lonely place. The other detective and a friend joined the party and overpowered Brainerd, telling him they must take him to the States by fair means or foul. They bound him, and drove with all haste sixty miles, until the boundary line was crossed. Brainerd's wife, becoming uneasy, communicated to the police. When the latter realized that a game had been played on them, a special train was secured and late Sunday night the police started out to intercept the party at the boundary. A collision occurred, throwing the special train from the track and preventing the police from reaching their destination. Another went down to St. Louis Sunday and found the detectives with Brainerd on the other side of the line. The detectives refused to deliver Brainerd, and while the police were endeavoring to take steps to bring him back, the detectives procured a wagon and drove off rapidly.

ISHMAEL PASHA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

PARIS, September 8. Private advices received in diplomatic circles here lead to the conclusion that the ex-Khedive of Egypt, Ishmael Pasha, now living in Naples, is to be reinstated, and that within the next month. The change is said to have been brought about by the effort of Sir Drummond Wolff, the English Ambassador now at Constantinople, but who has until within the past few days been looking into the financial situation of Egypt at Cairo. Just what is to become of Tewfik Pasha, the present Khedive, is not known.

LOCAL OPTION IN TEXAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

ALBANY, TEX., September 8. The local option election in this (Shackleford) County resulted in the defeat of the Prohibitionists by a two to one vote.

ROCKDALE, TEX., September 8. In the local option election in this (Milan) County, the Prohibitionists prevailed by a majority of eighty-six.

SATAN'S STRING.

A Saloon-Keeper in Milwaukee Wounds Three Children by Firing His Gun.

Ferdinand Ward Again on the Stand.

Frankie Morris Gets a New Trial.

The Chattanooga Lynching. Another Death.

The Polk Boys Burned in Jail.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

MILWAUKEE, WIS., September 8. Joseph Jarvek, a saloon-keeper, is under arrest for shooting three children. Jarvek purchased a gun on Friday and loaned it to a neighbor to go hunting. It was returned on Sunday afternoon, the man being unable to discharge it. Jarvek took the gun into his back yard, and when fifteen feet from the fence, discharged it, intending, he says, that the shot should enter the ground. The cartridge passed through the close board fence and exploded as three children were passing. One of them, Frances Karresdoumsky, fifteen months old, occupied a baby carriage which was wheeled by Frank, her seven-year-old brother. Frank received nearly twenty shot in the chest, abdomen, shoulder, and head, and the baby several shot in her head. The doctors have little hopes for their recovery. A twelve-year-old girl was also shot in the arm. Jarvek concealed himself in his house, but was only saved from the threatened violence of the mob by the arrival of the police, who placed him under arrest.

FERDINAND WARD.

NEW YORK, September 8. The suit brought by George C. Holt, as assignee of Ferdinand Ward against William S. Warner, to have set aside transfers of property made by Ward to the defendant and others just prior to the failure of Grant & Ward, was continued today before the referee. Ward was again called to the stand and testified that on March 1, 1884, there was due Mr. Warner about $1,000,000, for which he gave new obligations upon which he was to pay Warner twenty per cent a month. These obligations were to fall due September 1, 1884. These had been delivered to Warner and were returned to him in part in the form of coupons. A sum of $70,000 paid by Warner in April was to bring $136,000 in October 10 following. Ward said that the transfer of his property to Warner was made on May 7, 1884, and the total amount of obligations for which he gave deed was $578,560. The hearing will be continued tomorrow.

NEW TRIAL FOR FRANKIE MORRIS.

ERIE, KAN., September 8. Last evening the District Court of this county sustained the motion made by the defendant to set aside the verdict of the jury in the murder case against Frankie Morris, Judge Stillwell holding that the verdict was not sustained by the evidence. This decision meets the almost unanimous approval of the people here. The motion has been argued since Friday last by Messrs. Denison, of Osage Mission; Burton, of Abilene; Hackney, of Winfield; and Fenlon, of Leavenworth, for the defendant. Cox, County Attorney of Neosho County, Stratton and Hutchings as his assistants, argued for the State. Great interest was manifested in the case and the court room was crowded during the argument. The decision is received by the public here with approval, and the counsel for the defendant and the judge are complimented on all hands.

AFTER THE LYNCHING.

CHATTANOOGA, TENN., September 8. The city is now quiet, but men are seen in groups everywhere, discussing the terrible events of Sunday night. There is a great deal of suppressed excitement, but no fear of any further trouble. Williams was cut down from the beam in jail at two o'clock and was taken in charge by his friends. William T. Nancy, a prominent young man, who was shot during the indiscriminate actions of the negro mob, died this morning from his wounds, and his death has intensified public grief. The other wounded men were not seriously hurt. The remains of the ex-Chief of Police, whom Williams murdered, were buried yesterday. It is now clear that had the negroes not attempted an outbreak, no shooting would have occurred. The hanging was done within the jail building without excitement or disorder.

ROASTED IN JAIL.

WASHINGTON, ARK., September 8. A mob on Sunday night visited the Pike County jail at Murfreesboro and made an attempt to shoot the Polk boys confined for murder, but not being able to get them in range, the mob hauled a load of wood to the jail, piled it around the iron cell, saturated the wood with coal oil, and literally roasted both prisoners alive, nothing standing but the brick walls of the jail. The Polk boys murdered a peddler last year and have had several trials. The affair has created great excitement and this was the third effort by mobs to kill them.

MRS. WALKUP WAIVES EXAMINATION.

EMPORIA, KAN., September 8. Yesterday was the day set for the preliminary trial of Mrs. Walkup and the time was awaited with great interest. Mrs. Walkup's attorney, W. W. Scott, appeared yesterday morning before 'Squire Payne and waived examination. This now places the case on the regular docket for the October term of the Circuit Court, at which time the trial will occur. Mrs. Walkup at her cell is the recipient of numerous floral offerings and altogether is receiving a liberal amount of sympathetic expressions and acts.

BOLD BURGLARY.

NANTASKET BEACH, MASS., September 8. One of the boldest burglaries ever perpetrated in this section occurred last night at the Ocean View House. The thieves forced an entrance into the building, carried the safe to the beach, and blew it open. They obtained $10,000 in cash and valuable jewelry. Some papers and $100 were found on the beach this morning near where the safe was blown open. The burglars also entered the Hotel Standish, broke into the wine cellar, and helped themselves.

GREAT FORGERIES.

ST. THOMAS, ONT., September 8. Robert Bates, a master plasterer, is missing from his home and is supposed to have gone to the United States. Before leaving he succeeded in passing about $200,000 in forged paper, of which nearly every broker in this city holds a portion. He leaves debts to a large amount.

POST-OFFICE OFFICIALS ARRESTED.

WASHINGTON, September 8. Thomas Hughes, postmaster at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Assistant Postmaster Clark have been arrested, a shortage of $1,200 having been discovered in the accounts of the office.

AN OLD CHIME.

GARDEN CITY, KAN., September 8. J. B. Hayes, the section foreman at Hartland, was arrested yesterday for the murder of Martin Dingus in Kentucky seven years ago. The officers left with him for Kentucky last night.

STORM AT RICH HILL.

A House Blown Down and a Boy Killed. His Sister Injured.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

RICH HILL, MISSOURI, September 8. Just before midnight last night this town was struck by one of the fiercest winds followed by a terrific rain storm never known before in this section. The storm came up from the southwest, and the first residence struck near the end of the town was the two-story brick, owned and occupied by William Blotzshe and family. The house was completely wrecked, and the fifteen-year-old son, Henry, and the five-year-old daughter, Ellen, were buried in the ruins. Both were sleeping on the upper floor. The former was killed instantly and it is believed the latter will die from the injuries received. The large mill owned by Taylor & Sons was also wrecked. The roof was completely torn off, and the machinery is now in very bad shape. The damages will run very high. About fifty small residences were also more or less seriously injured, many persons being seriously hurt by the falling timbers. Complete details are not yet obtainable, but it is known that at least twelve persons were injured. The rain storm which followed did almost as much damage to property as the wind storm which preceded it. An estimate of the damage is almost impossible at this hour.

THE CHICAGO & ALTON ROBBERY.

Arrest of Two Other Suspected Parties Near Topeka.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

TOPEKA, KAN., September 8. Sunday afternoon great excitement prevailed around the courthouse when Hugh McHenry and Howard Pierce were brought into Sheriff Thomas' office on the charge of having been interested in the Blue Springs, Missouri, train robbery, which occurred on the Missouri Pacific Railroad on the night of September 3. The arrest was made yesterday, five officers having gone to the house of Hugh McHenry, who lives about five miles northeast of North Topeka, on the line between Jefferson and Shawnee Counties. The officers, who were Deputy Sheriff Disbrow, Special Officer Parkhurst, Marshal Phillips, of Jackson County, Mo.; his Deputy, Hulse, and Detective Delong, of the Missouri, Pacific Railway system, surrounded the house, and Deputy Disbrow served the warrant. The following is Marshal Phillips' statement as to the manner of capture and the reasons for suspecting McHenry.

"Having been given a description of the robbers who worked the car by Dr. Bedford, of Independence, and James Liggett, of Kansas City, we, that is, Hulse, my deputy, and Detective Delong, of the Missouri Pacific, took up the trail from Independence on the Missouri Pacific to the town of California, twenty-eight miles from Jefferson. From there we went north into the brush about nine miles through the worst country you ever saw. We came at last upon a log cabin containing one room. It was the home of the aged parents of Howard Pierce. The robbers arrived at this place Thursday night, staying all night in a little outhouse. The next day (Friday) they left the home of Pierce's parents on foot. The old people did not like the looks of Howard's companion and remarked it to us. They said they did not know where their son and his companion were going and they did not expect them when they came, they having traveled all night. We came upon this house in the morning, but we learned our birds had flown. Taking up the trail here we tracked them across the country to a little town called Monetan, west of California. From that point they took a train known as No. 5, of the Pleasant Hill accommodation. They bought tickets at Monetan for Kansas City. They seemed to be very much in a hurry when they arrived at Pleasant Hill. They had to lay over until train No. 1 for Kansas City came along. They took the train there and arrived in Kansas City Friday night. Saturday they took the Union Pacific for Topeka. From there they went home, where we found them about eleven o'clock yesterday. We surrounded the house and Deputy Sheriff Disbrow, of Shawnee County, served the papers that made them our prisoners. The robbers live about five and one-half miles northeast of North Topeka, near what is called Calhoun's Bluff, on the line between Jefferson and Shawnee Counties. Their home is in the worst part of the State. That is about the substance of what may be considered a 'stern chase, with happy results.'"

McHenry is an old and well known farmer of this section, having lived here eighteen years. He is worth about $2,000, and is a man of family. Of Pierce, nothing is known. If, as seems likely from the above dispatch, Marshal Phillips has got the right men, all the other men who have been suspected of the robbery will, of course, be cleared.

HIS PAY WAS STOPPED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

WASHINGTON, September 8. First Comptroller Durham yesterday stopped a requisition to pay the salary of J. A. J. Creswell, Government Counsel before the Court of Commissioners of Alabama Claims, for the month of August, until it is settled that there is any balance due him. The First Comptroller takes the ground that Mr. Creswell is not entitled to a fixed salary of $8,000 per annum, but that sum is named as the limit of the fees to be allowed him for the trial of cases. He says that the law organizing the court provided that the Government Counsel should receive a reasonable compensation for each case tried, and that subsequent laws limited such compensation to $8,000 per annum. The court, however, he says, neglected to fix the amount of a "reasonable compensation," and has illegally treated that item as a fixed salary.

REVOLUTION INEVITABLE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

PARIS, September 8. A great majority of the newspapers here this morning believe a revolution in Spain inevitable.

CENTRAL ASIA.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

LONDON, September 8. The Ameer of Bokhara has abdicated in favor of his son, Turani, who is an enemy to Russian interests and friendly toward England. Russia has determined to extend her railway system through Bokhara despite the protestations of Turkey. A Bokhara embassy is at present in St. Petersburg discussing the question with the Turkish ministry. The concession for building the railway was obtained by Russia from the father of Turani and is in connection with the Trans-Caspian railway.

HEAVY RAINS.

Southeastern Kansas Visited Again by Heavy Rains. Crop Losses.

No Lives Thought to be Lost.

Great Destruction of Tobacco and Corn By Hail in Maryland.

The Cleveland Oil Fire.

Gasoline Explosion with Heavy Loss.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

PARSONS, KANSAS, September 8. A heavy rain storm set in here Sunday night and the rain continued to pour down with brief intervals until late yesterday afternoon. The streets of the city were flooded and the water rushed through them, covering the sidewalks and flooding cellars. The creeks in this section are all out of their banks for the third time this season, and farmers living on the lowlands are again subjected to great damages and loss. This city is an island, being surrounded by water, which in some places is several miles wide. Many people living in the suburbs along Labette Creek have been forced to again vacate their houses and seek higher ground, the water in some of the houses being from two to four feet deep. The water at three o'clock yesterday afternoon had reached the same height as in the great flood of July, when it commenced to recede slowly. Some stock has been drowned, but no human lives lost. The crops on the bottom lands are a total loss. The Kansas City, Fort Scott & Gulf has two wash-outs just east of here, and no train from Kansas City has come in over that road since last night. The Missouri Pacific track is still solid, but in several places east and north of here the water is running over the track and wash-outs are feared should more rain fall.

FLOODS IN CHEROKEE.

CHEROKEE, KAN., September 8. One of the heaviest and most disastrous rain storms that ever visited this section commenced at twelve o'clock Sunday night and continued with unabated fury until late yesterday afternoon. The whole country is under water and great damage to property along the water courses is feared. G. L. Carpenter yesterday endeavored to cross Wolf branch, west of town, the bridge having washed away. Both horses were drowned, and he himself was saved by almost superhuman efforts. Lake Malcolm in East Cherokee has overflowed its banks and Hall street, in front of the Commercial Hotel, is two feet under water. No trains have come in on the Cheyenne division of the G. R. R. Great loss of property, and even life itself, is looked for.

THAT OIL FIRE.

CLEVELAND, OHIO, September 8. At 2:20 yesterday morning fire started in the Doane Oil Works, which caused an explosion of three stills. The overflowing and flaming oil was emptied into Kingsbury Creek, and ran into the Standard oil yards, setting fire to the agitators south of the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio track. The loss to the company is scarcely in proportion to the magnitude of the fire. Not more than 5,000 barrels of oil were lost, and the value was less than $5,000. The loss on the plant is estimated at from $30,000 to $40,000.

DESTRUCTIVE HAILSTORM.

PORT TOBACCO, MARYLAND, September 8. The most destructive hailstorm ever known in this section occurred Saturday evening. Entire fields of corn and tobacco were destroyed. In many fields not even a leaf of tobacco was left on the stalks. Corn was completely stripped from the stalks while little more than half ripe. The hailstones were as large as pullet eggs. The destruction was general where the storm touched. The damage in Charles County is estimated at $100,000.

GASOLINE EXPLOSION.

CLEVELAND, OHIO, September 8. Yesterday afternoon L. D. Mix's refinery on Commercial street was destroyed. Gasoline escaped from a still and trickled into a furnace beneath. The still exploded and others followed until the entire establishment was in ruins. The loss was $45,000; the insurance $12,500. Mix was the oldest refiner in this city.

SUING THEIR OLD NEIGHBORS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS, September 8. Lowman Bros., formerly of Arkansas City, now living in Mississippi, opposite that place, have filed suit in the United States Court in this city for fifty thousand dollars damages. Lowman Bros. were at one time merchants of Arkansas City, but their neighbors conceived the idea that they were responsible for a good deal of the trouble there and ordered them to leave. They left, hence the suit. Lawyers of this place, Pine Bluff, and Arkansas City represent the citizens, while the Lowman Bros. have retained legal advisers here. The case will no doubt be held at the October term.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The Horticultural Society was attended by a small number of persons Saturday last on account of the unfavorable weather, yet there was on the table a fine display of fruits, among which were from Mr. John Curns, two varieties of peaches, very fine, names unknown. G. S. Manser, peaches, Old Missouri, Free Hill, Home Chief, and three varieties of apples. W. W. Limbocker, peaches, thought to be Ward's Late. Mr. Taylor brought apples of the Ben Davis, Maiden Blush, and Vandevere Pippin varieties. Wm. C. Hayden showed large improved cuttings. J. F. Martin had six varieties of peaches, those named being Raverine, Martha Washington, and Wager. Mr. Manser also exhibited Bartlett pears, Rambo, Hubbardson, Nonesuch, and Hysloo crab apples. It was greatly regretted that more of our citizens could not have seen this fine display of Cowley's fruit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mr. John Croco, who, with his wife, is visiting in Newton, Jasper County, Iowa, writes us: "We had a nice trip and cool weather up here. Enterprising, moral, social, and go-ahead people. The country about Newton is some broken, but a good soil. They raise lots of grass, oats, and corn here. Newton has three railroads water works, barbed wire factory, creamery, canning factory, and electric lights; many church buildings, a nice large schoolhouse, nice residences, and contains 2,000 inhabitants. It has been settled 20 years. Politics runs high. The temperance law does well. The women are the brave champions as in Cowley. The St. John advocates are not so numerous as they will be in 1886."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

We see Tom Richardson's earmarks all over the Wellington Press. From a dry funereal sheet it has suddenly sprung into a live, rustling, witty newspaper, an honor to such an office as that of the Press. As an appreciation of your honest concert, Tom, we'll daily make the Press "holy" enough for a sieve. Cast thy bread upon the waters and it will return to thee after many days. Where there's a chance, thee's a wa'; but, "be gosh," how few locals ever furnish the chance. In the meantime, take our all. We don't care. It is thrown out to the public. Let it use it as it may--if it can find anything worthy. We'll never kick.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. Mendenhall came in Tuesday in response to a telegram announcing that his little daughter was sick with diphtheria. It will be remembered that we announced a few days ago that Mrs. Capps had been called to Winfield on account of her little grandson being stricken with this disease. The little sister was sent here for safety, but it seems that the germs of the terrible disease had been taken into the system before she left and she came down with it here. It is to be hoped that none of the Wellington children have contracted it from her, as we have so far this season been free from it. Wellingtonian, 8th.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Company C, K. N. G., has received its bright new uniforms and is now ready for dress parade. They are Regulation Fatigue Uniforms: cap, blouse, and pants. The officers' uniforms are very nobby, with sword and belt. The uniforms are furnished by the state. Our company is already one of the best drilled in the state, composed of as fine young fellows as were ever congregated, and will carry off the honors at Topeka Re-Union, on the 19th and 20th of September and Oct. 1st. The members of the company can get their uniforms by calling on Capt. Steuven and giving a receipt therefor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Yes, he tried to keep it quiet. But we've got it, all the same. The idea that a plump, rosy-cheeked, ten pound boy should dawn in this world, brining joy and noise to proud pa and ma, will out the fact being heralded through THE DAILY, will never do. It shall not occur. Mr. and Mrs. Perry Tucker are the happy parents, and Perry steps higher than the moon, and carries a peculiar smile around on his visage which says, "Boy, by jinks--finest in the world! Whoop!!" Perry is young, but makes a mighty good looking "dad." His general air is very different now.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Marshal McFadden took in one A. C. Anderson Sunday, and lodged him in the bastille, arrested on a telegram from K. C., wanting him for some serious misdemeanor. Just before arrested, he sold a fine $10 gold band ring to a boy on the street for $3. The marshal telegraphed his arrest, and will hold him for an answer.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A. C. Anderson, whom Marshal McFadden arrested on suspicion of being the perpetrator of deviltry in Kansas City, was turned out of jail last evening. He was arrested on a descriptive telegram, and the marshal wired his capture at once. Waiting in vain a day and a half for an answer to the telegram, the prisoner had to be released. Last evening the marshal got a telegram saying "hold him till I arrive: right man." The telegram was signed by a K. C. official. Very lively official, that: expecting McFadden to hold a man, merely on suspicion, awaiting a sluggish telegram.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

It won't be much fun hereafter to be a city guest. The Council orders the Marshal to feed them all on bread and water. This is a hard blow on tramps. Of course, the cooler is at the command of the city at any time--the city having a life long agreement with the county. Now when a city official takes in an unruly individual, said official will go past the bakery, get a hunk of bread, swing around by the town pump for a bottle of water, and the banquet is ready for the man of durance vile.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A writ of habeas corpus was issued from the District Court on Tuesday in the M. W. Sawyer case. Sawyer violated Arkansas City's fire ordinance by building a frame structure within the fire limits. He was convicted in police court at Arkansas City and fined $10 and costs, to be committed to the jug until paid. He refused to pay. Judge pro tem Dalton decreed the proceeding legal and remanded Sawyer to the custody of the Sheriff. He'll pay up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Ed Weitzel is formulating plans for a fine hotel building of forty-two sleeping rooms, and commodious ground floor apartments. He will erect an addition 25 x 140 to the Commercial, run it, with the old building up three stories high, making a building 50 x 140, and over all put an artistic mansard roof. He begins the addition at once. This will make one of our finest buildings and for a hotel couldn't be excelled. The location will always be one of the best.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss S. Weigle has opened a dressmaking establishment over Baden's store, in the room formerly occupied by Miss Holmes. She has had experience in eastern cities. Cutting and fitting a specialty. Call and see her before going elsewhere. Prices reasonable.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The Latham Journal, just started in Latham, the new Butler County town on the K. C. & S. W., has just reached us. It is a neat six column folio, published by Olin W. Meacham, and blows its bugle loud for Latham.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Several communications came in too late to appear in the WEEKLY. If you want your letters to be certain to appear, never send them in later than Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

I have 40 head of stock hogs for sale. Inquire or address me at Tisdale. E. I. Johnson.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Rock township will hold their primary convention on Saturday, Sept. 12, at 2 p.m., at Rock.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Bob Phelps was over from Burden Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Charley Hodges came up from Ponca Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

J. M. Napier was down from Udall Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Grant Wilkins was over from Cambridge Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. June were down Tuesday from Udall.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

T. J. Gilbert and J. P. Holloway were up from Arkansas City Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mayor Schiffbauer and D. A. McIntire were up from Arkansas City Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Tyner is getting ready to move his goods into the Blue Front.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mrs. W. P. Hackney accompanied the Senator to Wellington Tuesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

S. F. Steinberger and W. G. McKee were up from Arkansas City Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Judge Pyburn and son, Walter, Canal City, were up Monday courting.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. G. H. Hart and J. B. Johns were up from Maple City Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Bessie Handy is visiting her sister, Mrs. Dr. McClung, in Burden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.



Harry Bahntge left Saturday evening for a week's business trip in Mexico, Missouri.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

W. H. Thompson returned Saturday from Illinois. We are glad to see him back.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Judge Sumner, D. H. Thomas, and T. L. Hill were among the Arkansas City visitors to the Metropolis Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Baden is chuck full of new goods from garret to cellar. It looks squeezing to get through his dry goods department.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Herpich showed us through his line of goods just brought in. He has an elegant assortment of the latest styles.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. Park is on the eve of taking his better half and going east to his old home in Illinois for a thirty days' visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dickson's Restaurant has received a new coat of paint by Barnes & Shaw, and looks as neat as a red wagon with blue sideboards.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mrs. Fred Dobson, nee Miss Lutie Newman, is here with her baby girl, from Cherryvale, for a visit with her sister, Mrs. G. H. Buckman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Garber left last Monday for their home, Petersburg, Illinois, after a month's visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Clark.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Carey Boone and Robert Fleming were Police Court victims on Monday, the former $7.25 fine and costs for carrying concealed weapons, the latter $7.25 for blasphemy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Joseph Farrell was too full of mechanical purposes Monday, and ran against Night Watchman McLain at the wrong time. Seven twenty-five before Judge Turner.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Dora Hughes returned to her home, Britton, Dakota Territory, last Monday, after a very pleasant month's visit with her sister, Mrs. John W. Arrowsmith.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Ed Nelson showed us a copy of a paper published in 1773. It is quite a curiosity in the shape of a newspaper. In it is a notice of sale of property by George Washington.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. and Mrs. W. P. Rothrock left in the afternoon for two weeks at Larned. They go to attend the marriage of Mrs. Rothrock's niece, a daughter of Capt. Morris, of Larned.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Chas. S. Dever is off for a few days with his folks at Topeka. Of course, he'll have a good time. One of his objects will be treatment for his slight deafness by a Topeka specialist.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.



C. W. Sears, the bottling works proprietor, has bought out Fred N. Dickens' interest in the broom factory. The firm will now be St. Clair & Sears. We predict a big business for this firm.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

J. F. Stewart commenced the erection of the K. C. & S. W. depot on Monday. It is situated just back of the bas works. Mr. Stewart has twenty days to complete it. He will get there; you bet.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Thomas Barnthouse and Alice Hartman; Andrew D. Bryant and Cassie Mumness were granted the documents by Judge Gans Tuesday authorizing the cementing of their hearts and fortunes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

J. F. Graham, W. G. Graham, G. W. Yount, W. W. Limbocker, D. C. Beach, L. C. Clark, and R. Ehret have filed appeals in the District Court from the K. C. & S. W. damages allowed them for right of way.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

H. G. Fuller & Co. are primped up very prettily in their new location on north Main. Artistic signs, adorning neat ground work paint, a canvas awning, and numerous "fix-ups" give them very cosy quarters.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Eli Youngheim left Tuesday for an eastern purchasing tour--to ransack the eastern markets for the nobbiest and latest clothing and furnishings for his Mammoth Gents Furnishing House. Eli always gets there, too.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Rev. Stone, who has filled the Presbyterian pulpit of this city for several weeks past, returned to his home at Corry, Pennsylvania, Monday. He is a minister of much ability: clear, practical ideas, and good address. The Presbyterians were much pleased with his sermons.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Willis A. Ritchie went up to Newton Tuesday with the plans of the new Methodist college under his left wing. He meets with a committee of the College Trustees to finally determine on the plans of the college building, and various things regarding its construction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. S. B. Parks and wife left for Illinois and other eastern points, Tuesday, for a thirty day's trip. The Doctor needs a rest. With his large and increasing practice, he has been pretty well worn out. With a little beer on ice and proper nursing, "Doc." will come back fat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Gene B. Welch, who has been with Sam Myton for some time past, left Monday for Syracuse, Kansas, where he will start a hardware store on his own hook. Gene is one of those sterling young fellows who will succeed anywhere, and in wishing him success, we know our wish will reach its fruition.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Miss Lizzie McDonald left on Tuesday for school, at Beaver, Pennsylvania. She will be absent nine months. Miss Lizzie is one of our brightest and most attractive young ladies and will be missed from the social circle. All rejoice, however, at her opportunity to complete the accomplishments she has so successfully begun.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

T. A. Beard received a load of melons from Dave Bright, near Geuda Springs, that beat them all. Forty-two melons weighed 2,050 pounds. This averages a little over 48 pounds each. The largest weighed 61, the next 61, and the smallest 43 pounds. This looks like a big melon story, but the melons are on hand to prove it as well as the figures.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Irve Randall commenced throwing dirt on Tuesday for his new building just north of Kyger's second-hand store. It will be a two-story building of brick and stone. Ed Weitzel will commence a similar building adjoining the Commercial Hotel. Ed is thinking of making it a three-story, and will go to work just as soon as the hide house is removed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Tom McGuire adorned THE COURIER tables Tuesday morning with a bevy of peaches that challenge the world for an equal. They were raised by Geo. H. Crippen, in the grounds of his home, on west 10th Avenue, and the finest budded fruit, any peach of which would size up with a large sized tea-cup--rosy, luscious, and fat. Mr. Crippen has a good selection of fruit, and takes much pride in its culture.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

J. W. Millspaugh, of Vernon, tells the champion watermelon story. He was out to Attica the other day and stood in a thirty acre patch in which the melons were so thick that he could hardly keep from stepping on them. One had been plucked weighing seventy-three pounds and over twelve car loads had been sold this season. The market being glutted, the owner was dispensing his gigantic crop at any price he could get.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Hon. C. J. Jones, the Garden City capitalist, has invented a new scheme in city real estate. On Thursday, the 10th, he will have a grand auction sale of town lots in that thriving city, and will pay the railroad fare to and from Garden City for anyone who purchases $300 worth of lots. On the same day he will have a big "doins'" in laying the cornerstone of his big hotel and the Court House, which he is building, and proposes to donate to the county. Jones is a rustler and will make Garden City one of the biggest wonders of the west.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Rev. John Ferguson and S. Eastburn and wife left Sunday evening for their home in Mahaska County, Iowa, after a delightful visit of three weeks with Mr. D. Robertson and family, and the Fergusons and McEwens, of Walnut township. They were very agreeably surprised at the luxuries that Kansans are accustomed to indulge in, thinking that they would have to help purchase part of their provision while here and most of the people here were in want--actually in destitute circumstances. Come to Kansas, ye easterner, and get a square meal and flutter awhile amid our wealth.

FRANKIE MORRIS AGAIN.

She is Granted a New Trial Amid Immense Applause.

Gross Misconduct of the Prosecution and the Evidence of the Chicago Expert,

The Grounds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Senator Hackney passed through on the S. K. Monday, on legal "biz," at Wellington. He was returning from attendance upon the motion for a new trial in the celebrated Frankie Morris case, which was argued at Erie, on the 5th and 7th. A new trial was granted. This case is one of the most notorious in the history of the State, and has been conducted by Senator Hackney, principal attorney for the defense, in a manner to add laurels to his already famous reputation as a criminal lawyer. Frankie Morris was tried for the poisoning of her mother, Mrs. Poinsett, to obtain $15,000 life insurance, and convicted of murder in the first degree. Notwithstanding the fact that medical experts of the State University had sworn to finding arsenic sufficient to cause death, the verdict of the jury was not backed by public sentiment. Senator Hackney determined to make the investigation more thorough and accordingly had the body re-exhumed and sent the stomach to Chicago, in care of Judge Gans, Probate Judge of Cowley, for analysis by a regular analytical chemist. Dr. H. D. Harrison was the chemist, and at the motion for a new trial, swore that he found only a faint trace of arsenic, and that there could not have been enough in the stomach to kill Mrs. Poinsett. Numerous witnesses were sworn to prove the misconduct of the prosecution in heaping anathemas on the defendant in the opening and closing arguments at the trial. Harrison's evidence and the misconduct of the prosecution were the grounds on which a new trial was granted. The motion for a new trial was argued by the ablest attorneys in the west--speeches whose eloquence reached the skies and whose logic went down into the very depths of fact and circumstance. Senator Hackney's speech is said to be one of the best he ever made at the bar. The prosecution was argued by C. A. Cox, County Attorney of Neosho County, C. F. Hutchins, and R. S. Stratton; the defense by Senator Hackney, Tom P. Fenlon, and J. R. Burton. The court room was jammed with eager listeners to the arguments, and when the new trial was granted, a shout went up that showed the wildest approval. Public sentiment has been gradually changing in Morris' favor since the beginning of her trial, and now it is nearly one-sided. She is out on a recognizance of five thousand dollars. Her second trial will come off in November.

DIGGING HIS OWN GRAVE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Winfield has a deplorable case. It is a young man who is daily making his own sepulcher: a dead man, who won't do to bury. He is of good appearance, bright native intellect, and agreeable social qualities--talents that would soon place him high among men if properly applied. But the gifts that a generous Almighty has bestowed are swallowed in the vortex of indolence. Day in and day out, week in and week out, and so on through space, his hours are squandered--accomplishing nothing for himself or his fellows--only bringing disgrace. Could he afford it, were misfortunes traceable, no voice would be raised. But the individual or community that will stand a financial leech, who is as able to earn his bread by the sweat of his brow as any man in America, can't be found in this country. Here, business is king. No sluggards are tolerated. No fancy dude can strut the streets at the expense of his fellows. His adamantine cheek may carry him awhile, but he will, sooner or later, run against a public disgust so deep, so bitter, so rankling, that it will lay him away where he belongs, among the unrecognizable dead beats of the nineteenth century. This is the point reached by Winfield's case. Did he stir a peg, were the old story of strong drink the cause, were there a single palliating circumstance, this item would never appear. It relates to a young man dead on his feet--not in vice; not that, for his moral habits are unquestioned. It is indolence, "the dead sea that swallows all virtues, the self-made sepulcher of a living man." It soon ostracizes its victim from all enterprising society. So in this case. It has reached its final. Oh, be a man! The rustle and bustle of a city like Winfield recognizes nothing else. Use the talents God has given you. Don't suck your existence, like a leech, from those around you. A young man of able body, clear mind, and average talents, who can't earn a living for himself--no one else to support--in this country ought to get out of the world. There is no place in it for him. If this item succeeds in eliciting a determination from this young man, to do what his hands find to do--if it draws out the latent sparks of manhood in his being, it will have accomplished its purpose, and we will grasp the young man's hand in an encouragement that will be vouched by every citizen of a grand community. Otherwise, adieu forever.

A NEAT COMPLIMENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Prof. Inskeep and his young bride have recently located in Winfield, he being one of the principals in our new Normal and Commercial College. The Bluffton, Indiana, Banner mentions their marriage and departure thusly. "On last Tuesday week, August 25, there occurred a brilliant affair at the residence of Mr. John Earnest, of this city. A number of the relatives and a few intimate friends were brought together to witness the marriage of his daughter, Minnie, to Prof. Isaac Inskeep, at 5:30 o'clock in the afternoon. The happy couple, after partaking of supper, left on the 7 o'clock train for their new home in Winfield, Kansas, where Mr. Inskeep has arranged to open a commercial college. While we deplore the loss of such young people from our community, it is a source of congratulation when we think that they will make useful and brilliant additions to the society of the place to which they have gone. Bluffton need never fear for its reputation abroad when such couples leave for other places. May much happiness and prosperity attend this young couple."

SLUGOLOGIST O'BRIEN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

It turns out that one of the Blue Springs train robbers is Slugologist O'Brien, the peregrinating disciple of the silent messengers of thought, who held forth in this city for a few months several years ago. Everybody knew him then--it didn't take him long to form acquaintances. He was pressman for the Telegram for a while and "subbed" on THE COURIER. His main vocation, however, was making "slugs," which gave him the unique cognomen of "Slugologist O'Brien." The dispatches say he was seen in a saloon about 11 o'clock the night of the robbery. This is conclusive. It was Johnny. Drink was his main stock in trade. With his hide full and his pocket empty, he has been in about every city and village of the Union--familiar in every print shop as way up in the Order of Tramp Printers. He knew a little of everything--no subject too deep, and his geographical knowledge of the country was as certain as the sun. But his alimentary canal was his master--drink his despotic sovereign.

STILL OLD CUPID CONQUERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

And now another couple has yielded to the entrancing influences of Cupid and ended by uniting their hearts, their fortunes, and their hopes. The home of Mr. Frank Hartman, on east 8th avenue, was the scene of a quiet little wedding Monday morning. The principals in the hymeneal were Mr. Thomas J. Barnthouse and Miss Alice Hartman. Rev. H. D. Gans pronounced the ceremony, which was witnessed by only the immediate relatives and friends of the happy pair. The bride was very tastefully attired, and the groom wore a smile only obtainable through the blissful hopes of matrimony. A carriage was in waiting, and a party composed of the bridal pair, Mr. J. M. Barnthouse, of the Winfield bottling works, and daughter, Miss Laura, and Master Elmer Hartman, were driven to the train for a western trip over the S. K., to return tomorrow. The groom is one of our most substantial young men, and the bride is possessed of the pleasant manner and independence that always win. THE COURIER throws its old shoe of good luck, wishing the fruition of the brightest hopes of the new pair.

COWLEY COUNTY TEACHERS ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The first regular session of the Cowley County Teachers Association will be held at Winfield, September 19, 1885. The program will be as follows.

1st. The Teachers Association. What should it do and how can it be done?

2nd. Speer's course of study. The difficulties in the way and how to surmount them.

3rd. How can we make the local divisions of our reading circle benefit our schools?

4th. Shall we teach the effects of stimulants and narcotics, and how?

5th. Upon what does the value of the common school depend?

6th. What in the public schools is open to the criticism of being impractical?

JUST ARRIVED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

I have just received a large assortment, and have more coming, of the best goods and the latest styles in the market, which I will make up to order or sell by the yard, at the lowest prices and first-class workmanship. A cordial invitation is extended to all to call and examine my goods. They are the best ever brought to Winfield, and when completed, will give an assortment of over 500 different styles. A. Herpich, the Merchant Tailor, Over Post Office.

FESTIVAL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

There will be an Ice Cream and Oyster festival at Olive schoolhouse, 1 miles north of Winfield, Tuesday evening, September 15. All are invited.

THE CITY RULERS.

What Was Transacted at Their Regular Semi-Monthly Commune Last Night.

Various Grindings.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The City Fathers met in regular session Monday night, Mayor Graham and Councilmen Connor, Jennings, Crippen, Harter, and Baden, and city clerk Buckman, present; absent, Councilmen McDonald, Myers, and Hodges.

An ordinance attaching territory to the city and one in relation to the public health were passed.

The sidewalk petition of A. B. Taylor et al was referred.

Petition of A. G. Wilson for reappointment as City Weighmaster, was continued.

Moore Tanner's petition for a permit to build a frame building on 9th Avenue was refused.

The petition of George S. Brown to be taken into the city limits was referred back for some more signatures.

A sidewalk petition of Dr. Mendenhall et al was referred to the city attorney.

The petition of J. J. Carson et al for a crossing to be built at expense of petitioners across Main street from Carson's saloon over to Kleeman's, to be on the street grade, was granted.

An ordinance to widen Fifth Avenue was indefinitely postponed.

The commissioners' report condemning out lots 4, 5, 6, and 7 was reconsidered and rejected.

It was determined that the city buy but eight more loads of dirt from the Eaton cellar.

The city marshal was instructed to take charge of boarding the city prisoners and feed them on bread and water.

The council recommended that the city board of education detach from the city for school purposes all the territory surrounded, or nearly surrounded by the city limits, the owners of which do not voluntarily come into the limits.

An ordinance was ordered cutting off the pay of the fire department members for monthly drill. The city attorney presented such an ordinance and it was defeated.

The street and alley committee were instructed to see that all ordinanced sidewalks unlaid, should be put in at once.

The following bills were ordered paid.

L. E. Back, nozzle clamps, $1.50.

Black & Rembaugh, printing, $25.

Frank W. Finch, boarding city prisoners, $27.75.

G. H. Klaus, hauling rock, $3.40.

J. O. Stewart, city engineer, $8.50.

J. C. McMullen, rent for fire department building, $25.

City officers salaries and express, August, $151.48.

S. H. Myton, supplies, $2.50.

Frank W. Finch, $22.40, boarding tramps, was laid over, and a number of bills were referred to the finance committee.

The license of J. M. Coryell, a pauper, for running a "striking machine" on the street, was remitted.

A letter from the County Commissioners announcing the opening of the new poor house was read.

THE JUSTICE MILL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Court convened Monday morning at 9 o'clock, Judge pro tem, Samuel Dalton, presiding.

John Wilson, colored, charged with stealing five dollars from the Lindell Hotel money till last March, plead guilty and got three months in jail. Put this with the five months he has already languished, and he has a tough lesson for $5--a bargain he won't soon want to make again.

Winfield Bank vs. W. F. Dorley--judgment for plaintiff for $441 and 12 per cent interest from July 8, 1884.

John Rinehart was decreed a divorce from Cynthia Rinehart. The abandonment business is usually on the other side.

Hiram D. Kellogg vs. Emily Sweet, et al, suit to quiet title--judgment for plaintiff, defendants to pay costs.

The connubial tie cementing Daniel Bunnell and Sarah C. Bunnell was severed, giving him a divorce, on grounds of adultery. Too much hired man.

Mary J. Bethel was given a divorce from George Bethel. This is one of the most aggravated cases of adultery. Bethel and his paramour are now serving out a six months jail sentence for adultery, found guilty in Judge Snow's court, the particulars of which our readers are familiar with. Leaving a faithful wife and loving daughter, he eloped with a professional "soiled dove." Mrs. Bethel was grit from the word go, followed him up, from Cherryvale, and landed both in jail, getting a divorce and what property he had.

A NARROW ESCAPE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

An accident occurred on Monday at the abutments of the new K. C. & S. W. railroad bridge across Timber Creek, just north of town. Charley Schmidt is constructing these abutments with a big force of hands. The excavation for the west abutment is right in the bank, making a wall on one side eighteen feet perpendicularly. At the top, within three or four feet of the edge, is the large derrick. The tramp of the men on the damp ground was too much for it, and a dozen or two loads of dirt went down with a terrible thud, covering the abutment where eight or ten men were working. That no one was killed is a mystery. Charley Kelly made a spring for life, but was caught on the back and left foot, spraining them badly. Dan Berigan got his body from under, but his left leg got an awful jolt, a bad fracture. John Ivy's escape was the most marvelous. He was right in the center of the pier, but happened to look up just as the bank began to give. With a yell, he sprang, escaping just at the moment. Dr. Emerson has Kelly and Berigan in hand. It will be several days before they can again handle themselves as of yore.

A WILD SCENE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

John Nichols' barber shop was in pandemonium Saturday. Its close proximity to the auction square has several times caused wild experiences, but this takes the medal. A Buck, finding no better way to give vent to his determination to leave the auction block, darted into the barber shop. John grabbed his razor--but scarce had raised it, when the "m-o-o, m-o-o" of a burly Bull broke into the door, followed by the Bull himself. Well, you bet, things were lively. In a marvelously short space of time that Bull had cleaned out the shop and he was monarch of all he surveyed--but, lo! Look!! Here comes a Bear! Is death inevitable? Look, look, he comes! and in darted a regular live Bear! The Bull held the fort nobly, but the room wasn't big enough for defense--he couldn't use his horns, and the Bear soon drove him pell mell out the front door--with a rush that left wool behind, scattered all around. It was the wildest congregation of names that has met in some time: Mr. Buck, August Kadau's cobbler; Dr. Bull, the dentist; and Mr. Bear, the mechanic.

ANOTHER DAY GONE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Yes, one by one the roses fall; one by one the boys drop into Cupid's yawning abyss. Now it is Will Clark. With scarcely a warning--without "sayin' nothing to nobody," he has "gone and done it." A heart that has withstood many an onslaught, succumbs at last. Sunday, Will H. Clark, the handsome and jolly Will of the English Kitchen, led to the altar Miss Maggie Sample, daughter of one of Bolton township's prominent farmers. They were united at the home of the bride's parents by Rev. Vie. The ceremony was witnessed by about forty relatives and friends, and was followed with a feast fit to tickle the palate of a king. It was a very happy occasion. Mr. and Mrs. Clark came up this morning. THE COURIER has smoked and the wish bubbles up as naturally as water runs down hill that all the prerequisites of joy and prosperity may be theirs forever and ever.

HATTIE WILLIAMS TO THE FRONT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Hattie Williams, whose foster father, M. S. Williams, of Udall, was convicted in Judge Snow's court a few weeks ago for unmercifully beating her, and fined $100 and costs, again comes to the front. She has filed suit in the District Court for $2,000 damages and $936 for labor. The $2,000 is demanded as remuneration for the stern fact that said Williams did "beat and pound said plaintiff with clubs, with his fists, kicked her with his feet, and produced and inflicted upon her back and head great gashes, wounds, and whelks; that by reason of said beating and pounding, plaintiff's spinal column is seriously and permanently affected and injured; that said defendant's treatment of her for fifteen years past, has been the most shameful and outrageous, inflicting indignity after indignity upon her person by forcibly and violently outraging her person." She is a young girl of sixteen, far from bright. Her headquarters are at the poor farm.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Jimmy Toole, a paddy who got too much "mechanical purposes," and didn't have the wealth to pay out, was put in Jim Connor's hands Tuesday, Jim to give him work and pay his fine. Jim put him to carrying stone at the new school building. He worked an hour or so, and didn't like it. He is a brick mason and didn't like stone: too heavy! He was being watched, but getting a chance, he skipped off and the last seen of him he was going northeast at a rate to discount an Arabian steed. Several fellows have worked out their fines with Jim, not caring to skip.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

EYE AND EAR. Dr. Brandom or Hays of Twin Brothers Infirmary, Wichita, will visit Winfield every first and third Monday and Tuesday of each month, at Central Hotel. Measures eyes for compound spectacles.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

BETHEL ITEMS. "L. B."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

S. A. Bucher and wife were at Winfield Saturday evening.

Uncle Bob Weakly is the first in this vicinity to begin wheat sowing.

B. D. Hannon's little daughter is yet very poorly, but they have hopes of her recovery.

Rev. Knight failed to make his appearance Sunday, and so did his congregation. "Oh, ye of little faith."

B. D. Hannon had a load of wood hauled from his timber recently and he has a pretty good idea who did it.

The much needed rain has come and the farmers are in splendid humor and will begin in earnest to put in their wheat crop.

I believe Henry Weakly will do well to accept the horse his brother offers him if he will marry a certain school "marm" in Winfield.

Uncle Bob Weakly has been treating his neighbors to some good cider. He has also made some grape wine which he will pass around as soon as it has aged enough.

DEXTER DOTS. "MOSS ROSE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mr. Taplin is erecting a two story dwelling in Dexter.

Mr. C. A. Peabody has a brother visiting him from Illinois.

J. D. Salmons' family spent Friday with relatives in Torrance.

There has been considerable corn cut and shocked along the Grouse Valley.

Miss Mattie Meridith is slowing improving from her serious sickness, typhoid fever.

Miss Sallie Davis, of Tisdale, formerly a teacher of our school, is visiting friends in Dexter and vicinity.

Farmers are plowing for wheat and the chinch bugs are putting in their appearance in some places.

Mrs. Garlinghouse, mother of Mrs. John Maurer, is on the sick list this week; also Mrs. Enright.

Mr. W. Underwood has commenced work on his new house. Mike Watters is doing the stone work of the basement.

The population of Dexter is increasing. The latest arrival was in the family of Rev. Warren: a son of average weight. All parties concerned are doing well.

The Bullington mill is running on full time and keeping up with the custom work. Mr. Tilford Spurgeon, head miller, is always ready to wait on the hungry.

Mr. G. N. Hardwick and wife, of Missouri, were the guests of W. P. Hardwick last week. While here they received a message stating that their father was seriously ill. They immediately returned to their home.

Mr. Thaddeus Salmons and son, Henry, have gone west with a view of locating in some of the western counties. They are making the journey in a wagon, and we fear these chilling rains will mar the pleasure of their trip.

CAMBRIDGE. "H."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The youngest child of Mrs. Stone is quite sick with Cholera Infantum.

Miss Tillie Froelich, of Winfield, is here for a few days visiting her parents.

Mrs. Frankie Adams, of Wellington, Missouri, cousin of the Harden family, is visiting in town.

County Surveyor Haight is in town performing the duties enjoined upon him by his office.

Bose Jones is back again from Wyoming Territory. We think a lady charms him back.

S. M. DeBolt has gone to Harter to act as telegraph operator. Mrs. DeBolt will follow him in a few days.

R. F. Roberts, who has been visiting in Missouri, has returned home and is greatly improved in health.

Miss Ida Bard, of Winfield, and Miss Fannie Saunders, of New Salem, are guests of Mrs. W. A. Weaverling.

Miss Allie Harden has been employed by the primary department at Burden. She will enter upon her duties next Monday.

It has rained incessantly for a week and the farmers, who, three weeks ago, were sighing for rain, are praying for dry weather.

Judge Soward failed to put in an appearance at the schoolhouse Sunday, hence we had no temperance lecture; but the Band of Hope occupied the time that was to have been occupied by Judge Soward.

James Moore, of Kansas City, is visiting his sister, Mrs. M. J. Weaverling, who lives east of town. Mrs. Weaverling will return to K. C. with him and have the tumor taken from her side that has been troubling her for some time.

"Under the Laurels" was rendered in good style at the schoolhouse last Saturday evening to quite a large audience. The drama was played by home talent and should be encouraged in a rousing way. The participants are Misses Allie Harden, Maud and Minnie Leedy, and Lillie Long; Messrs. Harden, Howland, Alberts, and Allen. The play will be repeated next Friday evening.

OTTER VALLEY. "JESSE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Dr. Long has returned from his trip east.

The farmers are most all through making hay.

Rev. Warren preaches at Windsor every two weeks.

M. F. Carmer, of Nevada, Missouri, is visiting Otter friends.

J. B. Rowe and S. B. Sherman spent Wednesday in Winfield.

Rev. Webb preached at Highland schoolhouse last Sunday.

D. Foster and D. T. King were in Winfield Monday on business.

John Rowe, who has been visiting friends here, has gone east.

H. R. Branson was in Otter Valley last week buying cattle to feed.

Mrs. Capt. Rowe has been having an attack of chills for some time past.

The peach crop seems to be plentiful around here, but the peaches are very small.

Miss Ida Stranghon has been suffering severe illness with her eyes the past few weeks.

Miss Fannie Darnell left last Wednesday for a few weeks' visit with relatives in Albion, Kansas.

John Burlier, of Dade County, Missouri, is visiting D. T. King. He thinks Kansas is a fine country.

The corn crop is not as good as was expected here. They find since they began to cut, it will fall short.

Mrs. Gester, of Wyandotte, who has been visiting E. J. Shurlock's family, returned to her home last week.

Mrs. M. J. Weaverling, who has been suffering for some time past with a tumor, has gone to Kansas City for medical treatment.

Mr. Utley and family moved from this neighborhood last week to take charge of the poor farm. We regret having them leave us. But Miss Hattie will remain and teach our school.

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

560 acres of good prairie upland, six miles south of Dexter in Cedar township, one mile from the line of the D., M. & A. R. R.; good water; 1,000 fruit trees,; fair dwelling and out buildings; 125 acres broken; nearly all plow land; price $9 per acre; easy payments. Address, D., this office.

WANTED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A chance on a farm by a married man to farm on the shares, or will feed stock. He has had years of experience and can give first-class recommendations from former employers. Call at this office.

H. G. FULLER & CO.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

We are prepared to make farm loans at as low rates and on as favorable terms as any firm in the county. Our office now removed to Main street, north of Myton's. H. G. Fuller & Co.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

At P. H. Albright & Co.'s loan office you will always find all the money you can put up real estate security for--on the safest and most reasonable terms and rates. We run a small hand money mill of our own.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Fuller & Mullen can give you some bargains in houses and lots, vacant lots, and suburban property. Office north of Myton's store.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Disinfect your cellars and out houses with anti-septic powder. For sale at Williams' drug store. Price only 25 cents per box.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A nice, clean stock of groceries to trade for raw land, cattle, or hogs. M. C. PUGH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Disinfectants, both in liquid and powder forms, at Williams, the druggist, 25 cents per box.

BEN FRANKLIN'S PAPER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mrs. C. M. Phenix read our ancient newspaper note Tuesday and Wednesday, discounted it by bringing in a copy of the New England Courant, a facsimile of the first paper ever printed by Ben Franklin. It is dated "Boston, from February 4, to Monday, February 11, 1723," followed with "Printed and fold by Benjamin Franklin in Queen street, where advertisements are taken in." It is a little two-column leaf ten by fourteen inches, and all who have visited the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, D. C., have seen the press it was printed on. It is one of the most primitive things of which you can imagine. It is all of wood. The base of the press is hewn out of a log, square shape, and the impression is made by a block just to fit into this space, and the block's force is made by a wooden screw attached to a crooked pole lever. Every time the type was inked, the "form" had to be lifted out. Not a piece of iron about the press. It stands up four feet high on four sprawling wooden legs. This sheet is one of the rarest we have ever seen, containing not more matter in all than would fill two columns of THE DAILY COURIER, and over half of this being "His Majesty's Moft Grocious Speech to both Houfes of Parliament, on Thursday, October 11, 1722."

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

160 acres of land, good apple and peach orchard, good stone house, all fenced, for less than one can put the improvements on. Address, Box 48, Maple City, Kansas.

WANTED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A good driving horse. H. G. FULLER & Co.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

There will be a delegate convention at the Dexter schoolhouse on Sunday, Oct. 4th, at 1 p.m., for the purpose of making a permanent organization of the Sunday Schools of the southeastern part of the county. It is desired that each school send two delegates.

E. I. Johnson, Chairman Com.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

McGuire Bros. take the lead on melons now. They have a 63 pounder staring the passers by in the face. It was raised by John Balmuth, near Geuda Springs. Next.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The Republican Primary for Pleasant Valley will meet at Odessa schoolhouse on Friday, September 18th, at 1 o'clock p.m. Sampson Johnson, Chairman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

P. H. Albright & Co. loan money on city property for any length of time--from one day to three years.

YELPING FOR YAP.

Spain Still Clamors for the Carolines.

Great Meeting in Cuba. Dragging France In.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

MADRID, September 8. Count Von Hatzfeldt, in his statement to Count Benonmar, regarding his orders that had been given to the German gunboat, meant the gunboat had been forbidden to hoist the German flag where the Spanish flag had already been hoisted. He said the disobedience of the commander of the gunboat would not affect the situation. Dispatches just received regarding German's occupation of Yap state the Spaniards on the island had hoisted the Spanish flag and had lowered it at sunset for the night, as is customary with all nations, and that immediately afterwards the German gunboat ran in, landed marines and sailors, and hoisted the German colors, formally occupying the place, despite the protestations of the Spaniards. Prince Bismarck has offered to withdraw the German forces from Yap provided Spain will not occupy it pending the diplomatic solution of the question as to Spain's claim over the island. Germany will acknowledge the Spanish occupation of Yap provided Spain proves that the Spanish flag had been hoisted on the island before the German gunboat had arrived in the harbor. Excitement in Madrid over the affair has quieted down. Everything was tranquil last night. Count Von Solmes-Sonnewalde, the German Minister, had a lengthy interview today with Premier Canovas Del Castillo. He repeated the assurance that Germany would surrender Yap if Spain had occupied the island before the Germans arrived. At a meeting of the Council yesterday King Alfonso declared that he had confidence in the present Ministry. He said he was convinced that Emperor William would meet him half way in an honorable compromise. A special posse of police guards the German Embassy.

EXCITEMENT IN CUBA.

HAVANA, September 8. About 5,000 persons attended a meeting at the Spanish Casino yesterday, which had been called to take action in connection with the seizure of the Carolines by Germany. Enthusiastic speeches were made, pledging the lives and property of the citizens of Cuba in support of the Spanish Government in case of war. A merchant, in the name of merchants of Havana, offered $500,000 toward purchasing men-of-war. A resolution was adopted urging traders to suspend relations with Germany while negotiations are pending. A procession was then formed and marched to the palace of the President, and directors of the casino called on the Captain General, and informed him of the action of the meeting. The Captain General thanked them, and said that if war broke out the Germans would not go to Spain, but might come to Cuba, in which event, he was prepared to defend the island from German aggression, and he counted on their support and that of all the people of Cuba. The gathering dispersed peacefully after giving three cheers for Spain, King Alfonso, and the Captain General. A portion of the crowd passed in front of the German Consulate, repeating the cheers for Spain and King Alfonso. The Consulate is guarded. A committee from the political party known as the Union Constitutional, and the commanders of numerous volunteer corps have offered their services to the Captain General and the National Government. The press of Havana is highly indignant over the Carolines affair, and the public excitement is intense.

IN A HURRY.

PARIS, September 8. M. de Freycinet, Minister of Foreign Affairs, is hurriedly returning to Paris in consequence of the excitement occasioned by the Carolines affair. Spanish residents at Marseilles threaten to attack the German consulate in that city. Local authorities have taken steps to prevent any repetition of the Madrid outrage. Newspapers of Paris, in commenting on the difficulty between Germany and Spain, insist that Prince Bismarck is trying to embroil France in the affair.

BISMARCK'S SEASONED JUDGMENT.

BERLIN, September 8. The Kruise Zeitung says that Germany, in obtaining reparation from Spain, refrains from adding to the trouble of a friendly sovereign. The Kruise Zeitung is confident that Prince Bismarck's seasoned judgment and firm hand will conduce to a settlement of the dispute. Other newspapers praise the calmness displayed by the citizens of Berlin.

THE JUSTICE MILL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

John Buckley vs. John Bevens, et al, suit to quiet title. Judgment for defendant.

The connubial tie binding Mary E. Cox to J. E. Cox was rent asunder, giving her a divorce on ground of bigamy.

The matrimonial tie binding Josephine Willis to Geo. W. Willis, was also severed, a divorce being decreed her on grounds of profligacy. She had to work out to support him and got tired of her burden.

Court adjourned to Monday morning, Sept. 14.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

If you don't want to be troubled at night, give your little ones Cole's Diarrhoea Remedy for cramps, colic, etc. Prepared and sold only at Cole's Drug Store, Winfield.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Three of my family had the ague. One bottle of Cole's Ague Cure has cured them. I can cheerfully recommend Cole's Ague Cure as the best ague remedy I ever used.

A. L. Crabtree.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Knowing the formula of Cole's Diarrhoea Remedy, I consider it the best medicine a person can use for all summer complaints--Colic, Diarrhoea, etc. Every family where there are children, should keep it in the house for immediate use. Dr. Rothrock.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

A BARGAIN. A fine Ottawa six-horse sheller, with elevator, cob stacker and feeder, mounted sheller and mounted power. Cost over $500.00 laid down here. Used only a short time and taken up on a debt. Has been nicely stored. Price $300.00, on reasonable terms.

W. A. Lee.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Mothers.

There are upon the skin of every human being, child and adult alike, 2,300,000 pores. Through these pores in the form of insensible perspiration, is expelled more than one-quarter of the nourishment taken into the system. The importance of keeping open these perspiration valves upon a child's body, is second only to that of promptly digesting the food eaten. It was to open the pores of the skin and to assimilate the food that Dr. Pitcher formulated Castoria. Loose bowels, constipation, fevers, and eruptions which are so constant among infants and children, and which kill one-third of all children before they are five years old, arise principally from these two causes. It is from the wonderful results attendant upon the use of Castoria in regulating the stomach and bowels and keeping open the pores of the skin, that Castoria acquired its world wide reputation. With plenty of water for the body, pure air for the lungs, and Castoria to assimilate the food, there need be no unaccounted for sickness among children. Castoria is a vegetable prescription without morphine or other narcotic property. Thirty years' extensive use has given it a history never attained by any other medicine.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

For loans on improved farms, go to Jarvis, Conklin & Co. They will give lower rates and better privileges than any other firm can give. Money paid as soon as the papers are executed. They are the only firm in Cowley County that have the coupons on hand to deliver when the interest is paid.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

For Rent. 6 room house with cellar, good well of water, and will rent low to a permanent tenant. Apply at Wallis & Wallis' grocery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

New Book Store.

The City Book Store at the "Red Front," on Main street, is now open for business. A first-class stock of Books, Stationery, School Supplies, Blank Books, etc., will be kept in stock. Also curtain goods, poles, and a fine line of late styles picture mouldings, from which frames will be made to order at price of moulding. None but the best goods carried in stock, and I hope by moderate prices and fair treatment to merit a fair share of your trade.

I will receive subscriptions and furnish at the City Book Store, any paper, magazine, or periodical published, at publisher's price, for any length of time.

North Main Street.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

WANTED.

250 men to call at my shop on Loomis street, between 9th and 10th Avenue, west of East Boarding House, and examine work in the blacksmithing line. Horse-shoeing a specialty. Particular pains taken in the treatment of diseased and Contracted feet, over-reaching or interfering horses. And good work guaranteed on plows and all kinds of farm work. Charges reasonable. Come and see me and be satisfied.

WILLIAM TITUS, Blacksmith.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

C. W. ARMSTRONG,

NOTARY PUBLIC.

Collecting Agent.

Abstract of Titles a specialty. Office with W. B. Pixley, N. Main Street.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

NOTICE!

All persons having colts from French Dick, foaled in 1885, are requested to bring them to my farm on the first Friday in October. I will give two premiums, for best colt, $15; second best, $7.50, judges to be picked by exhibitors. My own colts will not be shown in this competition. B. W. Sitter.

NOTICE OF ATTACHMENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Recap. Before G. H. Buckman, Justice of the Peace, Winfield: W. A. Lee, Plaintiff, against A. W. McMillan, Defendant. $75 plus interest thereon at the rate of 12 per cent per annum, from July 10, 1885. Buckman took action against the goods of defendant. Said action to be heard before Buckman on September 24, 1885, at 10 a.m. J. F. McMullen, Attorney for Plaintiff. W. A. Lee.

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Recap. Estate of Jabez D. Hammond, Deceased. Charles C. Hammond, Administrator. McDonald & Webb, Attorneys. Final report and settlement by administrator to be made October 5, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Recap. Estate of Alfred Elliott Johnson, deceased. William H. Johnson, Administrator. Jno. D. Pryor, Attorney. Final report and settlement by administrator to be made October 5, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Recap. Estate of John Servis, deceased. James Kirk, administrator. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for Administrator. Claim for expenses and final settlement of said estate to be made October 5, 1885.

SHERIFF'S SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Recap. G. H. McIntire, Sheriff, selling September 28, 1885, property to satisfy case of M. M. Rutherford, Plaintiff, vs. William F. Wise, Lafayette Wise, and Eliza Wise, defendants.

REVERE THE AGED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

"He is an old crank," said a thoughtless young man to our reporter yesterday. The subject of this harshness was an old man of sixty-five years or more. He started in life with high hopes, early in the present century. The same ambitions fired his heart, the same emotions warmed his young life that incites the youth of today. The kindly greeting of friends were with him and the prayers of loved ones followed. Care to him was an unknown quantity. The dawn of his morning sun was bright and peaceful; the beginning of his career auspicious, the counterpart of what we thoughtless youths are building today. May we ask you, young friend, to look into his faded eyes and upon his bent and tottering form and see what you will be forty years hence? Then your life will have been spent, your record made, pride and selfishness will be well nigh eliminated from your nature, and in the richness and fulness of a charity born of suffering, you will forgive the careless cruelty of words such as you have spoken. With this aged one the voyage of life has been perilous. The clouds of adversity have darkened his way, and the cry of despondent ones has driven him to the pursuance of one idea, to the end of accomplishing one great result. Does this make him "a crank?" Will you despise his gray hairs because he pursues a branch of reform not congenial to your taste? Let us hope not. Your words were wicked, thoughtless, heartless. Will you guard the evil impulse that brought them to your lips? Have you stood at the portals of death's dark chamber to receive the last words of a dying father? No, or you could not have spoken those cruel words; you would not have admitted the evil thoughts. "Old age is honorable" even for its own sake, and cold is the heart and irreverent the hand that gives not a token of respect to the fathers and mothers of our race.

THE INCENTIVE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

The newspapers are very much put out to find an incentive for the poisoning of Walkup by his wife, at Emporia. Why may it not have been revenge? It is said that she is young and very beautiful, a true type of southland loveliness, with a touch of French creole blood in her veins. Walkup became completely infatuated with her and to gain her, represented himself to be very wealthy. Her mother, to make sure of his financial standing, visited Emporia before the marriage, at which time it is said that Walkup showed her about the city, pointing to this, that, and the other properties as belonging to him, offering, it is said, to make her a deed of one very fine residence. Now, if this is so, the girl was badly fooled and instead of getting an old man of great wealth, she found she had an old man and poverty. From what we gather from the papers, it seems that his farm was mortgaged for all it was worth and that the house he lived in was not his own but belonged to his daughter, and that, in fact, he was practically a bankrupt. Of course, his young wife was not long in finding this all out, and that she had sold her young life, but that she had been not only cheated out of the consideration expected but out of all that life had to offer for her. Men have taken the life of others who have defrauded them of paltry dollars in small amounts. It may be, however, that the young woman is innocent of any crime; we hope it may be so proven. She is very young and so bears the impress of innocence on her face that all who see her are at once induced to believe in her innocence. Wichita Eagle.

WHO IS GUILTY?

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Friday evening, in the presence of a crowd of men, one of our merchants made the remark, as he stood wistfully eyeing a watermelon that registered 60 pounds on the scales, "I'll give anyone 10 cents that can steal that melon." Well, that melon disappeared in a very short time afterward, and the faker did not get the ten cents--didn't even ask for it. He didn't want it, and we wouldn't either, under the circumstances, for that merchant was mad. He wanted to exterminate somebody, but who, he didn't know. Who perpetrated the deed? was the question. This morning the ghastly remains of that melon were found in the street in front of Williams' drug store. The marks on at least a quarter section of it showed almost conclusively that the molars of our fat man had played a very interesting part in its murder, but on being questioned, he swore innocence on a stack of almanacs. Judge Beck said he was positive that Noble Caldwell was the guilty victim, but Noble says he was trying his mightiest to convince his best girl's mother that he was the proper man for her son-in-law: would "insure" her he was, during the entire delightful evening. The innocent expression of his face betrayed no guilt and it was unanimously conceded he was innocent. Jack Hudson--but we promised not to give it away and you bet we won't. Our church reputation is above par and if we disclosed the cost of that melon and the various owners, our moral proclivities might slide down below zero.

A STABBER CAUGHT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 10, 1885.

Sheriff W. R. Kelly, of Wilson County, came in this morning to get Thomas La Mar, who was captured by Constable Church, near Dexter, and lodged in our bastille yesterday. Last Saturday morning La Mar stabbed Bill Kalor, a few miles from Fredonia, cutting off his right lung and laying him up in bad shape. It was over an old grudge. La Mar is a widower, thirty years old, and leaving his little boy, fled on foot, accompanied only by a shirt, an old pair of pants, and pair of stoga boots, mingled with fright that sent him along like a reindeer. The fellow he stabbed was the black sheep of the neighborhood, and not much effort was made to find La Mar. But the sheriff, of course, following the straight line of duty, carded La Mar's description all over the country, and wrote a letter to Church at Dexter, expecting that Thomas would haul up at his brother-in-law's, B. Losey, near that place, which Thomas did. La Mar has always been a young man of peaceful habits, and will have much sympathy. He thought he had killed Kalor, and when he was brought out to see the sheriff this morning, broke into sobs and trembled like a leaf. Kalor will recover. La Mar fled on foot all the way and looks used up. The officer and prisoner left for Fredonia this evening.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, SEPT. 17, 1885.

THE AWFUL ROAR.

The Roaring of the Funnel Fiend Before the Destruction of Washington, Ohio.

Halls, Dwellings and Other Buildings Go Down With a Crash in the Darkness.

Marvelous Escapes from the Ruins.

Five Killed, Three Fatally Insured. Damages, $1,000,000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, September 10. Washington Court House, the scene of the terrible visitation by a cyclone Tuesday night, is the county seat of Fayette County. It has had a most extraordinary business growth within the past fifteen years, and being the center of a rich agricultural district with excellent school facilities, it had grown to be a business place of considerable importance. The residents had beautified the town with tasteful dwellings, and its recently completed courthouse was one of the best in the State. Today this prosperous town is a mass of ruins. Tuesday night's experience of its inhabitants has no parallel in the experiences of any town in Ohio. A heavy rainfall began about eight o'clock Tuesday night. That and darkness drove everybody into shelter, so that while there are some who say they saw the funnel-shaped clouds, it does not seem possible that there could have been much observation of the heavens. Shortly after the rain began wind came with a terrifying sound. Its work was almost instantaneous, and people say it was over in two minutes, but nobody could take note of time in such a fearful experience. The fierce

ROARING OF THE TERRIBLE TORNADO,

the crashing of broken and falling buildings, the sharp flashes of lightning, the rolling thunder and the pitiless rain combined to produce a sensation of the most horrifying character. The two minutes of this startling experience was followed by a new terror to the scattered survivors more sickening than that through which they had passed. It was the uncertainty of the fate of friends and relatives. All who escaped alive felt sure that many lives had certainly been lost. When the fierceness of the storm had passed and men could communicate with each other, it was found that all were in darkness. The gas works were destroyed and all the street lights were out. Only by the lightning's flashes were the frightened people able to catch glimpses of the desolation that had spread. Friends called for friends and as answers came, the first shock of dread was relieved. The number of deaths was miraculously small. The next duty was to search for the imprisoned and wounded. In this there was prompt and hearty effort. Bonfires were lighted and torches improvised, and wherever cries were heard, ready aid was given. More than that, the debris was overturned to see if any more dead could be found. With a cheerful welcome the doors of such houses as were not destroyed were opened for the houseless ones driven into the rain. In many cases these were utterly bereft of all of their household goods. The

NIGHT WAS A FEARFUL ONE,

but it was full of helpful work for the strongest. The Sheriff called upon the militia to set a guard over the exposed stocks of all the business houses, for they were all broken or destroyed, and prowling thieves were not wanting, even in the first hour of the city's misfortune. Of course their number grew today when the crowds of visitors poured in. With daylight came a most disheartening spectacle. The fair town of yesterday lay torn and wrecked in disordered heaps, the streets well nigh impassable from the trees and parts of houses cast into them. Worst of all was the sight of the poor who had lost all and who had no place to lay their heads. They wandered hopelessly about as if they were strangers. Of course, the people whose houses were not ruined began at once to care for their unfortunate fellow-sufferers, but the farmers soon began to pour into town, drawn by curiosity, but at the same time bringing with them substantials for the destitute. Before the day ended the council had taken formal action, by organizing a relief committee, and by night much was done toward preventing actual privation. The great wonder is that more lives were not lost. In Odd Fellows Hall forty-six members were gathered at a meeting in the second story when the storm came. The building was literally thrown down, and yet not one was injured. Thirty-one went down with the ruins and escaped, while nine clung to the walls of an adjoining block and were rescued by ladders. People were not frightened until they heard the rattle of signs, threshing in the terrible storm. It kept getting

WORSE AND WORSE

until the largest and most substantial brick and stone structures of the city heaved to and fro at the mercy of the gale. Bricks and beams, roofs, fences, and almost every conceivable thing that could possibly be wrenched loose flew through the air, scattering death and destruction everywhere. For eight long minutes the disastrous work went on. Music Hall was filled with people attending the Salvation Army meeting, and a portion of the roof and ceiling fell in. A disastrous panic and stampede was prevented with the greatest difficulty. The list of the killed is as follows: Mrs. Mollie Jones, Edith Floyd, Ella Forsha, Flora Carr. The fatally injured are: Herbert Toggart, James Jackson, J. C. Van. Fully 300 persons were hurt: too many to make it practicable to give their names. Among the seriously wounded are Mrs. W. P. Irving, badly wounded; B. Hess, wounded on the head; Milton Hyer, back injured; James Snapp, struck by a falling telegraph pole; Mrs. W. Thorp, blown across the street and badly hurt; Miss Lulu Clifton, lower portion of the body crushed; Herbert Taggert, badly crushed; Charles Mercer, badly injured; Mrs. James Bench, badly hurt. Following is the list of losses, there being no insurance against this sort of damage: Clogston & Beaver, $1,000; George Melvin, $3,500; the Rev. Norman Jones, $1,000; Melvin, Coffin & Haley, $1,000; the courthouse, $2,500; the Arlington House, $1,500; the H. Haht estate, $1,000; H. Hildebrandt, $1,000; Willett, $1,500; Dr. Rush, $1,000; Garringer & Baird, $1,000; James Walton, $5,100; D. Kennedy, $3,500; Masonic Hall, $4,000; Rice, $1,000; the Music hall, $2,000; the Hon. Mills Gardener, $2,000; B. Kelly, $5,000; Stimson Bros. & Co., $2,500; James Purcell, $3,000; the J. D. Stukey mill, county, $5,000; Dayton & Tronton [? Toronto] Railroad, $1,000; W. Sager, $1,000; Purcell & Bro., $3,000; Barr & Co., $1,000; Blank Redicords, $1,000; Craig Bros., $1,500; W. A. Harlow, $1,500; J. P. Robinson, $1,000; J. N. Vandeman, $2,000; W. T. Ustick, $4,000; Z. Heagle, $2,500; Stutson Good, $2,000; George Dahl, $2,300; the Odd Fellows, $1,500; James Bragg, $3,000; P. J. Burk, $3,000; Baker & Weller, $6,000; White & Ballard, $2,000; C. M. & V. Railroad, $3,000; T. C. Coffman, $10,000; Dennis & Salesbery, $4,000; Stonehart, $1,000; Bing & Son, $1,000; George Bailey, $8,000; D. Shannon, $1,000; C. O. Stevens, $1,000; A. Dewitt, $1,000; Thomas Craig, $1,000; C. C. Lawhead, $3,000; P. S. Collins, $1,000. These losses are upon buildings alone, and are far from complete. Senator John Little estimates that the loss from the storm in Washington and vicinity will not fall short of $1,0000,000.

TORNADO FATALITY.

PIKE, OHIO, September 10. The cyclone Tuesday afternoon demolished the house of Andrew Curry, and hurled Mrs. Curry and the babe she was holding in her arms several hundred feet. The baby was instantly killed by being dashed against a tree and the mother fatally injured. The father, who was also in the house, was struck with timber and will probably die.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

WASHINGTON, September 10. United States Consul General Williams, at Havana, Cuba, was directed today to see that Cerello Puebla, of New York, who is in prison at Havana, has a fair and speedy trial. Puebla is a Cuban but some years since became a naturalized American. He recently returned to Cuba on, he says, private business. Immediately on his arrival he was seized and imprisoned on the charge of inciting a rebellion against Spain.

"WHERE IS THE JONAH?"

The Yacht Race Results in Another Failure Because of Light Winds.

The Boats Make a Fair Start. The Genesta Takes the Lead for a Time.

With Failing Wind the Puritan Forges Ahead and Has a Good Lead

When Time is Called.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

NEW YORK, September 12. "Where is the Jonah, here or on the Genesta?" asked Mr. Tams, of the regatta committee, of Sir Richard Sutton at nine o'clock, after letting go the Genesta's tow line in the horse shoe. She had been towed in from sea after the third unsuccessful attempt to sail the first race in the series for the American cup. "I am sure I don't know," replied Sir Richard, despondently. "I suppose we must try again." If not for the delay in putting crews and officers on the yachts from the Judges' boat, many think the race might have been sailed within the time limit of seven hours. The early morning sky gave every promise of a good breeze for the contest and a superb yachting day for all. Hundreds of people were early active and flocking to the steamboat docks, each with high hopes for the success of their favorite boat. A larger number of yachtsmen and their friends than usual left pier 3, East River, on the committee boat, Luckenbach, at 8:15 yesterday morning, and all are certain that the race would be made in seven hours. Many wages were made on the result of the contest on the way down the bay. The Puritan was standing out through the narrows under mainsail and jib at nine o'clock when the Judges' boat, having on board Messrs. Tams, Schuyler, and Stebbins, arrived at Tompkinsville, Staten Island. The Genesta also was underway, heading for the narrows under her jib. Her white jacketed crew were soon aloft in the rigging, and the cutter's mainsail was hoisted in a few minutes. The easterly winds which had prevailed Thursday left a heavy ground swell which rolled in over the bar and bank, making itself felt as the yachts, under sail, made their way through the channel to the Scotland lightship--the starting point. The Genesta's new bowsprit was admired by the yachtsmen, while the Puritan's mainsail, which had been cleverly patched, showed no difference in its setting.

THE START.

By 10:30 the steamers Grand Republic, Columbia, Cygnus, Taurus, and Sirius, The Empire State, Elmerty, and the steam yachts Atlanta, Electric, Wanda, and over a score of sailing yachts, including General Butler's America, were assembled near the light. The wind was blowing a fresh breeze from the eastward and the tide was about one-quarter off when the preparatory signal was given at 11:30, followed by the one to start at 11:35. The Judges' boat lay with her head to the northward one-eight of a mile from Scotland lightship and the course was east by north, twenty miles to windward and return. At 11:45 the whistle to get into position was sounded and the sloop and cutter had every square inch of canvas up as if by magic. The way the Genesta showed her hull under the pressure of the breeze amazed the yachtsmen who had not had occasion to see her in anything but the comparative calm of Monday and Tuesday. She keeled over at times in a way that would have frightened the spectators had they not known how much more still was under water, and how many tons of lead held her down. Her speed during the preliminary sailing for position could scarcely be compared to that of the American boat, but both dashed through the water in a fashion which promised a fine race. They did not come near enough to have what might be called a brush until the line was crossed, perhaps having last Tuesday's disaster in mind. At 11:20 the signal was given, and in a minute two blasts from the Judges' boat announced that the racers were off. The Puritan passed first, so far as could be seen from Sandy Hook, and taking windward heading about northeast, nearly parallel to the line of Coney Island. The Genesta was about ten seconds behind and on the land side. Whether her delay was due to the Puritan having taken her wind could not be determined, even with good glasses. Five hundred yards from the start, the two boats had drawn apart, but with about the same speed, the Genesta wishing apparently to repeat Monday's programme and get ahead of the Puritan by going freer.

THE GENESTA LEADS.



The Puritan sailed as close to the wind as possible, and by the end of the first mile the Genesta had run several hundred yards in advance, the Puritan keeping doggedly in the teeth of the breeze, which had become so strong as to send half the smaller boats back under reefs after they had seen the start. At 12:10 the Genesta put about as if to cross the Puritan's bow, but gave it up in two minutes and resumed her course. Her first tack was made at 12:41, when she was apparently half a mile ahead of the Puritan. The Genesta only crossed the Puritan's bow by about three lengths and immediately went about again at 12:44. The Puritan kept on the starboard tack until 1:10 when she came about with the Genesta then under her lee. The wind falling light soon after, she began to steadily increase her lead on the Genesta and when at 1:18 she set her sprit topsail and the Genesta set her club topsail, the Boston boat had a good lead. After a long stretch to the starboard, the Puritan tacked again at 3:10, the Genesta following suit five minutes later. The boats both carried the same sail, mainsail, club topsail, forestaysail, and jib. The Genesta took in her balloon forestaysail and set a smaller one while on this tack. The Puritan made a short stretch on the port tack at 4:10, going about again at 4:20. At this time the state boat was three miles to the windward and was just visible, but the wind being light and the swell still quite heavy, there was but little chance for the yachts to finish.

THE PURITAN TAKES FIRST PLACE.

The Genesta set her big club topsail at 4:50 and went about to port. The Puritan had been slowly but surely "eating" her way to windward of her antagonist and was now a good mile ahead of her. At 5:15 both went about again, while over a hundred crafts of all sizes patiently waited the coming of the racers at the outer mark. The Puritan tacked for it at 5:23, when the Genesta was yet nearly two miles to windward with not enough wind to fill her sails. The Boston boat rounded the mark at 5:37.56, while a chorus of steam whistles from the flotilla of steamers greeted it. A moment later her spinnaker was thrown out to port, making a beautiful picture as she shipped away over the now almost glassy surface of the undulating swells toward the brilliant sunset sky to the west. The committee, finding that it was impossible to sail the race in seven hours, took the Genesta in tow, while the tug Scandinavian was sent to bring the Puritan into the horse shoe. The yachts are to be started at 10:30 today. The indications are that the weather will continue light.

INCIDENTS OF THE DAY.

The flotilla which had gathered around the Scotland light ship in the morning was imposing in numbers, even if it did not equal the dimensions of the great fleet which had covered the face of the ocean a week ago. In addition to the countless yachts, from a majestic schooner to a small sloop and cutter, which dashed among their larger companions like gulls and minnows, there were steam yachts and a number of large steamers especially engaged for guests of the New York Yacht Club. The day was regarded as most favorable for the Genesta, but the Puritan after the Goelet cup race in a rousing southeaster at Newport should not be brought to dislike the weather. General Ben Butler could not have wished a better breeze for the America, and he is not thought to have had any reason to complain, even though he were arranging a match, as he did at Gloucester, when the only condition of the race was that there should be an eight knot breeze. It was then said after he had been beaten by the Fortuna, Titane, and Mohican, that he had all the wind he wanted and the process of whipping him was termed "Educating Ben Butler."

ALL OVER THE WORLD!

A Peregrinating Disciple of the Silent Messengers of Thought.

A Sad Picture!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

He walked silently in. We knew him the moment we raised our eyes and saw him standing there. In fact, we had been expecting him; he nearly always comes when we are in just such a strait, and needing him. He always wears pants of another; he hasn't any vest; his shoes are worn and run down at the heels, and his hat is battered and dusty. There are spots of ink about his shirt, which hang over his waistband, and his new paper collar is the only fresh, white thing about him, and it looks as though he had just put it on with soiled fingers. He is pale, weak-eyed, and prematurely gray-haired; he looks as if he had never known regular hours, either for sleeping or eating, and he must have come thousands of miles, and been coming ever since he was a boy. His starting point was so far away and so long ago that he has almost forgotten where it was; but we have an idea it must have been when his mother buttoned his little blue shirt-band around his white, boyish throat, put on his little straw hat and sent him barefooted to ask for a place to work in the printing office. How proud he was when he went home that first night, and showed his new brass rule, and tells his mother he has learned all the boxes and has a free ticket to the circus next week, and the editor gave him a big piece of wedding cake, a part of which he has brought home to the baby, and if he sets a column one day next week, he can go fishing on Saturday. Yes, somewhere about there, was the commencement of his long journey, and here he is now, perhaps two-thirds of the way. He asks us: "What is the show for a sit?" We give him a case, and by and by he says he feels faint, and asks us if we can't lend him a quarter--he hain't had any breakfast yet. We know his weakness, and, as we need his work, we go down with him, and order some breakfast at the nearest restaurant. When he comes back he looks happier, and better able to work. In the evening when he goes to distributing his case, he recounts the history of his late places of employment. He knows the circulation and the amount of business of every paper in the state, and just why the Dispatch suspended, and why the Advance sold out to the Courier. He is well acquainted with the unknown editor of the Thunderer, and had friends on the editorial force of all the leading journals of the country. By and by he whistles an air from an Italian opera, and in reply to the question, answers with a Latin quotation. He stays with us a week, and we grow to like him more and more every day. He has read everything from Shakespeare and Ruskin to Mark Twain and Bill Arp; he knows more about our laws, national and state, than the best lawyer in the city; he is well acquainted with the lives of all eminent persons of the age, and is a perfect encyclopedia of passing events; but we cannot afford to keep him any longer, so we pay him off and he again starts on his long road that leads--not to home, for he hasn't any; not to the society of intelligent people like himself, for outside of the printing office he is unknown; maybe back to night work on some city daily, or, if too old and worn for that, a rapid descent from one office to another, with whiskey and laudanum for companions, to an unmarked grave by some lonely wayside.

A SAD SCRIBE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Eagle claims Wichita to be a city of thirteen thousand inhabitants--a rustling, bustling city whose life surpasses that of any metropolis this side of London, England. But the reporter wasn't posted about the dead give away business Friday. Listen. "A knight of the faber, whose daily duty is to dish up two columns of intellectual food to satisfy the greed for knowledge of the thousands of readers of the Eagle in this fair city, had a hard tussle of it yesterday. It was not a circus day by any means, but was dull in trade and a dead one for news. The manipulator of lead watched every act and asked everyone he knew if they could give him a pointer. Vain effort! They didn't know a thing. The very essence of reportorial soundness is his ability to dish up a column of highly interesting matter out of nothing. The Faber knight who is equal to this is worth millions. Along Main street the clerks in the stores were cracking nuts, while here and there a few men could be seen sitting upon door steps chewing their cuds. The only place any life was visible was about the new buildings going up. Real estate men were not rushing wildly about with anxious intending purchasers."

SHUT UP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

R. H. White is still writing letters to parties in Winfield, from Sharon, Barbour County. He says he is going to Illinois soon. Every letter he writes is just that much toward convicting himself. Everyone of them shows a haunted mind--haunted by the weight of something that is grinding out his life, sleeping with him by night and walking with him by day. No frank, honorable traces can be seen in his words, while between the lines are plainly visible truths which would be far better for him if kept still. Our advice to White is to keep his mouth shut. Every time he opens it, he gets his foot farther in. If he wants the "bloody negro," let him go to Douglass, where he is, and get the $550 reward himself. Every man who has read his letters is convinced that they are only the mutterings of a diseased conscience. Of course, no one is yet ready to convict him, without the doubt, but a few more letters will do it, beyond the doubt. Shut up, White, or give your letters an honorable tone.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The moist east wind, which for the past twenty-four hours has, with vigorous yet unseen pinions, tossed into billows the boughs of trees above the city's roofs, and which has moaned so sadly around the gables of our houses, foretells the end of another summer, and whispers of gathered fruits and garnered grain, says the Wichita Eagle. This eastern messenger, with its tale of decay and death, its murmurs of pinching hunger and ragged want, kisses the brow with a soft touch, like the kiss of a mourner whose cheeks are bedewed with tears and whose sighs are a heartbreak. The o'er cast heavens have sung like a pall and the pulse of nature throbs responsive to the knell of the dying season and its perishing colors. The voices of night, which all through the long summer have lulled the weary to slumber with their soft cadences, are now almost drowned by the plaint of the rustling leaves, as they sob out the dirge that has touched the hearts of poets since the time when first harps were attuned and tongues loosed in song, and we already see the dreary length of that line of tramps, who shall destroy our substance for many days, reaching away to the buds and birds of another spring.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Company C, K. N. G., appeared for drill at the rink Friday evening in their bright new uniforms. It was a charming sight to see them go through the manual of arms in full military array. The private uniforms are Regulation Fatigue, cap, blouse, and pants, while those of the officers are the latest cut, full suits, with artistic epaulets and sword and belt. Next Monday evening the company gives a dress parade at the rink, with an admission fee of ten cents, to help out on incidentals, rink rent, etc. Of course, everybody will go, encouraging by their presence one of the best drilled companies in the state--one an honor to our city and the members who compose it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

This is the way the editor of the Greely News goes for the Mound City editor. "The low, filthy, ill-bred, unscrupulous, unprincipled, conscience devoid, thimble-headed, long eared, thieving natured, rotten livered, foul mouthed, lying, stench loving, journalistic bastard, that calls himself the editor of the Mound City "progress" says we threatened him with personal violence, which is a LOW-DOWN LIE of his own hatching." Our advice to the Mound City man is to look in the dictionary, and if the above means anything bad, to give that Greely News man a "lickin'."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

When Winfield builds a town, if it is necessary to bridge the ocean gulfs to insure success, they are bridged, you bet. The Veteran Bridge Company was organized Friday, with James H. Bullene at the head, to bridge the Arkansas river between Syracuse and Veteran, the new Winfield town. This will put Veteran in twenty-one miles of its best Santa Fe supply point, Syracuse.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Capt. H. H. Siverd brought in Edward Roberts, a druggist of Udall, Saturday, charged with violating the liquor law. Roberts gave bond of $300 for his appearance next Thursday for trial before Judge Snow.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Nancy A. Clarey filed a petition in the District Court on Friday, for divorce from Isaac Clarey, on various grounds.

A FEW DETESTABLES.

A Pin for Some of Our Citizens Whose Livers are Always On a Strike.

A Growling Curse and a Sunshiny Blessing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Probably the most elaborately discontented man in the universe is the habitual growler; he whose plaintive whine is always sure to break in on the gladness of others; who loves to sit in the shade and darkness, and snarl at his fellow creatures for basking in the sunlight; who sits on the high throne of misery and throws cold blankets on the gladness that other people feel. The growler ever and anon sends anonymous epistles to the papers, wailing about something, with no apparent reason, and it is the growler who says unkind things to hurt the feelings of those about him. There are growlers in Winfield by the dozen. They amble through life with a soul full of sorrow, wishing they were dead, and when the old gentleman with the scythe serves his papers upon them, they kick when they die. The fact that theaters come occasionally gives them cause to snarl; the sight of a man on a bicycle throws them into moral convulsions; the skating rink is a source of constant anguish; dancing is but a device of the devil and everything that tends to amuse is denounced as a similar snare. As a rule the man who earns an honest living has but little time to hunt for things to growl about, and those who do not earn an honest living have no right to complain of anybody's short comings before they give their own a blast. The man who journeys through this vale of tears with a smile of peace on his countenance and the light of gladness in his eye is sometimes described as an imbecile, but in the long run he is the man to tie to, and when you come to measure him up for true worth, the man with the smile always outweighs the man with the groan. People keep growing because the city doesn't do this, that and the other, when it is doing the best it can with the material on hand; others growl because of the wet weather, who may live through to a year of drouth, and growl at that. It is more comfortable to be happy, and the man who feels that way is the one who makes friends and finally influences the keeper of the golden gate to turn his head to one side and let him slip in.

ALIVE YET DEAD.

SHUT UP.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A mute half breed Creek Indian was brought up from Arkansas City the other day in a terribly bad condition. He lit down on the streets of Arkansas from nobody knew where. His clothes were in tatters, his toes, in years back, had been frozen off, and with no mode under heavens to communicate his wants or feelings to others, he is the most pitiable object the human mind can conceive. He was placed in the poor house, but soon wandered off, as aimlessly as an animal, drifting back to Winfield. He was put in the jail last night, and when the door was opened up this morning, he darted past the big revolver guard like a cat, and made up the street. He was brought back, and nobody can conceive of what to do with him. He seems to know nothing, yet is not insane, and therefore not admittable to an asylum. He is not a Kansan and therefore can't go into the mute asylum. He is cut off from the world and yet in it. He seems to have been drifting around like a wild animal, with no physical case whatever. Our officials will see what can be done. He'll have to be kept at the poor farm at present.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Instead of bewailing that period of slack trade commonly denominated "hard times," every mother's son should hail it as friendly medicine, which though bitter to the taste, is calculated to bring into action all the disarranged and abused machinery of commerce and trade. A period of hard times teaches us economy, obliges us to carefully take stock of assets and consider our liabilities. It prevents us from indulging in foolhardy speculations and extravagant living. In short, it is a discipline the human family can get in no other way. It prods on the lazy and causes the chronic loafer to either work or steal, and in case of the latter alternative, he finds himself locked up out of the sight of decent men and women, which is a blessing to society. Instead of cursing and complaining therefore, we should learn the great lesson a wise Providence is trying to teach us, and be thankful rather than rebellious.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Barnthouse, with the others of the bridal party, returned from the west Wednesday, to find a magnificent banquet awaiting them at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hartman, east 8th avenue. In the words of some ancient philosopher, "the table fairly groaned under the weight of tempting viands"--every thing superior culinary taste could desire. Such a temptation hasn't greeted the lank, hungry form of our reporter for many moons. He stuffed himself on the interior and exterior (pockets) and to boot was given a basket full for our fat man, devil, and the rest of THE COURIER sinners. A very pleasant party partook of the banquet. The bride and groom received a number of artistic and valuable presents, with the heartiest well wishes of all acquaintances.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Phil. S. Kleeman is in a box, and THE COURIER put him in by making him say Winfield was a city of seven hundred inhabitants, in his article Wednesday, when he meant seven thousand, with great big illuminated letters. Fellows have been tackling him all day, determined to annihilate him if he didn't cave. He referred them all to THE COURIER and our fighting man, with his big "editor's club--dinamite, hands off," has made the air blue all day, standing off the fellows who wanted to murder the man who said Winfield only had 700 inhabitants. We take all the blame, and gladly place our population where Phil. truthfully put it, 7000.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Juvenile Band was out in an open bus the latter part of Saturday, serenading. They went all over the city, drawing appreciative forms, clad in the gauzy habiliments of stilly night, from every window. The music was entrancing, as it floated out on the balmy night air, and thoroughly enjoyed by all. The Juveniles are improving astonishingly--in fact, their improvement from the start has been great. They will soon make one of the best bands of the State. Our citizens are proud of them, and always ready to accord every meritorious praise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Arkansas City Traveler has a column article showing up delinquent subscribers. It don't take many words to size up such an individual. Dr. Evans hands us a few lines from his old home paper that knocks out the bull's eye with neatness and dispatch. "You may hive all the stars in a nail keg, hang the ocean on a fence to dry, put the sky to soak in a gourd, unbuckle the bellyband of eternity, and let out the sun and moon, but never delude yourself with the idea that you can escape that place on the other side of purgatory, unless you pay the printer."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Rev. C. P. Graham, formerly pastor of the Walnut Valley and New Salem Presbyterian churches and well known all over Cowley, was married recently in Chicago to Miss Ellen Piggott. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Gerrat Snyder, at the home of the bride's brother. The bride was one of the active members of "Mr. Moody's church" in Chicago and was held in great esteem by the Christian workers there. The pastor of that church, Rev. Dr. Goss, being away from the city, the marriage ceremony was performed by the above named clergyman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Odd Fellows' base ball nine went down to Winfield Tuesday to play the return game with the Winfield Odd Fellows, who beat them here a few days ago. The boys came back on the evening train very well pleased with their trip, but acknowledged that they had been defeated by one tally, the score standing 20 for Burden and 21 for Winfield. Our boys think they can down the Winfield boys next time, and feel quite proud of the three straight white-washes they scored against them. They claim that this was a much better game every way than the former one. Burden Enterprise.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Ed. Weitzel moved the old hide house building off the lot next to the Commercial Friday. It is one of Winfield's earliest settlers, will rusticate on Ed's lots on Ninth avenue, next to Mrs. Blair's cottages, and be fixed up for a business house of some kind. Ninth is catching all the old Main buildings. Ed will commence his addition to the Commercial at once.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Heard at a Wellington boarding house: "Did you have any spring here this year?" "Oh, yes, a very pleasant one." "I wish you had caught it and put it on my bed."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

We have sworn vengeance on the first man who brings another watermelon into THE COURIER sanctum. We like them, oh yes, but when an enterprising public tries to stuff us sufficient to make a shaking off of the mortal coil almost unavoidable, we must call a halt. The whole COURIER force is demoralized--basely intoxicated on watermelon. Nearly every man who has walked down our sanctum portals in the last few weeks was under a big melon, and we have eaten and eaten, again and again, until death looks us square in the face, the grim monster that he is. Without ceremony, we shall take down our editor's club and shoot dead the next watermelon donor. If you want to die, now is a daisy chance--a sure go.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

We've done it, Mr. Burden Enterprise: "If THE COURIER would patch up a hole in the blanket of its press, at the bottom of the second column of the local page of the daily and fourth column of the 2nd page of the weekly, and prevent that everlasting white streak, its otherwise handsomely printed papers would not look like they were regularly struck by lightning." She's patched. The devil did it in the first place. He did it with his big four-tined fork.

[Note: This explains why I had so much trouble reading some items. MAW]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The plans of the new Methodist College are about completed, in W. A. Ritchie's architectural rooms, and give a good view of the building. It has four stories, a gothic roof, adorned with three towers. It will be one of the finest buildings of the kind in the west, costing over $60,000 to start on.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. Fred Dobson returned to her home, Cherryvale, last evening, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. G. H. Buckman. Her visit was abridged by illness. Mrs. Buckman came back this morning.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

J. B. Lynn is home from Chicago, carrying a metropolitan air very becoming to a city like Winfield--a Chicago number two. His fall stock will roll in a day or two.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A wheel of Quincy Glass' coal dray got tired running Saturday and dropped off. The horse took its place and began to run like a booger, making a few bad mashes. It was one of the "might have beens"--easy escape from much damage.

FAREWELL! OLD TOWEL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Old towel, thou, like the fabled canin', has had thy day. We regret thy departure from thy wonted haunts. The old rusty nail upon which thou was wont to hang, has another tenant, and the dirt calsomined floor 'neath the stone, where so oft thou didst recline, is too good for thee now. Thou must get thee from our sight entirely. Of thee this office is ashamed. True, true, thou was once fair to look upon, but that was in the long, long ago. Dost thou complain? And wherefor. Hast not this office dealt kindly with thee, thou ungrateful thing? Within the memory of the oldest inhabitant of this shebang, the hand of no heathen washee has walloped thee about in dirty suds, nor spat upon thy face with squirt 'twould make a Babcock ashamed nor red hot smoothing iron didst ever, to our knowledge, scorch thy dusky bosom. Cast thine eyes upon the old tenpenny nail; and feast thy callous soul upon the gorgeous thing suspended there. Pretty as a spotted pup; it is new, and thou art, or might be, a thousand years old. It is yet clean and thou art as di , just look at thyself. And yet we were fain to retain thee in some subordinate role, but alas! we were overpowered. The imp who presides over "Bingham's best roller;" the autocrat of the broom and lye brush, didst roll thee up until thou wast of the consistency of a base ball bat and having spat upon his hands, did flourish himself around and with threatening aspect and "devilish" mien did brandish thee about as a war club, and with bitter, mocking words, swore that he a head would put upon us, did we not displace thee with another better suited to his dignity as a COURIER valet. We yielded. We had to. Then swore that swarthy "devil" that thou was fit for naught but handspikes, or post, whereat to tie the lowly mule. With this, and our dignity the better to maintain, we invested a portion of a handsome dividend in a new towel, the same which doth now so proudly hang from the old nail. That's all.

OUR FELLOWS ELIS AGAIN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The base ball game between Burden's Odd Fellow nine and a nine of Winfield's Odd Fellows, at the Fair Grounds Thursday afternoon, was one of much interest and splendidly played for amateurs. The Burden nine were: W. R. Jackson, catcher and short stop; J. S. Leffler, pitcher; Wm. Elliott, catcher and short stop; E. W. Woolsey, first base; J. W. Henthorn, second base; John Ledlie, third base; Arthur Bangs, left field; George Cessna, center field; E. A. Henthorn, right field. Our nine was composed of A. J. McClellan, catcher; John Craine, pitcher; Amos Snowhill, short stop; George Byington, first base; A. B. Taylor, second base; Billy Dawson, third base; George Lierman, left field; George D. Headrick, center field; James Vance, right field. Clint Austin umpired the game and James McLain scored. E. A. Henthorn, John Ledlie, and Billy Dawson were the attractive stars. Enos had to have his balls so high that the catcher had to stand on stilts, and the players looked up like a gentle youth star-gazing. John Ledlie and Billy Dawson had soft bottomed stools and a ten cent boy each to run in their balls. At the 9th inning the score was even, when our fellows made the winning run, with one man out. The score stood twenty for Burden and twenty-one for Winfield. The jolliest good cheer was maintained throughout the game by players and spectators. The visit of the Burden Brethren was very enjoyable all around. They were banqueted at the Central, the guests of our nine.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

"Mr. Lafayette Gibson brought to THE COURIER office Thursday the best bunch of millet seen this year. It is about six feet long with heads ten inches long and was raised on the Nancy Randall farm. Winfield Courier.

"That may be considered good for Cowley County, but of course would hardly be noticeable in Meade. We have had millet here in our office six feet, nine inches high, and heads thirteen inches long. It takes a mighty good un to hold Meade County down."

Fowler Graphic.

Oh, get out with your downing old Cowley! That millet was in its infancy. Before it could dry hanging in our office the heads grew to 15 inches and the stalks went as far as they could for the ceiling. And full grown millet all over Cowley twenty-eight hands high was no surprise this year. Get up earlier, Mr. Graphic! You'll have to stay up all night to down prolific Cowley.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Merit always wins. One of Winfield's prominent merchants employed a salesman four or five months ago, agreeing to pay him thirty-five dollars a month. The salesman was almost a stranger, but went to work with a vim and knowledge that soon began to tell. His services won their own reward. He was economical and drew only what money was needed for expenses. Thursday his employer stepped up to him and said: "When you began to work for me, I only agreed to pay you thirty-five dollars a month. You have been worth more. I have credited you with fifty dollars a month since you began, which money is ready for you any time you call for it." Again we say, merit always wins. The man who works for his employer s though working for himself--spends no indolent hours, and exercises his every talent, will get his reward as sure as the sun shines.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

THE COURIER has fenced off one corner of its sanctum for its great aggregation of agricultural wonders, which is daily increasing. It is presided over by our country editor, who knows every quality of a bean and can dissect any bald headed onion that ever came from the sweet odored hand of Nature. Bring on your curiosities in growth. THE COURIER delights in heralding to the world the prolific prolificness of Grand Old Cowley. Every mammoth apple, peach, pear, ear of corn, or other product you deposit with us is that much toward spreading the truth about our splendid county, and, yea, more--they go to fill a chronically empty alimentary canal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The reporter took in Arkansas City Thursday and Friday. We arrived just in time to attend the water works meeting. The Terminus is all broke up on water works. A party from St. Louis has in a bid to build the works; this is the only bid. About half of the representative businessmen are for taking this proposition, the other half against it. Many of the citizens seem to think it would be to the city's advantage to receive other bids. Arkansas City is full of business. Quite a number of good buildings are going up, and things look lively, although Friday was an uncommonly dull day, as is usual everywhere.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Arlington Hotel has been sold to Messrs. A. D. Speed, formerly of Winfield, but more recently of Spirit Lake, Iowa, and J. V. Crenshaw, of the Phillips House, this city. The sale is made on account of ill health of Mrs. Northrop, one of the owners. The greatest thing we see to deplore is that it will take the genial Fortesque out of the city. "Forte," since he took the management of the house, has made hundreds of friends who will, with this paper, be sorry to see him leave and sadly miss him when he has gone. The change will take place sometime between this and the 20th of the month. What will become of the Phillips, we do not know, as Mr. Crenshaw declined yesterday to be interviewed on the subject.

Wellingtonian.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

D. L. Kretsinger, secretary of the Cowley County Fair Association, was in town Tuesday, and appointed N. T. Snyder his assistant. Persons wishing to make entries can call on Mr. Snyder, who will attend to their business, and save the delay of correspondence or a visit to Winfield. The Fair opens on Monday, the 21st inst., and closes the following Friday. Fare there and return will be 1 rates. Liberal premiums will be paid, and an unusually fine display is promised. Arkansas City Traveler.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

There is at least one Wellington man who is convinced that work is being done on the D., M. & A., says the Belle Plaine News, and that is Judge Woods. He left Wellington for Conway Springs last Friday evening with his wife and daughter, and not being aware of the fact that Sumner County extended beyond the limits of his native city, he got lost and wandered around until he struck a graders' camp, where he was directed to a house nearby, where he stayed all night, arriving at Conway next day.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Hank Mowry, the Arkansas City murderer, had another nervous fit in jail Tuesday, and the county physician, Dr. Pickens, had to be called in. The Doctor says Hank is of a naturally nervous temperament; his mind is agitated, and his nerves shocked, to which he gives no control, just submits. When he breaks down in these fits, it takes three of four men to hold him on his bunk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Always give the ladies the "right of way" on the pavements. This suggestion is not intended for gentlemen, who always do that. It is given out for the benefit of the loungers who are in the habit of blocking up the sidewalks and who do not know enough to step aside and allow a lady to pass them. Carry a derrick around with you and have someone hoist you out of the way.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Fifteen individuals whose lack of proper backbone ran them against the chilly arm of the law, now enjoy the luxuries of the Hotel de Finch. In the daytime they are all loose in the bastille corridor and have constitution, by-laws, rules, and usages, in black and white, as a governmental pivot.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A Cowley County contemporary reports a curiosity in the way of a cow who is bringing up three pigs, nursing them in the regular way, and treats them as her own offspring. They in turn regard her as their mother and feel more "stuck up" than other swine.

Belle Plaine News.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

While a man was unloading a lot of beer from a wagon at Kiowa lately, he was struck by lightning and killed and the beer destroyed. It is now in order for whiskey men to resolve that God Almighty is interfering with their personal liberty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Parsons has a man who answers to the name of Sourbeer. Parsons should be congratulated on its temperance status. We don't know of a town in this section where beer would get a chance to sour.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Here below is not a land of happiness. I know it is not; it is only the land of toil, and every joy which comes to us is only to strengthen us for some greater labor that is to succeed. Fichte.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Emporia Republican makes this timely spurt of alliterative truth. "Corn, cattle, and contentment characterize Kansas."

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Capt. Stuber was down Thursday from Wilmot.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

P. F. Endicott and lady were up from Arkansas City Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A. Gilkey was up from Maple City again Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Albert Dean, Canal City, visited the metropolis Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Chas. S. Dever got home Friday from several days with his folks at Topeka.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The lumber office of G. B. Shaw & Co. is being spread by an addition on its north.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. Cap. Whiting went over to Wellington Friday, to visit friends and view the Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. E. S. Miner got in Thursday from Ashland to visit her folks for a couple of months.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. O. L. Edwards and Mrs. George Hazell [? Hanell] were up from Arkansas City last Wednesday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

W. D. Roberts, of Walnut township, has favored THE COURIER with some delicious peaches from his orchard.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

James Jones, until recently a member of THE COURIER force, has again joined the K. C. & S. W. surveying corps.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The small child of Samuel Houx died Thursday on west 8th avenue. Funeral services were held at 5 p.m., conducted by Rev. Reider.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. F. S. Jennings and Mrs. G. H. Crippen went west last Thursday morning to visit relatives in southern Sumner County.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Judge Gans issued the documents cementing Andrew J. Carder and Anna Davis, and John H. McKown and Minnie E. Evans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Anna Hunt, much to the pleasure of her many friends here, returned Friday from a six weeks' visit with her aunt in Peabody.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Adam Walck filed an injunction Friday in the District Court stopping the removal of the schoolhouse in District 91, Maple township.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Chas. Mayer, of Winfield, a friend of Al Roberts, has been visiting Udall this week. He is talking of renting the Commercial hotel. Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Chas. C. Black and J. J. Burns came in from Belle Plaine Thursday. Thirty miles of the D., M. & A. are graded, and track laying will start off in a day or so.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

J. C. McGee, editor of the Harper Sentinel, and wife, spent Friday with F. K. Raymond and wife. Mr. McGee was a college chum of Frank's years ago in Ohio.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Geo. Miller, of Winfield, an old residenter in Cowley County, was here Wednesday night. He was wonderfully surprised at the growth made by Udall the past two years.

Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Methodist people at Atlanta have the money nearly subscribed for the erection of a church which will be immediately put under contract and pushed to an early completion.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mr. S. H. Houk desires to thank through THE COURIER all the friends whose sympathy and kindness were so readily extended during the illness and death of his little girl, Alice.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The D., M. & A. bonds carried in Fawn Creek township, Montgomery County, by 149. The proposition for the D. & V. I. W. railroad was held the day before and defeated by 119 against.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Julius Goldsmith came in from Medicine Lodge Wednesday to see his brother, Adolph, who is visiting here from St. Louis. This makes a family reunion, all the boys being at home.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Capt. J. B. Nipp, our county treasurer, was here Monday rustling about among his constituency. The Capt. Is a whole-souled, affable gentleman, and will doubtless be re-elected this fall. Udall Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

S. L. Mitchell, of Davenport, Iowa, a builder and contractor, has located in Winfield. He visited several cities of Southern Kansas and as soon as he struck Winfield, was charmed, and sent for his family.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Thomas Manning and Julia A. Copeland, Lester D. Hulse and Clara A. Teter were granted matrimonial certificates yesterday, and are probably by this time enveloped in wedded bliss and heavenly hopes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. John Rule, of Walnut township, lost their bright little daughter, Janet, last Saturday. The family are just from Scotland, came with high hopes and bright prospects, and this death is a very sad blow.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

"Mark," our Pleasant Valley correspondent, suggests a new feature in the prohibition business--the publication of the name in every statement filed by the druggists, with the purpose for which the liquor was used.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

It isn't very often a railroad train is held for any man, but such was the case Thursday. C. B. Jones, claim agent of the S. K. road, was in the city, and his business up town detaining him, he telephoned to have the train held fifteen minutes. It was held.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Sheriff McIntire is home from the U. S. District Court, at Wichita. Bob Perry, who killed one of George Miller's Territory ranchmen, plead guilty and was given three years in the pen. He had languished at Wichita for three years. The court adjourned yesterday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

D. L. Kretsinger went over to Wellington Friday to take in Sumner County's fair, and remind exhibitors of the premiums and attractions Cowley will show up, Sept. 21 to 25. Sumner's Fair is said to have fair exhibits, but the weather has kicked complete success in the neck.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. M. Whorton and daughter, Miss Lida, of Knightstown, Indiana, mother and sister of our Lon, of THE COURIER force, arrived Thursday for a month's visit. Lon hadn't seen them for several years, and is as gleeful over their visit as a small boy over his little red wagon. We don't blame him.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Dr. Emerson, as physician of Cowley's Local Board of Health, is taking a registry of the county's doctors. Already he has a list of ninety-six, with several precincts to hear from. And still the county lives! With such an array of doctors combined with thirty or forty drug stores, the people are marvelously escaping Gabriel's bugle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Dave Bright, residing over on the Arkansas river, brought us in a "mush" melon on Saturday--not a watermelon; he'd be dead if he had. This mush melon is a whopper--over two feet long and a foot or so around. The sand of the Arkansas draws out vegetation harder than a mustard plaster.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Lacey Tomlin and Ed McMullen left Saturday to take in the Kansas City Fair. "To take in the fair" is good, you see? There is a very weighty attraction for them in the Orient--hearts are trumps. Frank Robinson accompanied them to K. C., where he will spend a day or two, go on to Jacksonville, Illinois, for a visit, and then resume his studies at the Bloomington, Illinois, college.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

D. D. Kellogg was arrested Tuesday by Deputy U. S. Marshal Garnett Burks and taken to Winfield on a charge of selling cigars without license at the festival given at Kellogg last spring by the ladies of the Baptist church. The complaint as made and sworn to was that he was engaged in selling manufactured tobacco. The person who made this complaint committed a low, scurvy, contemptible act, who should and does merit the scorn and derision of all justice loving people. One box of cigars were taken to Kellogg that day, not for sale, but for free distribution, and if any were sold, it was without authority or any intention of violating any law. His preliminary trial comes off before Commissioner Webb at Winfield next Tuesday. Udall Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

G. S. Manser got home Saturday from a four days' visit at Bismarck Fair. It was not as big a success this year as in the past. Its principal attractions were gambling devices. Every conceivable game of chance and dumpy show was on the grounds, despoiling victims by the hundreds. Cowley County's Fair wants no wheels of fortune or other gambling schemes. People who haven't sense enough to protect themselves must be protected. Like at last year's fair, the Fair and Driving Park Association will give gambler the shake. Mr. Manser says Bismarck's fruit and stock display was very fine, but otherwise exhibits were a disappointment--not a fair representative of the great State of Kansas.

THE SOCIAL CIRCLE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Mary Berkey gave a very enjoyable party to a number of her young friends at her home Thursday evening. Those present were: Mrs. Roy Stidger and Mrs. Spencer Miner; Misses Leota Gary, Millie Schute, Minnie Taylor, Emma Strong, Bert Morford, Nona Calhoun, Eva Dodds, Ida Johnston; Messrs. George Schuler, Lacey Tomlin, Frank Robinson, Tom Eaton, Addison Brown, P. S. Hills, A. F. Hopkins, Ed McMullen, Harry Sickafoose, Phil. Kleeman, and C. S. Seitz. Miss Mary, assisted by her mother and sisters, Miss Eva and Mrs. Miner, did the honors of the evening elegantly, making genuine enjoyment supreme. Cards, music, and other amusements, with a luncheon of choice delicacies, made the time fly rapidly until twelve o'clock, when all bid their agreeable entertainers appreciative adieu, wishing the return of many such happy occasions.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

We have seen the scavenger, the man who gathers the slop, the rag gatherer, the bone gatherer, the man who gathers up all the old iron, but Friday evening we saw a man who was gathering up all the toads he could find. This takes the--takes--the toads anyway, and struck us as being the most peculiar business we ever saw or heard of. Our natural curiosity was aroused and we at once tackled the man to inquire what he could possibly want with these innocent, inoffensive toads. He informed us that he was a fisherman and cut them up and used them for bate--nothing better in the land. He had a sack about half full--probably thirty or forty in all, and the manner in which he did the work evinced that he was no novice at the business--the wail of the little creatures never causing a tremor on his part. This wanton destruction of these insect destroyers causes the question to arise in our mind, whether the luxury of having fresh fish to tempt our appetites is of more real value to us than the total extermination of the toad family?

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A Chinaman writes to inquire whether it is healthy for a Chinaman in this city, or in other words, whether the boys would let him stay here. He wants to know what the chance would be to get a "Melican" wife, and what kind of hosiery the men wear, whether silk or government socks, and also whether the city has water works and steam laundries. He inquires about the number of inhabitants, and if the cats are bad and noisy at night. He gives himself a first-class certificate to practice his profession, being a washer woman, but says he can work in a saw mill or maple sugar camp quite as well. He is a Hong Kong dude who parts his hair in the middle in front, but the back hair is spun out in clothesline shape, reaching clear to the back yard fence, and is often used to hang clothes on.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The sidewalk on the east side of Millington street, from the Christian to the Baptist churches, ought to be made eight or twelve feet wide. They are too narrow for the throngs that always pass along them going to and from church, Sundays. Let the members of the different churches and public spirited citizens get up a subscription for this purpose. It would not need much pressing. Every Sunday, as the crowds, some coming from and others going from church, have to get clear off the sidewalk to pass. This shouldn't be. A wide, smooth walk along the distance in question is a very necessary adjunct to the handsomest churches of any town in Kansas.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Winfield is spreading rapidly--getting way out like a hen on thirty-two chickens, with little vacant space under the wings. Now we are to have another touch of the metropolitan. John Bachelder has bought the frame building on Wallis' lot, where Tyner's grocery has been, and will move it to the lot adjoining his residence, eight blocks east on Ninth avenue. He will fix it up and put in a stock of family groceries--a complete suburban store. This is certainly a novel move, and John thinks success is certain. East Winfield is the principal residence portion of the city, and its grocery patronage, if it can be caged, will be no small things.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

For the information of those who do not patronize skating rinks: It is estimated that there are 50,000 skating rinks in this country. On an average there are six falls a day in each rink; this makes a total of 300,000 falls a day throughout the country, or 1,800,000 falls a week. In the face of this showing the fall of Adam dwindles into insignificance. But the true American is by no means dismayed by these statistics. On the contrary, he exclaims: "O, my country, with all thy falls, I love thee still."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Thank heavens! Rise up and sing loud hosannas! The filth and slime that has decorated the gutter along Ninth avenue, past McGuire Bros. and the lunch counters, are no more. Marshal McFadden has taken the citadel--got the right thing in the right place, and cobble stones have been scattered in the gutter and boggy place. These let the water through and do away with the mud. You can now venture along there without holding your nose.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

"I estimate my loss by 'sponging' since the opening of the fruit season at fully $50," said a grocer this morning, as the reporter helped himself to a bunch of choice grapes and a few fine peaches. "Just to see how long they would last, I exposed a basket of nice grapes the other day and they were cleaned out in a few hours. Nobody thinks it any sin to steal a few grapes or a peach from a grocer."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Ceph Condit, near New Salem, confronts our scientific scribe with a wonder that beats them all. It is a bunch of corn that started wrong in life. There's nothing like starting right. On a little stub of a stalk are clustered twenty-five little ears of corn, from one to three inches long, roughly formed, all from the same shoot. What could cause such a curiosity is beyond our system of metaphysics. We "gum" it up.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The company of Winfield men who founded the new town of Horace, in Greeley County, twenty miles north of Syracuse, on the Santa Fe, had their town site "jumped" and a contest ensued. A telegram was received from M. L. Robinson, who is out looking after things, that the contest was decided in favor of the Winfield Company. This permanently settles the matter, and the boom will again loom.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Hank Paris and Ben Harrod, the contractors, finished the Farmers' Bank and Short excavation Friday. Eighteen hundred cubic yards of dirt were taken out in twelve days. All the contracts, except painting, in the building's construction, have been let. Conner & Sons have the mason work contract, McKay & Pettit the carpentry, and John Craine the plastering.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The old building was moved off the lot of Wallis & Wallis, where Tyner has been, Saturday, and this firm will begin the excavation for a fine business building, to be erected at once. Curns & Manser also talk seriously of building on the lot adjoining, while Daniel Hunt will extend the Stump building back eighty feet. Verily, the city boometh.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Alluding to several recent scandals, "Gath" says: "All these things show that man the criminal, man the devil, is still rampant, and is his own family crest. The devil lies close alongside of every man, as he lay in the garden of Paradise by the most amiable inmate there." This philosophy accounts for many evils and many crimes.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The examination of Ben Bartlow charged with sending obscene literature through the mails, came up before U. S. Commissioner Webb Friday afternoon, and was again continued, District Attorney Perry's time being too limited to conduct it through. The case will come up the 30th inst.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The place where the old hide house building stood, and the building itself, smell as though there had been a collision between a car load of rotten eggs and one of Limburger cheese. It is a strong man who can pass that building on 9th Avenue without being knocked down.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The COURIER was favored Saturday with a splendid basket of fruit from Mr. R. E. Rogers, the present owner of the Ware farm, in Vernon. There were pears, peaches, and apples of many varieties and most delicious flavor--as fine a collection as can be shown in any country.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A. H. McMaster & Co. have the contract of furnishing the lumber, lime, etc., for the Imbecile Asylum. It will fill one hundred and thirty-five cars, representing over six thousand dollars. This is the biggest lumber contract of the season.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The banquet at the Ryan House last evening was a magnificent affair. Gov. Hubbard, Mayor Rice, Ex-Governor Ramsay, and Ex-Governor Marshall held reception in the parlor, attended by an ample corps of assistants and introducers. The banqueting hall was opened at 10 o'clock and about six hundred guests marched in and partook of all manner of refreshments served by at least seventy-five skilled waiters. The tables were decorated with flowers and set pieces--and there was no lack of sinister bottles. What they contained we did not learn and noticed that most of the guests were in doubt for they had to sample them many times. There were toasts and speeches and a general hilarious time.

Today is an excursion by steamboat to Stillwater, leaving St. Paul at 9 o'clock a.m., and arriving at Stillwater at 3 o'clock p.m., where the delegates are to be banqueted and shown the government works and river improvements in progress. They will return by special train. It is sixty miles by the river and about eighteen by railroad. We concluded that it would be too monotonous and so neglected to take this excursion, but instead have been "doing" Minneapolis.

We stopped at the West Hotel, a house built and operated for the "grandest hotel in the world." It is indeed a grand hotel, but certainly not larger or better furnished or better looking than either the Grand Pacific or Palmer in Chicago. It is eight stories high and long and broad in proportion. But in comparison with the Ryan in St. Paul, it has this disadvantage: the Ryan was built last and one great object in building it was to beat the West, and it did so both in beauty and style of architecture and in richness of furniture. We like the West, but like the Ryan best. But the West has one important advantage over the Ryan in that her elevator system is ample and works to a charm, while the Ryan's is deficient and very hard to manage. The West has, I think, rather higher prices for the same style of fare. In one respect the West got ahead of the Ryan. Yesterday I asked a Ryan man what the Ryan cost. He answered: "A round million." Today I asked a West man what the West cost and was answered: "A million and a half." I don't think either of them cost a million, but would think the Ryan the costliest of the two.

We took a view on all sides of the palatial residence of Hon. E. B. Washburn, one of the flouring mill kings of Minneapolis. In grandeur, beauty, and style outwardly, it is equal to any residence we have seen in Chicago, or even in New York, Philadelphia, or Washington. We suppose it did not cost near as much as some of those palaces in the eastern cities but we were seriously told that it cost a million and a quarter. But these folks up here talk as though millions were pretty common articles of commerce, and as though a building that did not cost a hundred thousand was not worthy of notice. But while we imagine they estimate the cost in a more inflated way than Kansans do, we have seen today so many really magnificent buildings and so much taste and style that we are surprised. St. Paul is ahead of Kansas City in population and the number and size of her buildings, and much farther ahead in the taste and style of her buildings. Minneapolis is ahead of St. Paul in all these if we except the principal hotel of the latter.

We have taken a great deal of pleasure in seeing the natural beauty of these two cities. Their finely rounded hills and fine natural groves and parks, now being beautified by art, are charming to us. St. Paul has the advantage in the line of picturesque hills and groves, but Minneapolis offsets this with the falls of St. Anthony right in her midst, and in her Central park, which includes a beautiful lake.

St. Paul has got the advantage on the wholesale trade and the state capital, but Minneapolis has her water power, her flouring mills, the most extensive in the world, her saw mills, and other manufactories. They are indeed two wonderful cities, but are awfully jealous of each other. St. Paul insists that she is at the head of navigation while Minneapolis clamors for the falls of St. Anthony. The latter insists that the young men of St. Paul are not allowed to marry any but Minneapolis girls so as to subtract one from the population of the city around the falls and add one to St. Paul's census every time there is a marriage; while the St. Paul folks claim that Minneapolis, when she hears of a widow with twelve to eighteen children in Tennessee or any other state, she sends an agent to hire her to emigrate with her family to Minneapolis. Such a rivalry runs through everything and was the subject of some fun in the convention.

MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA, Sept. 6.

Yesterday we visited the falls of Minnehaha. It is about four miles southeast of Minneapolis and is reached by a motor train, which leaves every hour or two. It is a very beautiful sheet of water falling into a deep gorge. With some difficulty I persuaded Mrs. Millington to pass with me around behind the laughing waters in a crescent shaped cave covered by projecting rock and along a sloping shelf. After taking in the romance of the place and its surroundings for about an hour, we returned.

Today we have been "doing Minnetonka." We went by the "motor line" which leaves Minneapolis every hour to two during the day. Three and a half miles from our hotel, but in the outskirts of the city, we passed Lake Calhoun, which is about a mile wide and a mile and a half long, with very charming surroundings. A short distance further on is Lake Harriet, about the same size as the former and still more beautiful. Here we tarried about an hour and took a ride in a skiff propelled by myself. We passed Lakewood Cemetery, which, with its smooth rounded hills and valleys, all a park of trees and monuments, is very fine and will some day be famous like some of the eastern cemeteries. Excelsior, on the nearest bay of the Minnetonka Lake, is twelve miles southwest of our hotel. Here we left the cars and took to the water, taking passage in a small excursion steamer which carried us about three and a half hours and thirty miles among the bays, islands, inlets, headlands, and sinuous passages of this most charming lake. The beauties of this lake lie in the irregularity of its shores, its undulating banks, and the grand forests which surround it. Innumerable vistas of water and woodland stretch away for miles as we pass from one bay to another formed by projecting points and green islands with which the lake is interspersed. Perched upon the hills and promontories around and in it, are charming villas or even extensive hotels used for summer resorts for people from all parts of the country. Our enjoyment of this day has been immense. Minneapolis has recently taken a census and reports 129,201 inhabitants. I suspect this census was considerably inflated in order to beat St. Paul, but after traveling over miles and miles of city, Mrs. Millington think the census is about right. St. Paul reports about 112,000 and we suspect that is inflated too. But they are both wonderful and beautiful cities. Tomorrow morning we start for central Iowa.

BELLE PLAINE, IOWA, September 8.

Our last night in Minneapolis we had a neighbor in the adjoining room at the "West" who sang, whistled, and declaimed nearly all night, keeping us awake. He appeared to be happy though and his songs were in variety. We concluded he was some young dude who was a little cranky and did not know any better. In the morning we got a glimpse at him. He was rather a thick-set man of about fifty years, neatly and clerically dressed, and on inquiry, we came to the conclusion that he was a certain noted revival preacher. We left Minneapolis yesterday at 8 a.m. In the sleeper going south was a man of about fifty years, who was suffering with asthma and coughing a great deal. He was attended by his son and was quite restless, frequently walking through the car. Finally he walked through the car and laid down on the lounge in the gent's dressing room and in a few minutes he was dead. He had been about the Minnesota lakes for his health and was now on his way to the sanatorium at Excelsior Springs, near Independence, Missouri.

We arrived at Cedar Rapids after dark and changed cars for the west. It had set in for a steady rain and was as dark as Erebus. The train west was a long one, but was jammed full of passengers, most of them on their way to the State Fair at Des Moines. About two more got on at Cedar Rapids and had to stand up in the aisles. We found a fat woman and her escort and her baggage occupying two seats. She was sufficient to fill one seat and seemed to be a richly dressed and high toned lady, but we compelled her escort to squeeze in beside her and took his seat by storm. So we, too, got along very well. We alighted at Belle Plaine at 11 o'clock in the midst of impenetrable gloom so thick that the rays of the carriage lamp seemed to penetrate only about six feet and all beyond seemed a solid black wall, and the rain was pouring down. Somehow the carriage driver found the residence of Mrs. Millington's sister and we escaped into shelter and comfort.

If our trip had been for the purpose of taking in fairs and expositions, we could have had a dozen of them in a few days. Yesterday the Minnesota State Fair opened, but we came right away from it and were in danger of being swept by the multitude into the Iowa State Fair, which opened the same day. The Chicago exposition is in full blast and we shall be swept into that in two or three days. Whether we can get home without taking in any more fairs such as the Kansas City Exposition, which also opened yesterday, the St. Louis Exposition, and the Lawrence Inter-State Fair, remains to be seen.

RAILROAD RACKET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Great honor is due Hon. C. R. Mitchell for the money he has spent and the great amount of labor he has performed in order to secure a railroad to this place. Now when he has come so near getting the road, let us stand by him, and not go off to some other scheme that will take a year to work up. It seems to us that Wellington is only working to head us off. When we were working for a road through Valverdi township, they had a road ready to come through the township and give them a depot near the center. And now when Henry Asp has told them that he intend to build a road to Caldwell via Geuda Springs, they commence with renewed vigor trying to beat us out of the road that is already building and will complete within six months. So let the whole township stand by Mr. Mitchell and we will assure that you will never regret it. Geuda Springs Herald.

With the greatest respect to Hon. C. R. Mitchell and our sprightly acquaintance of tender years, Henry Asp, we want to say that the Wellington portion of the Ft. Scott, Wellington and Northwestern is substantial and is backed by cash and not wind. Now to talk seriously and earnestly to the people of Geuda Springs, we wish to say that the Wellington stockholders in the road are actually worth over one million dollars, and their business, honor, and credit is at stake on this railroad question. Now, to taxpayers, look at this matter in a sensible light, and train with a crowd that amount to something financially. Wellington is not given to twaddle and taffy, and upon this railroad question is not dealing out newspaper gush to fool the people. We are sick and tired of the schemes set on foot by Winfield men to induce the people to believe that the town is not dying with "dry rot." The place is peopled with a class of folks that could not enjoy life, and do you think sensible, careful businessmen will invest their money in a town covered entirely up with debt? But to get back to where we began. We once more ask the taxpayers to put their faith in a project backed by individuals who are able themselves, without assistance, to build a railroad and run it. Wellington Press.

So you are "sick and tired of the 'schemes' set on foot by Winfield people," are you? This grunting and groaning on the part of Wellington is most pitiable. Does anyone suppose that Winfield would sit sleepily and let these railroads run around her, cutting off her richest territory? Not much. The success of any city is simply measured by the enterprise and life of its citizens. Winfield does not whine and make faces at its neighbors, but devotes its spare time to organizing new enterprises and its energies carrying them to a successful termination. Why so, pray tell us? Is not Winfield money and brains building the C., M. & A. through the fairest part of Sumner County? Of course, it misses Wellington on the north, but that can't be helped. Then is not Winfield enterprise building the K. C. & S. W. through the rich territory of southeastern Sumner? This misses Wellington on the south, but that can't be helped. Of course these roads all come to Winfield, for they were born here.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Fuller & Mullen can give you some bargains in houses and lots, vacant lots, and suburban property. Office north of Myton's store.

WHAT OUR NEIGHBORS ARE DOING.

Newsy Notes Gathered by The "Courier's" Corps of Neighborhood Correspondents.

TORRANCE ITEMS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Willie Reynolds is lying sick with the fever.

Jimmie Haygood is at home for a day or two.

Mr. Higbee and son were in Butler last week.

Mr. McPherson has sold his house to Mr. Evans.

Miss Lollie Haygood is visiting over the prairie.

Link Branson and Add Higbee were in Winfield Wednesday.

Our B. B. Club played Grand Summit last Saturday and came out "vic."

Miss Lou Wilson, accompanied her friend, Miss Gibson, as far as Winfield, Monday.

Miss Mattie Rittenhouse teaches the lower room here this winter. We wish her success.

Mr. Evan, since our last, has taken unto himself a wife and little one. He is the happiest man on earth.

Mr. C. C. Rockwell, who has been in Ford County the last month, returned home last week. He hear he has taken a claim.

Mr. Will Taylor, who has been in Brainard for the last week, returned home Monday evening. He reports lots of rain and dull times.

Miss Beamer returned to her home in Missouri last Saturday. She made many friends while here, who were sorry to see her go so soon.

HACKNEY HAPPENINGS. "MARK."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

E. W. Ewing will flourish the scepter at Victor, district 115, the ensuing school year.

Last night, Monday, Sept. 7th, this locality received the finest rain that has fallen for eight long, dry, and dusty weeks.

Saturday last Messrs. Moses Teeter and Z. B. Myers started for Wichita on a courting excursion. They were drawn as members of the U. S. Grand Jury.

Zack Whitson and R. M. Victor have just received, direct from the factory of Racine, Wisconsin, a large drum roller for preparing their field for wheat this fall.

J. B. Tannehill is reported by the county papers as being married by two ministers last week. We always thought it would take two to tie Buck whenever the matrimonial idea struck him.

Some of our neighbors have tried the Kellogg Farmer's Mill with a grist and claim that they can do five pounds better on the bushel at Arkansas City mills. There is nothing like co-operation.

Score one for "Neppie" and "Peddie." The bristling array of interrogatives at the teachers examination failed to down them. Both have secured schools at top wages, and will thus be usefully employed for the season. "Nothing succeeds like success," and "Mark" admires genuine pluck and grit wherever found.

Prof. Ingalls, state Sunday school evangelist of the Christian denomination, who held a series of meetings last week at the Tannehill schoolhouse on analysis of the Bible, spent last Friday visiting J. C. Snyder and family. J. C. and wife were once honored students of the Professor when he was a member of the faculty of Abingdon, Illinois, college.

The "medicine" record for the county the past month still discloses the fact that death does not diminish our list of invalids, but all seem to maintain sufficient health to imbibe their usual rations of stimulants. Would it not be a good policy for county prohibition papers all over the State to publish monthly a list of names affixed to statements filed with the Probate Judge? In addition to the name, and following each should be specified the particular purpose for which the "statement" was issued. Rome might howl because of such a publication, but I firmly believe that such treatment would have such a salubrious effect upon our patients that many of them would speedily recover from their peculiar afflictions.

OTTER. "OTTERITE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Jim Utt could be drawn on the jury.

A. A. Mills could be appointed road viewer.

Again I am ready to bore you with "nuthen."

Born to Mr. Sims and wife, an heir. Sex unknown.

Old man Burnett is very sick and will probably never recover.

Hewins won't bet ten to one anymore against the D., M. & A. not being built.

More rain than is wanted by the most pronounced Baptist or Campbellite in the county.

George Hosmer is talking of giving the young idea the direction of the target at Eli this winter.

Your correspondent is of the humble opinion that the hay and fodder is damaged at least fifty per cent.

Zimmerman and son have purchased two new riding plows, and will ride when the ground dries up.

Mr. Harden, principal of the Grenola schools, has been employed to teach our school at a salary of $50 per month.

Rob Nelson's wife has returned from Illinois, and we think, much better satisfied here than before she made her visit.

Uncle Johnny Nelson is becoming very feeble, and complains most all the time of not being as able to work as when a young man.

Elmer Howell has sold his farm to Aley Bros., and says he will go east to his wife's people. Success to the man that has "a wife's people."

Dr. Donalson and Tom Groom had an altercation a few days since, and the Doctor seems to have got the worst of it, since he appears to be very lame.

We could have more offices in our township and school district to fill, so some of our most influential men that now have only four or five offices could be accommodated.

Tom Bush bought a pony and took it home and it choked itself to death the first night. He has now bought another one of Mr. Fudray, and we hope he will not lynch it this time.

Dr. C. H. Lewis, late of Cedarvale, was buried Friday near that place. The ceremonies were conducted by the Free Masons. The Doctor had many friends in this locality, most of whom were present at the funeral.

Friday was the day for Mr. Haight to meet our viewers and survey out a county road on the ridge between the Cedars, but as usual, he failed to make connection, and the people begin to think we should try a new man. Don't someone else in the county know how to fill that office?

BETHEL ITEMS. "BLUE BELL."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Most too much rain in these parts.

The fair is all the talk with some folks.

Health pretty good in this community at present.

Farmers are awful busy getting ready for seeding.

Wheat in the stack ought to be threshed, and would be, I presume, if farmers' granaries were empty.

Charles Ticer, Alex Shelton, and Lon Bryant contemplate going "west," I understand. Success to them.

Sunday was a beautiful day--nice enough for everyone to attend Sunday school, bot for all that not many attended.

Some were out riding over the beautiful prairie, viewing the picturesque scenery, and enjoying the balmy air, last Sunday.

CAMBRIDGE. "H."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Minnie Leedy spent Saturday and Sunday in Burden visiting friends.

S. M. DeBolt came in from Harper Friday. Mrs. DeBolt accompanied him to Harper Monday.

Miss Ida Bard returned to her home in Winfield Monday. One of our young men says he will Sunday in Winfield in the future.

Miss Blanche Palmer and her brother, Clarence, returned home Friday, after a two week's visit near Winfield, with their sister, Mrs. Charlie Davis.

"Under the Laurels" was rendered at the schoolhouse again last Friday evening to a very large audience. A German farce, which was very good, closed the exercises.

School commenced in the upper room Monday. Mr. Alberts wields the rod. The primary school will not commence until the first of November. The teacher has not been employed.

The schoolhouse has been repainted and other improvements around the building, such as hitching racks, fence, etc., add much to the appearance of the building and speak well for the community.

Three freight cars loaded with cattle were wrecked at Torrance Saturday night during the storm, killing nine head of cattle and completely demolishing the depot platform. No other damage reported.

Miss Allie Harden went to Burden Monday to take charge of her school. We are sorry to lose her from our society circle, but Burden gains an intelligent lady by our loss. Such acquisitions to society as Miss Allie are very desirable in any community.

Some of the young people enjoyed a social hop at George Ford's last Wednesday evening, and but for the interruption of a man who had been to Winfield and "signed up," everything would have passed off smoothly. Your druggists, Mr. Editor, sell "awfully fighting whiskey."

Saturday night we had the hardest rain that has visited this section for a long while--some say it was the hardest since the flood. In less than an hour the streets were flooded with water, and the soil from the north part of town was carried to the railroad in less than no time. The track was covered with water for quite a distance.

The funeral sermon of Joseph Wager was preached at the schoolhouse Sunday a. m. by Rev. Duer. The funeral services were conducted in Colorado before the body was shipped here for interment, but as the widowed mother was deprived of showing her love to her darling boy during his illness, or watching the life so dear to her ebb away, and could not even see the lifeless form or attending the burying, she had the last sad rites paid to his memory on Sunday by a second funeral sermon. The God of the widow and orphan will uphold her in this great grief.

TORRANCE ETCHINGS. "DAN."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Nettie Reynolds is having the chills.

Mrs. Elliott was in Winfield Thursday.

M. Link Branson has a blemish on his chin.

Messrs. Peabody & Hardwick shipped two car loads of calves Tuesday.

Mr. Jones, of Cambridge, was in our city Sunday. Come again, Mr. Jones.

A number of our young men attended the play at Cambridge Friday night.

Miss Ida Bard, of Winfield, spent Thursday and Friday with Miss Lou Wilson.

Mr. A. O. Elliott came near drowning one day last week, while trying to cross the creek.

Miss Lou Wilson spent the day in Cambridge, Thursday, and attended the play there Friday night.

Messrs. Grant and Lon Marshall, of Rock Island, Illinois, are visiting their cousin, Mr. Cliff Rockwell, in this city. They are very nice young men, and we are sorry that their stay is short.

A freight train, loaded with cattle, going east, was wrecked at Torrance Sunday morning about 2 o'clock. There were no men hurt, but eleven cattle were killed. The platform in front of the depot was completely torn away, and cattle were running wild all day. Mr. Jackson was compelled to shoot one as it was about to take the place.

SOUTH BEND. "G. V."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The smiling phiz of Ed Green shone on South Bend last week.

Miss Mary Bookwalter has been visiting her sister, Miss Kizzie, several weeks, but will return to Arkansas City soon.

Al Bookwalter has profited by Snarks' gentle advice of "harnessing the gentle zephyrs with a wind pump." He has a "Little Joker."

The sale at Magnolia turned out O. K. for those who sold stock. It's a cold day when livestock fails to sell on good time, especially in these diggings.

Lightning struck Oliver Morton's barb wire fence and ran along the wire until it had demolished 50 or 60 posts. Barb wire is no stock protector during stormy weather.

Miss Mollie Holcomb will attend the fall term of Manhattan college. She will stay until qualified to pass an examination as pedagoguess. May success crown her efforts.

Mr. Lowell haltered a yearling calf so close that it ceased to respire. As H. is an old California pioneer, he probably mistook the calf for a Mexican Cass, and got too close to the calf's pelt.

A festive company of young people enjoyed a social hop at Mr. Birdzell's one night last week. All made the most of the occasion until they had "circled to the left" many times and the fiddler had fallen asleep like unto a disgruntled possum.

"G. V." has been accused of having done "free advertising for the Magnolia Farm and its management." Now every locality is deteriorated more or less by the presence of a chronic boor, who becomes so prejudiced as to mistake honorable mention for an advertisement; therefore no great amount of notice should be paid such assertions.

Mr. B. W. Sitter advertises a colt show to take place on his farm the first Friday of October. Prizes of $15 and $10 will be awarded to first and second colts sired by his stallion, "Dick." B. W. deserves much credit for the manner in which he brings his stock before the public. His own stock will not compete.

[The next item is most confusing. Think the "type setter" was asleep!]

Andrew Bryant and Miss Cassie Murmett [? Mummert] were married on the 8th inst. "Roger" has curdled the official blood of this part very much lately by riding up and down our highways yelling, "delizacracken," and other similar names as loud as a calliope's tones. May their matrimonial barque plow the sea of hence for also the rocks of domestic infelicity.

Has the gentle reader ever studied the extreme vitality and double goodied make up of the cockle burr? Pull a small burr from its terrestrial seat, and you find a burr clinging to its roots; so we may rest assured that this little burr is dated one year ahead. A. works hard and tries to rid his field of this growth, while B. stays at home with his family. Next winter 887 rabbits will make an air line through A's burr orchard and "scatter seeds of kindness" from their fur until A. has a better crop than ever before. Each rabbit will carry 7 ounces of burrs and make 173 trips to A's field daily. Moral: Let the farmers work together or not at all, in the extermination of weeds.

DEXTER. "MOSS ROSE."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

W. P. Hardwick shipped a car load of calves this week.

"Taking care of the peaches" is all one can hear now-a-days.

The infant babe of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Oliver died a few days ago.

John Reynolds has gone to Medicine Lodge for a month's ramble.

Miss Lou Jarvis will teach the coming winter in the Shreves district.

Died, at the residence of his parents, Willie Dunlap, on Sept. 5, aged 17 years and six months.

The heavy rain fall Saturday night put Grouse creek on a big boom Sunday.

Our school opened Monday with Mr. McClellen, of Winfield, and Miss Laura Phelps, as teachers.

Marion Littleton has commenced work on his photograph gallery. Dexter is bound to keep up with the times.

Mrs. Secrist returned from her visit to Kansas City last week and reports a splendid time. She improved much in health.

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Branson have gone to Eureka to visit relatives. May they have a pleasant time is the wish of the writer.

Married, in Dexter, at the home of the groom's sister, Mrs. Clifton, Mr. J. Green, and Miss Rosa Brown, last Thursday afternoon. May joy and prosperity be theirs is the wish of the many friends.

A Republican convention was held in Dexter, Saturday. The following gentlemen were elected delegates to the county convention: R. C. Maurer, C. W. Dover, Ed. Nicholson, J. A. Bryan, John Wallace, J. V. Hines, and C. A. Peabody.

A WICHITA MAN TALKS.

Winfield Superior to Wichita in Every Way.

The Best Prospects of Any City in the West.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A prominent citizen of Wichita visited Winfield recently and commenting on his home and this city, said: "Winfield is a much more desirable city than Wichita. Her prospects today are double those of Wichita. She will beat Wichita in the race of life. Her citizens have more moral stamina; more true grit and enterprise; as has been shown in her victories over my city this year. I have no desire to run my home down, but I believe in crediting merit when I see it. Winfield is now the only city Wichita really fears, and she fears you badly. Your big strides in securing such public enterprises as the Imbecile Asylum, the Methodist College, your new railroads, and other things have put Wichita on the alert. She knows from which quarter her greatest rivalry is coming. Winfield's surroundings are far better--a better country to draw from, and more general resources. The D., M. & A. is cutting Wichita off on the south, while on the north other lines will head her. Wichita has five thousand people of the lowest strain of humanity, who are pulling her down. Men with families to raise--men of moral tendencies and the essence of the best citizenship will take Winfield every time. Let Winfield grasp the grand prospects she now has in sight, coupled with her progressing enterprises, and in five years she will be the great metropolis of Southern Kansas. Everything is in her favor. Wichita's present prospects are nothing compared to those of Winfield. I have visited Winfield often and know whereof I speak. You have got the prettiest city in all the fair west, and if you don't make it the second city to the State Capital in ten years, then I am mighty badly fooled in the make-up of your citizens. Wichita is rapidly and mournfully learning that whiskey and bummers will never make a big, powerful city. It takes a solid, progressive, and moral people to do it."

FOURTH ANNUAL REUNION

OF THE SOLDIERS AND SAILORS OF KANSAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

I. Having been assigned by the department commander in General Order, No. 8, to the command of the 3rd Division embracing the counties in the Third Congressional district, each county in the district will be organized into a battalion for re-union purposes. The battalions will consist of all Grand Army posts in the county; and post-commanders are urged to invite all ex-soldiers, sailors, sons of veterans, and others to attach themselves to the post for the purpose of re-union.

II. Comrade J. C. Long of Winfield Post, No. 85, is hereby assigned to the command of the first brigade. Comprising the counties of Elk, Chautauqua, and Cowley. Comrade J. R. Hollaway, of Post No. of to the command of the second brigade, comprising the counties of Cherokee, Labette, and Montgomery. Comrade J. L. Dennison of Post No. , of Osage Mission, to the command of the third brigade, comprising the counties of Neosho, Crawford, and Wilson.

III. The following appointments are hereby announced: A. B. Arment, Winfield Post, No. 85, Assistant Adjutant General and Chief of staff; T. N. King, Division Quartermaster, Sedan; R. W. M. Roe, Grenola, Commissioner of Subsistence; D. L. Kretsinger, Chief of Artillery; Rev. Bernard Kelly, Division Chaplain; Dr. A. M. Fellons, Division Surgeon; H. H. Siverd, 1st A. D. C.; and A. P. Lowry, A. D. C.

T. H. SOWARD, Com. Third Div.

A. B. ARMENT, A. A. G.

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Chas E Clark to John R Smith, sw qr 28-32-7e, 40 acres: $300

Joseph Furman et ux to Louis Scott Vibert, [?] lot 4, blk 5, Dexter: $12

Louis Scott et ux to Elizabeth J Hendry, lot 4, blk 5: $80

E J Hendry to Dexter Lodge 156 F Masons, lots 4 and 5, Dexter: $187

James McDermott to Elizabeth J Hendry, lot 5, blk 5, Dexter: $10

Burden Town Company to Aaron M Treadway, lot 10, blk 47, Burden: $75

W D Carver et ux to W P Carver, se qr 10-31-5e: $2,000

James F Wallace et ux to Joseph F Kidwell, 12 acres in 8-30-7e: $98

Franklin C Jocelyn et ux to State Bank of Burden, lots 1, 2, 3, 6 and 7, blk 40, Burden: $1,300

College Hill Town Company to S R Reece, lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, blk 16, C H ad to Win: $1,280

B W Matlack to Elizabeth Standley, lot 4, blk 131, A C, q-c: $20

Annie K Scott to A J Chapel, lot 17, blk 133, A C, q-c: $1

W W Pearce et al to Calvin S Acker, lot 13, blk 63, A C: $100

Charles H Wisner et ux to Cynthia A Castanian, lots 1 and 2, 2-31-3e, 77 acres: $2,500

Cynthia Castanian et ux to Charles H Wisner, lots 1 and 2, 2-31-3e, 77 acres: $2,500

Elizabeth Rice to Edward M Rice, sw qr 21-32-5e, 160 acres: $3,500

Frank Gilkey to Anna Gilkey, lots 2, 3 and 4, 3-33-6e, 137 acres: $2,000

Albert Gilkey et ux to Frank Gilkey, s hf ne hf and se qr and ne qr nw qr, 27-32-6e, 80 acres: $500

Johnathan K Guinn et ux to Jas. H Guinn, nw qr ne qr & ne qr nw qr, 27-32-6e, 80 acres: $500

J C Smith to Albert Gilkey, w hf nw qr, 31-34-6e, 80 acres: $800

Lucy Van Buren and hus to John M Guches, n hf ne qr 16-31-4e, 80 acres, q-c: $1

Wm T Wagner et ux to David A Dale, w hf ne qr 28-31-7e, 80 acres: $1,000

David Beauchamp et ux to L J Richard, lot 1 and se qr ne qr and e hf se qr, 6-31-8e, 158 acres: $750

Robt Harris et ux to William T Wagner, w hf ne qr 28-31-7e, 80 acres: $500

Mary B Hoyland and hus to W J Rarick, nw qr se qr and n hf sw qr, 14-31-5e, 120 acres, $1,600

Joseph Overall to Lindley Young, ne qr se qr sec 20 and nw qr sw qr and sw qr nw qr, 21-33-3e: $200

John C Hattery to Frank W Smith, nw qr, 14-30-6e: $2,500

Franklin Pope et ux to Joseph Hornbeck, e hf ne qr 33-30-3e: $1,200

M F Gregory to C W Gregory, lot 4 and se qr sw qr sec 30 and lot 1 and ne qr nw qr, 31-32-6e: $2,700

George W Williams et ux to Thomas M Williams, se qr nw qr sec 1, nw qr ne qr 12-31-5e, 80 acres: $400

Geo W Williams et ux to John T Stimson, e hf nw qr 12-34-6e: $750

Emert B Johnson et ux to Thomas J Feagins, lot 13, blk 74, A C: $300

Geo A Cutler et ux to William B Berkey, lot 5, blk 1, Geuda: $100

Jane Williams and hus to Geo W Williams, se qr nw qr 12-34-5e: $400

William Hammond et ux to William A Smith, se qr 25-32-4e: $3,000

Wm R Pierce et ux to John P Hefner, lots 13 and 14, 7-34-8e, 80 acres: $1.460

John P Hefner to Wm H H Rathbun, lots 13 and 14, 7-34-8e, 80 acres: $1,450

Wm L Hefner et ux to Wm R Pierce, lots 13 and 14, 7-34-8e, 80 acres: $1,400

Joseph A Garner to H. G. & C. E. Fuller, e hf nw qr & w hf ne qr, 22-30-4e: $2,500

Jesse Williams et ux to J W. McConnell, hf ne qr & sw qr ne qr, 7-33-5e, 120 acres: $350

Elihu Wade et ux to Henry Denning, se qr sw qr 11-33-5e, 40 acres: $200

Archibald F McClaren et ux to Leonard Farr, ne qr 11-31-4e: $,000

Wm J Fountain et ux to Joshua Bitner, lot 10, blk 3, Cambridge: $150

Alden Speare et ux to H J Foster, lot 8, blk 4: $40

Mary L Elliott and hus to David F Clary, lots 1 and 2, blk 205, Citizens ad to Winfield: $2,400

Mary T Gridley et ux to John W Eley, tract se qr 28-32-4e: $1

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

160 acres of land, good apple and peach orchard, good stone house, all fenced, for less than one can put the improvements on. Address, Box 48, Maple City, Kansas.

TO THE TRADE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

We can sell you goods wholesale as cheap and as good as you can buy in the east.

J. P. Baden.

AD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

INSURANCE.

The Continental Fire Insurance Company of New York. Fire, Lightning, Tornado and Cyclone business. Instalment plan of payments. Cash on hand, $1,000,000. Losses paid, $15,000,000. All losses paid promptly and in full.

F. A. BRADY,

District Agent for Cowley and Sumner Counties, Wellington, Kansas.

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Recap. William H. Johnson, Administrator, estate of Alfred Elliott Johnson, deceased. Notice that final report and settlement will be made October 5, 1885. Jno. D. Pryor, Attorney.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Emporia Republican found a curiosity bound for Winfield from Manitoba, way up in British America. Look out for the caravan's arrival: "A canvas covered wagon, a la prairie schooner, drawn by two gigantic long-horned steers, containing five tallow complexioned children, besides a complete kit of household fixtures, passed down Commercial street yesterday. An interview with the head of the family, a tall, rawboned granger, disclosed the fact that they were all the way from Manitoba, the scene of the late rebellion, starting from those parts some fourteen weeks since. They were en route for Winfield, Kansas."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Thursday of next week will be Winfield and Arkansas City day at the Cowley County Fair. Arrangements have been made for a special train of ten coaches, leaving Arkansas City at 7 a.m., returning at 7 p.m. N. T. Snyder has been appointed assistant at Arkansas City and is working up a boom. Friday will be Children's Day for the entire county. All children under fifteen years of age, when accompanied by their parents, will be admitted free. Special attractions have been arranged for these two days, of which we will mention in full, later.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The future fortunes and misfortunes of Lawrence Holzderler and Minnie Chetlick were united by Judge Buckman Saturday night, amid the patter pater of the liquid elements. As a knot tier, the Judge is a scientist, and ties a regular concentrated bow knot that we'll bet will never be severed. Mr. Holzderler is one of A. Herpich's tailors, an industrious and sturdy young man who will always win, while his bride has resided here some time and is possessed of many sterling qualities. May they "leef long und been habby," is THE COURIER's wish.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Some very ludicrous things are seen in the far west. A gentleman in from the vicinity of Sun City, a new town springing up, and intended for the future county seat of the southwest corner county of the State, reports a very novel sign posted on an abandoned dugout. The fellow was evidently a "tender foot," who couldn't find he rose-colored romance he hunted. The sign read:

"Two hundred feet to water.

Seventy-five miles to wood,

And six inches to h l;

God bless our home."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

In the Mt. Dora items published in a late number of the Tavares (Fla.) Herald, we clip the following notice of a young gentleman, a grandson of Col. Alexander, who was born in this city under the supervision of Dr. Mendenhall, and who was contemporary of Miss Nina Harter and Masters Clyde Hackney and Baron Bahntge: "Last Wednesday being the fifth birthday of Master Johnnie Rhodes, he gave a party to his young lady friends, to help him celebrate the event."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Methodist deacons found a button in the contribution box Sunday. One of said deacons was met on the street this morning with the query, "Didn't you find a button in your contributions yesterday?" "Yes," was responded. "Well, you hand me that button and I'll give you a quarter. I hain't any money and put that in as check." This is a new use for the button--it don't usually go in as a check or anything else but a button and a deceitful intention.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

And now we have another new firm--Pryor & Young, real estate dealers and agents. It will make one of Winfield's best firms. Jno. D. Pryor is known favorably to everybody in Cowley, while E. P. Young is one of Cowley's earliest pioneers and has always been one of her staunchest citizens. He is a rustler and knows all about Cowley and her people. He will be the outdoor rustler of the firm, and as such, will soon put it to the front.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Winfield City Schools will again open Monday, Sept. 28. At the Central building an examination will be held Sept. 21st, at 1:30 p.m., for the benefit of all pupils who desire to be promoted to advance grades. Also those who have never attended our city schools should be examined with the above, that they may know the grades to which they belong and thus avoid all confusion at the opening of school.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Of the many conductors on the Santa Fe, Conductor Myers, on the Arkansas City branch, is one of the most agreeable. It is a pleasure to travel with a conductor of this type. We hope he may long continue on this route. It certainly is the voice of all in this country who are acquainted with him. Any company may consider itself lucky in having the services of such a thorough railroad man.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Ollie Stubblefield, daughter of the Captain, has entered the State Normal school at Emporia for the winter's term. She is one of the brightest graduates of the Winfield High school, and all her acquaintances take a warm interest in her advance. Her ambition and keen intellect will soon put her to the front in the State Normal.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

One week from next Monday the Cowley County fair opens and continues five days. This is usually one of the best county fairs in the State, and, from what we can learn, this year will be no exception to the rule, otherwise than it will be better than ever before in every particular. Oxford Register.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The postoffice department has adopted a new design for postal cards. The stamp of the present card is square and the design of a female head, which will be replaced by the head of Jefferson with a symbolical wreathe, with a band upon which appears the words, "One cent."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

All cases of contagious diseases and all death from any cause must be reported to the health officer of each county. A failure on the part of a physician to make such report subjects him to a fine. Dr. Emerson, at Winfield, is the health officer in this county.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The school board, at the last meeting, elected Carrie Crysler, of New York, and Bertha Wallis and Mary Randall, of Winfield, as teachers in the new central school building. There is yet one vacancy. Misses Crysler and Randall have not yet accepted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

At P. H. Albright & Co.'s loan office you will always find all the money you can put up real estate security for--on the safest and most reasonable terms and rates. We run a small hard money mill of our own.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Wichita Beacon remarks that "the Wichita jail holds more men put there for disobeying the prohibition law than all the other jails in Kansas. Our county attorney is argus eyed, and running the boys in lively."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Stockholders in the Cowley County Fair and Driving Park Association can get their season complimentaries by calling at the secretary's office, before the Fair, or at the ticket office at the Fair ground, during the Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Owing to the unfinished condition of the Central school building, the high school and one of the grammar schools will open in rooms in the McDougal block.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Simon's Comedy Company will play Winfield during the Fair. They carry a fine repertoire and are receiving flattering press notices.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Disinfectants, both in liquid and powder forms, at Williams, the druggist. 25 cents per box.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

We invite an examination of those stylish combination suitings just opened at M. Hahn & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

$5,000 to loan on short time on good personal, chattel, or real estate security.

HARRIS & CLARK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Everything in the hardware line at bottom prices at I. W. Randall & Co.'s.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

J. B. Harden was in Tuesday from Dexter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

P. L. Brown was over Monday from Grenola.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

F. M. Webber was over from Elk Falls Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

J. A. McCormick was up from Arkansas City, Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Fred Bower, Arkansas City, was up Monday evening.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

J. E. Doyle was up from the Canal City, Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

L. N. Northey and wife were up from Arkansas City Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Ed G. Gray and Cal Swarts were up from the Miasma City Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

H. W. Douglass, of Udall, was circulating over the metropolis Monday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Stafford's street bus is out again after a few days being laid up for repairs.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

John W. Leach has been appointed administrator of the estate of John Leach, deceased.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Judge Sumner was in the city Monday, returning to Arkansas City from several days at his old home, El Dorado.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Will C. Higgins, the rustling young editor of the Udall Sentinel, was down Tuesday attending the Kellogg trial.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Judge W. A. Tipton and family left Sunday to reside in Springfield, Missouri, where the Judge will open a law office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Rev. B. Kelly, of this city, and Rev. James Tull of Udall, went over to Torrance on Tuesday to attend a church trial.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

W. H. McMaster, the rustling baggage man at the S. K. depot, left on Monday for Greensburg, Indiana, called by the illness of his father.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

D. W. Pierce, one of Ninnescah's staunchest farmers, was in the metropolis Tuesday and made THE COURIER an appreciated visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

T. W. Myton, brother of Sam, and formerly a resident of Winfield, came in on Tuesday from Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, for a few week's visit.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Conrad & Shearer will add an attractive feature to our Fair by operating their Burgess Steam Washer, and will serve hot coffee to all their patrons each day during the Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

J. L. Horning is limping around with a club cane and a sprained foot. He made a miscue in the dark cellar among the hardware and various truck.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Prof. R. B. Moore came in from his Clark County claim Saturday, going to Burden. The Burden school, of which he is superintendent, opened today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. Ed. G. Cole and the Doctor returned Monday from their Canada visit, and Ed. is Happy. His days of widowerhood had become quite burdensome.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Al Taylor was out Tuesday after several days hard tussle with malaria. It will be a day or two yet before he's back in his old place at the Register's office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Lula Millspaugh returned Monday from a three weeks visit at Carthage, Missouri. Ob Millspaugh also came in, having spent a week at St. Joe, taking in the Fair and having a big time generally.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

D. W. Holcomb was up from South Bend Tuesday to see his sister, Miss Mollie, off for the Manhattan College. She is a bright young lady and all rejoice at her opportunity to advance in educational matters.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Rev. A. A. McDonough arrived from Weston, West Virginia, Tuesday, and will become Rector of Winfield's Episcopal church. He is a minister of high attainments and will no doubt soon win the good graces of our people.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Rev. F. A. Brady and wife were down from Udall Tuesday, drawn by the Kellogg U. S. case. The Reverend has won the good graces of the Udall people, as pastor of the Baptist church, and is meeting with splendid success.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Dr. W. S. Mendenhall and family left on Tuesday for Manitou, Colorado. They will remain in Manitou till Oct. 1st, and till Nov. 1st in Denver. The trip is made for the health of the children, who are just recovering from severe cases of diphtheria.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mrs. Payson, who ran the Hotel Stewart, South Main, for several months past, has got up and got, leaving many anxious inquirers, who don't trace her indebtedness to any misfortune. She represented to all that she was doing a good business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Mattie Reider and brother, Freddie, niece and nephew of Rev. J. H. Reider, arrived from Toledo, Ohio, on Friday last. Master Freddie will make his home with his uncle in the future. Miss Mattie expects to visit with friends here during the fall and perhaps winter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Johnnie Hudson has gone into the snake business. A granger brought him in some snake eggs, and he made an incubator of a bottle. In a day or two a bull snake a foot long wound its reptile shape out of an egg, and Johnnie has a pet, with good prospects for another.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Marshal McFadden has bloomed out in a new policeman's cap. We have wondered why he didn't do this before. It is necessary to the dignity of the Queen City. Then, it becomes our marshal finely--giving him a regular N. Y. official look. It spoils his disguise, though.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Judge Pyburn was up from Arkansas City Monday afternoon, and it is currently reported that he got a wedding document from the Probate Judge. Judge Gans has been numerously besieged regarding this matter, but won't give it away. We know, but can't tell. Just wait!

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The case of the State against Frank Manny for cutting and hauling off prairie grass from the premises of W. W. Andrews was before Judge Buckman Tuesday afternoon, with a jury of twelve. It is a little case run on big dimensions. County Attorney Asp prosecutes and M. G. Troup defends. Unfinished.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Miss Bertha Wallis has accepted the second reader room in the new Central school building. Her election to the position, by the School Board, is a meritorious compliment. She is the second graduate of Winfield's high school who has been honored with a position as teacher in our city schools. She is ambitious and bright and will fill the position with credit and satisfaction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Sing Lee is here from Kansas City for a visit with his cousin, Wau Sing, of our Chinese laundry. Lee was formerly a "washee" of our laundry, but is now running one in Kansas City. These Chinamen are intelligent, honest, and industrious, and deserve the success they attain. Wau Sing can read and write English well--much better than thousands of American who have wasted opportunities that Wau never had. He has dug it all out himself--no tutor.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Judge Gans married a couple the other day, solicited by County Attorney Asp. The ceremony was pronounced and the Judge hadn't said boo about his license and marriage fee. His nervousness was plainly visible as the couple began to depart, and rushing over to Henry, the Judge said: "Henry, stop him! I haven't got my fee yet!!" Henry laughed and the Judge got clear off his "base." Raking up courage, and getting no assistance from Henry, the Judge quietly called the groom back, cornered him, and told him that in order to make the wedding according to the "statoots," he'd have to whack up, which the youth did, with becoming innocense.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The case of Uncle Sam against D. D. Kellogg, of Udall, was before U. S. Commissioner Webb on Tuesday. He was charged with selling cigars, at a Baptist social at Kellogg station, without government license. It was proven that Mr. Kellogg took a box of cigars to the social, but that he intentionally sold any could not be proven. He had no intention whatever of selling any, if he did. He took them to treat the band boys and others. W. W. Campf made the complaint. No malice was proven. James McDermott defended and Lovel Webb was both Commissioner and prosecuting attorney. Kellogg was dismissed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Mike O'Meara got home Saturday evening from several days at Veteran, the new Winfield town in Stanton County, in which he has an interest. He says things are developing magically in that "wild west." Veteran is getting on its pegs in good shape and soon every branch of business will be represented. Nearly all the claims for miles around are taken, and the only chance to get in now is to buy off some of the soft hearted fellows who never "stick" anywhere. People are flocking in there by the hundreds. It is only a matter of a few years, if the fine western rains continue, until all western Kansas will be thickly populated and blooming like a rose. What has formerly been looked upon as a barren plain will be a luxuriant garden of vegetation, with happy homes and prosperous people. And all Kansas will be bettered. The place of every man of small means who goes west to get a home is filled by some easterner of competency, thousands of whom are leaving the dingy east to cast their wealth in the rustle and bustle of Kansas, the fairest of the galaxy of states.

WRONG'S REMEDY.

Stephen Carver, Confronted With the Gravity of His Crime,

Ends All in Matrimony.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A week ago Stephen Carver was brought before Judge Buckman, charged with being the father of Maggie Thompson's unborn babe. Both reside in Liberty township. He is a young fellow of twenty-four and she a girl of twenty. He has always been considered a tough one. She is of a good family, one upon whom no stain has ever before fallen. He wooed Maggie, got her confidence and love, and under the guise of a matrimonial engagement, took her virtue--a woman's all. That he never intended to marry her is evident. His property was put in the name of another, and he got in readiness to "skunk" out. But the girl realized her misplaced confidence--her terrible mistake--and brought a criminal action. The trial was set for Monday. A day or so ago County Attorney Asp got Carver in tow, and talked to him like a Dutch Uncle, showing up the devilishness of Steve's crime--how he had ruined a promising, innocent girl, to be thrown on a cold and unsympathetic world with an indelible brand on her brow, and the legal penalty to pay himself. Steve "caved," and consented to end all in matrimony, and yesterday the climax came. The relatives on both sides appeared in the County Attorney's office, Judge Gans and a marriage license were sent for, and the ceremony pronounced. The Judge's preliminary advice melted everyone present. He told of the mistakes of life and their remedies; the solemn obligations of the marriage vow, admonishing the young couple to retrieve their mistakes with a determination unshakeable. It was a peculiarly pathetic scene--in wonderful contrast to the usual jollity of a wedding. The bride and groom cried like children. Those who know the couple best think their marriage will "stick," and their lives be happy. She loves him with an ardent devotion that will go a long ways toward this result. His late actions exhibit manhood, capable of blotting out this mistake in a long and happy wedded life. That such will be the case is the earnest wish of all.

ANOTHER STIR!

The Social Arena of Liberty Township Again Shaken--Too Much Lothario.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Liberty township again stirred from center to circumference, right on the heels of the Carver-Thompson case. This time the social disarrangement embraces numerous families whose male guardians have wandered from the straight and narrow path of virtue. The origin of the affair is with Mrs. Jake Davis. It is reported that Jake had been watching her suspicious actions from the corner of his left eye for some time, and at a Holiness meeting night before last, her Lotharios' made themselves entirely too officious. Reaching home Jake began to tear up hades, and his wife, instead of penitently pleading, told him to go to "thunder." Warmer and warmer grew the melee until household furniture flew like hail stones. The old lady, with furious anathemas, "got up and got," leaving the old man the field. She declares her determination to come to Winfield, hire out as a domestic, and shuffle him forever. Jake is forty-five years old, and they have six children, the oldest twenty-one, and the youngest a baby. The affray has caused intense excitement in the neighborhood, and the gossips are rolling morsels of unusual sweetness under their tongues. Our informant was unable to say what would be done with the children. A number of married men have an unenviable interest in the row--their better halves' in their wool in a manner that beckons a divorce court. Jake don't kick on his wife's precipitate flight--is glad of it.

THE COURIER HEADQUARTERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

THE COURIER will have a large booth on the Fair Grounds, next to the secretary's office, where our reporter can always be found. Visiting newspaper men and all friends of THE COURIER are invited to make themselves at home in THE COURIER Headquarters. That's what it is for. We are arranging for elaborate reports of the Fair. Our reporter will not leave the grounds and will strain every nerve to give every worthy exhibit a creditable write-up. Cowley's Fair this year will be the grandest exhibition of her material worth ever made on her soil, and will be an advertisement of incalculable benefit. Nothing has been spared to make it a success in every minutia. To give the county the credit such an exhibition deserves, will be the ardent ambition of THE COURIER. Our WEEKLY solicitor will be continually on the grounds and newcomers into whose homes THE COURIER doesn't go will be given a convenient opportunity to subscribe. THE DAILY will also be on the grounds at all hours, in the hands of carrier boys, with complete detailed reports and programs of the Fair. We will have first and second editions of THE DAILY, at noon and in the evening, should the occasion demand. We will keep up with the procession, if it takes the wool off. So don't forget THE COURIER Headquarters.

BROKEN BONES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Isaac Crane met with a very bad accident Monday afternoon. He was in the second story of John A. Eaton's residence, the floors of which are skeleton--on joists. The hands had been going up and down on a pulley, which was used for hauling scantling up. Ike put his foot in the loop, grabbed the rope, and started to go down. He caught hold of the wrong end of the rope, and instead of his weight balancing him, he went through the rafters with a crash, falling with terrible force on the sills twelve feet below. His left leg was broken diagonally a few inches above the knee, with a bad fracture of the leg's calf. The small bone of his left arm, below the elbow, was also broken. He was otherwise jarred up and is now at the home of brother, Mat, in a condition from which it will take him months to recover. Dr. Wright has him in hand. He is a single man of forty-five, and, like his brothers, is a stone and brick mason.

THE JUSTICE MILL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The District Court convened Monday morning, Judge pro tem Dalton presiding.

The matrimonial bond binding James F. Monical and Martha Monical was rent asunder, a divorce being granted him on grounds of abandonment.

Ellen Pollard vs. Laura J. Gillespie, et al, foreclosure--judgment for plaintiff for $373.92.

The motion to confirm the sheriff's sale in Byron Farrar vs. Sarah A. Drennen, was sustained, sale confirmed, and sheriff's deed ordered.

James McDermott was appointed guardian ad litem of the minor heirs of Camilla R. Bigler; and Frank F. Leland, guardian ad litem of the heirs of John Deffenbaugh.

Sale confirmed in Thomas S. Kautz vs. William Greenhaw and sheriff's deed ordered.

Court adjourned to Saturday.

RAILROAD WRECK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The S. K. had a bad wreck at Torrance Sunday. Three cars of a cattle train, going down the heavy grade just west of the Torrance depot, jumped the track. It was impossible to stop the train and the cars bounced around fearfully until nearly to the depot, when the couplings broke and with fearful lunges the cars stacked themselves up on the depot platform, killing eleven head of cattle and wounding others. The main track next to the depot was plowed up by the "wild" cars, and the passenger trains yesterday came by the depot on the side track. Spreading of the track is supposed to be the cause of the jump.

DEAD CARCASSES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Uncle Billy Moore is after the S. K. section boss with a long stick. Said section boss dumped thirteen dead sheep, the other day, in a stone's throw of Uncle Billy's house, across the river, sprinkled the carcasses over with dirt, and left them to swell up and stink everybody out for a mile or so around. Uncle Billy has notified the section boss to get those "dead corpuses" out of there and if he don't do it, he'll get the cold arm of the law, as he should. It don't cost any more to haul such truck away from society than it does to leave it in the door yard of some good citizen. Billy is wrathy, and we don't blame him. Make the wool fly.

REJOICING DOWN SOUTH.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

LEXINGTON, KY. Mr. John T. Bruce, of the United States Revenue Collector's office, informed an editor of the Daily Press, of this city, that for seven years he suffered terribly from rheumatism in his ankle, which most of the time was swollen to two or three times its natural size, and was so painful that he could not put his foot to the ground. After trying everything he could think of without relief, he at 10 o'clock one morning applied St. Jacobs Oil, and shortly afterward made two more applications. At three o'clock that afternoon the pain was gone; the swelling also disappeared and the cure was as permanent as it was quick.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

For rock bottom prices call at the Bee Hive store. We will not ask you to part with your money until you are fully convinced that we give you more than your money's worth.

M. HAHN & CO.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Oscar Wooley lost a blue coat between the west bridge and his home in Vernon. Finder will please leave it at this office.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Before borrowing money on real estate, call at the Farmers' Bank and get rates. No delay in closing loans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A nice, clean stock of groceries to trade for raw land, cattle, or hogs. M. C. PUGH.

LIGHTNING BOLTS.

Electricity Takes Possession of Two Houses and Makes a Lively Tour.

Chimney and Door Cases Riddled.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Bolts of lightning tore things up lively during Saturday evening's storm in George Corwin's house and one of Irve Randall's, on east Tenth Avenue. The bolt struck the comb of George's house, knocked the chimney to pieces five or six feet down, followed the tin gutter, joining joint roofs, went through the roof, struck the plastering above the west door of the north wing, and knocked it across the room. This plastering struck J. P. Overman, who lives in the house, a square diff. The lightning separated over the door, following down each side and passed along the side of the house, and left, tearing off a big streak of siding. The inmates of the house were badly shocked. Irve Randall's house is only thirty feet west, with John Roberts' house between. About the same time Irve's house was struck with two bolts. One came in the south end of the comb, went down between the plastering and the wall to a place in the upstairs wall where hung a looking glass, near the window, fastened by a steel wire. The bolt came through the wall in a little hole as though made by a bullet, melted that wire cord and threw the looking-glass across the room. The window was splintered. It then went down to the lower room and splinted the window casing, passing through the floor into the ground. Another bolt struck the east comb of the house, riddled the chimney, went through the roof to the door between the kitchen and sitting room, splintered the door, and then jumped ten feet across to the south window, to a steel spring in a window roller, melting the spring and completely demolishing the roller and curtain, then passing out. T. V. Ray, the carpenter, lives there, and the family thought their time had come. They soon recovered from the shock.

A LOST POCKET-BOOK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

What on earth so quickens the poise and makes the heart jump around in ecstacy as the finding of a fat pocket-book! A man found one on Ninth avenue Saturday. It was a red book and looked plethoric enough to belong to Jay Gould. It lay in the gutter! He eyed it, glanced all around to see if anybody could see him pick it up, and with his head turned and his fingers spread, made a grab for it. But he didn't get it--it was gone. Glancing three feet away, he again saw it and appeared to think at once it was only a little mistake in location. Then he braced up, put his hands in his pocket, and waited till everybody had passed, when he glanced slyly around, and made another dart for that pocket-book. Again, it disappeared--not coming back. He was amazed and looked like a sheep killing dog. The laughter at headquarters was at first a giggle and then roars of laughter. Two little darkies were the cause of that book's disappearance. It was fastened to the end of an almost invisible cord, attached to a pole. The boys stood in the door of one of the business buildings, and when the elated finder stooped over to grab his prize, they would draw it in with a jerk. Dozens of fellows got sold clear out, and were willing to do anything under heavens to keep it still. We are subsidized and won't give names--it would be dangerous.

ANOTHER WALNUT BRIDGE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A meeting of Vernon and Winfield citizens was held in this city Monday to arrange for a new bridge on the old piers on the Walnut at Bliss & Wood's mill. Chas. C. Black was president of the meeting and G. H. Crippen secretary. It was determined to erect a six thousand bridge. Senator Jennings, J. B. Lynn, S. H. Myton, J. W. Millspaugh, Billy Moore, S. W. Schwantes, B. F. Wood, and J. F. Martin were appointed as committeemen to boost the matter through. It is proposed to erect a $6,000 bridge on private subscription. Twenty-two hundred dollars were subscribed in this meeting, the largest amount, $800, by Bliss & Wood. The road, as condemned and paid for years ago, leading from Vernon to this bridge, runs along the north bank of the river until it strikes the bluff, where it comes out on the section line. Another meeting will be held on the 28th to perfect matters.

THE PRIMARIES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The primary elections to elect delegates to the Republican nominating convention on the 19th, were made lively Saturday by the contest for the county clerkship, between S. J. Smock and Capt. Hunt. The returns so far indicate between 85 and 100 delegates instructed for Smock. Arkansas City and Creswell instructed 17 out of their 21 delegates for Smock, and Winfield's Smock delegation went in by about 100 majority. There now seems no doubt, in the minds of any, but that Smock's nomination is sure, though nothing absolute can be told until after the convention. No other candidates had opposition.

UNTITLED LARGE AD INSERTED IN PAPER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

For loans on improved farms, go to Jarvis, Conklin & Co. They will give lower rates and better privileges than any other firm can give. Money paid as soon as the papers are executed. They are the only firm in Cowley County that have the coupons on hand to deliver when the interest is paid.

TOO MUCH LIQUID.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Capt. H. H. Siverd was up to Udall on Monday and Tuesday, subpoenaing about twenty-five witnesses in the Edward G. Roberts whiskey case. Edward quit teaching school some time ago to go into the drug business, and has run against the cold arm of the law. Captain Siverd took an invoice of the whiskey found in the drug store, over a hundred gallons. It is a very plain case, and Edward is in a very tight place. Mr. Amon, who was on Roberts' bond with the latter's father, withdrew his name yesterday, and Roberts is now in the county bastille. His trial comes off before Judge Snow Thursday.

JUST ARRIVED.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

I have just received a large assortment, and have more coming, of the best goods and the latest styles in the market, which I will make up to order or sell by the yard, at the lowest prices and first-class workmanship. A cordial invitation is extended to all to call and examine my goods. They are the best ever brought to Winfield, and when completed will give an assortment of over 500 different styles. A. Herpich, the Merchant Tailor, Over Post Office.

FARMERS, THRESHING MACHINE MEN HOLD.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Do you know that we have the largest and best stock of brass goods, pipe fittings, hemp and rubber packing, machine and cylinder oils, waste, and, in fact all kinds of supplies this side of Kansas City. Call and see us and get anything you may want at low prices.

Ostrander & Stayman, Foundry and Machine Shop, N. Main St.

FOR SALE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

500 acres of good prairie upland, six miles south of Dexter in Cedar township, one mile from the line of the D., M. & A. R. R.; good water; 1,000 fruit trees; fair dwelling and out buildings; 125 acres broken; nearly all plow land; price $9 per acre; easy payments. Address, D., this office.

QUARTERLY MEETING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The third Quarterly Meeting for the United Brethren Church, in Winfield, will be held the approaching Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 19 and 20. Prof. Geo. Kettering will conduct the services. Preaching Saturday evening. A cordial invitation is extended to the public.

J. H. Snyder, Pastor.

A MOTHER'S FEARS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

E. W. C. We know that many children have died from the use of couch mixtures containing morphia or opium. But the new remedy--Red Star Cough Cure--is entirely vegetable and harmless, and eminent physicians testify as to its curative powers.

PREPARE FOR COLD WEATHER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

But do not buy a dollar's worth of woolen goods until you have looked through our stock, which is by far the largest shown in Southern Kansas. M. HAHN & CO.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Our very extensive stock of carpets is now open for your inspection. Kansas City and St. Louis prices matched in every instance by M. Hahn & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Over 100 dozen of underwear, in all the various qualities and sizes, for ladies, gents, infants, boys, girls, misses, and young gents, at M. Hahn & Co.'s.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Disinfect your cellars and out houses with anti-septic powder. For sale at Williams' drug store. Price only 25 cents per box.

OF INTEREST TO ALL.

The Mammoth Dry Goods Emporium of J. B. Lynn--Chock Full.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

When you touch a man's pocket book, you touch him all over. If you can convince him that he can get more and better goods for his money at once place than another, he is not very long in embracing the fact. That J. B. Lynn's dry goods emporium will give you better bargains, with a better stock to select from than any other house in Cowley County, Mr. Lynn is prepared to prove. He has just shelved a magnificent stock of everything in his line, fresh from the eastern markets--personally purchased at bargains which will greatly enhance his customer's pockets. J. B. is one of Cowley's pioneer merchants, and the people have long since learned that he always backs up, to the letter, everything he advertises. His dry goods, notion, carpet, clothing, gent's furnishing goods, and other departments are complete, with attentive salesmen, assuring most agreeable treatment to all. Embracing the low ebb of the wholesale market, and in anticipation of buoyant times this fall, Mr. Lynn has filled his store from cellar to garret. The city trade will find his fine goods department unexcelled, while in anything he will discount all competition, in both selection and price. Consult your best interests and visit J. B. Lynn's dry goods house, corner 8th avenue and Main. Once there, you will readily be convinced of the fact here chronicled.

AN UNIQUE OFFICE.

H. G. Fuller & Co.'s Enterprise and Taste.

In the First Rank for Real Estate and Loans.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The Real Estate office of H. G. Fuller & Co., on North Main, sparkles all over with enterprise and vim. It is without doubt the neatest office in the city. Artistic signs and paint on the exterior, with a neat canvas awning, make the office a prominent attraction, while pretty wall paper, neat curtains, and delicate paint adorn the interior beautifully. The interior has every convenience. The window contains some of Cowley's mammoth productions--a pumpkin weighing 125 pounds, watermelons weighing 60 to 75 pounds, and other wonders. There is money in enterprise. No one could step into this office without readily perceiving that this firm is a rustling one--one always to the front. And this new location is proving a drawing card, and H. G. Fuller & Co.'s business is daily increasing. Messrs. H. G. Fuller and W. L. Mullen are on the go showing land buyers around while Chas. E. Fuller is always busy in the office. An unique feature of this office is a changeable bulletin of lands for sale, houses to rent, etc., on the front of the building. H. G. Fuller & Co. stand in the front rank of our real estate and loan firms, and will always hold an enviable position. Their agreeable courtesy in showing strangers around, and their large list of lands to select from are appreciated, and seldom fail to catch the land seeker.

GREAT SALE OF CATTLE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A mixed herd of 350 head will be sold on Wednesday, the 30th day of Sept., 1885, at "Glenwood Ranch," on Timber creek, 6 miles northwest of Burden, Cowley County, Kansas. The herd consists of about

90 head of cows,

80 head of high grade Short horn heifers,

125 head of high grade Short horn calves,

1 Short horn bull,

3 full blood Galloway bulls,

1 full blood Jersey bull,

1 high grade Short horn bull.

Jersey heifers are of the very best milk stock that could be secured in the U. S. and are bred to a Jersey bull whose sire cost $3,000.

Terms of sale, 6, 12 and 18 months time will be given. Good security will be required in every case. Free lunch. Good bargains will be given at private sale. J. C. McMULLEN.

IN MEMORIAM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

The following resolutions were passed by the First Baptist Sabbath school on the death of Peter E. Miller.

WHEREAS, God in his infinite wisdom has called one of our members, Peter E. Miller, to enter into the rest that remaineth for the people of God; and

WHEREAS, We recognize in Brother Miller an earnest christian, faithfully attending to the duties of this life according to the precepts and example of the Master, and when his work on earth was drawing to a close he expressed himself as ready and willing to depart and be with Christ, therefore be it

Resolved, 1st. That in the death of Peter E. Miller this school has lost one of its most faithful workers and whose young life exemplified the Christian Virtues. That while our loss is his gain, we will cherish the memory of him who was punctual in attendance, a help to his teachers, and whose conduct was such as to endear him to his classmates.

2nd. That we extend to the parents, brothers, and sisters of brother Miller our sympathy in their bereavement and bid them remember that they do not sorrow as those who have no hope, for in due season they will see him again.

3rd. That these resolutions be spread upon the minutes by the secretary and a copy be furnished to the family.

WM. R. JIMISON, JAMES M. STAFFORD, A. P. JOHNSON, Committee.

STREAKS OF SUNSHINE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

20,000 bushels of choice peaches wanted. J. P. Baden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Drills to sow wheat in corn for sale at W. A. Lee's Implement House.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

TO THE TRADE. My stock of dry goods, hosiery, notions, boots and shoes, is now complete. Prices bed rock; come and make your selection. J. P. Baden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Farmers. I am needing your chickens, old and young, turkeys, ducks, and produce of all kinds; will pay you the best market price for the same. J. P. Baden.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

A BARGAIN. A fine Ottawa six-horse sheller, with elevator, cob stacker and feeder, mounted sheller and mounted power. Cost over $600.00 laid down here. Used only a short time and taken up on a debt. Has been nicely stored. Price $300.00, on reasonable terms.

W. A. Lee.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

IT IS A MATTER

of both pleasure and business that we announce the arrival of our new stock of seasonable

CLOTHING,

Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps and Gloves,

GUM AND OIL CLOTHING, ETC.,

for men, boys, and children. Come and look at them. It will cost you nothing. Our prices are marked in plain figures and all goods sold at marked prices. Remember that we ask no one to buy on the strength of our advertisement. We know that the

Quality and Price of Our Goods

will appeal to your good judgment. We trust that every reader of this paper will be sufficiently interested to call and examine our

FALL AND WINTER STOCK.

We are always glad to show our goods and think our display cannot fail to please you. By strict attention to business, careful study of the latest patterns and the faithful performance of our obligations, we hope to merit your patronage and deserve your esteem.

Respectfully Yours,

J. J. Carson & Co.,

812 MAIN STREET.

WINFIELD, KANSAS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Biggest Show Ever in Kansas.

Greater than all others. It needs no combination. The people's crowned prince and splendid ruler of the exhibition world.

ADAM FOREPAUGH'S

New and Colossal All-Feature Show.

Only tented entertainment that presents more than it advertises.

WINFIELD, TUESDAY, SEPT. 29!

An elephant traverses a suspended wire. An elephant with boxing gloves knocks out a great pugilist. An elephant perplexes and cunning outwits his tutor.

25 elephants in ingeniously contrived obelisk high pyramids. Broad-sword combats and battle scenes, marching in squadrons and military drill, whirling in the waltz and quadrille, is an amusing tuneful scene.

[ILLUSTRATION: SMALL ELEPHANT ON PLATFORM ABOVE TWO LARGE

ELEPHANTS WITH MAN WITH WHIP IN CHARGE.]

The mid-air bicycle elephant wonder. Four great rings and grand elevated stage, Roman hippodrome racing track, on which contests occur in bewildering succession, typical of the days and pastimes of imperial Rome and the heroic ages. The done of the huge tent checkered with mid-air apparatus, on which perilous and sensational feats astound the multitude.

Ask who alone runs 4 railway trains of his own cars, almost three times as many as any other show in the West, rents, owns, or controls; erects tents twice as large as any other, and gives 80 acts in a three hours' program; whose daily expenses are three times greater than all others; owns the most animals, horses, and elephants; makes ten times the best parade; employs four times the most people, and pays more liberal wages and takes better care of his army of men, and everybody will tell you, ADAM FOREPAUGH.

Museum of strange living wonders, embracing every freak of nature, or its prototype, worth seeing--and a gathering of the savage and untutored types of the human race from all parts of the world.

Twelve motley monarchs of earth, "Little Sandy" and his Laughing Pig and Donkey. Circus celebrities from every amphitheatre and arena in Europe. Adam Forepaugh always exhibits what he advertises. As a fitting inauguration of the splendors of the day, there will occur at 10 a.m., prompt, a sun-dazzling and gold-glittering pageant. The array of golden chariots and gorgeously statue-ornamented tents and lairs beautified with the historical scenes of Lalla Rookh's departure from Delhi, and Cleopatra in her barge of beaten gold. The whole made glorious with many kinds of delicious and novel melody. For full description of the superior parade and exhibition, carefully examine other publications.

Two full performances every day at 2:00 and 8 p.m.

Doors open at 1 and 6:30 p.m.

Admission 50 Children under 9 yrs. 25 20,000 Seats.

Reserved Number Chairs Extra.

For the accommodation of the public who desire to avoid the crowds, reserved seats can be secured at the Post Office Book Store the day of exhibition only at the usual slight advance.

WELLINGTON, MONDAY, SEPT. 28.

Independence, Wednesday, September 30.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

EVERY REQUISITE

-FOR-

Boys' School Apparel

Can be Had in Local Variety at

ELI YOUNGHEIM'S,

Boy's Outfitting Establishment.

Experience has proven that nothing more surely gives a boy a relish for his books than the sauce that is furnished by a brand New Suit.

ELI YOUNGHEIM.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

COWLEY CO. FAIR

Everybody is requested to visit the

NEW YORK STORE

before going home from the fair or circus. You will see one of the cheapest and handsomest lines of

DRESS FLANNELS,

DRESS GOODS.

SILKS, CARPETS, ETC.,

ever brought to Winfield. Our stock is now complete, and as goods are advancing, now is your time to buy your fall supply.

Dry Goods Never were so Cheap as this Fall.

Don't fail to come in and take a look and get our prices before buying elsewhere.

A. E. BAIRD.

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Recap Notice of Final Settlement, James Kirk, Administrator, Estate of John Servis, deceased. Hackney & Asp, Attorneys for Administrator. Date: October 5, 1885.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

Recap Sheriff's Sale. G. H. McIntire, to sell Sept. 28, 1885, real estate property to settle claim: M. M. Rutherford, Plaintiff, vs. William P. Wise, Lafayette Wise, and Eliza Wise, Defendants.

THE THIRD AUDITOR.

Colonel Williamson Claims to be a Wonder in the Way of Work.

The Treasury Department Brought Out of Egypt into the Land of Beulah.

Admiral Jouett and His New Orleans Festivities.

Advised to Sue for Stopped Pay.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

WASHINGTON, September 12. Colonel John A. Williamson, Third Auditor of the Treasury, yesterday addressed a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury, stating that on the 1st day of May last, when he assumed the duties of Third Auditor, it was notorious that the business of the office was largely in arrears, the plea being that the clerical force was not sufficient for the prompt dispatch of the work. The pension division was nearly a year behind in its examination and settlement of the accounts of pension agents involving the sum of $75,967,885. The miscellaneous claims against the Government, including state war claims, amounted to $15,557,774. Some of the work in the collection division was over two years in arrears. In the horse claim division over 11,000 claims were pending and unsettled, involving $1,716,396. The unsettled accounts of army quartermaster and commissaries amounted to $5,408,208. The unsettled accounts of engineers amounted to $5,556,826, making a grand total of $104,527,017.

[Note: I added up figures given by paper and found $104,207,089 instead of above. This seems typical of figures given by paper. Rarely can they be relied on. I don't know if the problem lay with the "typesetting" department or not! MAW]

In the short space of four months, ending August 31, and without increasing the clerical force, Auditor Williamson says the accounts of all the pension agents have been examined and settled up to the 1st of June last, and the clerks in the division are now examining and settling the accounts of the last quarter, which is current work. As showing the improvement in the working capacity of the clerks in that division, he says that during the month of May, June, July, and August, 1884 there were examined and settled accounts aggregating $16,223,580. For the corresponding four months of 1885, the same clerks, with perhaps three or four exceptions, examined and settled $75,105,773. These figures make their own comment. In the horse claims division, 612 claims have been adjusted or rejected, involving $76,275, besides carrying on a large amount of correspondence necessary to the proper disposal of the remaining cases. During the same period in 1884, 200 cases were disposed of, involving $27,774. The accounts of the quartermasters, commissaries, and engineers are up as far as it is possible for them to be, and the clerks in these divisions are now engaged in current work. The claims division, the collections division, and the horse claims divisions are the only ones in arrears, and the character of the work necessarily precludes the possibility of its being done promptly. This is explained in the fact that, in almost every case, information is required from other offices and outside sources which often involves long delay. Auditor Williamson says it is due to the clerks in the office to say that, with few exceptions, since the present Auditor's incumbency, they have been faithful and efficient. Their improvement in this respect is simply wonderful. As a consequence, a large amount of work has been performed, so that, on the whole, the business is in a very satisfactory condition. He says in this connection, however, it may be stated that since the 4th day of March there appears to be an astonishing improvement in the health of the clerks. Last year with 159 clerks, there were 1,696 sick days. Today the clerk knows of only two clerks who are absent on sick leave. As a result of the improved condition of the business in the fact that a greater efficiency has been obtained, the Third Auditor recommends a reduction in the clerical force. The law now provides for 158 clerks. There are now six vacancies, by resignation, four of which need not be filled. The services of twelve more clerks can be dispensed with without injury to the public service, making total reduction of sixteen clerks.

REPLY TO JOUETT.

WASHINGTON, September 12. Second Comptroller C. Maynard has written a reply to Rear Admiral Jouett in regard to the item of $400 paid for the entertainment of visitors to the flag ship Tennessee at the New Orleans Exposition, in which he reviews the whole question in the light of the points raised by the Admiral in defense of the expenditure. He takes issue with the Admiral on the point that the expenditure could properly be made from the naval contingent fund, and quotes from a decision made by Attorney General Devens "that the words 'contingent expenses,' as used in the appropriation acts, mean such incidental casual expenses as are necessary or at least appropriate and convenient in order to the performance of the duties required by the department or the office for which the appropriation is made." The Comptroller says that he has been unable to find any law which requires the Navy Department or any officer of the navy to entertain public officials at the expense of the Government, and says that he cannot assent to the Admiral's statement that it has been the practice of the accounting officer to allow such disbursements under the head of contingent or extraordinary expenses. But, whatever the practice may have been in this respect, he says it will be conceded that if unlawful, it cannot be too promptly discontinued. The Comptroller adds that the records of the Treasury Department will bear him out in the statement that from time immemorial it has been the practice where a public officer had received money belonging to the Government, which he was for any reason not entitled to, to make a stoppage in his pay account until the amount illegally received has been made good. In closing, the Comptroller suggests that the Admiral bring suit for the portion of his pay withheld, and so test the whole question.

AN OLD ACCOUNT.

WASHINGTON, September 12. The Second Comptroller of the Treasury has made a decision denying the motion of the counsel for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, and that the accounts of that company for the general transportation of soldiers and supplies during the civil war be reopened. The application was based on the ground that the company was subjected to extraordinary dangers and expense in executing the business of the Government, and was therefore entitled to a more liberal compensation than was allowed at the time the accounts were settled. The Comptroller declined to reopen the accounts for the reason that they had already been settled and because no new evidence was presented to justify such a course. He also made the point that the property of the company, instead of being jeopardized by the business of the Government was, in fact, protected thereby.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 17, 1885.

SHORT-HAND

AND TYPE-WRITING thoroughly taught and books furnished. Pupils may begin at any time. Charges very reasonable. J. H. FAZEL.

THE WINFIELD COURIER.

WINFIELD, COWLEY COUNTY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, SEPT. 24, 1885.

D'YE HEA' DE SLOGAN?

The Air Buoyant With Prosperity.

Winfield Spreading On Every Hand.

Her Prospects Grand.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Prosperity is dawning on Winfield, in bold reality. The last year has been a dull one all over the Union. Winfield, like every other city, has not made any remarkable strides, but her growth has never ceased. Our enterprising citizens, with deep seated confidence, have been improving right along. Our citizenship in general have strained every nerve for future public and private improvements. While other cities around us have sat in sleepy ease, Winfield has been reaching for the enterprises that are bound to put her in advance of any city of Southern Kansas. Winfield money and brains saw the necessity of more railroads--freight competition. She didn't depend on others to get them. Taking off her coat and going down in her pockets, the K. C. & S. W. and D., M. & A. railroads were originated. Then the money panic came on and things looked blue. But the feasibility of the lines were patent, and eastern capitalists were enlisted. Now the roads are materializing. The K. C. & S. W. is within a few miles of the city, her depot in Winfield nearly done, and in two weeks her engines will whistle in Winfield, and we will have direct railway communication to St. Louis, with Gould competition, to be followed soon with another direct line to K. C., forty miles shorter than any other line. Work is progressing on the D., M. & A., and the chronic growlers who said it would never amount to anything have gone into their holes and pulled the holes in after them. The bonds have been voted from Kingman west, to Baxter Springs on the east line of the State, and the D., M. & A. has proven itself a live, forcible reality that will give Winfield and Cowley County a direct Southern market for her products, to be returned by far cheaper fuel, lumber, etc. Among Winfield's triumphs of the past year is the Imbecile Asylum, which is now in process of construction, and by January first, will be ready to receive the State's imbecile and idiotic youth, with any in Cowley who may need rooms. The building's construction, as now being erected, will distribute twenty-five thousand dollars among Cowley County laborers and contractors, while the asylum itself will be a continual financial benefit, employing thirty or more attendants and consuming large quantities of produce. Winfield's next victory was the securing of the College of the Southwest Kansas Conference, laying the "Windy Wonder," Wichita, the villages of Wellington, Newton, El Dorado, and a number of others in the shade. Everything is in readiness to commence operation on this College at once. It will cost sixty thousand dollars and be one of the finest educational buildings in the west. Its location, on a table mound overlooking Winfield, with an entrancing landscape view for miles around, is one of the grandest. Another of our public improvements is the fine Central school building, which will be finished by November fist, making one of the city's most creditable public edifices. Its cost, with the present additions, will reach twenty-five thousand dollars, and will exhibit forcibly the educational tendency of our people. Private improvements are going on on every hand. All over the city are being erected valuable and commodious residences, while in the business portion of the city a regular boom is materializing. Main street's old rookeries, of pioneer days, are being moved to back streets, and in their places are going up imposing brick and stone blocks. The fine three story block of the Farmers Bank and J. P. Short's block; the Winfield National Bank extension; the commodious Commercial Hotel addition; Irve Randall's business block; that of Wallis & Wallis; Curns & Manser, and numerous others might be mentioned among the boom in Main street buildings. And many other valuable blocks are projected for erection at once. The next three months will make a magic change in Winfield. The Queen City's prospects are certainly unprecedented. Capitalists from the east are daily arriving, anxious for investments in a city of such certain promise. Property is beginning to change hands rapidly all over the county, though the prices are reasonable. That Winfield and Cowley County are on a great big illuminated boom is depicted on every countenance. Our people are happy and contented and a plethoric pocket-book stares them in the face. Pluck and energy, backed by the grandest soil and greatest natural advantages of any county west of the Mississippi, always tell. What we want now are more manufactories--which we are ardently reaching for and will get.

FOREPAUGH'S CIRCUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The one most frequent overheard remark about the great Forepaugh show is that it don't advertise things which it does not present. It is so large, complete, and satisfactory that its proprietor does not feel any undue and unwholesome stretching necessary. He advertises exactly what he can and does exhibit, and feels that he cannot afford to exaggerate. The public in general have learned this fact and place the most implicit reliance in every promise he makes. He does not want anyone to believe in him unless he deserves it, and he feels that his honest course in the past has done more to establish the people's confidence in him and win for him the appellation of "truthful advertiser" than all the many strange wonders he has had the good fortune to unfold to a delighted world. It appears at Winfield on the 29th.

AND STILL ANOTHER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

We hear that there is a scheme on foot to build still another railroad into Winfield, a branch of the "Sunflower" road, or, rather, the Ft. Scott, Wichita and Western. It is proposed to branch off at Rosalia and run down the Little Walnut river all the way to Douglass and thence down the east side of the Walnut to Winfield. This will give us a Gould road and can be built if Winfield men will give it the necessary amount of attention, which they will of course proceed to do. Winfield is going to be a division station with machine works for at least two railroads, and an important point on at least three roads. Within five years she will have many large factories and other valuable business improvements, and a population of near, or quite, twenty thousand.

MORE RAILROAD RACKET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A gentleman from Kingman yesterday said the Wichita Eagle reports considerable excitement in that burg over railroad matters. On Monday the D., M. & A. people graded their road across the right of way of the Wichita & Western, and that night the W. & W. folks collected their forces and laid down ties and a track on the grass, by the side of their road-bed so as to shut off the D., M. & A. folks. They worked by lamp-light and the excitement ran pretty high. The same authority said the W. W. people propose to build a spur from their track near the stockyards up to the hill, the object being to compel the D., M. & A. to keep on the south side of the river. He says the people are for the D., M. & A. The fight still goes on.

'RAH FOR GOOD TIMES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Winfield merchants, most of whom have just returned from the east, are buoyant with the prospects for brighter times. The stagnancy of the east has broken, and business is brisker than for two years. Confidence among capitalists and manufacturers is restoring and everything points to good times. And this impetus is felt westward. Winfield shows signs of prosperity all around--begins to sparkle with it. Our merchants are confident and have backed this confidence with large stocks. Our capitalists are spreading their wealth in valuable improvements, and our laborers are all busy.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Wail from the Kingman Democrat: About the meanest, measliest man in the world is the man who expects to get noticed often in the paper, and is the last one in God's creation to give a newspaper man anything to the amount of a nickle.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Kansas may be occasionally dry, and again very wet--it may be as cold as Greenland or as hot as hades, but it cannot be denied that Kansas has more weather to the square inch than any other State in the union.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The tail gate of a farmer's wagon load of wheat swung loose on Main today, and wheat came down with a vim. It made a golden path for half a block, spilling three or four bushels.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Considerable wheat is coming in now, selling at from sixty to seventy cents a bushel. The grain is plump and as good as the average for this country, which is never mediocre.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Warner & McIntyre have the contract for putting up the Wallis & Wallis and Curns & Manser buildings on South Main street.

HORRIBLY DEGRADED TASTE.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

This is the way Tom Richardson, in the Press, expatiates on Wellington's patent girls. His taste is so degraded he couldn't tell an Esquimaux, of the female persuasion, from a blooming American maiden. Listen: "There never was a better assortment of real lovely maidens gathered together than was assembled at the opera house last night. Strangers were dazzled with the magnificent array of loveliness, and all the young men visiting the fair from a distances are trying to get situations, so they can remain permanently in Wellington." Oh, Thomas! such a wail shows you are very near the brink of despair. Why, Wellington's girls are all wigs, cotton, crinoline, and ruse--regular patent dummies. Take our their store teeth, pull off their wigs, and let them fall back on nature, they would go clear back into total oblivion. They couldn't pass for dromedaries--excepting as their feet appeared. Give us no more taffy about your old patched up girls, Thomas. A glance at Winfield's effeminate beauty would make you feel so ashamed of your home comment you would hide your faber forever. Winfield girls are the perfect handiwork of nature. They don't have to patch up their forms, paint their cheeks, and borrow their neighbor's hair every time they appear in the social arena. Think of the perfect rose, dear Thomas, as it casts its entrancing beauty all around, and you have a fair idea of the natural charms of our girls. Now shut up, and come over. We'll prove our bill of particulars.

Wichita, the city that "don't prohibit; where more whiskey runs than under saloon rule," is easing down--her joints getting scarce, as appears by this, from the Eagle. "Two men who had sold a load of melons in town yesterday hunted around half an hour in vain for a joint. One at length lost patience and said, 'Let the joints go to sheol, I won't hunt any longer,' but his partner said, 'Have patience; nothing succeeds like patience. Napoleon was a very patient man and he generally gained his point.' 'Yes,' said the other, 'But when Napoleon came to town with a load of melons, he didn't have to sneak into all the alleys and lanes in town to find a joint.'"

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

We wondered what was the matter with your nose, Brother Seaver. The Telegram explains all. "THE COURIER hints that it would be a good idea to widen the pavement between the Baptist and Christian churches. We think so neither. It is so pleasant, when you have once screwed up courage enough to attend church, to be continually stepping off the walk into--you don't know what, or bumping your nose and skinning your shins against a tree. By the way, did anyone ever notice that a tree is sure to be right where a chap don't expect it on a dark night?"

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Jones, what did you give your hogs for the cholera?" asked Smith the other day. "Turpentine," replied Jones. Today Smith and Jones met in Winfield. Smith said: "What in blanknation did you tell me to give my hogs turpentine for, Jones? Every hog I gave it to died." "That's the way it worked on my hogs," said Jones. "But you must remember I did not advise it as a remedy." And yet Smith is confident that Jones did advise it as a remedy, and now they don't speak as they pass by.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The world is full of smart men, agreeable men, fascinating men, and wise men. The one kind of men not so numerous are the true men. One who says a thing, means it, and upon whose word you can rely as implicitly as if an affidavit were made; who measure up one side and down another and are not found wanting. We laugh at the jester's wit, admire the learned man's knowledge, but it's the true man we want to tie to.

SHORT BUT SWEET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Moonlight--autumn--September--June,

Rippling rivers--fragrant lane;

Trembling--sighing--vows--kiss--

Love--forever--Heaven--bliss.



Morning--autumn--church--ring,

Flowers--flavors--shoo--fling--

Bridegroom happy--bride fair--

Fitness wondrous--fortune rare



Winter--dreary--love flown;

John--club--Jane alone;

River frozen--lane cold--

Vow's forgotten--story told.

A DRUGGIST'S WOES.

The Trial of E. G. Roberts, Udall's Druggist, for Violating the Liquor Law.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The trial by jury of Ed G. Roberts, a druggist of Udall, for violating the liquor law, was commenced before Judge Snow Thursday. Roberts is a young man of about twenty-one, who quit teaching school to get wealth and fame in the drug business. The case has elicited deep interest, and a big attendance of Udallites, some thirty of whom are witnesses, this number about "'alf and 'alf" for the defense and prosecution. W. G. Webster, of Udall, and Jos. O'Hare, of this city, are attorneys for the defense, and Senator Hackney, acting County Attorney, for the prosecution. One illegal sale has already been proven and others are being crowded. The invoice of Robert's liquors on hand showed over a hundred gallons. Five witnesses of the prosecution swore they never saw or knew of Roberts selling any liquor illegally. Hackney said they lied. He at once made out warrants and had Noah Douglass, Clarence Boots, Peter Kelly, W. A. Cox, and Peter McCush arrested for plain drunks. The first arrest was knocked by the statutory limit of thirty days in which to file complaint. M. G. Troup, attorney for the plain drunks, brought up this point. This morning Hackney re-arrested the whole five on charges of more recent date.

SLOWLY COLLAPSING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"The Wichita Eagle vainly imagines that there is a terrible fight now going on between that town and Kansas City over the question of which of the two shall lead in the future commercial business of Kansas and the west. And the ant said unto the elephant--how we apples swim."--Newton Kansan. The Wichita Eagle seems to have a corner on wind, lately. Column after column of stuff has been dished up relative to a recently discovered rivalry between that place and Kansas City. While this puffing and blowing is going on, the D., M. & A. is building around Wichita to the south and west. Hutchinson, on the northwest, is booming to the front with new railroads, and the "Windy Wonder" shows grave and perilous signs of a collapse.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

That saucy river crank, the Kansas Millers, returned to her wharf in this city Friday with her cargo of flour undischarged. The vessel has been tied up somewhere near Stewart's ranch, on the Ponca reservation, for the past month. The boys seem to have grown discouraged at the difficulties they encountered, so they turned around and came home with their errand unperformed. A. C. Traveler.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A letter from the Sandwich Islands, addressed "General Grant, the U. S.," recalls an anecdote told by Benjamin Franklin, who at one time sent a communication to his friend, "Samuel Johnson, Great Britain." Not to be outdone, Johnson returned the compliment by directing his answer to "Benjamin Franklin, The World," which was duly delivered.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Whenever you find a man who is continually grumbling, growling, and discontented, you can mark it down that he belongs to the indolent, and loafing class. That contentment which brings satisfaction always depends on energy, industry, and economy. Contentment don't argue inaction any more than ordinary means would argue laziness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

This is the season when poetry on "the falling leaf" gets ripe. Any talented post hatching verses for THE COURIER will please send them through the postoffice, otherwise he might run against the chilly end of our editor's club and certain death. The daisies would suddenly be blooming on a fresh made grave. Be careful.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Just one," said the lover as he stood upon the stoop with his girl, "just one!" "Just I," said the mother, putting her head out of the bed room window above. "Well, I guess it isn't so late as that, but it's pretty near 12, and you'd better be going, or her father will be down." And the lover took his leave with pain in his heart.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Three trains of empty cattle cars, over a hundred cars altogether, went through one right after the other on the S. K. last evening. The cattle shipping business is on an illuminated boom now.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Out of every one hundred and nine female school teachers," says an exchange, "seven marry every year." How many times do the remaining 103 marry? Give us all the facts.

THE JUSTICE MILL.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The District Court opened again Saturday with Judge pro tem Dalton in the seat of honor. This was divorce day. Seven connubial knots were rent asunder in four hours, each in half the time it took to "pop the question." This is a hard slam on the domestic department of Cowley. But they will marry and unmarry in this country. Divorces will soon be as common as marriages, and twice as easily made. Jane F. Pack was given a divorce from her husband, Samuel D. Pack, on grounds of drunkenness, debauchery, and extreme cruelty. Alfred Rice, after hanging fire for several terms, got the conjugal tie binding him to Ella J. Rice, severed. He proved abandonment. H. C. Stivers was granted the document forever separating him from Mary Stivers, on grounds of adultery, and abandonment. Savilla M. Stucker and Eli J. Stucker were divided and she given a separation document. He was intemperate and failed to provide for her. The knot binding Mary B. Seabridge to Levi Seabridge was cut in twain, on proof of abandonment, and she given a divorce. Turtules V. Ray and Mary C. Ray were divorced, he proving his complaint of abandonment. They moved west. She didn't like the country and refused to live here. He swore by the Gewhilikins that he wouldn't go back east and hence this divorce. Frank J. Barton was divorced from Susan A. Barton. She skipped out with lover number two. The marriage vows of Hannah Smithy and S. B. Smithy were declared "off," she proving that he left her in Arkansas five years ago, since when she had heard nothing of him. Mary F. Briscoe, on grounds of drunkenness and general bad conduct, was granted a divorce from M. S. Briscoe. The docket is only partially cleared yet of bad-bargain matrimony.

The case of G. B. Shaw & Co. vs. Irwin Franklin et al, was dismissed, with prejudice.

Catherine E. Hodgdon vs. Wm. H. Crawford, et al, case dismissed at cost of plaintiff.

S. M. Jarvis vs. Elijah E. Craine, dismissed.

R. R. Conklin vs. John H. Hicks, et al, dismissed at cost of plaintiff.

R. E. Kinnie vs. John C. Armstrong, dismissed at cost of plaintiff.

John Windle vs. John H. Hicks et al, case dismissed at cost of plaintiff.

BOY SHOT!

Sam Gill Goes Squirrel Hunting and Kills His Brother's Foot. Very Bad Wound.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Sam and Jim Gill and Fred Crane took a shot-gun and went down on Timber creek, Thursday, to hunt squirrels. The gun was heavily loaded with number seven shot. The boys tagged through thick brush and over fences, and finally brought up in an open space, to confab as to the probability of game. Sam Gill, aged thirteen, held the gun, pointing to the ground. Without saying a word, the gun discharged. Its muzzle was in two feet, full range, of Jim Gill's right foot. The whole charge, powder, wadding, and all, entered his foot, just above the four first toes, making a horrible hole, into which half a hand could be put. The toes were almost severed. The big toe of the left foot also got several shot. The boys think in going through the brush the trigger caught and raised. Jim had to be carried home, and will not walk any on that foot for many a weary week, if the toes don't have to be amputated. He is fifteen years old.

OGILVIE'S HOUSE PLANS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

We have just received from the publisher a neat new book, containing plans and specifications for 25 houses of all sizes, from two rooms up; also engravings showing the appearance of houses built from the plans given. In addition it has information of permanent and practical value on subjects relative to building and building contracts that cannot fail to be of value to those who intend to build. Geo. W. Ogilvie & Co., 236 Lake Street, Chicago, are the publishers, and will mail it on receipt of 5 cents, to any address.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Frank Goode, aged thirty, died at his home, eight blocks out on east 6th avenue, this morning, of typhoid fever. The funeral takes place tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock, conducted by Rev. A. A. McDonough, Rector of our Episcopal church.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Rudolph Brofft was down from Burden Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Miss Millie Chandler, of Oxford, is visiting with Mrs. C. A. Bliss.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

M. N. Snyder, of the Terminus, was circulating over the hub Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. H. Gray, of the blooming village of Udall, visited the hub Thursday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. R. McDonald is in from a month at Veteran, highly elated over the prospects of that infant town.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Married in this city on the 17th inst., by Rev. J. H. Reider, Samuel C. Smith and Sylvia De Faulk.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

John Bachelder is getting the building for his suburban store, out on east 9th avenue, fixed up in good shape.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

F. E. Balyeat, cousin of our Frank, of the Farmers' Bank, was up from Arkansas City Wednesday, where he resides.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Little Jack Beck is "Old Persimmons" in rattling bones. He can make as much tuneful noise with bones as any expert.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

It is rumored that Miss Josie Mansfield and Mr. G. B. Salade, the artist, were married at Wichita Monday evening last.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Enis Axtell was a guest of Judge Turner Thursday, charged with assaulting Fred Hurst. On a plea of not guilty, he got $12.25.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A. J. Havencamp has sold his interest in the Lindell hotel to W. S. Bradley, of Osage agency, Indian Territory, who takes possession Sunday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

James McLain is down with rheumatism and malaria. A bad case. Judge Beck is doing double duty on the police force now.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mrs. T. H. Soward returned Thursday from a visit of about eleven weeks in Pennsylvania and reports having enjoyed it very much.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Word has been received from Dr. Rothrock that things are very dull about Larned, but he is having a good time and will be absent ten days or more, yet.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The transcript of the Henry Mowry preliminary examination, before Judge Snow, was filed in the District Court Wednesday. It is a lengthy document.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell and Q. M. Bixler were over from Geuda Friday, consulting with the K. C. & S. W. folks regarding their Caldwell branch from Winfield via Geuda.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Miss Ollie Stubblefield entered the State University at Lawrence instead of the Emporia Normal school. She will take a four year's course--complete in the classics.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Prof. E. P. Hickok came in from Protection, Wednesday. He hadn't been home for three months. He is elated over the grand prospects of Protection and Comanche County.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

James P. Gardner, who started with J. O. Taylor Thursday for the west, was taken very sick when they reached Geuda Springs. Dr. S. R. Marsh was sent for and reports him out of danger.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Miss Louise Gregg, the teacher for the Grammar school here, from Bluffton, Indiana, where she has had charge of the High School for some time, arrived Friday, and is a guest of Rev. Reider.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Tracy Elder, the son of Dr. Elder, broke the bone of his right arm just above the wrist, Thursday. He was riding on top of a load of lumber; and falling off, the lumber fell on his arm.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Lovell H. Webb and Frank K. Raymond came in from Wellington Thursday. Lovell has been shooting the "statoots" in Sumner's District Court, while Frank is the official faber slinger of the Court.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mr. and Mrs. D. A. Millington returned Thursday from their trip to Minnesota, Iowa, and Chicago, having been absent from Winfield just seventeen days, seventeen hours, seventeen minutes, and seventeen seconds.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Misses Mary Randall and Mary Majors came up from Ponca Thursday afternoon, after two weeks visit with the Hodges. May and Will Hodges accompanied them up. May will remain to attend our high school.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Judge Soward's transformation is wonderful. From the lowest ebb of despondency, he has suddenly risen to the second heaven of ecstacy, and smiles all over. His three months' widowerhood are ended. His wife and baby are home.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

C. A. Roberts, of Winfield, was here during our colt show, and helped out the Sentinel band with his playing. Charley is an excellent musician and teacher, and will accompany the Winfield Courier Band to Topeka. Udall Sentinel.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The trial of Noah Douglass, Clarence Boots, Peter Kelly, W. A. Cox, and Peter McCush, arrested during the Roberts trial for plain drunks, is set for Tuesday next, the 22nd. Two of them have skipped and the others will likely plead guilty.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Charley Long, who has recently located here, and is prominent in serenading parties with his banjo, is one of the very best banjoists. He traveled for years with a first-class minstrel troupe. He can draw out all the music a banjo is capable of.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

William Craig is here from Kansas City for a visit with his brother-in-law, Walter G. Seaver, of the Telegram, and with Walter, came into our sanctum Friday. Mr. Craig is one of the Santa Fe's employees, and an old hand at the bell rope.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

John Q. Ashton, contractor of the Imbecile Asylum, came up from Arkansas City Friday. He says the whole front of the McLaughlin building, almost enclosed, fell down yesterday. The center column was too weak. The damage is four or five hundred dollars.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mr. John Stockdale was over from Otter Friday. Among other errands he brought THE COURIER a splendid pear from his orchard. It was eleven inches in circumference, smooth and nicely formed, and of splendid flavor. Eastern Cowley is coming to the front in the fruit line.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mr. C. A. Shaw, of this city, has been appointed by President Cleveland to the Superintendency of the Ponca Indian school, and will move his family there to reside October first. This family will be parted with regretfully. Miss Mamie is a favorite among our young folks and will be greatly missed, as will Mr. and Mrs. Shaw.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Eli Youngheim returned from the east Thursday, having laid in a mammoth stock for his mammoth Dry Goods House. He reports factories resuming in the east and a booming air in all business circles. He comes back convinced that the hard time panic is busted, and general prosperity again dawning. So mote it be.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The many friends of James Scott, who formerly resided on Posey Creek, will regret to learn that he has answered the last roll call between here and eternity. He lived here several years, with his cousin, Joe Hill, but later married and went to Washington territory, where he leaves a wife and two children to mourn his departure to the veiled unknown.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

H. E. Silliman returned from Ottawa Friday and reports a very gratifying state of affairs in the University. There is double the number enrolled this year than there was at this time last year--107 now on the roll, 32 counties of Kansas being represented, and some from without the state. One student is from Salt Lake City and was formerly a Mormon. There has been an increase in the faculty, and under the energetic management of President Ward, the Baptists of Kansas have a school of which in the near future they will be justly proud.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Dr. and Mrs. J. G. Evans, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Harter, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hosmer, and Mr. and Mrs. Fred C. Hunt; Misses Bertha Williamson, Nona Calhoun, and Bert Morford, and Mr. Harry Bahntge got home Friday evening from their Territory recreative expedition. They were absent five days and had charming weather--not a drop of rain. They had two tents fourteen feet square, one for the ladies and one for the gentlemen, and a complete camping outfit, with a commissary wagon chuck full. The crowd rode in buggies. At Ponca they camped several days, hunting, fishing, and having a good time variously. While at Ponca the Indians gave them a war dance. The party are enthusiastic over the glorious time enjoyed. The only mar of the trip was the loss of Harry Bahntge's fine bay horse, which occurred the first day out.

ANOTHER TERRITORY MURDER.

Oliver Solds Kills G. W. Handy, in Self Defense. Solds in Our Bastille.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Deputy U. S. Marshal Rarick brought Oliver Solds up from Arkansas City Saturday and lodged him in Cowley's bastille. Solds shot and killed G. W. Handy, thirty-five miles below Arkansas City in the Territory, Thursday. Handy was under bond to answer the charge before U. S. Commissioner Bonsall, on the 29th, of having stolen a valuable saddle from a Territory ranchman. Solds was the principal witness against him. He tried to buy Solds off, but he wouldn't sell. Then a quarrel ensued and Handy said Solds had got to "cave" or one of them would die. More words warmed his blood, and whipping out a big pocket knife, he made successful passes at Solds, who has a crippled spine, and couldn't physically resist. The first slash or two went through Solds' clothing, and backing off, he drew his revolver and shot Handy in the left breast. Handy didn't fall, but made at Solds furiously, severing the latter's revolver belt in an effort to strike his stomach. Solds fired twice more and Handy fell dead. Handy's wife and two children and others saw the tragedy and justify Solds, who is a young man of twenty-two or more. Handy had a good ranch in the Territory, where the killing occurred, and Solds had been in his employ three months. Handy was a man of violent temper.

[Note: The Arkansas City Traveler had the name of "Oliver Soule" rather than the name "Solds" in his article covering the above murder of G. W. Handy. I believe the Courier "goofed" in name of the murderer. MAW]

HOW HE DOUBLED HIS MONEY.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Kick me, won't you?" said a prominent citizen to a COURIER reporter last Thursday. "Why?" "Because I'm a fool," replied the p. c., in a disgusted tone. "Read this," he continued, handing a newspaper to the scribe, who read:

HOW to double your money--A legitimate method, requiring wit but no risk beyond the cost of a letter and ten cents in silver. If you are not afraid of 12 cents, address McIlvane Sample Co., Box 98, Bible House, New York City. Mention this paper.

"I wasn't afraid of twelve cents. I clipped out the advertisement, pasted it on a sheet of letter paper, wrote the name of the paper from which it was clipped under it, wrote my own address, pasted a 10-cent piece on the letter paper by means of a 2-cent stamp, and mailed the whole to the firm in New York. In just eight days I got an answer to my letter. It came in a cheap, unsealed manila envelope. It was printed on a slip of the cheapest white paper and read: "'Dear Sir: In reply to your esteemed favor of a recent date, asking us to teach you

"'HOW TO DOUBLE YOUR MONEY,

"'We will tell you a plan for gaining wealth,

Better than banking, trading or leases,

Take a new greenback and fold it up,

And then you'll find your wealth increases.



"'This wonderful plan, without danger or loss,

Keeps your cash in your hand, with nothing to trouble it,

And every time that you fold it across,

'Tis plain as the light of the day, that you double it!'"

WHY A BARBER SHOULD TALK.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Our reporter had a long and pleasant talk Thursday with one of our prominent barbers, and in answer to his query why it was that a really good barber nearly always kept up a constant conversation while shaving a customer, he bit off the end of his cigar, thought a moment, then said, as an innocent smile played about his classic features: "The barber who doesn't talk isn't any good. He isn't popular with the trade and he doesn't make a good workman. You see, a man comes in and he gets into the chair and the barber commences shaving him without saying a word. The man who is being shaved has nothing to think about except himself and he immediately begins to kick about the razor. It pulls and hurts his face and nothing suits him and he goes away dissatisfied with the shop and the barber. Now one of those good-natured, talkative barbers would take that same man and commence talking politics and the weather, the police and the skating rink to him. and there would never be the slightest kick. No, sir, the barber could use his oldest and dullest razor, and the man would never think of complaining, and when the barber would finish combing his hair by telling him that he had hair just like President Cleveland or O. M. Seward, he'd get up and give him a cigar and go off feeling good-natured and swear that was the best shop in Winfield."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Geuda Springs is making strong efforts, headed by Hon. C. R. Mitchell, to get the proposed branch of the K. C. & S. W. railroad from Winfield to Caldwell, via Geuda. The people are satisfied of the surety of this line and show a readiness to give the required four thousand dollars a mile, with a good bonus for the territory in Cowley where bonds can't be legally voted. This is just the line Geuda needs to make her truly the Saratoga of the west. It will give her direct communication with St. Louis and Kansas City, and when the D., M. & A. comes in, much wider territory can be reached, whose invalids will flock to the springs. The efficacy of the waters of the Geuda Springs is undoubted, demonstrated thoroughly, and the K. C. & S. W. will make the health resort she is surely destined to be. Meetings have already been held in many of the townships in Sumner through which this line will go, resulting in a unanimous determination to give the necessary aid and offer every sensible inducement. The propositions will be submitted soon. The line is a surety. Wellington howls like a whipped cur, and is trying to sandwich in a windy paper road. But the Geuda people won't bite. They know better--can tell a good thing when it shows itself.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A happy little picnic party went down to Prof. Hickok's grove Friday, accompanied by various culinary delicacies, hammocks, etc., remaining till 9 o'clock, and returning under the silvery moon. The party was composed of Misses Ida Johnston, Nellie Rodgers, and Bessie Handy, and Messrs. George Schuler, Addison Brown, and A. F. Hopkins. There couldn't be a more delightful way to spend an evening during this charming weather.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The Traveler remarks: "The main struggle in the Republican convention at Winfield, on Saturday, will be over the county clerk's office, though it is said there is a Winfield man who intends to make it warm for George McIntire." Off, Brother Lockley, on the sheriff business. No opposition to McIntire whatever. His nomination will be unanimous--as easy as falling off a log.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

No more such anathemas as this, Mr. Harper Graphic! The old towel ought to rise up and knock you into the middle of next year. "Our office towel has become old enough to stand up, and will soon be strong enough to walk. We tried to enter it in the fine art gallery in Floral hall yesterday, but the judges said they were satisfied that it was the premium towel from its rankness and advised us to bury it at once."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Tectnicatlolicantornatipantapodon, a word of 13 syllables and 32 letters, at one time was used by an eastern Indian race now extinct, made so by the use of the word. A reward of a ten penny nail will be given to the person giving a correct pronunciation or definition. For further information apply to S. H. Crawford, Winfield, Kansas.

[Note: There were 33 letters in strange word rather than 32 letters.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The Lick Observatory, on Mount Hamilton, fifty miles from San Francisco, has yet to receive the object glass of the great telescope, now being made by the Messrs. Clark, of Cambridgeport. This will not be ready before 1887, and the building of the immense dome over the telescope must be deferred till then.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Miss Sarah Landreau, who was once the reigning belle of Savannah, Georgia, has for thirty-five years lived a hermit life in a log cabin near Fayetteville, Georgia, because of a disappointment in love. She was to have been married and the night of the wedding, the groom eloped with another woman.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Some of our business houses are drifting back into their old habit of piling their "rag outs" all over the sidewalks. Marshal McFadden says, by the horned spoons, this shan't be. So confine your displays, and remove your rubbish.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A man out west committed suicide the other day by drowning in six inches of water. He couldn't have done it alone, but his wife, with that self-sacrificing devotion and helpfulness so characteristic of the sex, sat on his head.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Never kick at a hat or a paper box lying on the sidewalk. We saw a man kick at a paper box this morning and the way he tore around and held his foot, and swore, and said: "Oh my!" would make a mule laugh.

THE PROPER THING.

The Baptist Gathering Yesterday for the Promotion of Sociability.

A Success Worthy of Emulation.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Church socials, whose object is money, are extremely antiquated. They are good things. There should be as much business in a church as in any other institution. Nothing can be run without money. But as a usual thing the regulation church social is dry and unentertaining: don't get people down off their stilts to that genuine inter-mingling that best promotes human aspirations. We are social creatures, and of all sociability, that of christianity and morality is paramount. Realizing the necessity for better acquaintance, a broader mingling of Baptists, Methodists, Presbyterians, United Brethren--all denominations--Rev. Reider hit upon a novel plan--a christian and every worldlian. It opened in the Baptist church at three o'clock Thursday, with a large attendance, a good number being in from the country, and the congregation well mixed. Revs. B. Kelly, P. B. Lee, and J. H. Reider made short addresses on the necessity of social culture, and a choir composed of Misses Lena Walrath and Bessie Handy and Messrs. E. F. Blair and John Roberts, with Miss Lola Silliman at the instrument, furnished appropriate music. The exercises occupied but a few moments, when all turned themselves loose in social intercourse, under the introduction of a committee for the purpose. It is at such meetings as this that the genuine christian sows the seeds of charity, courtesy, and kindred virtues from which a hopeful harvest may afterward be gleaned. As the truly good hate the sniveling hypocrite, so the world hates the over-sanctimonious, pinch-faced, and over-particular christian. Our churches are full of such. They go through the world like treading in a grave yard, taking every person they meet for a tombstone. The minister or layman whose influence for good extends the farthest, is the one who can lay off his far-away, sky-ward visage, the gauzy angelic robe that appears to cover every smile of some christians, and mingle among his neighbors much as other men do--not forgetting his Christly vows and engaging in amusements likely to bring his profession into disrepute. But don't crucify the body because it enjoys a hearty laugh, or condemn the soul to everlasting perdition because it finds convivial spirits while on earth. Be social. It is the grandest mode of promoting God's kingdom and the general welfare of yourself and your fellow. Who wants to go into a church whose reception is indicative of an ice berg. THE COURIER is indeed glad to note the inauguration of meetings like that of yesterday. A commingling of heart with heart, brain with brain, and ambition with ambition, followed by a grand temporal feast, always necessary on such occasions. The spread yesterday was a splendid exhibition of culinary taste, embracing everything the season affords--free as water. The meeting was productive of much good, and we hope to see many more such.

AN EMBEZZLER.

An Arkansas City Young Man in the Toils for Heavy Embezzlement.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Wm. R. Smith, a young man of twenty-eight, with a wife and three children, is in toils for embezzling a considerable sum from A. V. Alexander & Co., Arkansas City lumber dealers, for whom he was bookkeeper. He came from Washington city last February, and had been accustomed to high living. He is bright and agreeable, and as accountant and office manager for Frank J. Hess, was implicitly confided in, until discrepancies were noted, when Frank shook him. The books were so thoroughly "fixed" that Frank couldn't tell head or tails for a criminal action, but was satisfied of a loss of four or five hundred dollars. Smith acknowledges a peculation of $150 from Alexander, but the latter claims about six hundred dollars. Smith got fifty dollars a month, which sum was too small for his mode of living. He embezzled to keep up appearances. He was well liked by all acquaintances, has an accomplished wife and sweet children, and his misfortune is deeply deplored. Like all such cases, Smith was buoyed up by hopes of a way out, and now that hope is dead and the disgrace upon him, he is prostrated. His books, however, appear to show no novelty at peculation.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The printing press has made presidents, killed poets, furnished bustles for beauties, and polished genius with criticism. It has made worlds get up at roll call every morning, given the pulpit lungs of iron and a voice of steam. It has set a price on a bushel of wheat and made the post office the glimmering goal of the rural scribe. It has curtailed the power of kings, embellished the pantry shelves, and bursted rings; it has converted bankers into paupers; made sawyers of college presidents; has educated the homeless and robbed the philosopher of his reason. It smiles and kicks and cries and dies, but it can't be run to suit everybody and the editor is a fool who tries it.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

James Jordon is home from two months in the west. He visited Pueblo, Denver, Manitou, Colorado Springs, and Salt Lake City, and other places, and returned greatly improved in health--actually fat, though he doesn't look to his improvement as permanent. Judge Torrance and family had a cottage at Colorado Springs when Jim left, and one of their children was very sick. The Judge expected to go to Manitou next week. Jim also saw Dr. Mendenhall and family, who are at Manitou. He says Lafe Pence is way up in law circles at Denver.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

An exchange came to us last week with a large blue pencil mark drawn around a marriage notice pertaining to the marriage one Sam Stone to a Miss Flora Mason. Now as this is of no interest to us, we fail to catch the meaning unless they want us to say that we hope all the little Stone-Masons that may arise from this union will not come a-Miss.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Garfield will next year have the biggest Fourth of July celebration ever held in Western Kansas."--Garfield Letter. Well, what is the matter with Christmas? Gabriel may blow his trumpet before next year's Fourth, when the majority of the people would have all the fire works they want the whole year round in one of Bob Ingersoll's summer houses.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A. T. Spotswood, who is just home from a trip to Lexington, Kentucky, says the fine blue grass fields there are as barren and greenless as our prairies in mid-winter and everything has suffered from drouth. Trade is stagnant. Of all places he visited, Kansas takes the case. A visit draws a vivid comparison.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The regular S. K. passenger train from the east this morning was the biggest train that has struck Winfield for many a day. Between seventy-five and a hundred people, mostly emigrant land seekers and investors, got off at Winfield. And this is only the beginning. More will follow, thick and fast.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Douglass & Wilson have put a new ceiling in their barber shop, which adds to its appearance. Doug says he caught Wilson by the nap of the neck and cracked the old ceiling with his feet, and they had to repair. This occurred about the time Douglass had to shave for ten cents.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The County Commissioners finished the condemnation of the K. C. & S. W. railroad through Winfield Thursday. The route is down by Bliss & Wood's mill and the Fair Ground. The damages allowed will not be made public till the 24th, when the Commissioners report will be made.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Don't turn your hose loose and go off to let it run till it gets tired. It floods everything and has caused complaint to enter the ear of our faber critic. Sprinkle your lawns or water your trees sufficiently and then shut up. Don't leave the water to run all over adjoining walks.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mr. Crippen, one of Winfield's prominent businessmen, was down to the Terminus last Saturday. Mr. Crippen is completely captivated with our town, and talks of investing in real estate here. He tried to negotiate for the Stedman property while here last Saturday.

A. C. Democrat.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The prairie chickens are now ripe, and you can see our nimrods wending their way to the fields in search of them with gun and game bag in hand, and that is about all they bring home with them, but we suppose they have lots of fun scaring the chickens.

WINFIELD COURIER.

D. A. MILLINGTON, Editor.

REPUBLICAN TICKET.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

For County Treasurer, J. B. NIPP.

For Register of Deeds, T. H. SOWARD.

For Sheriff, G. H. McINTIRE.

For County Clerk, S. J. SMOCK.

For County Surveyor, N. A. HAIGHT.

For Coroner, H. L. WELLS.

For County Commissioner, (2nd District), J. D. GUTHRIE.

KANSAS CITY FAIR.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

While on Main street in Kansas City last Wednesday, we inquired what was the best way to get to the fair grounds, and were answered: "Take the cable street cars to the Union depot, there take one of the railroad trains which leave every fifteen minutes, and takes you to the fair grounds in five minutes." We followed these instructions and in due time were on our way from the Union depot. The train moved off south through the hills and gorges and in about fifteen minutes we arrived at the terminal station where we alighted. These trains are composed of seven coaches each and are generally well filled with passengers. From the terminal station we walked a mile, more or less, climbing a long, steep hill or mountain, on the summit of which we found the fair grounds, a succession of hill tops and gorges. We were so fatigued with our laborious and prolonged hill climbing that things did not look very enticing to us. The first thing we did was to look for a seat that we might rest awhile. This was a herculean job for nothing of the kind could be found in that large area except the cold, wet ground which did not suit us. Finally we paid fifty cents apiece for seats on the grand stadium facing the racing course and by the time we settled into our seats, we were so completely exhausted that the races failed to interest us to any alarming extent. The railroad fare was cheap enough, only twenty-five cents for the round trip; but if it had carried us to the grounds instead of halfway there, we should have enjoyed the show better. The entrance fee was fifty cents each, which we paid, though we had complimentary tickets in our pocket, for we did not want to feel as though we ought to suppress any truth out of return for the compliment.

While resting we witnessed half a dozen trotting races, with entries of five to eight horses for each race. These seemed to be peculiarly interesting to the immense crowd on the spectators' stand, for they cheered, yelled, and shouted like bedlam at the outcome of each race. Finally we got rested enough to start out and see the show.

The most conspicuous and numerous objects were the dinner, lunch, cigar, lemonade, and fruit stands, and it seemed to us that if all these were taken out, there would not be much show left. Now came the cheap gambling stands, such as wheels of fortune, throwing rings at knives, cans, etc. Then we saw looming up among the trees a great number of windmills and in out-walks we discovered large quantities of agricultural implements, carriages, buggies, etc., which made a good display. The inevitable sewing machine stands were there of course, the embroidery, dress goods, and carpet bazaars, the grocery samples, and the art gallery. We did not get time to visit the stock grounds, did not see but little of agricultural products, and did not conclude from what we did see that the show was a very interesting affair. If our Cowley County Fair next week does not beat it, we shall be disappointed.

BAD ADDRESSES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

During our absence of about three weeks, a considerable number of letters came addressed to D. A. Millington, Winfield, Kansas, and were not opened until our return, of course, yet many of them related to business with THE COURIER. This accounts for the fact that these communications were not attended to promptly. Now, we wish to caution persons writing us in relation to anything connected with THE COURIER to append the word "Editor" to the address, or, what is better, address "WINFIELD COURIER, Winfield, Kansas." We are still receiving letters addressed to us personally which should be addressed to "Postmaster, Winfield, Kansas." You never need to know the name of a public officer whom you wish to address on business connected with his office. The incumbents of offices change, and if you address one simply by name, it is not sufficient, but if you address only his official title, you are all right. Letters continue to come to this post office addressed L. B. Stone, treasurer, though he has not been treasurer for a year. They should be addressed "Treasurer of Cowley County, Winfield, Kansas," then Capt. Nipp or his deputy would get them promptly.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Would it not be a good idea for the city council to have the hose companies turn out two or three times during the week and attach the hose to the various plus along Main street and flood it so the dust would not stifle one as they traverse the sidewalks? All week hundreds and hundreds of vehicles will drive up and down Main as well as all the other streets, and will keep the dist flying continually. It will be impossible for the street sprinkler to keep the streets sufficiently wet to keep the dust down, but three or four applications from the hose companies would put the streets in good condition and keep them that way.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The COURIER always looks out for the ministers, hence it would be neglecting its duty if it failed to note that the balcony on the main exhibition building, fronting the race course, affords one of the best points for seeing the races. We noticed several deacons taking in the flyers from there today. They had apparently just stepped out on the balcony to take a breath of fresh air. We have reserved a seat there for Rev. Kelly tomorrow and shall make ample room for Revs. Reider, Myers, and Snyder. No wagering allowed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The Harper Graphic, in mentioning the fact that a boy had been named after that paper, remarks: "It is much more pleasant to have pretty babies called after the paper than to have the girls sitting on it in bustles." This is the worse break we ever knew you to make, Finch. The idea of a man of your standing, knowing, as you do, that newspapers contribute so much to a woman's shape and--well, we'll not make the matter too "graphic," but your taste, seems to us, has considerably retrograded.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Train men on the Santa Fe road are to be regularly uniformed on November 1st, says the Santa Fe New Mexican. The suits will be of navy blue, brass buttons, and regulation cut. A tailoring establishment in the east will get the job on contract for making the suits, and a bulletin will be issued in a few days informing train men of the forthcoming order so that they will not buy beforehand any necessary clothing for the winter. A. C. Republican.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Some of the Arkansas City papers are kicking against the City Council of that burg allowing the skating rink license to run. Say it is detrimental to society and otherwise an injury to the feminine gender in general. It's only a matter of opinion, Dick.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The largest fruit farm in the world of any one kind of fruit has been established in the southern part of Florida, comprising 200,000 cocoanut trees.

REPUBLICAN COUNTY CONVENTION.

Everything Harmonious, With No Opposition to Speak of. A Ticket Unexcelled.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The convention met at the Opera House in Winfield at 10 o'clock a.m. today according to the call, and was called to order by W. J. Wilson, chairman of the county committee. E. A. Henthorn, Secretary of the committee, read the call. On motion of G. H. Buckman, Hon. T. A. Blanchard was elected chairman pro tem and took the chair. On motion of Geo. T. Walton, E. A. Henthorn was elected secretary pro tem and took his seat. On motion of S. P. Strong, voted that the chair appoint a committee of five on credentials. The chair appointed S. P. Strong, Ed Pentecost, G. P. Haycraft, Ed Nicholson, and W. B. Weimer. On motion of Geo. T. Walton, voted that the chair appoint a committee of five on permanent organization. The chair appointed Sid Cure, A. H. Jennings, J. S. Rash, John Bartgis, and S. C. Pattison. On motion of P. A. Lorry, voted that the chair appoint a committee of five on order of business. The chair appointed P. A. Lorry, Samson Johnson, W. E. Tansey, J. R. Sumpter, and Capt. Stuber. On motion of J. C. Long, the chair was instructed to appoint a committee of five on resolutions. The chair appointed John C. Long, E. A. Henthorn, Dr. H. F. Hornady, L. E. Wooden, and J. D. Maurer. On motion, the convention adjourned to 2 o'clock p.m., sharp. Just previous to adjournment the chairman announced that all the delegates would be provided with dinner tickets by calling at the secretary's desk.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

2 O'CLOCK.

Convention called to order. Committee on credentials reported the following names of delegates entitled to seats in this convention.

BEAVER.

Delegates: J. R. Sumpter, L. K. Bonnewell, J. W. Browning, Louis P. King.

Alternates: None.

EAST BOLTON.

Delegates: Allen Mowry, Nat. Banks, Thos. Wing.

Alternates: Al Wing, Geo. Stevens, A. Wing.

WEST BOLTON.

Delegates: Wm. Trimble, A. J. Kimmell, John Linton, P. A. Lorry.

Alternates: A. Hurst, D. P. Marshall, W. A. Clark, P. B. Anderson.

CEDAR.

Delegates: O. D. Olmsted, N. Parish, O. F. McDonald, John Bush, Mr. Pratt.

Alternates: Ennis Patten, J. B. Wilson, James McIntire, A. A. Bruce, G. H. Shearer.

CRESWELL.

Delegates: G. W. Ramage, W. C. Guyer, Jesse Stansbury, F. N. Vaughn, A. B. Sankey.

Alternates: Squire Allen, A. G. Kells, Frank Boughton, R. G. Marshall, J. B. Tucker, I. L. Wade.

ARKANSAS CITY.

1ST Ward.

Delegates: W. D. Kreamer, J. T. Hight, F. M. Peck, T. D. Richardson.

Alternates: A. E. Kirkpatrick, Jas. Richardson, W. D. Johnson, J. M. Smiley.

2nd Ward.

Delegates: Frank Hess, Ed Pentecost, Chas. Bryant, Theo. Fairclo.

Alternates: Ed. Gray, D. Lewis, I. Barret, E. Baldwin.

3rd Ward.

Delegates: L. E. Wooden, C. H. Searing, Thos. Gilbert.

Alternates: Ed. L. Kingsbury, J. W. Cunningham, N. T. Snyder.

4th Ward.

Delegates: O. D. Rarick, D. D. Bishop, John Daniels, W. D. Mowry.

Alternates: C. Parker, J. E. Beck, S. C. Lindsey, A. Wilson.

DEXTER.

Delegates: E. B. Nicholson, C. A. Peabody, J. A. Bryan, J. V. Hines, C. W. Dover, R. C. Maurer, John Wallace.

Alternates: W. L. Reynolds, Sol Smith, Dick Gilbert, L. C. Patterson, John Clifton, J. D. Maurer, Sam Nicholson.

FAIRVIEW.

Delegates: J. W. Douglass, A. J. McCollim, J. L. Foster, E. Rogers.

Alternates: W. F. Lacey, N. Newberry, T. S. Covert, J. H. McCollim.

HARVEY.

Delegates: J. W. Parker, J. S. Rash, S. Sweet, Wash Tharp.

Alternates: Jo Hew, Sam Nels, J. Mason, W. E. Rash.

LIBERTY.

Delegates: J. L. H. Darnell, I. N. Darnell, P. B. Griffith, J. M. Mark.

Alternates: H. C. Castor, J. Cochrane, G. W. Stover, J. C. Castor.

MAPLE.

Delegates: E. J. Cole, Wm. Wise, W. R. Atkinson, W. O. Coval.

Alternates: None.

NINNESCAH.

Delegates: D. W. Pierce, J. L. Stuard, A. S. Capper, J. T. Dale, R. J. Gardner.

Alternates: Geo. A. Cole, S. W. Roberts, Geo. Sloan, Phil Stout, D. D. Kellogg.

OMNIA.

Delegates: A. Hattery, Geo. Haycraft, W. H. Butler.

Alternates: E. M. Henthorn, E. J. Parsons, C. P. Cogswell.

OTTER.

Delegates: John Stockdale, A. A. Mills, John H. Bartgis, James England.

Alternates: D. Kautz, J. B. Graves, J. P. Hosmer, D. Barnes.

PLEASANT VALLEY.

Delegates: D. S. Sherrard, B. W. Sitter, J. P. Henderson, Samson Johnson.

Alternates: R. H. Vermilye, S. S. Linn, C. R. Croco, M. H. Markum.

RICHLAND.

Delegates: J. R. Cottingham, Adam Stuber, S. J. Holloway, J. S. Bowker, J. P. Groom, D. C. Stephens.

Alternates: J. Cooper, N. J. Larkin, J. O. Van Orsdol, J. A. Childs, T. R. Carson, J. R. Cole.

ROCK.

Delegates: E. P. Hornaday, W. R. Grow, Jas. Atkinson, E. J. Wilber, S. P. Strong.

Alternates: John Holmes, J. B. Holmes, James Walker, Reuben Booth Jr., Wm. White.

SHERIDAN.

Delegates: J. J. Partridge, Levi Quier, E. Shiver, M. T. Armstrong.

Alternates. None.

SILVER CREEK.

Delegates: S. H. Toles, W. C. May, E. A. Henthorn, G. Walker, G. T. Walton, J. P. Zimmerman, Jo S. Leedy, H. P. Snow.

Alternates: None.

SILVERDALE.

Delegates: S. J. Darnell, Fred Heisinger, J. M. Longshore, S. I. Pering, J. B. Splawn.

Alternates: E. C. Hawkins, John Algeo, J. J. Estus, T. J. Eaton, S. W. Waldroupe.

SPRING CREEK.

Delegates: J. R. Daniels, John Drury, Jas. Gilkey, J. S. Wilkin.

Alternates: C. W. Bailey, R. J. Mead, J. B. Callison, R. R. Goodrich.

TISDALE.

Delegates: S. Myers, W. R. Bradley, R. A. Rising, C. P Humphrey, R. A. Rising, P. N. Downing.

Alternates: None.

VERNON.

Delegates: J. G. Pearson, J. W. Millspaugh, W. E. Tansey, J. F. Martin, N. M. Powers, C. D. Soule.

Alternates: None.

WALNUT.

Delegates: Frank Conkright, J. L. King, Frank Weakley, John Mentch, J. C. Roberts, T. A. Blanchard, Sid Cure.

Alternates: B. F. Walker, Mel Graham, John Anderson, Geo. Brown, S. C. Sumpter, Noah Wilson, J. H. Sorey.

WINDSOR.

Delegates: S. M. Fall, J. W. Tull, W. B. Weimer, G. G. Barber, W. E. Dwyer, Ike Phenis, Shelton Morris.

Alternates: A. B. Booth, Ben Clover, N. E. Darling, Jessie Hiatt, C. Rheims, Will Branson, N. S. Crawford.

WINFIELD, 1ST AND 2ND WARDS.

Delegates: H. H. Siverd, Frank Finch, C. E. Steuven, John Nichols, T. J. Harris, A. H. Jennings, W. B. Caton, Henry E. Asp, W. T. Madden, T. F. Axtell, A. J. Lyon.

Alternates: Greene Wooden, C. M. Leavitt, Hank Paris, Archie Brown, B. McFadden, James McLain, Walter Denning, W. R. McDonald, J. H. Taylor, A. B. Taylor, Ben Harrod.

WINFIELD 3RD AND 4TH WARDS.

Delegates: D. L. Kretsinger, G. H. Buckman, John C. Long, H. L. Wells, J. L. Horning, R. Farnsworth, A. McNeal, C. Stamp.

Alternates: Chas. Holmes, J. E. Snow, Capt. Whiting, L. Conrad, W. H. Shearer, Will Whitney, E. C. Seward, W. B. Pixley.

The convention amended the report by the substitution of H. O. Wooley for Pearson in the Vernon delegation, and W. O. Cunningham for G. W. Ramage in the Creswell delegation. Report was adopted and the committee discharged. The committee on permanent organization reported that the temporary organization be made permanent. The report was adopted. The chair, on motion, appointed E. J. Wilber as assistant secretary. The committee on order of business reported as follows.

1st. Report of committee on permanent organization.

2nd. Report of committee on credentials.

3rd. Report of committee on resolutions.

4th. Nominations in the following order: Sheriff, treasurer, register of deeds, county clerk, surveyor, and coroner. On motion, the report was adopted.

On motion it was voted that the several delegations are authorized to cast their full vote for their townships.

The committee on resolutions made the following report, which was unanimously adopted.

Mr. Chairman and gentlemen: Your committee on resolutions beg leave to report the following declaration of principles.

Resolved, 1st, That we heartily endorse the principles laid down by the last Republican National and State conventions.

2nd, We heartily endorse the administration of his Excellency, John A. Martin, as governor of Kansas, and hereby express our hearty appreciation of his wisdom, ability, and patriotism.

3rd, We hereby heartily endorse the course of our State senator, Hon. F. S. Jennings, in the Senate of Kansas, and of each of our representatives, the Hon. Ed. P. Greer, Hon. Louis P. King, and Hon. J. D. Maurer, and hereby desire to express our appreciation of their ability, fidelity, and patriotism.

4th, We hereby denounce the Democratic party as an enemy of good government, and a foe to the commercial advancement and prosperity of our common country.

5th, We hereby recommend that the office of county auditor be abolished; it being a useless expense upon the several counties of the State, and we request our State senator and representative to use their influence in the next session of the legislature toward accomplishing this end. Respectfully submitted.

J. C. LONG, L. E. WOODEN, H. T. HORNADY, R. E. MAURER, E. A. HENTHORN,

Committee.

G. H. Buckman in a happy speech placed G. H. McIntire in nomination for sheriff, who was nominated by acclamation. Mr. McIntire was called on for a speech, to which he pleasantly responded.

J. C. Long, in a few well chosen words, named Capt. J. B. Nipp for Treasurer, who was nominated by acclamation. The Capt. Made a happy speech of thanks.

H. H. Siverd named Tom H. Soward for Register of Deeds and Mr. Soward was nominated by acclamation. Mr. Soward expressed his thanks in a rousing speech.

Capt. Tansey, in one of his short, patriotic speeches, presented the name of S. J. Smock for County Clerk.

Mr. Presented the name of J. G. Shrieves.

The secretary read the withdrawal of Capt. J. S. Hunt as a candidate, which for its noble and patriotic sentiments, "brought down the house" with applause.

Mr. J. G. Shrieves withdrew his name and moved the nomination of S. J. Smock by acclamation, which motion prevailed; and Mr. Smock thanked the convention in a few appropriate remarks.

Capt. N. A. Haight was then nominated for Survey by acclamation.

Dr. H. W. Marsh and Dr. H. L. Wells were then put in nomination for coroner.

Voted that the chairman of each delegation report the vote of his township as the various townships were called by the secretary. The motion prevailed.

A vote was taken, resulting in 80 for Wells and 70 for Marsh, and Dr. H. L. Wells was declared the nominee.

Moved by Mr. Strong that Winfield be allowed two members of the Central Committee, Arkansas City two, and each township one, which motion prevailed.

The following were elected members of the County Central Committee for the ensuing year.

Windsor: S. M. Fall.

Walnut: Sid Cure.

Bolton: P. A. Lorry.

Cedar: Alex A. Bruce.

Creswell: F. M. Vaughn.

Dexter: S. H. Wells.

Harvey: J. S. Rash.

Rock: Dr. H. T. Hornady.

Otter: J. Stockdale.

Arkansas City: Theo Fairclo and L. E. Wooden.

Beaver: J. R. Sumpter.

Tisdale: Hugh McKibben.

Vernon: H. O. Wooley.

Liberty: Justus Fisher.

Richland: L. B. Stone.

Spring Creek: J. S. Gilkey.

Omnia: A. Hattery.

Pleasant Valley: S. S. Linn.

Maple: E. R. Morse.

Sheridan: E. Shriver.

Fairview: J. H. Curfman.

Ninnescah: J. S. Stuard.

Silver Creek: E. A. Henthorn.

Silverdale: S. J. Darnell.

Winfield: C. M. Leavitt.

Winfield: J. C. Long.

On motion the convention adjourned.

2ND DISTRICT CONVENTION.

The convention of the Second Commissioner District met in the same room and elected Louis P. King chairman, and N. T. Snyder, secretary. J. D. Guthrie and Wm. M. Sleeth were named for Commissioners. A vote being taken resulted 42 for Guthrie to 8 for Sleeth, and J. D. Guthrie, of Bolton, was declared the nominee. The Convention adjourned.

CENTRAL COMMITTEE.

The new Central Committee met at the COURIER office and organized by the election of Hon. J. C. Long, Chairman, E. A. Henthorn, Secretary, and J. R. Sumpter, Treasurer. Voted that a committee of two from each commissioner district be constituted an executive committee to be appointed by the chairman. Committee adjourned.

DON'T GET TAKEN IN.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The city this week will be full of rascals, who will carry and manipulate all kinds of devices for extracting money from the uninitiated. Their plans and schemes are all very nice and look very plausible to those who know not of the way, but don't be taken in by any trap specially set for this very purpose; don't stick your head in the tiger's jaws and then curse your fate afterward. You will gain nothing by bucking a man at his own game. He knows he will win or he wouldn't tempt anybody. These chaps win all the time or they couldn't follow their business. They throw out their net and ere you know it, if not careful, you will get tangled in its meshes and get out a poorer, but wiser man, cursing your ill luck and the gambler that robbed you so cunningly that you couldn't catch him at it. We say again, have a care where you put your money, be careful that you don't place it in some stranger's hands of whom you know nothing, and whose reputation is not worth the confidence you place in him. We will warn you in time, but the old saying that "the world will never get so old nor the people so wise that there will not be some suckers," is a very true one and before the week is over we will have to chronicle the wanton robbery of someone. Steer clear of these breakers and you are safe.

A DEMOCRATIC POSTMASTER.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

This morning it was rumored that George Rembaugh carried a smile on his "phiz" that betokened something more than the usual routine in the every day events of this life. It was said that a bran new Democratic postmaster had arrived at his house. The thirsty man of news made a dash for the postoffice and at once tackled George. He swore by all that was good or bad that it was a cruel joke some of the boys had instigated at his expense, but ye reporter detected the far-away smile in the corner of George's eye and pinned the boy to the wall and he "caved"--said it was too true. It's a bouncing boy--a full fledged Democrat, clamoring in a loud voice for a postoffice or something else; probably the paregoric bottle or some other infantile unmentionables. George stands it remarkably well considering that this is his first. He told us not to give it away and we won't. Don't say a word about it. We have not smoked yet.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

J. W. Johnson has the slickest thing out in a carpet exhibitor. It is a square box with reflectors. Place it over a strip of carpet and it magnifies to a large room. By this means the buyer can see how a room would look so carpeted.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A traveling men's Grant monument fund petition is pinned to the Brettun register on which thirty-one names are attached with their respective addresses to the right. None subscribed less than $1.00.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A. Lungan, Clay Center, is a Brettun guest.

STAGE-STRUCK MEN.

Experience on the Road in a Comic Opera Chorus.

The Inner Life of the Show Business.

Rapacious Managers and Disgusted Performers.

Working the Box. Office For Ducats.

[Correspondent, New York Sun.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"So you want to know something about the inner life of the show business?" said a dapper young man to the reporter. "Well, I'm just the one who can give you the straight up as to roughing it on the road.

"Ever since I was a boy, I have had a hankering after the show life, and a couple of years ago, while I was engaged in a church choir, I felt the fever coming on mighty strong. I began to cultivate an acquaintance with theatrical people, and almost before I knew it, I had signed a contract with a comic opera company for a forty weeks' engagement. I was to receive $18 a week besides traveling expenses, and I had it figured out how I was to do the country, and have a few hundred dollars saved up when we disbanded in the spring. Everything seemed rosy; there was an air of business about all the details, for the contracts were drawn up by a well-known agent, and, although the chorus was mostly composed of amateurs like myself, the principals were public favorites, and well up in their several lines.

"It was the middle of August, so we had about two weeks in which to rehearse our parts. The theaters were vacant at the time, and we had little difficulty in getting a suitable place. Although our repertoire consisted of several comic operas, we were to be put through only two, the others being rehearsed while on the road. It was here the trouble began. The chorus was painstaking and quick to learn; but the principals, who were blown up with self-sufficiency, seldom appeared together at the rehearsals, and when we made our debut in a small town in Jersey, one of the men, who had boasted he knew the whole thing, word for word, forgot his lines. We had struck our first snag, and the local papers gave us a poor send-off the next day.

"But I enjoyed the life. The gilt had not yet worn off the business for me, and I had conquered all traces of nervousness. The only thing we were afraid to face was the empty benches, and we saw plenty of them until we got into Pennsylvania.

"As soon as the manager got his clutches on the door receipts, they were sent off to the backer in New York. Of course, the principals, whose reputations made them independent, got their salaries; but the chorus and the rest of us got nothing but promises. It did not matter how good the houses were, we were always told we would be paid in full as soon as we struck good business. Our traveling expenses had to be paid, as well as the board bills; but we never had the money in our own hands. When we struck a stand, the manager would make arrangements with some third-class hotel to board the chorus. The principals, who had the spending of their own money, never put up at the same hotel with us, and I don't blame them.

"Why didn't we kick? What was the use? We were far away from home without a cent in our pockets, and as long as we stayed with the show, we had something to eat and a place to sleep. Some of the members who could afford it telegraphed home for enough money to take them back to New York, while others slipped into rival companies and took their chances of jumping from the frying-pan into the fire. We thought of nothing but schemes to raise the wind, and there wasn't a crook in the country who was so full of ways that are dark and tricks that are vain as we. Some curried favor with the principals, and managed in that way to squeeze the box, while others bribed the stage manager to discount their notes. But the best of all was the box office racket. It was this way. You see, a man would buy something--an umbrella, a valise, or any article he liked--and enter into an agreement with the storekeeper to take it back for a consideration. Then it would be sent to the box office with the bill. This panned out immediately until one day when we were in Galveston a Jonah sent a coon with a mule, upon which there was $65 to be paid. That was working it a little too much, and the manager shut right down on it there and then. We never got up anything so good afterward, although a Jersey man we had with us, a pretty hard drinker, hesitated at nothing when he wanted a drink. One afternoon, while we were rehearsing, he rushed into the green-room clad only in an old oilskin suit all smeared with paint and tar. He told the manager he had been taking a swim off one of the docks, and some sailors in a skiff had stolen his clothes and left the jumper and overalls in their place. He was drunk for three days, and when the manager asked him how he got such fine New York clothes in Texas, he never winked an eye.

"The manager thought of nothing but making money, and after the Treasurer had skipped with the receipts of one night, he became harder than ever on the company. For weeks we had nothing but one-night stands, and when the cities were a hundred or more miles apart, we had no sleep except what we got on the cars. At first we thought that when the last train left before the show was over we would have a full night's rest, but we soon found that the engineer had received extra pay to keep the train waiting for us. We got our meals in the same haphazard way as our sleep. We'd telegraph ahead to the next station for so many covers, and as there wasn't time for any examination, they didn't care much what the served. Sometimes the dinner was good, but the temptation to cheat was so strong that we soon began to anticipate it, and seldom got what we anted. The empty dishes were left at the following station, whence they were returned to their owner. When the dinner was particularly bad, the plates usually met with some accident.

"After being on the road some seven months, we disbanded at Philadelphia, all glad to be dropped so near home. I was all broken up. Instead of being recuperated by the traveling, I was sick in body and mind from the hard work and disappointment. We were promised settlement in full, and instructed to call at a certain place in New York for our statements. After charging me for many things I had never heard of, and over $100 for 'bus hire, they figured that there were a few dollars coming to me. I called a couple of times, but never got it. The Jersey man found himself in debt to the manager, and I'm afraid he never paid up.

THE WILMOT PROVISO.

How This Remarkable Enactment Originated, and Who Were Its Sponsors.

[Ben Porley Poore.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The Wilmot proviso, which was destined to play an important part in politics, originated at the dinner-table of a political club in the city of New York, which meets weekly. It was composed of Democrats opposed to the extension of slavery, and among those present on the day in question were John Van Buren, Samuel J. Tilden, John A. Kennedy, Isaac Fowler, Andrew H. Greene, and other well-known Free-Soil Democrats.

Mr. Howe, a Western member of Congress, was a guest, he having visited New York to confer with the Democratic opponents of slavery. During the consultation John Van Buren said that the protest against the extension of slavery introduced into Congress was not worded right. He suggested that the exact words of Jefferson in the famous ordinances of 1883 and 1887 should be used. This was agreed to. Mr. Howe stated that it would be difficult to introduce the proviso, as the Speaker would not give the floor to anyone friendly to freedom. Mr. Tilden, as the chief organizer of the movement about to be made, proposed that a ruse should be played. It was agreed that each man composing the little body of sixteen or eighteen free-soilers in Congress should have a copy of the provision in his pocket. Each should spring to the floor at the first chance and shout, "Mr. Speaker!" It was thought that one of them would be recognized. Mr. Tilden, with other members of the club, went to Washington to aid in carrying out the plan.

At a time agreed upon the Spartan band, each with the proviso in his hand, sprang to the floor and, in concert, shouted, "Mr. Speaker!" The Speaker was bewildered. He could not ignore the whole crowd. He selected Judge Wilmot as the most moderate of the party, and so the Wilmot proviso passed into history.

WITHOUT THE SLIGHTEST EXAGGERATION OR VARIATION FROM FACTS.

How a Colony of Rats Were Induced to Remove From One House to Another.

The Letter Which Caused the Hegira. Important, if True.

[By a Lineal Descendant of George Washington.]

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"Now, I am going to tell you something, and it will be hard for you to believe it, but I give you my word that I will not exaggerate nor misstate a single incident."

My friend and I had been comparing house-keeping notes, our pleasures, our cares and annoyances, and had finally come to rats. We agreed that of all the pestiferous creatures housekeepers were obliged to wage war against, rats were the worst. Then came the story.

"Right here on this very spot which you think so beautiful," my companion began, "and where I have spent several of the happiest summers of my life, there were rats enough last season to scuttle half the ships on the Atlantic Ocean. It was impossible to walk across the lawn or down to the plank walk leading to the beach without coming across two or three of those horrible animals. They were so fat and saucy, too, never in a hurry, and when we stamped our feet or clapped our hands, they would actually turn and look, as if curious to know what the unusual sound meant.

"Our cool cupboard at the back of the house, where we had always kept our butter and meat in perfect safety, were so infested by them that we could no longer use it. One morning the cook went to get some pork for frying fish and found that a piece, weighing fully five pounds, had been dragged into a hole as large as her head and two or three feet deep. A wooden box containing several pounds of lovely butter had been broken into and the balls dragged all over the floor. Even the swing shelf, in our little cellar, was not secure from their depredations, and I got so at last that I didn't feel safe even in my bed. All night the rats squealed and gnawed, and every morning a yell from the cook proclaimed that some new mischief had been perpetrated. I have never had much patience with nervous women whose happiness could be spoiled by the sight of a water-bug or a cluster of ants in the sugar bowl, and as my criticisms of such had been frequent and bitter, I thought it best not to make too much fuss even about rats.

"Why didn't I poison them? Because dead rats would have been infinitely worse than lives ones. And then, I tell you, there were hundreds of them. One morning, being particularly harassed and on the very verge of deciding to go back to the city, I confided my perplexities to a young man who supplied us with fish.

"'Why don't you write 'em a letter?' he inquired with his quaint down-East drawl and snicker.

"'Write 'em a letter?' I repeated wonderingly. 'What do you mean?'"

"'Why, write the rats a letter, a reglar perlite letter asking 'em to please go somewhere else,' he replied. 'But you must be sure and name the place, because if you don't, they'll be kinder upset, and as likens not, they'd take it out in spekerlating where they'd better go. I give you my word I never knew it to fail, and I've seen it tried more than a dozen times.'"

"'Write a letter to rats?' I said. 'Where shall I put it?'"

"'Well, the best place would be in the cellar, because nobody'd git hol of it there, but the the critters it's intended for.'"

"Of course this man was joking," said I.

"Indeed he was not, but just wait and hear how it came out," my friend answered, with a merry peal of laughter.

"'Where would you request 'em to go?'" I asked my adviser.

"'Well, naeow,' he drawled, 'Lapham's would be as good a place as any, wouldn't it?'"

"I had suspected before that my fisherman had a private grudge against the Laphams. Now I knew it."

"'The Laphams have always been kind to me,'" I responded, "''Twould be horribly mean to send such boarders to the Lapham House.'"

"'But you don't believe they'll go?'" my companion replied, with twinkling eyes.

"'Of course not.'"

"'Wall, then, you might as well experiment with Lapham as anybody, hadn't you?' The fisherman asked. "'And then,' he added, 'he can git rid of 'em in the same way. Why, I've known rats to move three times in a season.'"

"'All right,' said I. 'Lapham it shall be.'"

At this point my friend rose and went into the next room, returning with her portfolio.

"This is a copy of the letter I sent those rats," she added, and read aloud the following somewhat unique communication.

"DEAR RATS--Having heard that you were possessed of obliging dispositions, and always ready to make any reasonable sacrifice for those who in the past have fed and housed you, I write to ask if you will add to your past numerous favors by moving your quarters as far as the Lapham House? Your creature comforts will certainly be far better ministered to there than here, as Mrs. Lapham has a French cook, and you can literally live on the fat of the land. I would not make such a request if I felt strong enough to take care of so large a family. Yours, very respectfully, "

"What a pity to waste all that ammunition on rats," I remarked. "This is not the age for you. You should have been private secretary to Talleyrand."

"Now this document had to be taken to the cellar," my companion went on, "and I would about as soon have started for the bottomless pit. To attempt the trip in my flowing robes was out of the question, so I went upstairs and put on a pair of Tom's pants, folded them snugly round my ankles, and secured them with safety pins. Then I lighted a lantern, and with that in my left hand, an umbrella in my right, and my billet between my teeth, I started for the rats' stronghold. I had previously sent the cook to a neighbor's and fastened the doors that I might be perfectly dressed to carry out the details of this diabolical plot. If I hadn't been so insanely afraid of these creatures, I should certainly have exploded with laughter as I went stamping down those steep stairs. No more comical and ridiculous an object could ever be imagined. I touched the ground at last and cautiously advanced to the swing shelf. As I reached up to deposit my document, something jumped to my side with a sickening thud that I can hear now. I had presence of mind though, however, to leave the letter, and then I turned and ran as if the Prince of darkness was at my heels."

"And the rats remained?" I suggested.

"No, you unbeliever, they did not. Three days after this Mr. Lapham had occasion to call at our cottage, and this is what he said.

"'I declare, Miss Clarke,' he began after he had transacted his business, 'if we hain't had a real dispensation up to our house. Lord! The locusts of Egypt ain't no comparison to 'em. I tell you, Miss Clarke, if we've got one rat to our house we've got 25,000, and every tarnal one of 'em is as big as a cat. Miss Lapham says she guests she'll go to Saratogy for the summer and leave the critters in charge. They're bound to run the place anyhow, and the farm don't appear to be big enough for them and her too. Massy sakes! I'm to wit's end. The boarders are beginning to growl, and the cook says he can't stand it no how. Mebbe I ought to be ashamed to say it, but there ain't but one thing on airth that I'm afeard on, and that's a rat. Both Miss Lapham and me is in a cold sweat from the time we git up till we go to bed, and this morning I was so cramped up on account of having my knees up to my chin all night that 'twear all I could do to git my clothes on.'"

"What did I do?" Why, I laughed and laughed till the tears ran down my cheeks and my sides were ready to burst.

"Why don't you write 'em a letter?" I managed at last to find breath to ask. "I've been told that they'll leave if you do."

"'You don't believe any such fool stuff as that, do you?' my neighbor inquired, scornfully. 'And do you s'pose I'd be so tarnal mean as to send such an affliction to anybody else's house? Not if I know it, Miss Clarke.'"

"That was a good shot for me, wasn't it?" said my friend.

"Well, there hasn't been a rat seen on our premises since; and this is the truth, if I ever spoke it."

LAND SLIDES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The following are the real estate transfers filed in the office of Register of Deeds since our last issue.

Warren Neal et ux to Geo W Herbert, lot 3, blk 460, Leonard's ad to A C: $1,000

Fleazer Baldwin to Alice I Thompson, lot 16 and s hf lot 11, blk 165, Leonard's ad to A C: $500

Frank J Hess et al to James V. Jones, lots 1 and 2, blk 5, Hess' ad to A C: $125

Frank J Hess et al to Albert P Smith, lots 1 and 2, blk 8, Hess' ad to A C: $115

Chas H Holloway et ux to Alexander Crow, lots 20, 21, 22, and 23, blk 132, A C: $1,000

Harvey D McCormick et ux to Nathaniel Bryan, lot 12 and n hf lot 11 blk 95, Menor's ad to Winfield: $1,400

W J Cochran et ux to J M Alexander, lot 8, blk 107, Winfield: $1,500

Thomas H Tyner et ux to George Endicott, lots 6 and 7, blk 179, Tyner's ad to A C: $725

Eliza J Lacey et ux to Thomas B Young, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 178, Loomis' ad to Winfield: $1,200

Sylvester Wysong et ux to W J Cochran, lot 4, blk 227, Fuller's ad to Winfield: $50

W J Hodges et ux to W J Cochran, hf lot 7, blk 10, Winfield: $1,100

Geo W Herbert et ux to Warren Neal, w hf sw qr sec 4 and e hf se qr 5-34-5e: $1,750

Joseph Wise et ux to Edward Cannon, s hf ne qr sec 19 and w hf nw qr 20-33-6e, 160 acres: $600

J V Pierce et ux to H N Knallenberg, sw qr 32-30o-6e: $1,280

Amy A Jackson et al to Shewsberry Sweet, s qr sw qr 8-30-7e: $120

Lucinda Rash to John S Rash, lots 1 and 3, 4-30-7e, 80 acres: $1,500

Chas R Sipes et ux to J D Buckley, lot 10, blk 30, A C: $100

Margaret Kroenert et al to George Kroenert et al, lots 18 and 19, blk 45, A C: $200

Joseph Dewitt et ux to James Kizer, tract in sw qr 24-33-4e: $450

Henry Goldsmith to Abraham De Turk, tract in sw qr 27-32-4e: $1,800

W C Hayden et ux to W J Cochran, tract in ne qr 27-32-4e, q-c: $1.00

W J Cochran et ux to Walter Lewis, 5 acres in ne qr 27-32-4e: $750

James Kizer et ux to Chas L Clary, tract in sw qr 29-32-4e: $300

Winfield Water Company to Levi W Kimball, pt nw qr 28-32-4e: $300

James Hill et al to P F Endicott, nw qr 31-34-4e: $210

Retty Cary to A W Hawkins, 5 acres in se qr 7-35-4e: $125

J A Gilleland et al to Samuel Black, lots 7, 8 and 9, blk 71, Winfield's title in Manny's ad., C. Winf.: $2,750

Mary A Stacker and hus to Daniel Mater, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 133, Menor's ad to Winfield: $1,800

Albert A Newman to Thos D Richardson, lot 28, blk 64, A C: $50

Albert A Newman et al to Thos D Richardson, lot 28, blk 64, A C: $50

Frank J Hess to Thos D Richardson, lot 27, block 64, A C: $50

Sophia A Clark to Chas H Holloway et al, 5 inches off of lot 20, blk 81, A C: $1.00

Burden Town Company to C J Skinner, lots 9, 10, 11, and 12, blk 14, Burden: $5.00

Frank W Smith et ux to John C Hattery, nw qr 11-30-7e: $1,400

Edward T Irwin to Wm M Irwin, nw qr se qr 9-32-7e: $400

Hull S Bixby et ux to A F Hopkins, tract in se qr 21-32-4e: $300

David Mills et ux to P E Moore, se qr 11-32-5e: $305

Jacob F Baker to Lida Baker, lots 6 and 7, block 145, A C: $800

I C Puley et ux to O Stephenson, lot 3, blk 32, A C: $75

Maria A Andrews and hus to Sarah E Bixby, lot 1, blk 163, Northfield: $100

Richard U Hess to Sarah E Boucher, lot 15, blk 95, A C: $75

J S Hunt, county clerk, to Frank J Hess, lots 14, 27, 28, blk 108: $1.00

ONLY A COW.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The reporter was out Sunday afternoon enjoying the pleasures of a drive--with his best girl--his wife. When approaching the Davis House in Highland Park, a fiery steed was seen coming down the hill at a 2:40 gait. Upon its back were three tow-headed boys, and one small boy with fiery hair was trotting along behind urging the animal by the application of a big sunflower stock. The sunflowers are very high and strong upon one side of the avenue. The cow-horse, seeing us coming and knowing us to be a reporter and this to be Fair week, from extreme modesty, suddenly shied, which skinned the boys off as though a cyclone had struck them. The boys seemed to revolve around and around before coming down, but finally hit the ground. We saw three revolving in the air, but upon getting out to investigate the yells which came from the patch of sunflowers, we could find but one tow-headed urchin. Says the reporter, in a soothing, fatherly manner, "Sonny, are you hurt?" "No; dog on old Moll!" It was a narrow escape--for the cow.

TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

On last Saturday was held the first regular monthly meeting of the Teachers' Association. Fifty-three of the live workers of Cowley County were present, representing Winfield, Arkansas City, Burden, Cambridge, Dexter, New Salem, Udall, and Otter. In fact, every section of the county was represented, and the meeting was one of the best ever held in Cowley County. Each topic of the program, as given in the COURIER, was fully discussed. An account of the proceedings in full will be given in tomorrow's COURIER.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Paris & Herrod, excavators of the Curns & Manser, Wallis & Wallis, and Hunt cellar, are almost done with their work, and the mason work will soon commence. The block will be a seventy-five foot front and eighty feet deep; three stories high. When completed the building will fill the vacancy between Mater's blacksmith shop and the millinery store, which has so long been an unsightly place and a wilderness of sunflowers and other weeds. This is not all. The corner below the second hand store of Ira Kyger is owned by men of capital, who are arranging to erect a fine building thereon. And still we boom, notwithstanding the wail from other towns that times are close and nothing doing.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

J. W. Dix, of the firm of Kraft & Dix, is tip-toeing around this morning over the advent of a bouncing boy at his house last night. It's a mine and a half, powder and all, and Mr. Dix is in the seventh heaven of bliss. He is recovering, and will be able to do his usual shop duties in a few days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mrs. Ernest, from Indiana, is here.

WINFIELD COURIER.

FRANK H. GREER, Local Editor.

ANOTHER SEANCE.

At the Hotel de Stewart, In Which the Spirits Would Not Work Well.

Too Much Unbelief.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A seance was held at the Stewart Hotel last evening, conducted by George Search, a medium of great power. It is the first seance the reporter ever attended and he must own up that some of the "doins" were very peculiar, but for all this our faith is no stronger than before seeing these manifestations. We can't think or believe that spirits have anything to do with this mundane sphere. The seance was held in an upper story room, the parties sitting in a circle. A guitar and violin were procured for the spirits to manifest on. The windows and doors were darkened, the light put out, all clasped hands and were cautioned to keep the feet square upon the floor, and be careful and not touch the wall with their chairs. A song was started after much delay. Capt. Whiting was holding the guitar. Suddenly it was jerked out of his lap and commenced an aerial flight; while some unseen hand played upon its strings. The violin was changed from hand to hand at the start and the spirits couldn't find this, hence the spirits got in their work upon the guitar alone. We can't understand just how this guitar got around so lively. It certainly did sail around over our heads, for it gave us some very heavy bumps. This was kept up for some time. A small cabinet was arranged in the corner by the aid of two quilts. Nothing was behind this. In front sat the medium with another party. The medium tied the quilt together. The spirits were to shake hands with their friends through the aperture. Several went up and asked to be allowed to shake, and they felt two warm fingers touch their hand, and of course, it is easy to imagine the rest. After this we had table tipping. The table did tip and tip without any apparent cause. We could not see that there was anyone using any physical force, except once, when one of the party helped with his No. 12. Now a word! As we had said, we don't believe, or can't believe there is anything in this! We can't exactly see into the floating guitar, though we have our surmises. The handshaking could easily be done by the medium while holding the curtain. The table tipping might be caused by an over charge of electricity from the medium. If it is a fraud, it is done pretty slick; if a reality, it is a serious thing. Laying aside all scruples for the good of this man Search, we can say that enough was done last night to convince anyone that the business is a fraud and the man who is pursuing it a worse one. It is nothing but a money making scheme--one way to eke out an idle and easy living without work. The admittance fee was fifty cents per head, for those who believed or not, and the trouble last night was too much unbelief on the part of the audience--they wanted to investigate the matter too closely. Search became very nervous Sunday night because of the excited interest manifested by the audience while giving an exhibition of his power as a medium. And last night he became much more so--so much in fact that his cunning deserted him, and after a few futile attempts, he announced that some had come there for no good, or some were doubtful followers. It won't bear investigation. This same Search is known to be a traveling fraud and this is not the first exposure he has had from the press. From numerous places, we learn, he has been compelled to make his departure on very hasty notice. Last evening the instruments were misplaced by someone after the lights were turned out and the windows darkened, and the spirits failed to connect. Search couldn't find them in his frantic pantomimes. Search leaves here today; will search for a cooler clime. Such lazy leaches as he, deluding and defrauding the public, should be given a coat of tar and feathers and a stretching of the neck with hemp that would make him desist from this dishonest vocation and compel him to earn an honest living by the sweat of his brow, or languish where all felons get their sweet repose.

GREAT SALE OF HORSES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

I will sell at public auction, on the horse farm west of the fair grounds, Cowley County, Kansas, on Wednesday, October 7, 1885: Thirty-six head of brood mares--most of them Percheron and Clydesdale grades--all bred to imported Clydesdale horses, which are now on exhibition at the fair grounds. These mares are of the very best and finest of their class that could be purchased in Iowa and Illinois. Reason for selling--having disposed of my horse farm. Terms of sale: Twelve months' time will be given, with good security. An inspection of stock solicited. J. C. McMULLEN.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

"The Arnold boys sent a hack to Winfield yesterday to use during the Fair, which begins there today. Poor old Winfield can only support one cab, hence she has to draw on her neighbors. We can loan her all she needs and then have seven or eight left." Wellingtonian.

Send on your hacks, as many as you can spare. We have several hacks, but the crowd is so immense here that it would take all the hacks in Southern Kansas to haul all who wish to ride. You fellows catch on. But nevertheless, it seems so strange to see Wellington's second hand hacks driving along side of our painted and polished ones.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A one-legged man fell into the hands of Marshal McFadden Saturday night. The Marshal found him on the street, wrapped in the sweet embrace of Morpheus, "fuller'n a goat." McFadden took compassion on the fellow and took him home and put him to bed instead of giving him free lodging in the "Hotel de Finch." He was one of Sam Harper's cigar makers. The leniency of our marshal may have a tendency to cause the fellow repentance and a firm resolve to do better in the future.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

E. P. Young, of the firm of Pryor & Young, received a dispatch yesterday that his mother had died at Hot Springs, Arkansas. She was quite aged--just passed her seventy-ninth birthday. She has been an invalid for years. It was a sad blow to Mr. Young, and THE COURIER extends sympathy.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

What with the Republican convention last Saturday, the Fair all week with Simon's theatrical troupe sandwiched in, and the circus next week, everybody will be broke by the first of October, and the man who collects half of his bills will be a daisy and no mistake.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Owing to the unfinished condition of the Central school building, the high school and one of the grammar schools will open in rooms in the McDougal block.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

District Court is adjourned to Saturday next.

MOTHER GRUNDY'S NEWS-BUDGET.

Her Chronicle of the Comings, Goings and Doings of Persons at Home and Abroad.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

F. M. Escord, cigar man, Wichita, is at the Central.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mrs. Moore, of the terminus, is in the city today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

C. W. Bell, Cave Springs, Indian Territory, was in the city yesterday.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A. H. Huson, Pierce City, dined at the Central today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Sol Burkhalter came in from Fowler today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

J. D. Botkin, of McPherson, Kansas, is quartered at the Central.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

H. C. McDorman came over from Dexter today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. Dunn, commercial tourist, Chicago, is in the city dispensing wares.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Thos. Andas, Wichita, was in the city today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Don't forget to go to Kelley's photograph gallery.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Frank Lockwood came in from Medicine Lodge last evening.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. W. Clellan, Kansas City, was at the Commercial for dinner today.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

James McClain, deputy marshal, is confined to his bed with malaria.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Will Harlow came in from Burden yesterday. He says everybody is coming to the Fair.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Dr. A. Goldsmith has returned to his post of duty as assistant physician at the City Hospital, St. Louis.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Frank T. Berkey is in from Greensburg for a week with his folks to take in Cowley's big show.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Will Allison, fighting editor of the Wellingtonian, was over last Saturday viewing the Queen City.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mrs. Steinhilber leaves today for Davenport, Iowa, to attend the marriage of her sister-in-law at that place.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Capt. N. W. Dressie is serving as night watch, Judge Beck having resigned to buy wheat for G. B. Shaw & Co.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. T. Meril received a commission today as chief blacksmith at the Otto Agency, at a salary of $800 a year.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

A. J. Havencamp, formerly proprietor of the Lindell, is assisting Ed. Weitzel at the Commercial this week.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Noble Caldwell went up to Udall yesterday to settle a loss by lightning with one of his company's policy holders.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The A. C. Republican predicts that within one month that place will indulge in the sweet luxury of a Democratic postmaster.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Palice Kimball, one of Cowley's pioneer boys, is over from Harper, taking in our Fair. He hasn't been in Cowley for years before.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Frank Weaverling came over last night from Attica to take in our fair. Frank is accountant for a dry goods firm at that place.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The old Kansas grasshopper could be seen today going south. They were up so high that they could hardly be seen by the naked eye.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Spence Miner came in from Ashland Saturday. He says Ashland is the best town west of Medicine Lodge, in the southern tier of counties.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Mr. Myers is having an extension built on the rear of the express office. It is of brick and will make the rooms spacious and convenient.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

J. M. Stafford sold Frank Lockwood's property yesterday for $1800. Stafford is a rustler and generally makes it go--if nothing more than a ten foot lot.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Rev. Fleming came in from Arkansas City this morning on an early train. There be an addition to the reserved seats on the "deacon's balcony."

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

In chronicling the divorce of Frank J. Barton from Susan A. Barton, we said she skipped with lover number two. The complaint was merely abandonment--with no other man mixed in.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Dave Dix has finished the well at the Imbecile Asylum. He got twelve feet of water at fifty-three feet. Dave is a rattler on well business. This will have a water reservoir six feet in diameter.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Addison Powers came in yesterday from Ashland to take in the Fair and visit with his parents for several days. Ad is in partnership with Will McCartney in the real estate and law business.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. S. Reed's case came up in the police court this morning and he was convicted on the charge of carrying concealed weapons and fined five dollars and costs, making in all about fifteen dollars.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Dr. Fitch, the telescope man, came in again last evening from Wellington, and will be here during the rest of the week, giving the people another opportunity to view the sun, moon, and stars through his big gun.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Sol Burkhalter, wife, and baby came in from Fowler, Mead County, to see Cowley's big show and visit friends. It seems mighty old times to hear that gentle laugh of Sol's once more.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

J. E. Coulter, of Udall, filed an assignment in favor of his creditors, in the Register's office yesterday, with W. B. Norman as assignee. Coulter's liabilities are something near eight hundred dollars.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Ray Stidger is here from Illinois to visit a week and accompany his wife, nee Etta Robinson, and baby home. He is the same boy as of yore, handsome, smiling, and pert. He will move west to live in the spring.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

George Taylor, son of J. O. Taylor, came in from Geuda last evening to attend the fair. He, in company with several others, started out for a western trip, but was compelled to lay off at Geuda on account of sickness.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

George Stevens spent yesterday and today in Wellington, looked the town over from end to end, and says Winfield is way ahead of the town on the ridge. This is proper, you bet. Winfield is on top and will stay there.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The case of the State vs. Clarence Boots, for plain drunk, came up before Judge Snow this morning and was dismissed. The case of the State vs. Cox, for the same offense, also came up in the same court and was dismissed.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Wilkinson & Jennings trimmed up the tree in front of their establishment this morning. This is correct. That tree was trying its best to spread all over Main street and the buildings adjacent thereto, and needed a quietus.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

R. B. Griffith, of the Live Stock Record, Kansas City, came in yesterday and will stay here during the Fair and will give it an extensive write-up. He says our Fair is the best, or rather starting out with better prospects than any he has yet attended.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Isaac Williams and Matilda A. Taylor, William M. Dorsey and Virginia Green, wee given passage over the matrimonial route Saturday. Another couple were granted the documents for committing the deed, but begged so piteously not to give it away until tomorrow that we took compassion on them, and promised.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Saturday was a sultry day for joint proprietors in Wichita, according to the Eagle's statement of the matter. Twelve of the sheol dispensers were hauled over the coals--getting $100 and costs and the inevitable sentence of thirty days in durance file. Wichita, it seems, is trying to redeem her hard "rep." It certainly is time something was being done in that direction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Henry Phoenix and wife and D. F. Burt came in overland yesterday from Ashland. They are loud in their praises of Clark County. Mr. Burt is running a livery stable and Henry is on his claim. He left some sod corn with THE COURIER raised on his new claim that would do credit to lots of the older counties in the state.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Ike N. Davis came up from Maple City yesterday. He has just returned from Comanche, Clark, Ford, and other western counties, and is infatuated with the west. He located homestead and timber claims about twenty miles from Garden City and will move out with his family in the near future. Ike is a young man and a rustler and will succeed anywhere.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

W. M. Bowman and family, of Lincoln, Illinois, old friends of the Winfield National Bank folks, have located in Winfield. Mr. Bowman has bought a fine farm near Oxford, which his sons will run, while the remainder of the family reside here. This family is one of means and enterprise, and are most gladly welcomed as residents of the Queen City and banner county.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Joseph L. Forman and Katie E. Yount, Reuben H. Booth and Sarah J. Newell, John O. Ekel and Mary N. Annis, were granted certificates of matrimonial bliss yesterday. The Judge married the last two couples, Forman [? Ferman] and Miss Yount in the morning and the latter in the afternoon, which our reporter was fortunate enough to witness. The Judge made a short and impressive address in which were admonitions to both parties that if heeded will be of vital importance to both their happiness. The groom is an intelligent looking young farmer, and the bride a handsome young lady and ye reporter envies Mr. Ekel his good fortune in securing her. We hope the young couple may always find the bright side of this life and live long and happily together.

[Same old story: some of the names above could be wrong. Paper had "Ekel" and later "Eckel." They had "Forman." I wonder if the correct name is "Ferman."]

THE BIG SHOW!

The Third Day a Whooper--Big Crowds and Bright Sky. Everything Auspicious!

THE PREMIUMS AWARDED.

The Speed Ring Events--The Lucky Exhibitors, and General Attractions.

AN AUSPICIOUS OPENING.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The Third Annual Exhibition of the Cowley County Fair & Driving Park Association opened this morning. Everything on the magnificent Fair Grounds had been put in perfect shape. Early this morning the city showed unusual animation and the Fair Ground Boulevard has been thronged all day. Buses of every conceivable kind, with their lusty rustlers, were busy while private vehicles were thick. At the Fair ground all was animation. The first day of every fair is preparation day--the day when exhibitors get their "truck" on the grounds and shape it around. So with Cowley's Fair today. Exhibitors were as busy as bees, and by this afternoon the different "shows" were sufficiently arranged to insure the magnificence of the displays. Of course the principal attraction is the main exposition building. Here our more enterprising merchants were found working like beavers arranging displays of their wares. A. B. Arment has a fine display of elegant furniture, arranged by Sidney Carnine. Next Gene Wallis was fitting up a booth with wares from the grocery and queensware house of Wallis & Wallis. Johnnie Brooks, with coat off, perspiration on his brow, and taste in his mind, was filling a booth with displays from J. J. Carson & Co.'s clothing store. The dry goods exhibition of S. Kleeman is one of the most artistic, and will be a big advertisement for him. Horning & Whitney are always to the front for enterprise. Their display of stoves and hardware, arranged by Billy Whitney, is immense, and will be a big attraction. Bliss & Wood have a pyramid of their different brands of flour, reaching clear to the ceiling. George D. Headrick has arranged an elegant show of ladies' and gents' fine shoes from the boot and shoe house of W. C. Root & Co. F. M. Friend, as usual at every Fair, has a splendid display of musical instruments, etc. W. B. Caton has an elaborate display of tombstones, which present anything but a grave yard appearance amid so much animation. In the agricultural and horticultural departments things begin to loom immensely. Obese pumpkins, huge melons, and various mammoth exhibitions of Cowley's prolific prolificness are lying all around. The display of grains, vegetables, and grasses by W. C. Hayden and Jas. F. Martin are grand--will down anything any county in the west can show up. Among leading horticultural exhibitors so far are S. C. Sumpter, of Walnut; S. C. Cunningham, Ninescah; Henry Hawkins, Vernon; S. P. Strong, Rock; J. B. Callison, Spring Creek; W. C. Hayden, Walnut; Jake Nixon, Vernon. The several displays are grand, exhibiting forcibly the fruit proclivities of Cowley. The art department was gradually filling today, the superintendent bobbing around numerously arranging the different displays. This department will show up better this year than ever before. Smedley and Gest, the fence men, have an imposing pyramid of their patent fence, just north of the exhibition building. The wind mills of Bertram & Bertram loom skyward. The greatest exhibition of all is the fine stock show. It is magnificent already, with not near all in yet. Col. McMullen has his seven Norman and Clydesdale brood mares with their seven colts. They can't be beaten. Bahntge, Kaats & Co.'s fine herd of Galloway short horns, J. R. Smith's herd of blooded short horns, L. S. Cogswell's display of milkers, and Jonah Johnson's splendid blooded animals are prominent among the cattle. N. L. Yarbrough is here from Richland with his fine stallions and colts. Among the foreigners who are on the grounds to compete for the liberal premiums are C. F. Stone, of Peabody, with eight fine Holstein cattle and a herd of sheep; T. A. Hubbard and M. B. Keagy, of Wellington, with over fifty Poland and Berkshire hogs--a grand show. Cowley's swinish propensities show themselves already and more are rolling in. Secretary Kretsinger and assistant, W. J. Wilson, with other assistants, have been besieged with entries all day. And the end is not yet. It will be impossible to close the entry books before tomorrow sometime. Everything indicates a grand success for our Fair. About thirty "flyers" are entered for the races, some of them famous and some splendid exhibitions of speed are certain. Dining booths, swings, refreshment stands, and various money-making attractions--barring everything of a gambling nature--are tick, the lusty stand hustler is rampant. In the morning the entrance fee begins and the Fair proper starts off. Everything will be in good shape.

------------

The second day of the Fair opened this morning with a bright sky, warm sun, and all requisites to success. The thoroughfare leading to the grounds early felt the dampening influence of Uncle Wesley Paris' street sprinkler, laying the dust, and making the chewing of real estate less a necessity than yesterday. The Fair Grounds have been numerously animated all day--more so than expected so early in the week. This forenoon about finished the arrangements of exhibits. The main exhibition building is, of course, the principal attraction. The merchants and mechanical displays are artistic and elegant, every branch being well represented. The agricultural department is complete and grand, fully showing up the gigantic richness of Cowley's soil. The fruit display is ahead of last year. Our county is growing older and with her age is developing her fruit possibilities in a manner to compete with any county in the fair west. The rosy-cheeked apples, luscious grapes, and entrancing pears and fruits of all kinds that make the mouth water, are the pride and joy of every old pioneer who has strained himself in boosting this result. The dairy and preserve departments, exhibiting the industry and skill of Cowley's women, is a fine show. The fine art department is not quite as large as last year, but much better. Every exhibit is highly creditable, the prominent features of which we shall hereafter make special mention of. It is the blooded stock show that exhibits our county's advance in all its glory. There is blooded stock of every breed, from the big Holstein cattle to the pretty little Jerseys; horses from the big Clyde and Norman to the slender little flyers; hogs embracing the perfect handiwork of nature, in the finest imported blood and a creditable display of sheep. Of course no fair is without its dumpy shows--its side shows to rake in the odd sheckles of the credulous. There are three or four of these, none of which can be classed as "snides." But among the more passworthy facts, is the total absence of gambling schemes--no wheels of fortune games of chance or other bleeders of the innocent.

The first award of premiums was made this morning, commencing at 9:30 with the thoroughbred stallions. C. P. Buffington's "Dailey" carried off first premium and M. C. Hudgeph's thoroughbred second. Both of these were Sumner County horses. Mr. C. P. Cogswell showed "May Chief," and was the only competitor to the Sumner fellows. In the Percheron Norman class there were four stallions shown. Mr. C. P. Buffington's "Hyrade" took first and S. Allison's "Carlo" second. Mr. Buffington also showed his black stallion, "Nigger," and Mr. Hubbard, of Wellington, "Massasoit." The exhibit in Clydesdale was remarkably fine, there being six splendid stallions before the Judges, their aggregate being 10,210 pounds. The entries were Col. McMullen's "Caddie Lad" and "Iago;" J. S. Williams, of Sumner, "Lord Aberdeen" and "Duke;" S. Allison's "Ochilboy," and N. L. Yarbrough's "Jack Clyde." Again Sumner County came to the front and carried off the blue ribbon on J. S. Williams' "Duke." Col. McMullen's "Caddie Boy" took second. The two horses were so evenly matched that it was very difficult to decide. The judges finally took their preference from color and preferred the dark brown. The spectators seemed to be evenly divided in judgment also. In our estimation "Caddie Lad's" gentle disposition and easy movement should have been considered in his favor. He is certainly one of the most remarkably fine horses in the west, weighing 1960 pounds, but as supple as a cat. His form is splendid and his disposition as near perfect as can be. He can be hitched to a road cart and driven anywhere, and is but four years old, while "Duke," who was awarded the first premium over him, is seven. "Caddie Lad" took the first premium at the Iowa State Fair as a two year old. In the class for native draft horses the show was very large. The exhibitors were E. I. Johnson, mare and colt; J. H. Land, mare and colt; L. Stout, mares, colts, and stallion; Col. McMullen, ten mares and seven colts; F. W. Schwantes, mare; S. Allison, stallion; Frank Conkright, two stallions; J. M. Buffington, stallions; J. S. Hubbard, stallion; N. L. Yarbrough, stallion; T. P. Herriott, of Marion County, span of Norman mares. The competition for premiums was very lively, and resulted as follows.

Best stallion, 4 years old and over: L. Stout's "Roan Dick," first; J. J. Buffington's "Nero," second.

Best stallion colt: Col. McMullen first and second.

Best mare 4 years old and over: T. P. Herriott first; Leonard Stout second.

Best mare 2 years old and under 4 years: T. P. Herriott first; Leonard South second.

Best mare colt: Leonard Stout first; Col. McMullen second.

VARIATIONS.

The judges began their work in the hog and sheep departments this afternoon too late for reports in today's paper. Their awards will appear tomorrow.

The ladies are making a success of the Fine Arts exhibit.

The fruit and vegetable departments are a great deal better than last year.

Sid Cure makes a handsome assistant to Chief Strong and helps regulate the police department in good style.

F. A. A. Williams' little jerseys are among the admirations of the fine stock show. They are beauties; three cows and a bull.

G. H. Allen displays his Leghorn fowls in the feathered department. He hasn't much opposition and will, of course, come out Eli.

Chief of Police Strong is a host. He makes things lively in the police department, and woe be unto the unfortunate boy who is caught crawling under the barbed wire fence.

L. E. Pixley, of Eureka, is among the "foreigners" in the feathered bird department. He exhibits brown and white leghorns, Buff Cochin, Wyandottes, Black Red Games, Plymouth Rock, and others.

The hoggish propensities of Cowley were brought out in full force today, the last pen being filled. Adjoining counties are also entered in competition. But old Cowley will hold her own in everything.

N. S. Perry has also a remarkable wall display and is much admired. He has as foundation a growing vegetable garden with a good variety of "truck" and a few weeds. You must see this department to appreciate it.

Sumner and Cowley appear to be vying with each other to bring in the biggest hog. Some 50 very fine specimens were in the pen by Monday evening. All other stock departments are filling up with quite a full line of very good specimens.

The entries in live stock are way ahead of last year. Cowley is gradually climbing up in this direction. The long-horned, spindle-shanked Texas animals have given place to the finest imported stock. Your admiration of pure bred stock can have a feast at the fair grounds.

A good many of the boys braved the terrors of a barbed wire fence and crawled under this morning. One of them got a barb fastened in the dome of his pants, and could go neither backward nor forward. He hung in a very embarrassing position until he could induce a policeman to come and arrest him.

The stock department increased very fast after dinner, yesterday. McMullen's herd of colts and mares looked like a bona-fide drove. There are horses from the diminutive Shetland pony, imported by M. Y. Hudspeth, to the 2,000 pounds Percheron from the solid farm horse to the fleet-footed trotter, or the flying racer. Cattle from the ponderous Holstein, the short-horn beauties, the coal black Angus to the fawn-like little Jersey.

It is quite a pleasant surprise to persons from the timbered States who have been in the habit of thinking of Kansas as an extended treeless plain to ramble around in the 10 acres of natural forest in the Fair Grounds, and find such fine specimens of walnut, elm, hackberry, coffeenut, and other trees that he has been acquainted with "back east," as well as to notice the pecan and mulberry, oak, and elm, that are very different to those he has heretofore known. The part in the Fair Grounds will well repay a half day's ramble to persons who want to know what Kansas is and why it is so.

One of the most unique things of the agricultural department is the "Farmers Motto" that decorates the grand exhibit of grain, grasses, vegetables, and horticulture by President Jas. F. Martin, of Vernon. This motto is made of eleven kinds of grain. The groundwork, on a slab 5 x feet, is buckwheat reeds, fringed with dark onion seed. The first motto, "Fear God and Do Right," is made of timothy seed. In large letters is "Peace, Plenty, and Prosperity," made of different colored corn and watermelon seeds. This insignia is both expressive and impressive and attracts much attention. Mr. Martin exhibits in his display sixteen varieties of strawberries, all but one of which have fruited; nine species of evergreen; fifteen varieties of peaches, three of apples, two of pears, three of grapes, all magnificent specimens. This show is a grand exhibition of the possibilities of Cowley's prolific soil.

D. Taylor exhibits the peculiar Houdan fowls. They absolutely refuse to set--lay all the year round. They are odd in plumage, white and black scattered.

Samuel Lowe shows thirty feathered birds, all Plymouth Rocks. They make a fine show, some where hugeness makes the neighboring Turkey gobblers blush with envy. Mr. Lowe is one of Cowley's best poultry raisers.

W. P. Hardwick has his big steer on exhibition on the grounds. It is a Cowley County production, is four years old, and weighs 3,560 pounds. Only another evidence of Cowley's productive soil.

Numerous friends keep advising THE COURIER that its airy, fairy headquarters on the grounds won't shed rain. Of course it won't. There isn't to be any rain. THE COURIER arranged that matter before it erected its "summer resort."

Capt. H. H. Siverd, assistant general manager, is everywhere at once. His sorrel Arabian is always on the jog, and the captain's sonorous voice resounds with a dignity that introduces itself--peculiar only to the renowned Siverd. That he's the right man in the right place is forcibly apparent.

The first arrest made on the grounds was by Chief of Police Strong. Secretary Kretsinger was the victim. He had given strict orders to arrest any horse found tied to a tree. A boy drove his horse and returning, hitched it to a tree. Mr. Strong promptly cabbaged the horse and arrested the secretary. The fine is five dollars. Krets will put up.

THIRD DAY.

Again did the sun rise in a bright sky and balmy atmosphere this morning, insuring a big day for the Cowley County Fair. Early the streets began to be a jam and the boulevard to the Fair Grounds has been thronged with every conceivable vehicle, from the big 'bus to the dumpy hack, fare, twenty-five cents. Everybody who had a rig transported themselves, and those without the wherewith, or for economy, took Old Shank's Mare, fare nothing, with two bushels and a half of real estate thrown in. The dust rose in huge, continuous clouds. The Fair Grounds have been full all over, the large exposition building being a jam all day, while the big amphitheatre, free till noon and at 25 cents this afternoon, was "fuller'n' a goat." This has been a busy day for the judges. The premiums on general exhibits were largely awarded today, though not yet returned to the secretary. The lucky possessors of blue ribbons are numerous and happy, while those who got left are made, as usual, giving the judges sheol. This is all right. Otherwise, it wouldn't be human nature. The words of surprise and praise elicited from strangers and newcomers by the grand exhibition of Cowley's possibilities are numerous. The fair is an incalculable advertisement to Grand Old Cowley. No man can step around among the huge agricultural exhibits, and the fine show of blooded animals, without being imbued with the fact that this county is a wonder for its age--clear in advance of any county of its years in all the fair west.

YESTERDAY AFTERNOON'S AWARDS--HOGS.

In the hog department, Mr. T. A. Hubbard, of Wellington, took nine first premiums, four seconds, and the sweepstakes for the best board and best sow, of any age or breed. His display was truly fine, and has never been equaled at a county fair in Kansas. M. B. Keagy, of Wellington, also had a very fine display, and took six first premiums and one second. Isaac Wood took first on best exhibition of pedigreed hogs, and second on Poland China sows over one year old. E. R. Morse took five second premiums. F. W. McClellan took two second premiums. W. H. Roach had only one exhibit in the Chester White class. On the whole the hog exhibit was remarkable, and resulted in our folks being nicely done up by the Sumner exhibitors. They are fairly entitled to it, however, and the Cowley exhibitors will take warning and down them next year.

SHEEP.

The sheep were also judged yesterday. Mrs. N. R. Lowe captured all the premiums on long wools. In short wools Mr. C. F. Stone, of Peabody, took all the first premiums and sweepstakes. Neer Bros., of Cambridge, were content with a fine string of seconds. The Stone sheep were very fine and fairly won the prize.

THE SPEED RING.

The speed ring attractions yesterday were rather light, it being the first active day. The green trot was won by Lady Hart--3 heats; time, 3:18, 3:10, and 3:13. Prince, owned by S. G. Sparks, Arkansas City, got second money. Purse, $40. There were four entries for the best rider, boy or girl--Mollie and Cora Woods, Eudell Hereford, and Frank Pixley. Mollie Woods got first money and Frank Pixley, second. Purse: $8. The amateur bicycle exhibition went off very smoothly, with three entries--Jack Hudson, Will McClellan, and Phil. Kleeman. Jack took first money and Will second. Purse, $8. The boys rode only one round, owing to lack of time, riding finely for amateurs.

The display of hogs on Tuesday was just immense. The awards of premiums give a faint idea of the number of hogs, but not of the quality. There were 92 hogs competing. One or more were neglected as not worthy of notice; in speaking of the fact, a gentleman who has been a close observer of hogs at fairs for twenty-five years or more, stated that the rejected sow twenty-five years ago would have taken the sweepstakes as a Magee hog of fine pedigree. There was very little difference between three and four of the best pens--one hog as a case in point got one vote for first premium and one vote for second premium in one of the leading classes, yet in the final decision did not get any award. Messrs. Hubbard & Keagle, both of Sumner County, had a very fine display of Berkshires, and Mr. Hubbard had some very fine specimens of Poland Chinas. Mr. Morse, of Red Bud, this county, had a very fine lot of Berkshires. Mr. Wood did not prepare for or intend to show this year--wanted to give others a chance. He had to bring about a dozen over, and of course the judges, as has always been their habit, tied a few blue ribbons to his pens. Mr. Howells had a single hog that was hard to beat. Mr. Roach, of Sumner, had two Chester White pigs, but somehow white pigs do not suit the fancy of Kansas farmers. Hardly a person passed Keagy's pens, but stopped to admire the "baby," a coal black little four weeks old Berkshire, the only care of a 400 pound mother. One of the most difficult positions at a fair is a judge in the hog department. Most men can tell when a hog is nice and fat, but very few can decide between hogs that are thin in flesh as to which are best for all purposes. The judges this year appeared to know a hog whether he had on his good clothes or not. They gave as near general satisfaction as it is generally possible to do.

TODAY'S AWARDS.--STOCK DEPARTMENT.

The display in horses this morning was in the "agricultural" line. The exhibit was large and in excellent form. A. J. Lyon took first premium on a 4 year old stallion and H. C. Hawkins second. S. Allison captured another blue ribbon on his 3 year old, and Frank Conkright on a 2 year old, with N. J. Thompson second. John McMahan's one year old stallion took a blue ribbon, while N. L. Yarbrough got the red. F. B. Evan's stallion colts took both blue and red. In the Gelding ring F. W. Schwantes's fine iron gray took first on 4 year olds. For 2 year olds M. L. Read's handsome chestnut colt took the blue, and Gene Wilber's fine bay second. There was a great herd of mares competing. The first prize was won by Mr. J. S. Baker, of New Salem, and the second by Mr. E. J. Johnson, of Sheridan. N. J. Thompson's 2 year old mare also got a blue ribbon and J. R. Smith's the red. L. Stout got away with the yearling first prize and Joseph Hahn second. The colt prize was won by R. W. Stephens, N. L. Yarbrough second. In mule colts Henry Hahn took premiums.

CATTLE.

The shorthorns were the first called in the ring. Never has finer cattle been shown at any fair. They were all beauties, and it was difficult to judge between them. The judges selected were R. M. Clark, of Beaver; Silas Kennedy, of Bolton; and S. Allison, of Winfield. N. R. Thompson took a blue ribbon on his fine bull, and Bahntge, Kates & Co., a red. Mr. J. Johnson, of Spring Creek, captured two blue ribbons and two red ones on his fine show of short horns. J. R. Smith & Son took one first and two seconds. Mr. F. W. McClellan took two blue ribbons on his fine calves. In the Hereford class C. P. Cogswell's bull, "Kansas," took first, and L. F. Johnson's "Prince Albert" second. L. F. Johnson also captured both ribbons on his splendid Hereford cows. The cattle department is very large and the judging is still progressing as we go to press.

VARIATIONS.

Cowley is up along side of any of them in the fruit display.

Secretary of the State Horticultural Society, Brackett, is expected tomorrow, as President Martin telegraphed for him this morning.

In the report of premiums yesterday, P. C. Buffington was credited with several fine horses. It should have been the irrepressible J. M. Buffington, the leading horse man of Sumner County, not the ex-editor of Cherryvale.

By actual count on Wednesday morning, there were 560 plates of fruit at the Horticultural stand, over which is extended a sign bearing the laconic, and we might say ironic, words: "What a fine country we would have if we could only grow fruit," which our president had put up this morning, which no doubt has been said to him a thousand times by tenderfeet in the last eight years that he has been in Cowley.

The Juvenile Band occupied the amphitheatre band stand yesterday and today, eliciting many favorable comments on their beautiful playing. The boys are improving rapidly and are a big credit to Winfield.

The Courier Cornet Band will be out tomorrow in full uniform.

A very fine display of young horses and cattle were out for judgment this morning. Notable among the cattle were the white faces (Herefords) exhibited by L. F. Johnson and Mr. Cogswell. The Black Polled Angus attracted much attention. The cattle were not very numerous but very fine specimens of the different kinds were shown. The improvement in cattle and horses each year is very decided. Can be seen by the most casual observer. The awards will be published tomorrow. But many fine specimens have no premiums. There were not enough premiums to go round for all the good specimens in any department.

ENTERPRISE AND TASTE.

The Magnificent Fair Display of Horning & Whitney.

Hardware, Tinware, Stoves, Etc.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Among the most attractive mercantile displays at the fair, that of Horning & Whitney, just at the left of the east entrance of the exhibition building, attracts universal attention. It is a worthy representation of this firm's immense and popular Winfield establishment. The genial J. L. Horning, and the ever attentive Billy Whitney, are kept busy showing up the superior conveniences and general worth of the "Garland" cooking stoves, ranges, and base burners, the "Banquet," the "Modern Hub," manufactured by the Great Western Stove Co., than which a better or more elegant base burner has never been manufactured. Their stove display is grand, and has the admiration of all the ladies. Over the wall display is a unique lettering with bright spoons, "H. & W., Hardware." The wall display embraces mechanic and machinist's tools of every description; agate and granite ware and various novelties. But the big attraction for the ladies is the practical exhibition of Adams & Westlake's "Monarch" gasoline stoves, for which Horning & Whitney are exclusive agents for Winfield. This exhibition under canvas is in the east nook of the south exposition building wing. A dozen or more stoves are on exhibition. Mr. J. M. Gundlach, of Chicago, is here on the part of the manufacturers to practically demonstrate to the people what their stoves can do--that they can do more and better work, occupy last room, and consume less fuel than any other gasoline stove on the market. This fact is proved by the turning out daily, as a practical test, every culinary delicacy, which are exhibited in a case right there. Horning & Whitney have a display to be proud of. It not only represents their establishment splendidly, but is a credit to the county. Of course, they carried off the blue ribbons for the best display of hardware, and on their Adams & Westlake gasoline stoves.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

THE COWLEY COUNTY LAND OFFICE.

If you want to buy the best farm, if you want to buy the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th best farm in Cowley County; if you want the best stock ranch, or if you want the poorest tract of land in all the State of Kansas, you can secure it by calling at the

Cowley County Land Office.

We don't advise you to buy poor land--it's dear at any price; but we have to keep a little of it on hand just to have a general assortment, you see? If you would like a home in the city of Winfield, varying from the palatial mansion down to the vine-clad cottage by the "Raging Walnut," if you want a vacant lot, a , a or a whole block; if you want a 1 or 10 acre tract, you can secure all these by calling at the

COWLEY CO. LAND OFFICE.

Don't wait for property to get cheaper; it don't go that way in Cowley. The man who, in the face of all the grand and substantial improvements that are being made in Winfield and Cowley County, thinks that values are going to go backwards, is, in our opinion, a fit subject for one of the institutions that is now in process of erection near the city of Winfield. So don't wait for lower prices. That time is not a-coming. A good farm, or a good home of any kind in Cowley County is cheap at any price. It is worth something to live in such a county. Come right up the iron stairs and secure a home in the best county in the grand State of Kansas. At the

COWLEY COUNTY LAND OFFICE

You will always find immense sums of money ready to be loaned in sums of $200 to $20,000 on REAL ESTATE SECURITY, at reasonable rates, and on terms so easy that you will feel good.

Deeds and Mortgages carefully drawn, Acknowledgments taken, Abstracts of Title furnished; in fact, you can get any thing at the Cowley County Land Office that can be had at any first-class Real Estate Office.

Room No. 1, over P. O., Winfield.

H. T. SHIVVERS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Winfield National Bank.

NO. 3351.

CAPITAL, $100,000.

AUTHORIZED CAPITAL, $500,000.

President: H. B. Schuler

Cashier: E. T. Schuler

DIRECTORS:

C. Perry, H. B. Schuler, Geo. H. Williams, J. B. Lynn, A. H. Green, Geo. Emerson,

H. R. Braum.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Furniture and Carpets.

Having secured the exclusive right of the Patent Carpet Exhibitor, I am prepared to

SELL CARPETS LOWER

than ever. Call and see the wonderful invention, even if you don't want to buy carpet. I will also keep in stock

Carpet Sweepers, Stretchers, Binding

Oil Cloth, Carpet Felt, Door Mats. Rugs and Matting. Also the largest, latest, and most select styles of Parlor, Chamber, Dining, Office, and Kitchen Furniture to be found in the county. Picture frames of all kinds, oil paintings, chromos, water colors, brackets, towel and hat racks, foot rests and blacking boxes, and other articles too numerous to mention. Also keeps on hand a full line of mattresses. When in need of any article in my line, please call at

918 Main Street, East Side.

J. W. JOHNSTON.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

ELI YOUNGHEIM'S,

-VARIETY OF-

Gent's Furnishing Goods,

HATS AND CAPS,

Is more than double that of any preceding season, and the styles of Goods are

FAR HANDSOMER

than they have been for years.

In order to appreciate the same you must see them,

and be convinced that we not only carry the

Largest Stock, but are the Leader in Styles and Prices.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

COWLEY CO. FAIR

Everybody is requested to visit the

NEW YORK STORE

before going home from the fair or circus.

You will see one of the cheapest and handsomest lines of

DRESS FLANNELS,

DRESS GOODS.

SILKS, CARPETS, ETC.,

ever brought to Winfield.

Our stock is now complete, and as goods are advancing,

now is your time to buy your fall supply.

Dry Goods Never were so Cheap as this Fall

Don't fail to come in and take a look and get our prices before buying elsewhere.

A. E. BAIRD.

ONE HUNDRED AND COSTS

------

E. G. Roberts, the Udall Druggist, Convicted On One Count.

$100 and 30 Days.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The case of the State against E. G. Roberts, the Young druggist of Udall, went to the jury at five o'clock Friday, having been grinding a day and a half before Judge Snow. The jury was out an hour and brought in a verdict of guilty on the last count, recommending the defendant, owing to his youth, to the mercy of the court. The sentence was one hundred dollars and costs, about two hundred and fifty dollars in the aggregate, with thirty days in jail. He was tried on two counts, one charging that J. N. Reed got liquor without a statement on August 2nd and the other that one Shelton had done the same on August 27th. Roberts tried to prove an alibi for the latter, bringing witnesses to prove that his girl, Miss Sherrard, who stood by him through the trial, was his hostess that whole blessed Sunday, from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m., with only thirty minutes for refreshments. But this didn't work. There were about twenty-five witnesses on both sides. Roberts is an innocent appearing fellow of twenty-one years of age, and left the idea shooting business to enter drugs. He hasn't much wealth and can illy afford this drain. But violations of law, in this country, has its briars every time, and a man don't want to run against them too promiscuously. The jail sentence is imperative under the late law. A motion for a new trial was overruled. Roberts appealed to the District Court, giving an appearance bond, and was released from jail, awaiting the result of his appeal.

[Note: I do not understand phrase "left the idea shooting business to enter drugs." It does not make sense to me. Fell that a "typo or two was made on this article." MAW]

MISCELLANEOUS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

It is fashionable now in Emporia for young and blushing brides who marry old broken down physical wrecks with good bank accounts to lovingly pat the withered cheeks of their old back number hubbies, and with a pleasing smile gently lisp: "Walkup darling and take your arsenic!"

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Real estate is looming. Harris & Clark sold Thursday five acres on Alexander's Mound, east 8th Avenue, for $700; H. D. McCormick's residence, south Menor street, $1,400; and a half interest in the Hoosier Grocery Building, North Main, $1,500.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

The stone for the Farmers Bank building is being weighed instead of measured, it being the most accurate way of getting at a cord. It appears very odd to see load after load of stone going on the scales.

LEGAL NOTICES.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Recap. William H. Johnson, Administrator, Estate of Alfred Elliott Johnson, deceased. Notice of final settlement to be made October 5, 1885. Jno. D. Pryor, Attorney.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Recap. Charles C. Hammond, Administrator, Estate of Jabez D. Hammond, deceased.

Notice of final settlement to be made October 5, 1885. McDonald & Webb, Attorneys.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

Sheriff's Sale by Sheriff G. H. McIntire to be made October 19, 1885. Elizabeth McQuain, Plaintiff, vs. Nancy A. Baldwin, William C. Schooling, Francis A. Schooling, Isabella S. Schooling, Mary A. Schooling, and Luella C. Schooling, Defendants. Real estate to be sold.

ADS.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

AXTELL'S

The Best and Most Popular Restaurant.

Meals served at all hours, neat and substantial for

25 CENTS

A first-class Bakery. Fresh Bread delivered daily, and always on hand.

ICE CREAM

made to order in quantities for picnics, festivals, and private parties at

AXTELL'S.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

DR. H. C. BAILY,

SURGEON DENTIST. Office 2 doors west of post office. Nitrous Oxide Gas. Teeth examined free of charge. All work warranted. Having secured the exclusive right to use Dr. Baldwin's Preparation for the painless extraction of teeth, for this city, I am prepared to apply it to any person that has teeth requiring extraction.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

AMERICAN BIBLE SOCIETY.

ANY ONE wishing to obtain a copy of the Scriptures, who is unable to pay for it, can have the same by applying at the Depository. Brown & Son's Drug Store.

Winfield Courier, Thursday, September 24, 1885.

LINDELL HOTEL.

$1.00 A DAY HOUSE!

Board, $4.00 Per Week.

A. J. HAVERCAMP, Proprietor.

I have thoroughly renovated this hotel and am prepared to run it in first-class order.

This house is close to the depot, on

NORTH MAIN STREET.