ARKANSAS CITY TRAVELER.

[From Wednesday, January 18, 1882, through March 22, 1882.]

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882. Front Page.

A few days ago S. S. Richmond, one of the leaders of the Danford mob at Caldwell, went to Osage City on business connected with the wrecked bank. Danford at once served upon him the necessary papers in a suit for $100,000 damages.

[EDITORIAL COLUMNS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Senator Garland, on Dec. 19, 1881, introduced a bill for the disposal of the Cherokee Reservation in the State of Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The depredations upon Government timber lands in the west have increased to such an extent that the Secretary of the Interior has addressed a communication to the Attorney General, urging him to use all the means in his power to arrest and punish the offenders.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

At the meeting of the Board of County Commissioners last week, the contract for the county printing was awarded to the Courier for the coming year. One of the stipulated conditions was that the Tax list should be published in the Arkansas City TRAVELER.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Boom for the Steamboat.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

We have a new tin shop.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Steamboat meeting tonight.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Small pox is reported in Wellington.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Mr. Chinn, of Bolton, sold 29 head of fat hogs last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Read T. H. McLaughlin's "ad" and special notices in this issue.

AD:

T. H. McLAUGHLIN.

[Successor to McLaughlin Bros.]

WHOLESALE & RETAIL

-DEALER IN-

STAPLE & FANCY GROCERIES

STONEWARE

COAL OIL

TOBACCO

CIGARS.

Can give dealers inside figures on all goods in my line.

T. H. McLAUGHLIN,

NORTH SUMMIT ST.

Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Dissolution Notice.

Notice is hereby given that the firm of McLaughlin Bros. was this day dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. L. McLaughlin retires, and the business will, in the future, be conducted by T. H. McLaughlin.

T. H. McLaughlin, L. McLaughlin.

Arkansas City, Jan. 2nd, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The first "blizzard," of 1882, put in an appearance last Sunday night.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Winfield has a lodge of Good Templars and Arkansas City needs one.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

E. C. Manning sold his opera house in Winfield for $10,000, to Nina Lea.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Mr. Wyckoff has purchased the Sanford property in the west part of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Messrs. Jennings and Troupe have entered into a law partnership in Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Attend the Steamboat meeting to be held at Bonsall's office this evening at 8 o'clock.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Pollock, the U. S. Indian Inspector, is a candidate for Commissioner of Indian Affairs.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Cliff Wood, ex-mayor of Winfield, visits this place occasionally to purchase and ship porkers.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Lumber Small handed in a correct answer to cross word enigma in last week's TRAVELER.

NOTE: THE TRAVELER JUST STARTED A CROSS WORD PUZZLE DEPART MENT AND EVIDENTLY MADE NOTE OF THE WINNERS.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Major J. D. C. O'Grady returned from Pawnee Agency last week and spent several days in the city.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Parties from Emporia endeavored to buy corn at this place to ship to Texas, but could not secure it in sufficient quantities.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Mr. James Kelley and James Finch were down from Winfield last week, after some property taken on a chattel mortgage.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The TRAVELER smokes Tooth Pick Cigarsthanks to the courtesy of T. H. McLaughlin. They are beauties. Go buy you some.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

We call attention to the miserable state of the crossings at various points on Summit St. They should be attended to at once.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Our future highway for the south is the Arkansas River. Attend the meeting tonight and see how it is proposed to "did" this little thing.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Schiffbauer's horse concluded to be in style with other delivery horses and took a little run last week. He stopped before doing any damage.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Daniel Grant, one of our old residenters, who has been sojourning for several months at Eureka Springs, Arkansas, returned to the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

George Howey has about completed a small dwelling on lot nine, in block sixty, in the south part of town. New houses are going up all around.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Messrs. C. M. Scott and J. C. Topliff spent Sunday last at Harper, whither they went to purchase some sheep to stock their ranch south of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

James Fair, near Salt City, began with almost nothing a few years ago, and now owns the Henry Pruden farm. He manages to make about a thousand a year raising hogs.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

NOTICE. The Arkansas City Building and Loan Association will hold a special meeting tomorrow evening, at the office of I. H. Bonsall. All that feel an interest in this matter are invited to attend.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

A Young Men's Christian Association is in course of organization, and we doubt not will be the means of much good to some of the late converts in keeping them to the "straight and narrow path." We wish it success.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

We understand that our new tinner, G. W. Miller, has secured the contract for putting the roof on Geo. Cunningham's new stone store room. Mr. Miller is a thorough workman and will do himself proud thereon.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

MARRIED. Mr. H. C. Carder and Miss Temperance Endicott were united in the bonds of matrimony on Thursday, January 4th, 1882. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Laverty at the residence of the bride's father south of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

We received a pleasant call from Cal. Ferguson, of Winfield, last week. He was accompanied by Mr. E. N. Wert, of Humboldt, Kansas, who was en route for Geuda Springs to test the efficacy of the waters as a remedial agent for rheumatism. We predict a speedy cure.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The Commissioners met Monday and Mr. H. Harbaugh was unanimously elected Chairman of the Board for the coming year. Mr. Harbaugh is the senior member and is one of the most careful and painstaking commissioners that ever sat on the board, and his election to the chairmanship is a most deserving recognition of his worth in the management of county affairs. Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Capt. Siverd, of Winfield, was here a day or two last week, serving summons in Bolton Township. One farmer sued another, on a corn contract. The parties were Mr. Chambers and Peter Myers.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Howard Brothers commenced work upon the building for their tin and stove shop last Monday morning. When completed, it will materially add to the convenience of their already handsome store room.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Non-citizens are not to be allowed grazing privileges in the Cherokee Nation between Nov. 1st and April 1st, a law which if rightly enforced will make it unpleasant for some of the cattle men living on the line. Star.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The charter of the Winfield Loan and Trust Company was recently filed at Topeka

Capital Stock $10,000. J. C. McMullen, J. D. Leland, H. G. Fuller, A. B. Lemmon, and C. E. Fuller constitute the company.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Miss Jessie Millington now occupies the position of assistant local and bookkeeper on the staff of the Courier. Miss Jessie is a very popular as well as accomplished young lady, and will discharge her duties with credit to herself and the paper.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

DEDICATION. Mt. Zion Church, United Brethren in Christ, situated six miles west from Winfield, will be dedicated Jan. 29th. Services at 11 a.m. by Bishop E. B. Kephart, D. D. All interested are cordially invited to be present.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

C. F. Skidmore, of Eureka Springs, Arkansas, was in town last week. Mr. Skidmore is a son of Mrs. Cap. Sanford, formerly of this place, and was here to transact some business matters relative to the town property they still own in this burg.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

It is with pleasure we correct the rumors recently current with regard to Messrs. L. Lippmann and Chatterson. They were pure fabrications as both gentlemen are, at this writing, respected citizens of our sister state, Arkansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Charles McLain, the thieving and drunken dry goods clerk recently arrested at Winfield, went before his honor, Judge Torrance, in Chambers, and plead guilty to the charge of steal ing goods, and was sentenced to one year in the penitentiary.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Mr. C. F. France, of Toledo, Ohio, with his wife and child, are visiting with his brother, C. U. France, in this city, and will probably remain several weeks. Mr. France is a prominent attorney of Toledo and enjoys a large and lucrative practice. We hope the trip will prove a pleasant and beneficial one.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

CHEYENNE ARAPAHOE AGENCY, INDIAN TERRITORY.

JANUARY 4TH, 1882.

Beaver Horse Road lost a pony on the last trip to Arkansas City. Red or bay color, horse, branded, about 10 years old, and harness marked. Anyone finding same will please deliver to Schiffbauer Brothers, at Arkansas City. JOHN D. MILES, Indian Agent.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The New York State Fish Commission will send to any parties in the United States wishing to experiment in fish culture, from 300 to 500 of the California mountain trout, on receipt of fifty cents, to pay for the package. This species is very hardy, and valuable game and food fish. Applications must be made before March 1st, 1882, to Seth Green, Rochester, New York.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Mr. Geo. W. Miller has opened up a tinware establishment in town and is prepared to do all kinds of work in his line. After the middle of February, he will occupy the Benedict building as a stove and tinware store, and a full stock for the same is already on the way. Mr. Miller was with D. S. Rose while in this city, and made many friends who will be glad to hear of his locating with us.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

At the present low stage of water in the Arkansas River, large boats are still navigating it as far as Fort Gibson, as will be seen by the following item from the Cherokee Advocate.

"The steamboat `Fort Smith' arrived at the Fort Gibson wharf on the 28th ult., loaded with salt and departed with a cargo of cotton."

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The emigrant rates from Liverpool, England, to New York are:

First cabin $60 and $75, second cabin $40, steerage $26. The railway fare from New York to Arkansas City, for emigrants only, is $18.55 each. Each passenger is allowed to carry 100 pounds of baggage.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Salt City is growing like an evil weed this pleasant weather. About fourteen houses are nearing completion, among which is the infirmarya large substantial stone building. Besides these the foundations are laying for eight or ten more and still the boom goes on. Soon we shall expect to see these springs assume respectable proportions and gain the reputation and patronage which they deserve. Press.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Mr. Chamberlain, of Kansas City, who has been visiting his daughter, Mrs. Charles Schiffbauer, for several weeks past, returned to his home last Friday. We had the pleasure of several chats with the old gentleman during his stay, and much enjoyed his reminiscences of times and occurrences that transpired in Illinois (then the Far West) fifty years ago, which his age and varied experience made doubly interesting.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The well known and popular grocery firm of McLaughlin Brothers has dissolved, Mr. Lafe McLaughlin retiring. The business will henceforth be conducted by T. H. McLaughlin, at the old stand, and on the same general principles which secured the firm's success in the past and will, we doubt not, bear a like result in the future. Mr. McLaughlin has been one of the prominent businessmen of Arkansas City from the very first and is far too well known to need any commendation at our hands.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Instruction to Agents.

The Secretary of the Interior has prepared a letter of instruction to Indian agents with regard to the employment of the military to capture criminals. He instructs agents that they have power to put intruders off of reservations, and they may call out the military to assist them, not as a posse comitatus, but simply as a force to enable them to maintain their authority. This may be a precaution to prevent an invasion of the Indian Territory, by persons who have in view a settlement on these lands. Agents are instructed also that they may arrest criminals who have escaped from any State or Territory, but they must notify the authorities of the State or territory from which the captured criminals have escaped, and at what time and place the latter will be delivered.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Turn Out! Turn Out!!

A Steamboat meeting will be held at the office of I. H. Bonsall this Wednesday evening, at 8 o'clock, to organize a plan of action relative to obtaining an appropriation for improving the Arkansas River. This is a matter of vital importance, and our people will consult their own best interests by attending. Be on hand and help the "steamboat boom."

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

To Bolton Tax Payers.

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Township Board, of Bolton Township, will be held at the Bland Schoolhouse, on Saturday, January 28th, 1882, for the purpose of auditing the accounts and ascertaining the financial condition of the township. The matter of the Arkansas River Bridge will come before the meeting, and it is hoped that all interested will attend. By order, WM. TRIMBLE, Trustee.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The Cherokee Advocate, published at Tahlequah, Indian Territory, commenting on ex-Governor Crawford's letter regarding tax on the Cherokee outlet, says:

"Uncle Sam stands by the Cherokees in this matter, and those stock men who have stock on the Cherokee Strip, and who are kicking against paying taxes to the Cherokee authorities, are simply cutting their own throatsin other words `no pay no stay.'

"Our authorities are backed by the plain law, and have the consent and backing of the U. S. Government, and propose to collect the taxes as long as we hold the Strip, as we now do. So the stock men who are on the Strip might as well understand this now, and be ready, and more than willing, to pay their tax when called upon by our National Treasurer."

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

The Post Office Department at Washington has received bids from this place to Pawhuska (Osage Agency), Indian Territory, increasing the number of trips to three times per week. Also extended the route from this place to Caldwell, instead of only to South Haven, Kansas. Also added an extra trip to the Sac & Fox Agency route, and an extra trip to Wellington, Kansas, making each route carried three times per week instead of two as heretofore. The names of the fortunate bidders will be given on or before March 4th, 1882. We understand some bids were made from parties living here, at a less rate than it can be carried for, and that money will be lost rather than made.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 18, 1882.

Danford to the Front.

Danford has been arranging and fixing matters for the past three or four weeks, and from the following from Osage City we presume his labor will result in "a time" for some of his Caldwell friends who participated in the mob festival:

S. S. Richmond, one of the principal leaders of the Caldwell-Danford mob, who was appointed trustee of the assets of the Merchants and Drovers Bank, of Caldwell, with powers to settle up the business, came to confer with Danford in regard to some unfinished business. A suit was at once instituted by Danford against members of the Caldwell mob for $100,000 damages, and the papers were served upon Richmond by the Sheriff of this county. This takes the case to that county, and enables Danford to have papers served upon other members of the mob in Sumner County and compel them to go to that county for trial. There will be over fifty defendants.

[THE ARKANSAS RIVER: MAKING IT NAVIGABLE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, January 25, 1882. Editorial Page.

The Arkansas River.

The matter of improving and rendering the above stream navigable is now being agitated in earnest by our most influential citizens. Our members of Congress and Representatives have been corresponded with, and one and all express themselves as in favor of the measure, and in every way willing to exert themselves to the utmost to gain the desired aid in the way of the necessary appropriations. In connection with this we publish, below, a letter from Capt. Thos. H. Handbury, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., to Dr. Kellogg, which is full of information upon this project, and should be read by all our people.

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS,

JANUARY 20, 1882.

Hon. H. D. Kellogg, Mayor.

DEAR SIR:

Your note of the 16th inst., relative to the improvement of the upper Arkansas River, is at hand, and I take great pleasure in replying at once, seeing that I can give you some facts of interest in regard to this work which you seem not to be in possession of.

In February, 1869, Major Luter, Corps of Engineers, U. S. A., reported to the Chief of Engineers in Washington, D. C., the results of a reconnaissance of the Arkansas River between Fort Smith, Arkansas, and Wichita, Kansas, that he had been instructed to have made. His Assistant, J. D. McKown, who made the reconnoissance, submitted a rough approximate estimate of the cost of permanently improving the river. Major Luter did not deem it advisable to commit the Government to an expenditure of so large an amount as this estimate called for without some more definite data and statistical information than could be obtained by a mere reconnoissance of the river. In order to thoroughly study the problem and to develop a plan which would most economically and most radically improve the river for all time, he deemed it best that a thorough instrumental survey should be made, extending from Wichita, Kansas, to Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, where it would join to one previously made from that point to Little Rock, Arkansas.

In connection with this the data could be collected for an elaborate report such as Senator Plumb refers to in his communication to you. For this purpose he estimated that an appropriation of $16,360 would be necessary and recommended that it be made. This recommendation has been renewed every year since and laid before Congress.

In the report above referred to, Major Luter says:

"The estimates presented by Assistant McKown are for removing snags and rocks and so contracting the width of the stream as to give at low water a depth of about 2 feet, but this estimate is only a rough approximation at the best, and no work on this scale should be undertaken, even if deemed advisable, until a thorough survey of the stream has been made, the cost of which has been estimated at $16,360.

"I am however of the opinion that by removing the snags and constructing slight dams at some of the worst shoals, the navigation would be so improved as to render it as good as that between Little Rock and Fort Smith, and this would seem to be all that is worth doing until the general improvement of the river is undertaken. The cost of this work would be about $100,000, which could be expended in one season."

Whatever plan of permanent improvement be adopted, there is certain preliminary work such as the removal of snags, rocks, over-hanging trees, etc., that must be done. This affords temporary relief for the commerce seeking this outlet and is absolutely necessary. It is for this work that the estimate of $100,000 is made, and to it the funds that are from time to time appropriated by Congress are devoted. My own estimate for the next fiscal year is $30,000 and also $16,300 for the survey, making in all $46,300.

This estimate, with my report and recommendations, is now before Congress.

No plan has as yet been recommended for the permanent improvement of the Arkansas River, for the simple reason that we have not the data upon which to base intelligent conclusions as to what is best to be done. To devise a plan for the permanent improvement of a stream of so much importance as the Arkansas River is destined to be, running as it does between hills and through plains unsurpassed in natural wealth by any in the world and which is going to affect the development of this wealth, is a problem of no small importance and should be undertaken only with every possible data bearing upon the subject at hand. To collect these data it requires money, and it is that which is meant when we estimate $16,300 for the survey of the Arkansas River between Fort Gibson and Wichita.

In this connection it is well, perhaps, to refer to a point that is usually made by members of Congress, and rightly, too, as the law requires it, when a new work of improvement is to be undertaken. They desire reliable statistical information, showing what interests are to be affected and to what extent, and they naturally look for this to the Engineer Officer submitting the project for the improvement. He very often, as in this case, has no means of collecting this other than through the liberality of public spirited citizens, or those more or less pecuniarily interested in the success of the undertaking.

If the citizens of a community liable to be affected by a contemplated river improvement for which an appropriation is to be asked of Congress would make it a point to furnish the Engineer Officer, for his report, all reliable statistical information available bearing upon the improvement proposed, I have no doubt but little difficulty would be experienced in obtaining any reasonable appropriation asked for. As a general thing it is almost entirely upon the report of this officer that Congress makes an appropriation for River or Harbor improvements. Respectfully, yours truly,

THOS. H. HANDBURY, Capt. Corps of Engineers.

[EDITORIAL PAGE. ARKANSAS CITY SCHOOLS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

The following people of Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City Schools, were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Flora Kreamer, Maggie Ford, Clara Ford, Grace Houghton, Lizzie Garris.

Senior Department of Arkansas City Schools: those receiving above 90 were Stella Swarts, 99.8; Mollie Christian, 98.8; Sarah Randall, 98.5; Hannah Gilbert, 98.5; Emma Theaker, 98.3; Etta Barnett, 96; Charles Randall, 95; Jessie Norton, 93; Cora Pettit, 93; Alvan Sankey, 92.

[PUBLIC SALE: INDIAN TERRITORY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

PUBLIC SALE.

There will be sold, at public auction, at the Commissary Warehouse at the Kiowa, Comanche, and Wichita Agency, Indian Territory, at 12 o'clock Noon, Saturday, February 25th, 1882, for cash in hand, the following articles of condemned public property:

14 Wagons

1 Ambulance, 8 Pla [CANNOT READ REST OF THIS]

1 Buggy

4 Mowing Machines

2 Sulky Hay Rakes

2 Corn Shellers

1 Corn Planter

2 Cattle Scales & other scales

2 Cultivators

2 Circular saws

2 Sewing Machines

1 Baler [?] Machine

1 Platen [?] Press

And a great variety of other articles, of Blacksmiths, Carpenters, and other tools to be sold as "Junk." P. R. HUNT, U. S. Indian Agent.

Jan. 17th, 1882.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Now is the time to plant trees.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Arkansas City has a Y. M. C. A.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

L. C. Wood, of Wichita, was in the city on Monday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

BIRTH. Dan. Sifford rejoices in the possession of a bran new olive branch.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Skating was indulged in by some of our people last week upon the canal.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

The horse trainer has been doing good work at Stanton's stable the past week.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Mr. C. Marshall and wife arrived in the city last week, and are now permanently located here.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

We regret to state that Robert Maxwell is down sick at this writing, but hope `ere long to be able to chronicle his complete convalescence.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

T. J. Gilbert, trader at the Kaw Agency, was in town last week, as usual laying in a stock of supplies for the accommodation of his dusky patrons.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Mr. and Mrs. H. O. Meigs left Anthony on Wednesday morning last for a visit to Michigan, and will be absent several weeks. Anthony Republican.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

We understand that a new furniture store is shortly to be opened by Messrs. W. P. Wolf and A. Harnley, in the old tin shop building on East Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

The Y. M. C. A. met last evening at the White church. Rev. Fleming conducted a Bible reading in his usual felicitous manner. The boys are going to work nicely.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

A Literary Entertainment will be given Friday evening, February 23rd, 1882, at the M. E. Church, by the L. L. Society of the Arkansas City Schools, for the benefit of the Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

The case of Thompson vs. Shepard, before Justice McIntire last week, resulted in a verdict for the plaintiff, after a close contest of two days. The case will be taken to the District Court.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Capt. C. M. Scott and Postmaster Topliff returned from their sheep buying trip out west, last Friday. C. M. Scott returned to Harper the same day to assist in driving the sheep purchased through to their ranche south of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

We had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Bisbee, father-in-law of O. P. Houghton, last week. Mr. Bisbee is a typical New England farmer, and our Western life is a revelation to him, but the country he expresses himself charmed with.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

A party consisting of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Newman, Miss Annie Haywood, and R. C. Haywood started to take in the Ponca & Nez Perce Agencies on Saturday last, and returned on Monday after having spent a very pleasant time in the Nation.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

We had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Beal of Phillips, Maine, on Monday last, who is making a visit to old-time friends in this city. Should he be favorably impressed with our corner of the footstool, he will probably remove his family here for good. So mote it be.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Geo. Smith, of the Eureka Foundry, met with an accident last Saturday, by which one of his fingers was entirely separated from the hand. He was immediately attended by a physician, the injured member replaced, and strapped in position, and it is hoped a union of the severed parts may result.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

I. F. Moore, late of the Arkansas City House, was arrested yesterday, charged on two counts with selling liquor contrary to law. The trial came off before Judge Bonsall and the prisoner plead guilty and was fined $100 on one count and sentenced to sixty days imprisonment on the other. The County Attorney prosecuted.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

The young men of this city have taken the initiative toward forming a branch of the Y. M. C. A. in our midst. Last Friday evening they met and appointed committees for corresponding with the Missouri State Committee. The Winfield Quartet have promised a musical entertainment for the benefit of the project, in the way of furnishing rooms, procuring a reading room, etc. We wish it success.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Last Saturday witnessed quite a delegation from Phillips, Maine, some of whom come only upon a visit to Sunny Cowley, while some have finally decided to cast their future lot in our city. Among the latter we may mention Mrs. Sumner Whitney, mother of the Howard boys, and her daughter, Mrs. Albert Worthley, Bert Worthley and daughter, and Geo. Read. We extend to them a hearty welcome and trust they may find in their new associations nothing to cause regret for the step they have just taken.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Mr. Cline, the old-time clerk in Ekel's lumber yard, paid a visit to the city last week. He has been living in Wichita since he left this place, but is now on the road to Illinois for a short visit, after which he expects to reside in Dakota, where Ekel is engaged in his old businesslumber dealing.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

From Bolton.

Ed. Traveler:

Will you please announce that in consequence of Mr. Ayer's intention to grind for about one-eight toll, the Bolton Canal and Mill Company have postponed their enterprise.

W. G. KAY.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

An iron moulder has been secured, from the East, by Mr. George Smith, of the Foundry, and work of the same formally commenced this week. The task of getting in good working shape has taken more time than was expected, but now all is in good order, and this enterprise will, we hope, be a notable factor in promoting the commercial welfare of our city.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Mr. A. A. Newman was the recipient of a very handsome birthday present last Thursday, consisting of an elegant silver mounted dressing case, replete with every article that the most fastidious exquisite could desire in making his toilet. The gift was presented to Mr. Newman by Messrs. W. E. Gooch, T. L. Mantor, John Gooch, and Sam Reed, as a token of respect and esteem.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Mr. L. D. Wilson, a brother of Mrs. P. Pearson, who has been prospecting in the Gunnison country for the past two years, we notice, by the Mining News, published at Pakin [?], Colorado, has struck it rich, and is a third owner in the Moonlight mine, of which we quote: "This is probably the richest strike ever made in the gold belt, being parallel with the famous Legal Tender, and we congratulate the fortunate owners upon their success."

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Bolton Township.

Notice is hereby given by the voters of Bolton Township, that a caucus meeting will be held at the Bland Schoolhouse on the 28th day of January, A. D., 1882, at 2 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of nominating candidates for the several township officers, to-wit: One Justice, one trustee, one treasurer, one clerk, two constables, and seven road overseers.

By order of TRUSTEE.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

DIED. On Wednesday last, January 18th, 1882, at his residence, in Bolton Township, of pleura pneumonia, Elisha Bowen, in the forty-eighth year of his age. The funeral took place on the Friday following at 2 p.m., and the remains were deposited in their last resting place in the Mercer cemetery in the presence of many sorrowing relatives and friends.

Mr. Bowen was born in Ohio, but come to Kansas while it was yet a Territory, and afterwards moved to Bolton Townshipeleven years agowhere he resided up to the time of his death. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his loss, and to them is extended, the deepest sympathy in their sad bereavement.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Obituary.

[Eldest Daughter of Judge James Christian.]

DIED. At the residence of her father, in this city, on Saturday, January 21st, 1882, at 1 o'clock p.m., of consumption, George A., [Georgia ?] wife of A. W. Berkey, aged 22 years 10 months and 13 days. The funeral services were held in the Methodist Church on Sunday last, and the cortege that wended its mournful way towards the cemetery was the largest ever seen in the city. The deceased lady was the eldest daughter of Hon. James Christian, born at Lawrence, Kansas, on March 1st, 1859, and was the first child baptized in the Episcopal Church of that city. During her residence of several years in Arkansas City, her many sterling qualities endeared her to all with whom she came in contact; by whom, and the bereaved relatives the sadness of her passing away should be lost in the contemplation of that future meeting, where they too, shall stand robed in immortality.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Hackney's Old Neighbors.

Gov. St. John some time since wrote to Senator W. P. Hackney for information concerning the working of the prohibitory law in this county. Hackney answered fully and completely and of course made a splendid showing. Soon after, the Governor visited Illinois and made some speeches, one of which was to a very large audience of Hackney's old home. During the address he drew that letter from his pocket and read it to the crowd. When at the conclusion of the reading, he stated that the letter was written by one whom his hearers well knew, and that his name was W. P. Hackney. The whole audience responded with enthu- siastic cheers, loud, long, and repeated. The Governor imagined that if Hackney knew the warm hearted esteem which those cheers indicated, he would be the proudest man in Kansas. Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

In nothing, perhaps, has the progress of the past few years been more decidedly shown than in that domestic necessitya sewing machine. There is about as much resemblance between Elias Howe's first patent and the machine of today, as between Robert Stevenson's locomotive and that perfection of machinery behind which the traveler of the present day is whirled. One of the latest and most improved machines we ever saw is the new American No. 7 Sewing Machine. It is phenomenally simple in its construction, very quiet and easy to operate, has no springs, is fitted with every device that will enhance its usefulness; in fact, we think is the gem of sewing machines. They can be seen in operation at the Green Front Store, and all who can should call and investigate on their own account. One great advantage is, this make is much less liable to get out of order by reason of its extreme simplicity of construction.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

To Bolton Tax Payers.

Notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Township Board, of Bolton Township, will be held at the Bland Schoolhouse on Saturday, January 28th, 1882, for the purpose of auditing the accounts and ascertaining the financial condition of the township. The matter of the Arkansas River Bridge will come before the meeting, and it is hoped that all interested will attend. By order. WM. TRIMBLE, Trustee.

[COURIER CLIPS: PRINTING ONLY ONE OF THE ARTICLES GIVEN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Captain Scott, Postmaster Topliff, and Cashier Farrar, of the terminus, were doing our city Friday. Mr. Topliff was going west into Barbour County and Scott and Farrar escorted him this far on his road. He went on alone and anxious friends are praying for his safe return. We don't think he'll get lost.

[SOME BUSINESS NOTICES.]

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

BARBED WIRE.

We have just received a carload of barbed wire, which we will sell by the rod instead of by the pound, so that an exact estimate of what is needed can be made beforehand. We have in stock both the galvanized and painted wire. Howard Brothers.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Condition Powders

For Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, and Chickens. There is nothing to equal our Condition Powders.

Kellogg & Mowry.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

Gravel for sale. Inquire at this office.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

LAMPS. The best stock of Lamps, Chimneys, and Burners can be found at Kellogg & Mowry's.

Arkansas City Traveler, January 25, 1882.

FOR RENT. A farm of 47 acres45 under cultivation, good house, well, orchard, and stabling. Inquire at Traveler office.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, February 1, 1882. Front Page.

Winfield has a mutual protective association.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Robert McFarland, who died recently, at Lawrence, might have been called the oldest settler. In 1853 he removed from Pennsylvania to Kansas City, to await the opening of the Indian country across the border, and the hour he heard of the passage of the Kansas- Nebraska bill, he hitched up his teams and started. He located near where Lawrence now is, and was a free state man.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

The Y. M. C. A.'s are in search of a room.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Cal. Dean has returned from his visit to Illinois.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Remember Gilstrap's sale at his residence tomorrow.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Tom Berry came up through the storm on last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

J. R. Rogers, Division Supt., A. T. & S. F., was down last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

E. D. Eddy has been to Leavenworth on business and to see the folks.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Capt. O. S. Rarick is building a residence in the southeast part of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Will Griffith went to the Otoe Agency last Monday to do a job of tinning on the Agency buildings.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

G. W. Miller will soon move his tin shop into the building one door south of the Central Drug Store.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Misses Dixon and Newman, of Arkansas City, are visiting with Mrs. Hugh Davidson. Wellingtonian.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

M. B. Vawter has gone on a professional visit to Pawnee Agency. He will probably be away until Saturday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

See the card of T. H. Soward in this issue. Judge Soward has won golden opinions from all as a man and a lawyer.

CARD: T. H. SOWARD H. E. ASP

SOWARD & ASP,

Attorneys at Law

Winfield, Kansas.

Office up stairs, over the Post Office.

NOTE: ABOVE WAS THE OLD CARD, I BELIEVE, SHOWN ON FIRST PAGE.

NEW CARD:

T. H. SOWARD,

ATTORNEY AT LAW,

WINFIELD, KANSAS.

Office up stairs over the Post Office.

GATHER THIS MEANS HE IS NO LONGER CONNECTED WITH ASP!

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

It was a "goodly array" that stood up, to be formally received into the White Church, last Sabbath morning: 38 in number.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

If you want to borrow money, call on P. H. Albright & Co., of Winfield. Their ad. in this issue shows what they will do.

BIG AD:

P. H. Albright & Co.

One of the most reliable loaning

companies in the West,

HAVE NOW OPENED AN OFFICE IN WINFIELD.

OFFICE, FRONT ROOMS OVER THE POST OFFICE.

They will make loans in any of the Southern Counties in the State, AND ALREADY HAVE THE OVERSIGHT OF MORE THAN

$1,000,000

Heretofore placed in the Counties of Cowley, Bourbon, Labette, Wilson, Montgom ery, Chautauqua, Elk, Butler, Sedgwick, Sumner, Harper, Barbour, and Kingman.

The main office of the company will be at Winfield, where they will furnish money to borrowers on shorter notice and at lower rates than any others in the loaning business.

JAMES B. MOORE, of the firm of Geo. W. Moore & Son, of Hartford, Conn., will make this office headquarters for the winter.

P. H. ALBRIGHT & Co.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Quarterly meeting at the M. E. Church the last of this week and Sunday next. Presiding Elder King is expected to be present.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

George Cairns, of Winfield, is in town this week. George says he has fallen in love with Arkansas City. He displays good taste.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Mr. Davenport, of McIntire and Davenport, surprised his friends by returning home with a bran new wife. Here's to you, Tip!

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

J. F. Steadman & Bro. have opened a gun shop on East Summit Street, and are preparing to put in a stock of shelf hardware, ammunition, gun fixtures, and so forth.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Capt. Evins, of snag boat "Wichita," was in the city last week. The Capt. says his arrival at Arkansas City with the "Wichita" is certain.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

DIED. Henry Biggs, of Pleasant Valley Township, an old settler of this county, died on Thursday, Jan. 26th, and was buried on Saturday following.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Maj. L. E. Woodin was in town several days last week. The Major has an immense amount of business on his hands, but is master of the situation.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Mr. A. B. DeBruce has opened a blacksmith shop at K. F. Smith's old stand. Mr. DeBruce is a good workman and a reliable man. Give him a call.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Rev. Lindsay left for Seeley on Monday last, where he had been called to assist in a protracted meeting. He will return in time for his work the last of this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Our efficient City Marshal did not win much glory by allowing Moore to quietly walk away from him. Was he asleep? Or did Moore still have a drink left?

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Edward Haten, of Topeka, Western Passenger Agent of the A. T. & S. F., spent a day in town last week. He went over with C. R. Mitchell to take in Geuda Springs.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Col. E. C. Manning, formerly of Kansas, is figuring around the New Mexican Legislature, and proposes to have a bill introduced favoring a public school system for that Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Frank Jennings and M. G. Troup have formed a law partnership. They will make one of the best legal teams in this county, as both are well known as accurate, careful lawyers.

CARD: F. S. JENNINGS M. G. TROUP

JENNINGS & TROUP,

ATTORNEYS AT LAW,

Winfield, Kansas.

Office up stairs over the Post Office.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Annual election of township officers will be held next Tuesday, Feb. 7, at which time there will be elected one Trustee, Treasurer, Clerk, two Justices of the Peace, two Constables, and seven Road Overseers.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

The Schubert Quartet of Winfield has been making preparations to give a musical entertainment in this city for the benefit of the Y. M. C. A., but on account of sickness, this will have to be indefinitely postponed.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Rev. A. W. Lindsay, who has been placed in charge of the M. E. Church at this city, has been laboring here several weeks. He is a scholarly gentleman, and an enthusiastic worker in his profession; and has done effective service during the series of meetings just closed.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Township Primary.

Voters of Creswell Township will meet at Bonsall's Office, Saturday, Feb. 4th, at 3 p.m., to nominate township officers. By Order of Board.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

H. P. Standley, Editor and Proprietor, together with Stacy Matlack, C. F. France and Capt. Evins, of the "gun boat Wichita," are in the Territory hunting. We've engaged the dears. The other animals are as yet unengaged.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

V. M. Ayres, our new enterprising mill man, returned home last week, after securing the repairs necessary for his water wheel. We understand that he will paint all the wood work on the inside of his milla good idea.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Stacy Matlack went skating on the raging canal the other day. He broke through the ice, and as the silvery waves kissed his suspender buttons, front and rear, he gently murmured

o-o-oh-Oh-OH! May b-be you don't think this is cold.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Will Blakeney and E. F. Sheldon are now jewelers doing business as Blakeney & Sheldon. Next month they move into the room one door south of Cowley County Bank, where they will put in a complete stock of jewelry, and as they are both musicians and handsome young men, as well as reliable businessmen and good workmen, we predict success for them.

AD:

WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, ETC.

Lower than ever at BLAKENEY & SHELDON'S.

All kinds of repairing done on short notice, and at reasonable charges.

Repairing of fine Watches a specialty, and all work warranted. Call and see us.

BLAKENEY & SHELDON.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

We are glad to announce that Judge Christian will lecture on "Ireland and the Irish," at Grange Hall in Pleasant Valley, on next Saturday evening. The Judge has lectured on this topic in this city and at Winfield to full houses, and with great satisfaction to his hearers. If you want a good laugh, or desire to learn something, attend this lecture. Admission 25 cents.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

The first carload of coal from the Coal Valley mines arrived in Winfield one day last week. These mines are situated eight miles south of Grenola, Kansas, in the Cana Valley, and are the property of a joint-stock company of Winfield men. The company have expended over $5,000 and have developed a 20-inch vein of superior coal from which, after supplying the retail demand at the mines, they ship from five to ten cars a week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Mr. Sheldon's residence caught fire last Saturday morning about 8 o'clock, and was very badly damaged before the fire could be extinguished, the roof being entirely destroyed. Nothing but the prompt action of our citizens, the existence of Providence, and the Arkansas City Water Works saved the home of our friends from total destruction. The sufferers by the fire desire to return their thanks for the assistance rendered at the fire and for the money promptly contributed to purchase the material to repair the loss.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Spring Meeting of Stockmen.

Notice is hereby given that the annual spring meeting of Stockmen on the Cherokee Strip will be held in Caldwell, Kansas, on Wednesday, March 1st, 1882, at 10 o'clock, a.m., for the purpose of making arrangements for the spring round up and to transact such other business as may advance the stock interests of this section.

By order S. S. BURCHFIELD, Chairman.

R. F. CRAWFORD, Secretary, Caldwell, Kansas, January 24th, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Titsecomanse, a Cheyenne Indian, who went to New Mexico last spring in the interest of the Smithsonian Institution, has returned. He traveled along with a company of soldiers and related the story of a sharp fight with Apaches at White Mountain. In this encounter he forgot all about his bugs and went in for military glory. The battle resulted in the loss of several on each side. Our naturalist killed one Apache, whose scalp he brought home and now exhibits with great pride. He does not fancy bug hunting among hostile Indians and says he has explored New Mexico to his entire satisfaction. Titsecomanse is one of the original Florida prisoners. He spent two and a half years at St. Augustine, Florida, one year at Hampton, Virginia, and one year at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington. At the latter place he displayed considerable talent and soon became a general favorite.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Quite a large business has been done in Maine the past season in the shipment of young spruce trees to Kansas. Trees from twelve to eighteen inches in height are selected, packed in hogsheads or crates, and forwarded by rail. The spruce is found to take more kindly to the soil and climate of Kansas than any other evergreen, and grows very rapidly, making efficient protection against high winds.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

We call attention to the new Photograph Gallery, just opened by W. D. Stevens, one door south of Holloway's drug store, on Summit St. The rooms are neatly arranged and thoroughly equipped for work, and the proprietors are determined to demand success by deserving it. Mrs. Stevens, who has charge of the work, will be glad to see any expecting to have work of this kind done, and will take pride in being ready at all times to wait on her patrons, and in turning out first-class workmanship.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

The Y. M. C. A. met for the transaction of business, on last Monday evening, at the M. E. Church. The following officers were elected for the current year.

President: W. V. McCone.

Vice President: A. W. Patterson.

Secretary: C. L. Swarts.

Asst. Secretary: Chas. Hutchins.

Cor. Secretary: W. D. Mowry.

Treasurer: S. B. Reed.

The Association proposes to secure a reading room, and other necessaries and will engage at once in the usual work of the organization. This is the only society of the Y. M. C. A. in this part of the State.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Geuda Springs Items.

The Geuda Springs are still boiling over.

The two-story billiard hall of Messrs. Hahn & Bishop is almost completed.

Mr. Anderson, of Newton, is rapidly improving from an attack of rheumatism.

We have heard a rumor of a $10,000 hotel to be built by a joint stock company, but could not learn the particulars.

Some Winfield parties are now talking strongly of putting up some business houses here. We shall see what we shall see.

The Geuda Springs Co. are shipping their spring water to all parts of the United States, and are receiving flattering reports.

Jacob Musgrove, et. al, of Hunnewell, are putting in a stock of groceries, and will soon build a large two-story business house.

One man from Wichitawe did not learn his namesends word he will be here tomorrow, and wants to put up a building at once.

Mr. Bixler has commenced to build his residence on block 4, at the Springs, and expects, if the weather is favorable, to commence his business house within two weeks.

Another gentleman, who had tried Eureka Springs for three months for rheumatism without being benefited, is here now, and has gotten almost well in two weekscould hardly walk when he cameand is now at work for Mr. Buckwalter. This makes the fifth person cured here who has tried Eureka.

Contracts for 49 new buildings have already been let to be erected on the new town site, and all to be completed by June 1st, 1882. Three are to be large sized boarding houses, or hotels; fifteen of them cottage houses for rent; and the balance business houses or private residences.

A Mr. Roberts, of Ottumwa, Iowa, talks of putting in a newspaper. In fact, April 15th, 1882, will find Geuda Springs booming, as well as boiling over. NO NAME.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Entertainment Friday evening, February 3rd, 1882, at the M. E. Church, for benefit of School Library.

NAMES ONLY OF PARTICIPANTS GIVEN...

Glee Club, Frank Gammel, Miss Nellie Swarts, F. C. McLaughlin, W. M. Blakeney, Miss Minnie McIntire, W. M. Henderson, Fannie Vaughn, Miss Etta Barnett, J. R. L. Adams, Harry Finley, W. D. Mowry, C. L. Swarts, C. T. Atkinson, E. S. Donnelly, Miss Mary Theaker, Miss Anna Norton, Miss Mollie Christian.

Admission 25 cents, doors open at 7 p.m., commence at 8 p.m. All are cordially invited. Tickets can be had at the post office and drug stores.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

NOTICE. There will be a political meeting, at the East Centennial School House, in Silverdale Township, on Saturday, February 4th, 1882, for the purpose of organizing a Greenback club. Speakers are engaged. An invitation is extended to all, especially to the ladies. By order of Committee. J. M. FELTON, J. N. FLEHARDY, T. W. GANT.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

The following is a list of letters remaining uncalled for in the post office at Arkansas City, Kansas, January 31, 1882.

FIRST COLUMN: Anderson, A. O.; Adwood, E. A.; Adams, Mary J.; Brannon, John; Blakeley, Charles; Beck, Mrs. Flora L.; Cole, Mrs. E. J.; Cowell, Lizzie; Clark, James; Darnell, J. L. H.; Dunham, Mrs. E. E.; Ellenberger, Moses; Fuller, F.; Frazier, S.; Fitzgerald Bros.; Garlick, Mrs. C. A.; Gray, James H.; Garner, M. H.; Herix, George; Heizer, Miss Lavina; Hansen, J. C.; Hackleman, Ida; Irvin, Wm.; Willson, Mrs. E. A.

SECOND COLUMN: Jones, Smith D.; Keeley, William; Lane, Mrs. M. A.; Laura, Miss & Flora; McCormac, Rebecca; McCarrell, Mr.; McCutcheon, A.; McCormack, Wm. V.; Nix, Charles; Oliver, Robert; Phillips, Rose; Putney, Ira; Patterson, Miss B.; Paschall, William; Rogers, Miss Marie; Reed, George W.; Smythia, Mrs. Lon; Sprunes, Henry; Skirven, Walter; Smith, Mat; Setters, Samuel P.; Tannehill, Will D.; Thrasher, Thomas; White, J. L.

Persons calling for any of the above letters will please say they were advertised.

J. C. TOPLIFF, P. M.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

Report of Rose Valley School, District No. 34, for the month ending January 27th, 1882.

No. of pupils enrolled: 48. No. of visitors: 7.

LISTING NAMES OF PUPILS ONLY:

Nannie Maxwell, Emma Locke, Howard Warren, Lillie Purdy, Maggie Guyer, Theo. Tucker, John Drennan, Aaron Purdy, Frank Hughes, John Sankey, Jas. Hughes, Nora S. Drennan, Maggie Kirkpatrick, Henry Burt, Willie Purdy, Willie Maxwell.

SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

[BUSINESS NOTICE.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 1, 1882.

NOTICE.

Taken up by the undersigned on or about the 16th of November, 1881, one black mare colt, supposed to be 2 years old in the spring; small white spot in forehead. Anyone can have said colt by applying to me, proving property, and paying for this notice, and a reasonable fee for the care of said colt. JOHN E. PAPPAN, Kaw Agency, Indian Territory.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, February 8, 1882.

Mr. E. A. Barron has the mumps.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Lots of new buildings in course of erection.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

See the Y. M. C. A. Bulletin board at the P. O.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Judge Christian at the M. E. Church tomorrow night.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

A. A. Newman is slightly under the weather with a cold.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

W. E. Gooch has been invalided for several days with a bad cold.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Sickness is now very prevalent, mostly simple ailments however.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

The arrivals at the City Hotel, on Thursday last, numbered thirty.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

The ladies of the M. E. Church will give an oyster supper in the near future.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Arkansas City merchants received a carload of trunks and valises last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

M. B. Vawter was at the Pawnee Agency last week fixing ivories. He is now at Mulvane.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. Johnson of the well known firm of McDermott & Johnson was in the city on Saturday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Our friend, Thos. E. Berry, accompanied by his wife and children, were in the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Geo. Cunningham is already receiving stacks of farming implements for the coming spring trade.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. Fred Barron is again with us, after a lengthened tour in various States during the past few months.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Howard Bros. store is overflowing; they have fencing wire enough to fence in Cowley and Sumner counties.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Rev. W. A. Lindsay returned from Seeley, where he has been assisting in a series of meetings, on Thursday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Some new machinery was received at the Foundry last week, and work in good earnest will commence right away.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

E. F. Sheldon is the happy possessor of a bicycle, and now employs his spare time in going at a 2.40 gait on two wheels.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

"Bob" Maxwell is again on his pins, smiling over the counters of the Central Drug Store. He says "Richard's himself again."

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. Barnes, of Mound City, Missouri, is in the city, he having brought Charles D. Marshall's Livery stock through from that place.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Capt. Nipp has just returned from an extended trip to his new ranch on the Cimarron River, Indian Territory, about 160 miles south of Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Cunningham's new building will be finished this week, and he will fill it with machinery of all kinds. He says he will sell way down low.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

A coffee and cake social was held at the residence of D. W. Stevens on last Tuesday evening. A pleasant time was had by all who participated.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Will Griffith and Ed. Sheldon, who have been absent in the Territory, upon work at the New Otoe Agency, returned to the city on Monday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

A picture of anyone in town can be had at Eddy's, Kellogg & Mowry's, and Shepard & Maxwell's. This makes us realize that Feb. 14th is at hand.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

A meeting for the purpose of organizing a Horticultural Society will be held in the White Church at 2 p.m., Saturday next. All interested are invited to be present.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

MARRIED. At the residence of Rev. S. B. Fleming, the officiating clergyman, in this city, on Thursday, Feb. 2, Mr. Carlton R. Chinn and Miss Maggie Fleak, both of this county.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. H. H. Foster, of West LaFayette, Ohio, after looking around somewhat here and in the Territory, has concluded to locate here and engage in the cattle trade. That's right. He subscribed for the TRAVELER, and that's right, too.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

There will be a meeting held at the Schoolhouse next Monday evening at 7 o'clock to consider the providing of more school accommodations. There are now 450 children of school age in this district.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

The A. T. & S. F. R. R. have contracted for 400,000 cords of rock to be used for ballasting purposes. Mr. Henry Hill has the contract, and is working a large force of hands at his quarries north of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Attention is called to the new "ad" of the Chicago Lumber Co. in this issue. This firm keep up a good stock in their line, and under the skillful management of W. E. Chenoweth, we predict for them an ever increasing patronage.

AD:

Chicago Lumber Co.

-Dealers in-

COAL & LUMBER,

Lath, Doors, Sash and Blinds; Marble Head Lone Cement, Hair Plaster, Building Paper, Tascott's Ready Mixed Paintsthe best in use.

Large Stock, Good Goods, and Low Prices.

W. E. Chenoweth, Resident Manager.

(Office on South Summit St.)

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Messrs. S. Matlack, C. Mead, C. L. France, of Toledo, Ohio, and ye editor returned to the city on Sunday last from their trip to the Territory and the Snag Boat "Wichita" after having had a most delightful week's recreation. The members of the party are under obligation to Capt. Evins, of the Wichita, the first mate, Mr. Treline, and the engineer, Mr. Matthews, for the courtesies extended to them while on their vessel, which were duly appreciated and would be gladly reciprocated should occasion offer.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Headquarters of the Y. M. C. A. are located in the front room over P. Pearson's furniture store. A reading room will be one of the attractions as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

John Kroenert went out goodie-hunting a few days ago. He fired at an old gander, when, by some means, both barrels of the gun were discharged. John exchanged ends a few times, but escaped with only a lame arm. The goose in front of the gun was killed.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

"Jack" Hilliard, the Wichita end of the firm of Hilliard & Thompson, has been in town several days. Mr. Hilliard is a man of business, has the "necessary," and, as he expresses himself well pleased with our part of the country, we hope soon to see him one of our citizens.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. A. Harnley met with quite a serious loss, on Monday last, by fire. He had some thirty tons of baled hay stacked near his residence, which, by some unknown means, caught fire and were totally destroyed. The wind was blowing hard at the time, but luckily no further casualties occurred.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

MARRIED. We acknowledge receipt of cards announcing the marriage at Cambridge, Illinois, of Mr. H. S. Davenport, of this place, to Miss Nettie R. Page, on Thursday, January 20th, 1882. In welcoming the happy couple to their future home with us, the TRAVELER sincerely wishes them unalloyed happiness in the many years of wedded life, which we hope are in store for them.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Creswell Primary.

At the primary held in this city last Saturday, the following ticket was put in nomination for Creswell Township.

Trustee: U. Spray.

Clerk: W. D. Mowry.

Treasurer: W. M. Sleeth.

Justices: I. H. Bonsall and T. McIntire.

Constables: G. H. McIntire and J. J. Breene.

This ticket was elected by a large majority.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Last Thursday, Jefferson White Cloud, an Otoe Indian, brought a replevin suit against one Oscar J. Palmer, of this place, for the recovery of a certain brown pony which the plain tiff alleged had been stolen from him some two years ago. The case was tried by a jury, before his Honor, Judge McIntire, and resulted in a hung jury. A. V. Democrat.

The case was finally compromisedthe Indian taking the pony and paying costs.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

We received a very pleasant call yesterday from Mr. Ordway, of Waterloo, Iowa, who, with his wife, is staying in the city. This is Mr. Ordway's second trip to Cowley, and he intends making his home with us should the climate prove advantageous to the health of his wife, on whose account a change of location is desired. Mr. Ordway starts, today, for the Territory, to call upon some friends, and gain information relative to the stock business, in which he intends engaging should he locate in this section.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

The entertainment given by Prof. and Mrs. Price, at the White church on Tuesday and Wednesday evenings of last week, was the best of any that Arkansas City has yet enjoyed. The recitations were all good, and so marvelously varied in character, that no sense of monotony could be experienced.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

BIRTH. Peter Pearson's residence was invaded last week by a little stranger of the female persuasion, and, of course "way up" doesn't near express his feelings of joy at the event.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Tomorrow, Thursday evening, Judge Christian will deliver a lecture at the M. E. Church, in this city, which should be well attended as the Judge knows well how to entertain his hearers. One-half the proceeds will go to the fund for putting a tower to the church.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Mr. Charles Williams, Asst. Engineer on the Snag Boat "Wichita" spent several days in our city this week. He returned to the Wichita yesterday, taking down a lot of stores and other government property upon a flat boat. The trip will probably take three or four days if the weather is favorable.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Anyone wishing to purchase a residence property should take advantage of the following offer:

I have 60 acres of land, good house with all conveniences, about 400 bearing apple trees, 800 bearing peach, 50 bearing cherries, also a large number of plums, apricots, nectarines, quince, etc., from 2 to 4 years old, ½ acre of blackberries, grapes, etc. Improvements, above, cost over $2,000. It is my home farm, and I will take $2,000 for it: ½ cash, balance on time. This offer will be open for 30 days only, as I am making arrangements to move to Geuda Springs. C. R. MITCHELL.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Sheriff Shenneman has returned from an extended trip to Kentucky, and he has not been on a play spell. He brought back with him a carload of thoroughbred stock, consisting of twelve pedigreed short horn bulls, one fine jack, the largest ever brought into the county, together with a fine thoroughbred stallion. The stock is in good condition and stood the journey well. We are glad to see Mr. Shenneman turning his attention to this line of business, as we do not doubt that he will make it a success and of considerable benefit to this county. A. T. Shenneman is around shaking hands with the boys, and we expect the criminals of Kentucky fled to the mountains when they heard of our sheriff's presence. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

A. O. U. W.

A Lodge of A. O. U. W., consisting of forty members, was organized last week in this city by J. F. McMullen and B. M. Legg, of Winfield. The following officers were elected.

Past M. W.: James Benedict.

M. N.: Capt. O. S. Rarick.

Foreman: Archie Dunn.

Overseer: J. G. Sheldon.

Financier: W. M. Blakeney.

Receiver: W. E. Chenoweth.

Recorder: B. W. Matlack.

O. G.: H. R. Robinson.

I. G.: G. H. McIntire.

Guide: A. W. Patterson.

Trustees: A. A. Davis, J. C. Pickering, and C. R. Sipes.

Medical Examiners: H. D. Kellogg, J. T. Shepard.

Meets every Friday evening, at the Masonic Hall, until further arrangements.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

Receipts of entertainment given at M. E. Church, Friday evening, for the benefit of the Library.

Received at door: $18.50

Received at Central Drug Store: $2.00

Received at Kellogg & Mowry's: $3.00

Received at Post Office: $2.00

Received at E. D. Eddy's: $1.50

Total: $27.00

Expenditures:

Printing bills and tickets: $2.50

Rent of Church unsettled:

Lumber: $1.15

Music: $.85

Mucilage: $.10

Nails: $.10

Sub Total: $4.70

To those who, unconnected with the school, aided us, we extend our hearty thanks. Great credit is especially due the young men actively engaged in business. The proceeds will be promptly applied to the purchase of books for the School Library. Thanks are also due to those who aided us with their presence and their money, and we trust they will derive benefit from the perusal, by their children, of good books obtained. C. T. A.

[SOME OF THE COURIER CLIPPINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

One of the coal haulers of the Cana Valley Coal Company broke his neck while hauling coal to Grenola.

Two young fellows at Arkansas City had a quarrel over a ring which one had presented to his girl for a Christmas present, and found on the finger of the other. Both pugilists were somewhat discolored about the eye, but no damage done.

[SOME BUSINESS LOCALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

PUBLIC SALE.

A Boiler Engine and Ferry boat will be sold to the highest and best bidder, at Public Auction, for cash, at Pawnee Agency, on Tuesday, the 2nd day of March, 1882.

E. H. BOWMAN,

U. S. Indian Agent.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

ESTRAY NOTICE.

Taken up, by the undersigned, near Kaw Agency, one Stallion, supposed to be five years old, described as follows:

White Stockings, on hind feet, bald face, and a little white under the jaw. Anyone claiming said horse can have the same by proving property, paying charges, and taking him away. JOHN COOPER. Kaw Agency, I. T., February 2nd, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

WANTED. A girl to do general house work. Inquire at Eddy's Drug Store.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

VALENTINES at Kellogg & Mowry's.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

GERMAN MILLET SEED at the Diamond Front.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 8, 1882.

WANTED. Everyone indebted to us to call and settle before March 1st, 1882. Shepard & Maxwell.

[ABOUT KANSAS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, February 15, 1882. Front Page.

ABOUT KANSAS.

Some Remarkable Facts and Figures From the

Auditor of State.

[Topeka Capital, January 29.]

Twenty-nine years ago, this day, Kansas became a state by its admission into the union. Many of her citizens of that date are yet upon the "stage of action" and remember with what joy that event was hailed. For years the people of the territory had been elated and depressed, victorious and defeated, and when, after years of struggle, destitution, and bloodshed, victory crowned their efforts, and Kansas was admitted as a free state, they were as happy as the Israelites when they reached the land of Canaan.

But it is not of this we propose to write, but to give some figures showing the growth and development of the material and other interests of the state, from the date of her admission to this, her twenty-first birthday.

POPULATION.

By the census of 1860, just preceding the admission of the state, the population numbered 107,206.

By the next census, June, 1870, the people numbered 364,399a gain of 173 percent in the decade.

We may safely estimate at this date, one a half years since the last census, that the state has a population of 1,100,000.

TAXABLE WEALTH.

The taxable property of the state, as returned for the year 1861, was fixed at $24,737,000; for the year 1871 at $108,753,000an increase of 310 percent in ten years.

For the year 1881 the taxable property was returned at $170,813,000an increase in the last ten years of 57 percent.

Putting the taxable value at one-half the true value, we have for true value:

In 1861: $49,474,000

In 1871: $217,506,000

In 1881: $341,626,000

Equal to $310.57 of wealth per capita.

RAILROADS.

According to history (Wilder's Annals), the first iron for a railroad was laid on Kansas soil March 20, 1860, at Elwood, Doniphan County, the first whistle of a locomotive was heard April 23, 1860; and the first railroad celebration, "with accompaniments," was held at Wathena, July 19, 1860, on the completion of road from Elwood to Wathena. Thus it will be seen that Kansas when admitted had a railroad, although only about five miles long.

EDUCATIONAL.

The following shows the progress of common schools since 1861. In 1861, 217 districts, 4,901 children. In 1870, 2,068 districts, 100,242 children, 1,501 schoolhouses, valued at $1,520,041. In 1880, 6,134 districts, 340,647 children, 5,315 schoolhouses, valued at $4,632,044.

The common school fund of the state amounts to $2,227,602. The annual income upon which added to the interest on school land sales amounts to $247,725.19.

The state yet owns in trust for the common school fund 2,000,000 acres of land, which, when sold and the proceeds added to the fund on hand, will furnish an endowment fund for common schools of $10,000,000.

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS.

Under the control of the state, educational institutions have not been neglected. The state university at Lawrence was erected at a cost of $200,000, and has a capacity for 600 students. The state agricultural college, at Manhattan, erected and equipped at a cost of $100,000, has a capacity for 500 students. The state normal school, at Emporia, cost $65,000 and has a capacity for 500 students.

All these institutions are endowed with large land-grants, and aided biennially by the legislature.

POSSIBILITIES.

In the foregoing we have given the accomplished work only. Now a word as to possibilities.

Kansas has fifty-two million acres of land. By the last returns she has 7,182,110 acres in cultivation, sustaining 1,100,000 inhabitants, or about 6½ acres to the inhabitant. The speculative mind may predict the future population.

Nearly all the railroads so far completed are east and west lines. The next five years, if no disaster happens, the country will see the north and south lines built, and Kansas will have 5,000 miles of completed railroads.

SKIPPED MOST OF ARTICLE.

REPORT WAS MADE BY P. I. BONEBRAKE, STATE AUDITOR.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882. Front Page.

A twenty-three inch vein of coal has been discovered in Cowley County.

[FROM EAST BOLTON.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882. Editorial Page.

From East Bolton.

Weather mild and spring like.

Most of our farmers are engaged in plowing their ground for spring crops.

The young folks of this vicinity are carrying on an interesting Literary and Debating Society at the Bland Schoolhouse.

Richard Chinn has gone to Harper County, for the purpose of buying a herd of sheep.

Maj. Pettit, of your city, is going to move on to the line the coming spring. He is now making preparations for building a new house, and has recently bought him another farm on the line. Mr. Pettit is a first-class farmer, and now has about 105 acres of land ready for spring crops.

Mr. T. Parvin has rented most of his farm out, and intends to turn his attention to sheep raising.

The settlers of this School District are agitating the question of dividing the district, as their school is getting too much crowded.

MARRIED. Mr. Richard Chinn, of this neighborhood, and Miss Maggie Fleak, of the Territory, were married on the 2nd inst.

A singing school is being carried on at the Stony Point Schoolhouse on Monday evening of each week.

We think the line a first-class place for a man wishing to engage in the dairy business, as we learn one of our friend's milk bill, for skimmed milk during the present season, amounted to $48. How is this for a milk bill? U. GUESS.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Eggs 10 cents per dozen.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Potatoes $2.75 per bushel.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Geo. McIntire has got the mumps.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mrs. A. W. Patterson is convalescing.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Peter Pearson has purchased an $800 Hearse.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. O. J. Godfrey is recovering from his recent spell of sickness.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Washingtonian Supper at the City Hotel Friday next at 6 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

M. E. Oyster supper at the Central Avenue House Tuesday next.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Work upon the siding to the gravel bar was commenced last Thursday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Things in general have been looking lively, of late, in the vicinity of the Foundry.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

R. C. Haywood is again in the city after a several weeks trip in the northern states.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. Sheldon's residence, recently damaged by fire, has been re-roofed and otherwise repaired.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Be sure and attend the M. E. oyster supper, at the Central Avenue hotel, on Tuesday evening, Feb. 21st.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

IMPORTANT TO FARMERS. The notice published by Messrs. Searing & Mead, of the Walnut Mills, is in this issue. Read it.

NOTICE:

Walnut Mills!

We have just furnished a reel exclusively for custom work, and after this date will grind wheat for one-eighth toll, and shelled corn for one-sixth. SEARING & MEAD.

Arkansas City, February 13th, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. C. D. Marshall has put an addition to the rear of his livery stable, thereby much enlarging its capacity and convenience.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Col. O. P. Johnson and wife, who have been guests at the City Hotel, left on the 3 o'clock train yesterday for the north-east part of the State.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

We are pleased to state Mr. V. M. Ayres received his new wheel casing yesterday and proposes to make things hum at his mill within a few days.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mrs. A. E. Grimes, who has been visiting relatives and friends at Salinas, Monterey Co., California, returned to her home, in this City, last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

The Miami Indians recently received $220,000 from the Government. This was their last payment, and now they must look out for themselves. Transporter.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Schiffbauer Brothers are receiving large supplies of plows, drills, etc., which they are offering at unprecedentally low prices.

AD:

LOOK HERE!

GROCERIES at bottom prices.

HARDWARE at COST.

PLOWS from $7 to $12.

GARDEN TOOLS at COST.

FRESH GROCERIES are received daily.

CALL on Schiffbauer Bro's., who are agents for the celebrated J. I. Case & Co's., Eclipse and Agitator Separators and mounted and down Powers and Steam Engines.

Agents for James Leffell Water wheels, Globes and Penstocks. A cordial invitation is extended to all. Respectfully, SCHIFFBAUER BRO'S

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Charlie Coombs dropped into our sanctum quite unexpectedly last week. He holds cases on the Capitol and is now paying a visit to his mother and friends in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. W. E. Chenoweth was very dangerously sick several days of the past week with neuralgia of the stomach, but we are pleased to say he is now recovering from the attack.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

C. C. Holland, Esq., was absent from the city a few days the past week, on professional business, in the northwest portion of the county. Chris is a live young attorney.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Major L. J. Miles, the genial agent of the Osage and Kaw Indians, was in the city last week and favored the TRAVELER with a visit.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

We are pleased to see Capt. Scott on our streets again. He reports his sheep as doing first- class out in Harper, but will not attempt to drive them through to his ranch, south of town, till the grass is plenty.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

The Stanton Bros. sold out their Livery business to A. Fairclo, and gave possession to the purchaser on Saturday night last. We understand that the Stantons intend to return shortly to their former home at Oskaloosa, Iowa.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

At the school meeting held last Monday night it was decided to erect another permanent school building. Messrs. J. T. Shepard, T. H. McLaughlin, and L. Finley were appointed a committee to make estimates, select site, etc., to report at an adjourned meeting to be held Feb. 28th, 1882, at 7 p.m.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

One of the old habitues of the city put in an appearance last Monday in our sanctum, in the person of Col. O. P. Johnson, whom many of our citizens will remember with pleasure. O. P. Johnson has been traveling around for Uncle Sam, in various portions of the northern States and Territories as scout, etc., but is as accomplished as ever.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Jake Musgrove, of South Haven, shipped the other day from that little village 100,000 pounds of corn to the Territory, two cars of cattle, and three cars of grain north, and it wasn't a good day for shipping either. Ex.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

We learn that Mrs. Frank Denton, a former resident of Bolton, who moved to Winfield last spring, has removed back to her old home in Boltonpreferring the salubrious air of her rural home to the refined atmosphere of our county "hub."

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

The following are the names of pupils neither absent nor tardy during the last school month: Ella Wilson, Hattie Sipes, Dean McIntire, Etta Wilson, Emma Pettit, Willie Fleming, Morse Hutchison. SUSIE HUNT, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Having lost several of their school buildings by fire, the Creeks desire to cede 175,000 acres of their reservation to the Government, to obtain means to increase their educational facilities. Secretary Kirkwood recommends that the expenditure of $3,000 for surveys be authorized. Transporter.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

We take pleasure in calling attention to the new "ad" of Mr. L. H. Teets in this week's TRAVELER. Mr. Teets has opened up a Real Estate office, two doors north of the Central Avenue House, and invites all wishing to buy or sell real estate to give him a call. Read his special notices in this issue.

AD:

MONEY & REAL ESTATE.

I have opened up an office for the transaction of Real Estate Business and hope by fair dealing to merit a share of your patronage. I will buy and sell

Real Estate on Commission,

AND ALSO HAVE

Money to Loan

at lowest rates BIG GLOB OF INK COMES NEXT cordial invitation is extended to all to come and see me at my place of businesstwo doors north of the Central Avenue Hotel,

ARKANSAS CITY, KANSAS.

LEWIS H. TEETS.

Those wishing money should call and see LEWIS H. TEETS.

WANTED. 500 farms to sell on commission. Lewis H. Teets.

I do a general Real Estate Business. Lewis H. Teets.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

We received a pleasant call from Ed. Haight, our energetic and popular County Surveyor last week. He was en route for home, via Salt City, at which place he had some surveying to do. He had been surveying down on the line, and from what he said, we presume had played smash with some old-time land marks.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Geo. Rice, who was taken in the act of burglarizing O. F. Godfrey's billiard hall last week, had a preliminary examination, and was bound over to the next term of Court, which he is now awaiting in the Winfield jail. He felt his disgraceful position very keenly, we should judge, for when last seen he was playing a mouth organ for the balance of the birds in the cage to dance to.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Cowley County has 118 teachers employed the present winter, and but three cases of unpleasantness have come to our hearing. One of these, the teacher was dismissed for whipping a scholar; another was dismissed because he would not agree to whip his scholars. His patrons were evidently from Posy Co., Indiana, and doubtless related to the Means family, who thought that where there was "no lickin there was no larnin." The third district must have some Irish settlers in it, as they had a little "Donney-Brook Fair," growing out of a love affair.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Cowley County has the two oldest living members of the Supreme Court of Kansas. Judge James Christian, of Arkansas City, is the oldest member; J. Marion Alexander, of Winfield, is the second. They were both admitted at Lecompton the same day in December, 1855, the first day the court was organized. Samuel D. Le Compt was Chief Justice, Rush, Elmore, Saunders, and W. Johnson, associate Justices. Noel Eccleson, Clerk; and Andrew J. Isaacs, United States Attorney. On the same day was admitted R. R. Reed, Marcus J. Parrott, Edmund Brierley. But three of the above named gentlemen are living: Judge Christian, Judge Le Compt, and Col. Alexander.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. C. H. Sylvester, who for two years, has been reading law in the office of Messrs. Hazelton & Provis, was admitted to the bar of the Circuit Court this week. "Herb" will, before many years, be a prominent light in the legal fraternity, and wherever he may "tack up his shingle," will prove a valuable member to society, and an honor to the profession he has adopted. Boscobel (Wisconsin) Dial.

We, in common with the host of friends "Herb" made here during his sojourn of two years, as our School Principal, congratulate him upon his success, and hope that wherever he tacks up the "shingle" aforesaid, he may achieve distinction. Our bashfulness prevents any suggestions as to the advantages possessed by Arkansas City as a place for location.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Mr. W. E. Malaley, of the Indian Territory, is branching out in the cattle business. He has purchased the open "A" brand of horses from Jim Hamilton. He will purchase a few jacks and go into the mule-raising business, as well as long-horns. There is money in the mule business as surely as there is in the cattle business on this range.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

The following pupils in the Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City Schools were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Ella Pettit, Clara Ford, Annie Wagstaff, Maggie Ford, Minnie Wilson, Belle Johnson, Charlie Rarick, Henry Mott, James White, Flora Kreamer.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Messrs. C. D. Marshall & Co. are making vast improvements in their livery stables on Fifth Avenue in the way of repairing and refixing, the erection of a spacious carriage house, and last but not least the laying on of water to both barns and also to their stock yard. This firm has plenty of stock and is determined to run an establishment that will compare favorably with anything in the West.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Hunnewell will on the 6th day of March, 1882, vote to instruct the city council, of that city, as to the issuance of the bonds of that city in the sum of fifty-eight hundred dollars, to fund the outstanding scrip indebtedness of the city. The council repudiates sixteen thousand dollars at the same meeting, then orders an election of 5,800 more. That's business if they can make it work. Caldwell Post.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Our old friend, Jake Musgrove, accompanied by Mr. Newcome, favored us with a call last week. These gentlemen intend to shortly engage in the mercantile business, in Salt City, and were in the city last week for the purpose of purchasing lumber for a store building. Jake is a first-rate businessman, and makes a success of everything he undertakes. We congratulate our Salt City friends upon the acquisition of this firm.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Spring Meeting of Stockmen.

Notice is hereby given that the annual spring meeting of Stockmen on the Cherokee Strip, will be held in Caldwell, Kansas, on Wednesday, March 1st, 1882, at 10 o'clock, a.m., for the purpose of making arrangements for the spring round up and to transact such other business as may advance the stock interests of this section.

By order, S. S. BURCHFIELD, Chairman.

R. F. CRAWFORD, Sec'y., Caldwell, Kas., Jan. 24th, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

A. C. Schools.

HISTORY, A: J. W. Warren, 97; Emma Theaker, 93.5; F. C. McLaughlin, 96; Sarah Randall, 91.

HISTORY, B: Alvan Sankey, 98; Hannah Gilbert, 91; S. E. Fitch, 93; W. C. Edwards, 90.

GRAMMAR, B: Hannah Gilbert, 93; J. W. Warren, 93; Etta McConn, 92; Jessie Norton, 93; Anna Bowen, 92; Alvan Sankey, 91; Cora Pettit, 90.

GEOGRAPHY, A: Alvan Sankey, 99.5; Charley Randall, 97.5; Fannie Peterson, 96.5; Jessie Norton, 95.5; Hannah Gilbert, 95; Joseph Bell, 93. C. T. ATKINSON, Teacher.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Creswell Township Officers.

The following shows the result of the election, held February 7th, 1882, for Township officers. There were 190 votes polled as follows.

TrusteeU. Spray, 189.

ClerkW. D. Mowry, 186.

TreasurerW. M. Sleeth, 188.

JusticesI. H. Bonsall, 179. T. McIntire, 166.

ConstablesG. H. McIntire, 197. J. J. Breene, 136.

There were some scattering votes cast for different parties, but there being only one ticket in the field it is needless to publish them.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 15, 1882.

Kaw Agency.

During a recent trip to the Indian Territory, it was our good fortune to stay overnight at Kaw Agency, where we had the pleasure of meeting several old friends, as well as an opportunity for making a number of very agreeable and new acquaintances both ladies and gentlemen. It was also our good fortune to attend the evening exercises at the Mission House upon the invitation of the Superintendent, D. D. Keeler, who, with Mrs. Keeler as matron, and Mrs. Annuals as assistant matron, and teachers Miss Spence, Mrs. Curns, Miss Mattie Wright, and Miss Addie Hays, form a corps of workers that in their special department it would be hard to excel. The exercises consisted of reading and singing by members of the Mission School, and the evident pleasure taken by the children in the same spoke volumes for their perseverance and interest in their studies awakened by the untiring efforts of those in charge of their general welfare, both mental and physical. We hope, for the sake of the little ones, that Mr. and Mrs. Keeler may long remain in the good work they are so nobly doing.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882. Editorial Page.

A NEW TOWN.

GEUDA SPRINGS, KANSAS.

What Pluck and Enterprise Will Do.

The Medical Qualities of the Springs.

The Salt Works.

[Correspondence of K. C. Journal.]

HUNNEWELL, KAS., FEB. 9. As your valuable paper, although published in Missouri, is eminently a Kansas paper, I take it for granted that any items of interest from our State will be acceptable to your numerous readers.

We have a new town springing up here in Sumner and Cowley counties, for the county line runs through the town, that bids fair to make quite a sensation in the next twelve months.

I mean the new town of Geuda Springs, formerly Salt City. The new town is springing up like magic. Already some twenty-five new houses have been built within the past few months, and some fifty others contracted to be finished by the 1st of April. A $10,000 stock company has been formed to erect a large and commodious hotel. The foundation for the new sanatarium, a large, three story stone building, which is designed as a hotel, bath house, etc., for invalids has been laid, and a number of other large buildings will be commenced soon. The medical qualities of the water have been thoroughly tested, and is pronounced the best in the country. A number of patients who have tested these waters and those of Eureka Springs, Ark., pronounce those of Geuda Springs far superior to the former.

One of the most singular features of these springs is the fact that there are several distinct springs; all large and affording an abundance of water, not four feet distant one from the other, and all of different mineral qualities.

The famous Sumner County salt works are here, and in a few years the manufacture of salt at this place will be an important industry.

About 160 yards from the springs is a large salt spring. The proprietors have put a large iron tube in this, which throws the water up some six feet. It is the intention to fix here for a regular plunge bath, where the visitor can take a genuine ocean swim.

Just in front of the springs, and some fifty yards distant, commences a beautiful lake, which extends for a mile and a half, where the pleasure of boat riding can be indulged in to the fullest extent. A beautiful carriage drive extends along the lake; trees are being set out on both sides of the drive. In fact, no place in the country offers so many inducements for either the invalid or the pleasure seeker as this.

Heretofore there have been no accommodations of any kind, but now numerous cottages are being built. Dr. Perry has just finished ten handsome cottage houses, which are all spoken for. He will build ten more at once. These, with the new hotels and other accommodations, it is thought, will be ample to accommodate the vast number of visitors who are expected at the springs the coming season. Hon. C. R. Mitchell, who has had the direct management of the improvement, has been indefatigable in his labors, and his work now begins to show.

Of course we, of Sumner County, are proud of anything that adds to the wealth and prosperity of our county, and it is with no little pride that we hail the new town that is now springing up like magic in our midst. VERITAS.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Frank C. Wood was in town yesterday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Geo. Cunningham now occupies his new store room.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

E. J. Fitch was on our streets several days of last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Skates were in big demand on Monday and Tuesday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

L. C. Norton shipped three carloads of fat cattle to Kansas City last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mrs. T. C. Bird returned from a several months visit to Iowa, last Friday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mr. W. E. Chenoweth is much better and his physicians entertain hopes of his recovery.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Sleigh riding was indulged in by several of our gallants on Monday and Tuesday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The new tin shop has permanently located at Wilson's old stand on west Summit street.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The well at the Otoe Agency has already been sunk to a depth of 80 feet without obtaining water.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

R. E. Fitzpatrick is putting in a stone foundation for a residence in the north part of town, near the foundry.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Dr. Wells now languishes in jail for writing prescriptions at variance with the prohibitory statute now in force.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Charles Penny, a brakeman on the Santa Fe road, was killed at Wichita Monday night last while coupling cars.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

We understand Perley Davis retires from the control of the Arkansas City House this week. John E. Williams resumes.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mr. Knatt, of Chautauqua Co., has come into Cowley with his flock of 4,500 sheep. He will locate on the line west of town.

NOTE: THE NAME "KNATT" HARD TO READ! COULD BE WRONG!

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The construction train on the Santa Fe road was down last Monday to perform work along the line. Mr. Cline was in charge.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

C. M. Scott says he came out all right this time on chartering special trains on the railroad, but he don't want to follow it for a livelihood.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mr. Pierson, of Illinois, a large sheep owner, was here last week to look out a location for a ranche. He will probably locate east of Dexter.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Read R. L. Balveat's stray notice in this issue.

STRAYED!

One three-year-old bay mare colt, with bald face and rope around her neck, strayed from my farm, in Bolton Township, Feb. 12th, 1882. Any information as to her whereabouts will be liberally rewarded. R. L. BALVEAT, Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Frank J. Hess, after a sojourn of several months in Philadelphia and other cities to the East, returned to this place last week, to make it his future home.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Maj. Woodin, of the Otoe Agency, was in town last week, and received and shipped to the Territory a large quantity of personal and government freight.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The roof of Mr. McAllister's residence in the west part of town took fire yesterday morning, but was fortunately extinguished before serious damage was done.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mr. Ira Barnett has just returned from a trip to Kansas City, whither he went to superintend the sale of four carloads of hogs he shipped from the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mr. W. F. Benedict is still in a critical condition, but he is better than he was this time last week. We sincerely hope that convalescence has set in.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Geo. Rice will spend five years at the Reform School for the burglary upon Godfrey's billiard hall in this city, so said Judge Torrance at an adjourned term of Court last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The mounted scrapers, for use in filling the gravel contracts with the A. T. & S. F., were received yesterday by the Schiffbauer Bros. They are a novel but effective looking craft.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

We, last week, forwarded copies of the TRAVELER to the Historical Society at Topeka, in response to request stating that the numbers desired contained matters of valuable historical interest.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Major A. C. Williams, of Pawnee Agency, came up from the Territory last Saturday and will spend at least a week in the city visiting his daughter, Mrs. F. Schiffbauer, and other relatives.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The Water wheel at V. M. Ayres' mill was safely lowered into position on Thursday last and the work of preparing the machinery and interior of the mill is being rapidly pushed forward. It is hoped all will be ready inside of two weeks from this date.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

We received a pleasant call from Mr. Chas. Longfeldt, of East Bolton, last Saturday, and had the pleasure of taking his subscription for the coming year. Mr. Longfeldt is an energetic and prosperous farmer, and the permanent improvements upon his place in the way of good dwelling house and other buildings are evidence of the same.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The bulbs of the buffalo grass have been green all winter and are now ready to burst out. Sheep pick a good living on the prairies already, and cattle are getting green feed in the timber along the streams.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Newman, of Weld, Maine, and Mrs. Skidder, of Emporia, left on the cars last Thursday for the latter place. They have been visiting relatives and friends in this city for several weeks past.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Another train of Cheyenne Indians was up last week after flour. The aborigines must have their squaw cake and hoggy meat, even though they have to haul it themselves. Uncle Sam pays them for hauling it however.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Someone stole 240 sheep from Nathan Blevins, near Sand Springs, Monday night of last week. Mr. Blevins offers $200 for the return of the sheep and capture of the thief, or thieves. No trace of them has yet been obtained. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Rumors are afloat to the effect that our old townsman, James I. Mitchell, has "struck it rich" in the mining country of Colorado. While such reports, as a rule, are far from reliable, we sincerely hope in this case that they are founded on facts.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The oyster supper given by the ladies of the Presbyterian church, at the City Hotel last Thursday evening, was a grand success and well attended. The clear proceeds amounted to over $80; and will be applied to the incidental debt of the church. The ladies, by their energy and hard work, well deserved the success they achieved.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The new buildings at the Red Rock Agency are rapidly approaching completion. The offices, commissary, and workshops are completed and the next two weeks will witness the finishing touches upon the Dormitory, Schoolhouse, and the Agent's house. Major Woodin and his family have been living in tents and a permanent house will be an agreeable change.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

The storm of Saturday night, Sunday, and Monday is one of the hardest storms we have experienced for years. There was a similar one last year, but this is equally as bad. First sleet, then snow, then sleet again. Cattle on the range can neither browse nor eat the tall grass on account of the ice on it, and stock of all kind that is unprotected will suffer terribly.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

We acknowledge the receipt of a tasty invitation to attend a grand Banquet and Ball, to be given by the citizens of Caldwell, on March 2nd, 1882, in honor of the meeting of Stockmen of the Cherokee Strip. Caldwell people know how to do the right thing in the right way, and the above entertainment will doubtless make many friends for Caldwell among the Stockmen. We hope a right good time may be had.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Dr. Minthorn, of Ponca Agency, and Dr. Woodward, of Red Rock Agency, assisted by Mr. Satterthwait, clerk at Ponca Agency, and Peter Primeaux and Hairy Bear, a Ponca chief, successfully removed a tumor from the face of White Eagle, head chief of the Poncas, last week. Also, Dr. Minthorn, assisted by Jas. Reuben, interpreter and teacher at Oakland Agency, and Henry Rivers, a Nez Perce Indian, amputated an arm for a Nez Perce Indian last Saturday. Ether was given in both cases and both are doing well.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

J. L. Huey and wife, Mr. Ordway and wife, Wm. McConn and lady, Stacy Matlack, Major Searing, Mr. Ingersoll, Conductor James Miller, Samuel Hoyt, Michael Harkins, H. P. Farrar, C. M. Scott, H. Godehard, Wm. Speers, Mr. Roberts, Chas. Hutchins, Chas. Howard, W. Wolfe, S. Longdorff, Herman Wyckoff, Pink Fouts, Mr. Abbott, Chas. Holloway, and J. M. Bell, were among the number who braved the storm and went to Winfield on the special train to hear the Governor lecture on temperance last Sunday.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

In spite of the fearful storm, the excursion train to Winfield last Sunday left on time with about sixty passengers to attend the temperance lecture by J. P. St. John. After they had taken possession of the hall, they were informed that the Committee of Arrangements had decided not to have the Governor speak until evening; but when the Governor learned that the Arkansas City delegation had arrived, he determined to speak, and before he reached the hall the seats were all filled and many were standing. Those who were fortunate enough to attend the lecture will never forget it and much more never regret it. The lecture was a clear, strong, able argument, and delivered in a very able manner, the effect of which was plain to be seen from the many handkerchiefs that were brought to the faces of even strong men. Gov. St. John is an orator; and his reputation is spreading throughout the whole land.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Theaker School.

Report for the month ending Feb. 10, 1882.

No. of names of pupils enrolled, boys, 20; girls, 17; total 37. Average daily attendance, boys 16; girls 13; total 29. Average daily absence, boys, 2; girls, 2; total 4. Average daily membership, boys, 2; girls, 6; total, 8. Percentage of daily attendance, boys, 80; girls, 81. Percentage of absence, boys, 10; girls, 13. Percentage of non-membership, boys, 10; girls, 6; making a percentage of 100 for each, boys and girls. General deportment good. The following named pupils were present each day during the month: Gramlie [?] Armstrong, Alice Scott, Agnes Collinson, and John D. Armstrong; also those who received meritorious praise for their punctuality in school: Annie Pruett, Maggie Armstrong, Cora Milton, Ella Johnson, and Addison Annis. J. B. CURRY, Teacher.

[SCOTT MANUFACTURING COMPANY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Scott Manufacturing Company.

THE WAY TO INCREASE OUR MANUFACTURING INTERESTS. A new company was incorporated here yesterday under the title of the Scott Manufacturing Company of Baltimore City, with a capital stock of $40,000, whose business will be the manufacturing of hardware specialties, including apple and peach parers, egg beaters, ice-creepers, peach pitters, etc. The incorporators are Samuel G. De Cook, Wm. G. Atkinson, R. P. Scott, J. Glenn Cook, and Charles H. Wier. The Scott Manufacturing Company has been in existence for several years, doing an extensive business at Newark, New Jersey, and their wares command a ready sale throughout the country. Recognizing the need of such a factory in this city, several enterprising businessmen of this city prevailed upon the company to remove to this city, and agreed to purchase all the machinery. Mr. R. P. Scott, after whom the factory was originally named, and who has controlled it, is manager of the factory, and he will bring with him a number of skillful mechanics. There will be seventy-five men employed in the factory, and the number increased as may be found necessary. This is the first and only factory of the kind in the State, and as there has always been a large demand for the materials which the company proposes to manufacture, the incorporators are sanguine of success. Mr. Cook was in Newark yesterday superintending the removal of the machinery, and it is expected that work will be begun during the coming week.

From The Baltimore (Md.) American.

The "Mr. R. P. Scott" mentioned is our young friend, "Rob," who visited his brother, C. M. Scott, at this place when they hunted buffalo on the Salt Fork. "Rob" was a mere boy then, but now ranks as one of the leading manufacturers of the East.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Hilary Holtby, of Pleasant Valley Township, was taken before Judge Gans, Monday, and examined as to his sanity. The jury found him insane, and that he should be sent to the asylum. He was taken Sunday morning, and his insane fancies, all of a mild type, are queer. He says he is "inspired" and claims he has power second only to God; that this is the Garden of Eden and that all property is common. He has appointed Mr. Browning and Mr. Teter as superintendents to assist him in running the garden. He says God told him that Garfield is the only American in Heaven. Another of his hobbies is the invention of perpetual motion and power over animals.

It seems that these communistic ideas were first imparted to him by a couple of cranky preachers who infested Pleasant Valley some time ago and taught a kind of doctrine in which cures were effected by the laying on of hands, men were given power over animals, and doing away with the singular right of property. The idea seems to have so taken hold of his mind to the exclusion of everything else, and finally dethroned his reason.

[SOME BUSINESS NOTICES.]

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

STOVES! STOVES!!

A Full line, latest and most elegant designs, now on the road for the New Tin Shop.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

TOWN LOTS.

A list of the Town lots owned by C. M. Scott can be seen at C. R. Mitchell's office.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

Farm, Field, Flower, and Vegetable Seeds of every description in bulk at G. W. Cunningham's.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

LIFE INSURANCE.

The U. B. Mutual Aid Society, Secured by Assessment Basis of $21,000,000.00. Debt Losses Paid to January 1st, 1882, $6,600,000.00. Assets over and above liabilities, $165,679.27.

Before getting your life insured, please call and see what advantage you gain in our Company over others. Safeness and Cheapness Combined.

Office at Creswell Bank.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

LENGTHY AD BY T. H. McLAUGHLIN...

T. H. McLaughlin will sell you raspberry and blackberry preserves at 15 cents per pound. Currant jelly 15 cents per pound. Apple butter, in bulk, 12-1/2 cents per lb. Tenderloin mince meat 12-1/2 cents per lb. Gallon apples 40 cents per can. We have nice Prunelles [?]. Figs, Oranges, Lemons, Green Apples, etc. We have Little Neck Clams, Lobsters, Sardines, Salmon, Codfish Balls, Canned Corned Beef, etc. We can sell you a better Tea for less money than anybody. Our roasted Coffee, in bulk, is simply elegant. You will want to clean house soonbuy one of our scrubbing machines. The bottom is knocked out of flourWe have it at the lowest prices. Buy a glass oil can and save money. Try Cousin Joe Finecut Tobacco at 65 cents per pound.

Best quality of Corn Syrup, 60 cents per gallon. Best quality of Maple Syrup $1.10 per gal. Beehive Syrup for cooking 55 cents per gallon. Choice Sauer-Kraut. Try our Rio Coffee, 8 lbs. for $1.00. We have nice Pitted Cherries and Alden Dried Raspberries. We have white cherries, egg-plums, greengages, blue plums, monarch strawberries, blackberries, blue- berries, raspberries, gooseberries, etc., canned.

In canned vegetables, we have Lima Beans, succotash, Yarmouth Sugar Corn, Green Peas, Early June Peas, Tomatoes, etc. If you want anything else, ask for it, we have it.

Respectfully, T. H. McLAUGHLIN.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

PUBLIC SALE.

A BOILER ENGINE AND FERRY BOAT will be sold to the highest and best bidder, at Public Auction, for cash, at Pawnee Agency, on Tuesday, the 21st day of March, 1882.

E. H. BOWMAN, U. S. Indian Agent.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

SAFE FOR SALE. A good medium sized, fire proof, safe for sale by Schiffbauer Bros.

Arkansas City Traveler, February 22, 1882.

BIRD CAGES at the Notion Store.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, March 1, 1882. Front Page.

Arkansas City will erect another school building this spring.

[EDITORIAL COLUMN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

The Supreme Court has decided that the portion of the prohibitory law providing a fine for drunkenness is unconstitutional, on the ground that the title of the act does not cover the provision.

[DR. H. L. WELLSWINFIELD.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882. Editorial Page.

Dr. H. L. Wells.

We received a postal card last week from Dr. Wells, of Winfield, who is accused of prescribing liquors contrary to law, in which he appears to be somewhat exercised about our saying he "languished in jail."

We thought we had reasonable grounds for making this statement in the following extract from the Winfield Courant of the 20th ult.

"Dr. H. L. Wells' bond which was placed at $800, was this morning reduced to $500, but being unable to give even this amount, he surrendered himself to the sheriff and was placed in jail."

We have since learned he gave bond and was not placed in jail at all. His case will probably come up at the April term of court.

This man by his talk seemed to think it entirely out of our province to notice his case, but for the special benefit of himself and all like him, we will say that we uphold no one in defying or violating the laws, and the fact of his being a Republican and a county official makes the violation so much the worse in our sight. If half the alleged charges against this man be true, he should be punished like any other violator of the law.

[INDIANS: OPPOSED TO VEST'S BILL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882. Editorial Page.

Opposed to Vest's Bill.

The Senate Committee on Territories heard a delegation from the five Nations in the Indian Territory in opposition to Vest's bill for the establishment of a U. S. Court in the Territory. The committee invited them to place the agitation in the form of a bill.

In connection with the bill to establish a United States Court in the Indian Territory, now pending before the Senate committee, it is said that the Indians of that Territory regard the measure with suspicion; that they suspect it to be a scheme tending to the opening up of their country to settlement and to deprive them eventually of their lands. To remove this fear and at the same time afford protection to life and property in that Territory, the chairman of the committee, today, proposed to the representatives of the Indians that they assist to the extension of the United States criminal laws only over their Territory. This proposition was received with apparent favor, and it is probable that a substitute for the pending bill will be framed providing for the punishment for criminal offenses in the Indian Territory, but leaving all civil questions to be settled as now arranged among the Indians.

[COMMUNICATION FROM NORTH CRESWELL.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

NORTH CRESWELL, February 26th, 1882.

Mr. Editor:

Wishing to see your valuable paper prosper is my reason for contributing to its columns, and while important happenings are scarce, yet will give the best news possible.

Wheat is flourishing nicely, in this section, under the influence of the moist weather, and many of our farmers are busily plowing for spring crops, the ground being in excellent condition for stirring.

Henry Hanson is not through gathering corn yet; wish all could raise that much.

Preaching at Lonestar last Sabbath by Rev. Falkner, of the M. P. Church, did not come off as announced.

Our section of country is on the improve, and Mr. Wood has sold a quarter section of land to two newcomers, who are living on and improving the same. We hope the time is not far distant when every quarter will be occupied.

Three pedestrians passed through the other day headed for your city claiming to be a Doctor, a Dentist, and an Editor. While we need good farmers more than anything else, yet all are welcome to Cowley.

Large numbers of wild geese have been flying over the past week.

John Smalley has just finished enclosing a spacious pasture with wire.

The flourishing town of Geuda is still in sight from which I conclude it is not fledged enough to fly yet. WELLWISHER.

[REPORT FROM ROSE VALLEY SCHOOL, DISTRICT NO. 34.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Report of Rose Valley School, Dist. No. 34, for the month ending Feb. 28th, 1882.

Number of visitors, 2.

Names of those neither absent nor tardy: Emma Locke, Calvin Burt, Walter Burt, Willie Maxwell.

Names of those perfect in deportment: Maggie Guyer, Nannie Maxwell, Walter Burt, Willie Maxwell, Cal. Burt, John Warren, Willie Perdy, John Sankey, Bettie Maxwell, Roscoe Hamilton, Aaron Purdy, Hiram Tucker.

Names of those in the A grade who received an average of 80, or more, grading on a scale of 100: Ollie Kirkpatrick, 80; Maggie Guyer, 96; Aaron Purdy, 90; John Drennan, 91; Howard Maxwell, 88; Lillie Purdy, 95; John Sankey, 88; Theo. Tucker, 89.

Grade B, averaging 75 or more: Nannie Maxwell, 93; Hiram Tucker, 76; Hannah Drennan, 94; Willie Purdy, 86; Calvin Burt. 78; B. Kirkpatrick, 80; William Maxwell, 100.

SADIE E. PICKERING, Teacher.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

BIRTH. County Attorney Jennings smiles: It's a girl.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Saloons are running in full blast at Caldwell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

John F. Williams has resumed control of the Arkansas City House.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

A carload of Early Rose Potatoes on the road for the Stone Grocery.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

BIRTH. Born to Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, of this city, on Monday last, a daughter.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

BIRTH. Born to Mr. and Mrs. James O. Kelsey, of this city, on Monday last, a daughter.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Stacy Matlack is absent in Colorado on business connected with the shipment of produce to that State.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. T. J. Gilbert, of Kaw Agency, is in town replacing the Lures and Penates lost in the fire last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Miss Alma Dixon has returned to town, and will shortly resume her position with A. A. Newman & Co.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

We are pleased to learn that Rev. W. A. Lindsey, who has been seriously ill for the past week, is rapidly convalescing.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Bitter Creek, composed of one store, a Post Office and hotel, has a broom factory. They are keeping up to Winfield on the latter.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

The colored men from the Cherokee Nation sold eleven head of ponies to Ferguson & McIntire last week. They found ready sale for them.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

A. C. Wells returned to this city last week from Colorado. He'll try down South next time, if he don't make up his mind to stay in Arkansas City.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

A. A. Newman & Co. have fixed up a neat cash room in their store, and we understand Miss Gardiner will soon take charge of the books of that firm.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Perley J. Davis has vacated the Arkansas City House, and now resides one door north of the harness shop, where he will be pleased to take in a few boarders.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

All kinds of Garden Seeds in bulk can be obtained by calling upon T. H. McLaughlin. Those intending to make Gardens should call and make early selections.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. W. S. Chandler and wife, who have been residing in this city for several months, left last Friday for Caldwell, where Mr. Chandler intends to open a gun shop.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Our young friend, E. H. Roland, has gone to Sedan to take charge of a store there for Sen. J. C. Long. Ed. is a bright young man and is likely to succeed. Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

The physicians who were arrested the other day for violating the prohibition law in prescribing, will await the April term of court with a good deal of anxiety. Courier.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Ground has been broken upon Ninth Street, in the northwest part of town, for the erecting of a Free Methodist church building. We hope it may be completed at an early date.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

A literary entertainment for the benefit of the Lyceum will be given at the Guthrie schoolhouse in Bolton Township on Tuesday eve., March 7th, 1882, at 7:30 p.m. Admission 10 cents.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Messrs. Worthley, Beals, and Reed, who have been visiting friends in this city for several weeks past, started on Monday by wagon for Arkansas, whither they go with the intention of investing in young stock.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. Helm, one of the cattle kings of the Indian Territory, whose ranch used to be on the North Ford of Canadian, a short distance above the proposed town site of Oklahoma, was in town last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

BIRTH. Mr. and Mrs. Kendall F. Smith, of Ponca Agency, were made happy a few days since by the advent of a little girl stranger. The little Miss, we are pleased to say, makes herself quite "to home," and is getting along nicely.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. and Mrs. Ordway, who have been staying in the city for several weeks, left on the train yesterday for their home in Iowa. Mr. Ordway thinks highly of the country and we should not be surprised if he should return.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Cal. Ferguson, of the Southern Express Co., was in town last week on business connected with his mail route. While here he purchased a herd of ponies, which he drove to Winfield, and we presume there, offered them for sale.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. M. Stanton and wife, L. P. Stanton, wife, and children, and Ben W. Stanton took the train last week for Oskaloosa, Iowa, their former home. While we are sorry to lose them as citizens, we wish them every success in their new location.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mission School Burnt.

Intelligence reaches us that the Mennonite Mission School, at Cheyenne Agency, was destroyed by fire last week, and that four children were smothered in the flames, all efforts at rescue being abortive. Of the unfortunate victims, one was a child of Rev. Henry, principal of the school; a little daughter of James Morrison, beef contractor at Reno; a child of H. Hansels; and an Indian child. One other child was rescued from the building, and now lies in a very precarious condition. The fire broke out about 9 o'clock at night, and is said to have originated from a defective flue.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. A. A. Wiley, one of the TRAVELER's oldest friends, and a prominent stockman, favored us with a call last Saturday, he being en route for Winfield from his ranch in the Territory, south of this city, where he is wintering some 1,200 head of cattle, which he reports as in fine condition. He also states that stock have not been injured to any extent by the late storm, which was much lighter down South than with us; in fact, it gave no further trouble than covering up the feed for a couple of days.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

We call attention to the new "ad" of Stedman Bros., in this issue from which it will be seen they keep a stock of general hardware, gun material, ammunition, etc., and are also prepared to do every description of repairs to guns, pistols, etc. All work is warranted, and we speak knowingly when we say they are thorough mechanics. Give them a call. Store three doors north of Creswell Bank.

AD:

STEDMAN BRO'S.

Keep a Large Stock of

HARDWARE,

GUN MATERIAL AND AMMUNITION.

EVERY DESCRIPTION OF GUNSMITHING AND REPAIRS

Done to Order, and all work WARRANTED.

Store Three Doors North of Creswell Bank, Arkansas City, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Dr. Bird, the resident physician at Kaw Agency, passed through town, en route for that place, last Thursday, upon his return from Illinois, where he had been spending a two week's vacation. The Dr. is a graduate of the Cincinnati Medical College, a genial and well posted companion, and a gentleman whom we will always be pleased to welcome to our sanctum.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Mr. H. C. McDorman writes a very interesting article, from Dexter, to the State Board of Agriculture, on raising corn. He says with a yield of 30 bushels per acre, the cost for raising is 11 cents per bushel; 50 bushels, 7-1/2 cents; 60 bushels, 5-1/2 cents. From one bushel of corn fed to a good grade of steers, he realizes five pounds of live beef; and from one bushel fed to hogs, he realizes ten pounds of live pork.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Charles Payson, who was sent to the Penitentiary from Winfield for crookedness in real- estate transactions, and pardoned by Gov. St. John, was recently announced to lecture in Florence. He delivered his lecture but failed to pay his hotel and other bills. Augusta Gazette.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Rev. D. Thompson and wife left last Monday for Garnett, Kansas, where they will probably stay a short time, and then go on to Monmouth, Illinois, at which place it is intended to reside for the future. Mr. Thompson has been a resident of this city for several years, and it is with regret we chronicle his departure.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

The S. P. U.'s, of South West Bolton, will hold their annual meeting in the Mercer Schoolhouse, on Saturday next, at which officers will be elected for the ensuing year. A large attendance of members is desired.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Peter Pearson returned to this city from St. Louis last Thursday, and says he has the largest stock of furniture, of every description, ever brought to the city, which for style, quality, and price, can't be beat.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

We are reliable informed that the building occupied by Houghton & Speers has been rented for one year to a gentleman from Kansas City, who will fit the same up in good style throughout and run as a billiard hall.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Jake Musgrove, that popular man that sells goods at South Haven, has just finished his large storeroom at Geuda Springs, where he intends opening up a large stock of goods next week. Go it Jake, there is nothing like enterprise. Hunnewell Independent.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Arkansas City has the best livery stable south of Wichita, in all respects, and don't you forget it. C. D. Marshall & Co., the proprietors, take pleasure in turning out good rigs, and their accommodations for taking care of stock, carriages, etc., are simply, perfect. Give them a call.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

DIED. It is with regret we record the death of our townsman, W. E. Chennoweth, who died at his residence in this city, last Friday evening, after an illness of about three weeks. At his request he was buried on the following day, at the cemetery in West Bolton, by the site of his first wife. The funeral sermon was preached (by request) by Rev. Laverty, at the M. E. Church in this city on Sunday last, and was listened to by a large and attentive congregation. The deceased leaves a widow and several children to mourn his loss.

NOTE: ARTICLE SAID CHENNOWETH. Earlier articles had "Chenoweth."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

The following is a list of letters remaining uncalled for in the post office at Arkansas City, Kansas, February 28, 1882.

FIRST COLUMN: Adams, A. P.; Allen, Lena; Adamas, James; Arnett, Sarah L.; Butts, James; Busch, Charles; Barnes, Willie D.; Brown, Alice E.; Bonwell, John R.; Biggs, George; Childress, Libby; Crossley, Grant; Coy, Dan.; Davis, Thomas J., Edwards, Judd; Fread, George; Goodwin, Samuel; Geer, Lee H.; Gilmore, Pat Henry, Gray, Henry C.; Gender, George H.; Goodrich, Samuel; Holman, Oliver; Hughes, E. S.; Hutto, John; Hamlin, James; Harader, D.; Hatfield, William; Johnson, Elliott; Johnson, Artemus; Kelsey, J. W.

SECOND COLUMN: Kimmerer, J. O.; Lee, G. W.; McKinley, F. E.; Metz, H. J.; Miller, A. N.; Miller, A. A.; Moore, William; Moore, R. H.; Miller, Morris T.; Priest, John; Perry, William; Pasko, E. L.; Phillips, Rose; Posey, James B.; Ray, William G.; Roberts, Jes; Roberts, Mary E.; Rogers, J. A.; Stewart, Jessie; Strout, F. W.; Scott, Amanda; Smith, John U.; Smith, W. H.; Stewert, Mattie A.; Snow, Stella; Sturgile, W. R.; Smedley, Samuel; Stilley, B. F.; Whitehall, J. C.; Welsch, William.

Any person calling for any of the above letters will please say "Advertised."

J. C. TOPLIFF, P. M.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Fire at Kaw Agency.

Shortly after 12 o'clock on the afternoon of Feb. 20th, 1882, the residence of Mr. T. J. Gilbert, government trader at the above Agency, was discovered to be on fire. The alarm was first given by an Indian, but almost before any efforts could be made to extinguish the flames, the roof was totally consumed, and the building being constructed of lumber and lined with wall paper, all efforts to control the devouring element proved useless on account of the rapid combustion, and the most that could be done was to attempt to save the household goods. In this, however, they were but partially successful as all the bed furniture and wearing apparel were consumed while the furniture that was saved was more or less damaged. Mr. Gilbert's estimated loss including building will reach somewhere in the neighborhood of $700.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Horticultural Society.

At a meeting of the citizens of Arkansas City and vicinity held at the White Church, on Feb. 11th, 1882, for the purpose of organizing a Horticultural Society, the following constitution and by laws were adopted.

CONSTITUTION.

ARTICLE I. This association shall be known as the Southern Cowley County Horticultural Society.

ARTICLE II. Its object shall be to obtain useful information from similar organizations and other sources upon the subjects of horticulture and agriculture, and disseminating such information among the people as far as practicable.

ARTICLE III. Any person may become a member of this society by paying a fee of twenty-five cents annually. Ladies may become honorary members free.

ARTICLE IV. Its officers shall consist of a president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer, who shall be elected at each annual meeting, by ballot, and shall hold their term of office one year, or until their successors are elected.

ARTICLE V. It shall hold annual meetings on the second Saturday of February and semi- annual meetings on the second Saturday of September, and called meetings at any other time the officers may deem it necessary.

ARTICLE VI. It shall provide (as soon as practicable) a library and add books and publications for the use of the society.

ARTICLE VII. It shall provide at each annual meeting a standing committee to be appointed by the President: 1st, on orchards; 2nd, vegetable gardening; 3rd, small fruit; 4th, forestry and hedges; 5th, agriculture; 6th, floriculture; 7th, etymology; 8th, nomenclature; 9th, quadrupeds. The said committee re required to report at each regular meeting and oftener if it is deemed necessary.

ARTICLE VIII. This constitution may be altered or amended at any regular meeting by a two-thirds vote of the members present.

BY-LAWS.

The following shall be the order of exercises for the society: 1st, reading of the minutes of previous meeting; 2nd, communications and correspondence; 3rd, reports of standing committees; 4th, reports of special committees; 5th, miscellaneous business; 6th, general discussions.

OFFICERS FOR 1882.

G. L. Kirkpatrick, President.

Dr. R. H. Reed, Vice President.

S. B. Adams, Treasurer.

T. C. Bird, Secretary.

The next meeting of the Society will be held at the White Church in Arkansas City on Saturday, March 2nd, at 2 o'clock p.m. T. C. BIRD, Secretary.

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

Pleasant View Jottings.

Prayer meeting every Thursday night at Pleasant View Schoolhouse.

The farmers are mostly busy with their spring work in this part of the county.

George Hegger, by the way, has made quite an improvement by putting in an addition to his house.

Owing to the inclemency of the weather, Rev. Mc.Cammy failed to fulfill his appointment at this place last Sunday.

J. A. Scott is having the rock hauled preparatory to building himself a new house.

A Mr. Jones has rented the Caldwell farm and contemplates trying the fertility of Kansas soil again. Mr. Jones moved recently from Missouri to this county.

The sociable at Mr. Krepps last Wednesday night was largely attended and a general good time was had, although the night was somewhat inclement.

Addison and Emmett Annis returned last Friday evening from a sixteen days trip to Shawneetown, Indian Territory. Emmett got crippled by the wagon-wheel running over his foot, and Addison was captivated by the Indian police, but nothing very serious from the effects of either.

NOTE: FIRST TIME, THEY SHOWED EMMET...LATER: EMMETT.

Probably some of my readers would like to know where Pleasant View is. I will say that it is to be found in School district No. 36, commonly known as Theaker school district. It will hereafter be known as Pleasant View on account of its scenery.

LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.

[SOME BUSINESS NOTICES.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

WILL TRADE

Several Residences and Lots in town for a small farm.

Inquire of D. E. Sifford.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 1, 1882.

T. H. McLaughlin sells Garden Seeds in Bulk, including Golden Wax Beans, Black Wax and early Red Valentine Beans, Large Marrow fat, Dan O'Rourke and Early Kent Peas; Georgia Rattlesnake, Ice cream and Orange Watermelon Seeds; Cantaloupe and Green Nutmeg Musk Melons. Cucumber, Squash and Pumpkin Seeds. Tobacco Seeds; Sweet Corn; Top and Bottom onion sets, and onion sets and nearly everything else; and what we do not keep we will send and get for those wishing it. Expect a carload of Northern Early Rose Potatoes this week. T. H. McLaughlin.

SKIPPED BIG AD PRINTED IN MARCH 8, 1882, ISSUE FOR THE "MUTUAL AID SOCIETY, U. B., OF PENNSYLVANIA...PRINCIPAL OFFICE LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA. ARKANSAS CITY AGENT: FRANK J. HESS, CRESWELL BANK, COWLEY CO., KANSAS. PURPOSE: DEATH BENEFITS...PAYMENT $8.00 AT FIRST FOLLOWED BY $5 ANNUALLY AFTER THAT FOR FOUR YEARS; AND $2 ANNUALLY DURING LIFE, WITH PRO RATA MORTALITY ASSESS MENT. HEIRS TO RECEIVE $1,000. [BASIC TERMS: THEY ALSO HAD OTHERS FOR MORE OR LESS PAYMENTS/BENEFITS.]

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

W. G. Kay is absent in Texas buying stock.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Gen. Jorden, the Ponca Agent, was in town yesterday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. W. F. Benedict, we are pleased to state, still continues to improve.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. D. A. McIntire goes to Geuda Springs to engage in the livery business.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

John Keck has purchased Amassa Speed's interest in the livery business at the hub.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. A. A. Newman starts for New York, today, to lay in his spring stock of goods.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Geo. Keokuk, son of the old Sac & Fox Chief Keokuk, was in town Monday last.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. Frank Schiffbauer is again in the city after a lengthened sojourn in the land of "Lo."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

It is reported that Frank Williams has sold out his hotel in Kansas City and will return to Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Capt. Will Whiting with several of the Winfield boys were here Sunday. They had visited Ponca.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

O. A. Beeson, of Caldwell, will locate at Geuda Springs and engage in the book and stationery trade.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

J. P. Musselman, of Grouse Creek, dropped into our office last Monday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

A new society has been organized under the name of "Society for the Promulgation of Mutual Happiness."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mrs. Grippen, of Iowa, staying at the City Hotel, we are glad to say is recovering from her severe spell of sickness.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. Shelden of Eldorado, a brother of our library man, has been visiting relatives and friends in this city for several days.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Messrs. Houghton & Speers have removed their stock of clothing to the building south of Wm. Rose's boot and shoe shop.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The room north of Shepard & Maxwell has been rented by a Mr. Jones and will shortly be opened up as a millinery establishment.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The Free Methodist Church will be built near the Foundry on Block 127. C. M. Scott and A. A. Newman donate the lots.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

DIED. Friday last in this city, of pneumonia, Susie, daughter of Minton [? Milton ?] Fullerlove. The funeral took place on the following day.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Rev. Cairns returned from his Eastern trip last week, and will soon be actively engaged in his duties as pastor of the Baptist church.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Dr. Bowman, U. S. Indian Agent at the Pawnee Agency, spent several days in our city this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The P. M. H. Society will meet next time in secret conclave, and none but members of the "standing committee" will be permitted to enter.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Messrs. Wolf & Harnly have their building in good shape to receive their stock of furniture, which they propose to open up as soon as possible.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

J. M. Hayworth, special Agent of the Indian Department at Washington, passed through this place last Wednesday to look after matters in the Territory.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Judge James Christian and C. C. Holland have removed their law office to the building north of O. P. Houghton's store, and will occupy the same in connection with Mr. Harkins.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

R. C. Haywood sold two farms last week for $3,400. Mr. Beacham, of Bolton Township, sold his farm also. He will reside in town and engage in stock.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Inquiry is made all about as to the price of lots in Geuda Springs, and we notice several persons familiar with town lot speculations are figuring on them.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Dr. Belmonts, of Winfield, has established a cattle ranche on Deer Creek, about 12 miles from this place. The Doctor is rather effeminate for a cattle man.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. Stacy Matlack expects to leave today for the East, whither he goes to purchase a stock of the latest style goods in the line of Dry Goods, Clothing, etc.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. J. G. Shelden, we understand, will make arrangements to continue in some kind of business in our town, now that he has severed his connection with the Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Sheriff Shenneman has purchased three acres of ground on the Walnut River, near Winfield, upon which he intends to erect a barn for the purpose of keeping and feeding fine stock.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

We had the pleasure of meeting Mr. Wilson, an uncle of Bob Maxwell, from Bloomfield, Ohio, who, with his family, has just arrived in our city with a view to make a permanent location here.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Sheep men are talking of having a public shearing at Winfield sometime during the summer. At a similar meeting last year, one fleece was taken from a Butler County ram weighing 36 pounds.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. C. C. Pratt has been suffering from a severe attack of hemorrhage of the lungs, which at one time seemed to threaten serious results, but we are pleased to say he is somewhat better at this writing.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Notwithstanding the inclement weather of last Sunday, the rite of baptism by immersion was administered to Mrs. R. A. Houghton, of this city, and Chas. Weatherholt, of East Bolton. The ceremony took place at Harmon's Ford, on the Walnut River, during the afternoon.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. J. G. Shelden has sold out his book and stationery business to Mr. John B. Walker, who took charge of the same yesterday morning. Mr. Walker is well known to our people as an energetic businessman, and we heartily wish him success in his new calling.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

From a recent copy of the Coal Creek, Colorado, Enterprise, we learn that our former townsman, D. D. Lewis, is doing a lively business as a druggist, a justice of the peace, and postmaster. Good luck to you, Dave.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Judge Christian contemplates soon to start on a lecturing tour along the Santa Fe road to Kansas City. Judge Christian has many friends who will be glad of the opportunity to meet him, as well as to enjoy hearing his lecture.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Cowley County has more good towns in it than any county in the State of the same age. Speaking of good towns Cambridge, Burden, Torrance, Tisdale, Dexter, Maple City, and Seeley are each and all trading points that do more business than one would naturally imagine.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

TOWN LOTS. In another column will be seen the advertisement of nearly three hundred lots in Arkansas City, that C. M. Scott offers for sale at prices that cannot fail to induce purchasers to buy. Considering the rapidity with which the town is growing, it is a good investment for anyone. C. M. Scott will devote his time and capital to the sheep business.

AD: LOTS IN ARKANSAS CITY. The following Town Lots owned by C. M. Scott will be sold at prices indicated below, for the next 30 days. Title Guaranteed.

(Where lots join they must be sold together.)

[VERY HARD TO READ! AM NOT GOING TO TRY TO LIST....SOME LOTS LISTED WERE TO BE SOLD FOR $5 EACH; SOME FOR $10 EACH; SOME FOR $2.50 EACH; SOME FOR $15 EACH; SOME FOR $18 EACH; SOME FOR $20 EACH; SOME FOR $30 EACH; SOME FOR $40 EACH.

THE $40 EACH LOTS WERE: BLOCK 70, LOT 12; BLOCK 78, LOT 34; AND BLOCK 86, LOT 11.

Maps with the above lots marked thereon, showing location in the city, can be seen at C. M. Scott's office, over Wyckoff's Grocery, or at the offices of Mr. Teets. C. R. Mitchell, or Christian & Holland.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

A carload of fat wethers were shipped from this place to St. Louis last week from Mr. Babcock's flock of sheep. They averaged about 90 pounds each. Mutton sheep have been commanding very good prices of late. Last week natives averaging 100 pounds sold in Kansas City at $4.40.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

J. M. Hilliard and wife, of Wichita, spent several days of this week in the city visiting Capt. Thompson and looking up business matters. Mr. Hilliard is a member of the Wichita City Council and a thorough businessman. He speaks very flattering of Arkansas City as a business point, and we should be glad to welcome him and his estimable lady to our social circle.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Load after load of Geuda Springs' water is hauled to town daily, and retailed on the streets as though it was cider, or something stronger. When Mr. Buckwalter came in last Thursday, a crowd of more than a dozen gathered around his wagon with pitchers and jugs to be filled. Every day the water is growing in favor, and before next year we expect to see the water shipped out by the carload, instead of by the barrel, by express.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

What haven't we in Cowley County? In our office is a specimen of zinc ore, from the quarry on Mr. Rathburne's farm near the head of Cedar Creek, which, in time, will be developed and prove of great value. Lead has been discovered in the same region, and coal has been taken from the hillsides for the past six years. A vein of coal, one-fourth inch in thickness, has also been discovered on Mr. Spray's farm, three miles east of town, and another vein crops out near the "cut-off" on George Whitney's and C. M. Scott's lands. The new foundry men find that the very best of moulding sand can be dug up, by the wagon load, on the Arkansas River, and every enterprise that is started seems to find just what they want right here on our own soil.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Farmer's teams crowded Summit St. last Saturday from one end of town to the other. There was wood for sale, wheat going to the mills, groceries going to the Territory, freight wagons from the Indian Agencies and Military Posts, live hogs in wagons with high sideboards, covered wagons with immigrants wanting farms, ponies for sale, sheep buyers, cattle buyers, commercial men from Kansas City, St. Louis, Chicago, New York, and many of the important cities of the East. Every merchant and grocery man in town was flying around with either hat or coat off rolling out goods as they have never done before, and you may rest assured the TRAVELER man was getting in his work too. We like to see it. A live town makes a live paper, and it is getting livelier every day.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mr. L. H. Teets and Robert Smith have entered into a co-partnership for the transaction of Real Estate and other business. Office in L. M. Teets' building, on North Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

DIED. On Monday last at 4 a.m., at the residence of J. B. Splawn, on Grouse Creek, Stephen Splawn, aged 86 years. The funeral took place at 10 o'clock yesterday morning in the cemetery on Grouse Creek.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

S. Matlack returned from Colorado last Saturday. He was considerably tanned up, but reports having had a jolly time all the same. J. I. Mitchell's bonanza is not quite up to the expectations at first entertained.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Mrs. Grippen, with her son from Iowa, is here to buy a farm. They brought with them some fine horses and cattle, and will devote some attention to fine stock raising. Mrs. Grippen is a sister of the Judge Porter, who figured prominently in the Guiteau case.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Our esteemed friend, John T. Gooch, is now in charge of the trading post at the Red Rock, or Otoe Agency, Indian Territory. Mr. Gooch has had considerable experience in the Indian trade, and, will doubtless, soon be as popular with his new patrons as he was with the Ponca and Nez Perce tribes.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The next regular meeting of the Board of County Commissioners, of Cowley County, will be held at the Courthouse, in Winfield, on the first Monday after the first Tuesday in April, at which time, among other things, we learn that an application will be made to divide the School District in Bolton Township known as "Stony Point."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The Almighty favors Cowley County. For years the grass growing upon the prairies dried up and gave very little nutriment during the winter. Now a new grass is taking the place of the prairie grass, which grows green at winter, and resembles the old blue grass of Kentucky so closely that it can with difficulty be distinguished from it.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Judge De Long, of Independence, Kansas, formerly U. S. Consul to Morocco and San Domingo, and one of the prominent men of Kansas, was here last week, and contemplates erecting a three story stone building, 60 by 70 feet, with a large hall on the third floor, if he receives sufficient encouragement. The town would do well to donate four or five lots for such an enterprise.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Al. Mowry, President of the Farmers' Horse Thief Protective Association, of Bolton Township, Cowley County, was in the city Tuesday night on the trail of two horse thieves who had stolen two horses four miles west of Arkansas City Monday night. One horse was a strawberry roan about 15 hands high, and one a dark iron gray pony. A brass mounted drag on saddle was taken with the horses. Caldwell Post.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The Southwestern Stage and Mail Company, of which Mr. H. A. Todd is manager, was awarded the contract for carrying the mails on the Caldwell and Ft. Sill, Caldwell and Cantonement, Supply and Mobeetie, and Harper and Medicine Lodge routes, and several others we do not know the names of. The contracts run from July 1st, 1882, four years. Some of the routes were taken at surprisingly low rates, while others were away up yonder. Caldwell Post.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Rev. B. C. Swarts wishes to thank the Methodist folks of this city and the Alton neighborhood for the pleasant manner in which they have treated him while laboring among them. The supper and dinner given by the Methodists in this city last week netted $67.25, and the festival at the Alton schoolhouse on Wednesday evening of last week netted $26.75, a total of $94. The money was turned over to Mr. Swarts on his salary and overpaid it a few dollars. Caldwell Post.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

The meeting of the Stockmen on the Cherokee Strip, held at Caldwell last week, was largely attended, and most of the stock owners were represented. They decided to have a brand book published, and will set the time for the spring "round-up." The following newspapermen were present:

W. P. Brush, of the K. C. Indicator, Tell W. Walton, Caldwell Post, W. B. Hutchison, Caldwell Commercial, T. A. McNeal, Medicine Lodge Cresset, Will Eaton, Cheyenne Transporter, J. H. Carter, Hunnewell Independent, W. M. Allison, Wellingtonian, J. C. Richards, Wellington Press, W. P. Tomlinson, Topeka Commonwealth, Tom Richardson, cor., Leavenworth Times, and Halsey Lane, cor., Texas Live Stock Journal.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Those putting out trees this spring should remember that for shading the sidewalk, the trees must be planted nine feet from front line of lots on all streets, with the exception of Central Avenue and Summit Street, upon which the tree should be eleven feet from front line of lots.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

A number of the friends of Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Farrar visited them at their residence on Wednesday evening last, passing a most enjoyable evening. As host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Farrar are a success; as master of a household, Fred's old bachelor friends viewed him with feelings of admiration not unmixed with envy.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

WHEREAS, Brother W. E. Chenoweth was a member of the M. E. Church of this city, and it has pleased the Lord, the great head of the church, to remove our brother by death, and

WHEREAS, This our brother was greatly beloved by the church and community at large, and we recognize in his walk and conversation another evidence of the power of Christianity to make a life pure, beautiful, and holy.

THEREFORE, It is resolved that while we sincerely mourn his loss to the church, the world and his family, we especially tender our sympathy to his beloved wife, who is equally loved by the church and all others who know her beautiful life and character.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

A block in Arkansas City is 280 by 350 feet, or 98,000 square feet, equal to 2-1/4 acres. Most of the blocks have 28 lots, twenty-five feet wide by 132 long. Fourteen lots, or half a block, contain 1-1/8 acres. Lots selling at $6.25 would be at the rate of $100 per acre for the land. The lots are numbered from all four corners of the blocks, for what reason we know not. For instance, Block No. 1 is numbered from the north-west corner, while Block No. 156 is numbered from the north-east corner, and Block No. 73 from the south-east, and Block No. 56 from the south-west. The printed maps are correct, and by consulting them, confusion will be avoided.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Resolution of Respect.

WHEREAS, It has pleased the Supreme Master of the Universe to remove, from our midst, our esteemed brother, W. E. Chenoweth, therefore be it

RESOLVED, By Arkansas City Lodge, No. 89, A. O. U. W., that while we bow in submission to the will of the Most High, we do not less mourn for our brother, who has been taken from us.

RESOLVED, That it is a just tribute to the memory of our departed brother to say that in regretting his removal from our midst we mourn for a faithful and useful member of our order, one who was in every way worthy of our respect and regard.

RESOLVED, That the heartfelt sympathy of this Lodge be extended to his family in their great affliction.

RESOLVED, That these resolutions be spread upon the records of this Lodge, and a copy thereof be transmitted to the family of our deceased brother.

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Pleasant View Jottings.

Mrs. J. L. Armstrong has been quite sick for several days, but is convalescing.

Rev. Faulkner will preach at this place on next Sunday, at 11 a.m. A good attendance is desired.

A series of meetings began at this place last Monday night by Rev. Faulkner and concluded Friday evening.

John Annis and wife started last Saturday (4th) to Elk County on business and will probably be gone about two weeks.

That unfortunate pedagogue of a few Saturdays ago would do well to inquire for a lost dress pattern in this neck o' the woods.

We learn that Mr. Krepps and family will start in a few days to Pennsylvania where in all probability they will reside on heired property.

A FIRE. S. D. Collinson and J. A. Scott were smoking their meat at Mr. Collinson's place in a small house and about 4 o'clock Tuesday morning the 28th ult., the house caught fire and was in full blaze when discovered. It was with great difficulty that the fire was kept from catching in the stable where were all his horses and a greater portion of his farming implements. Mr. Collinson has been quite poorly since the fire. LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.

[SOME BUSINESS LOCALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

To the Ladies of Arkansas City and vicinity. Mrs. Berger and Miss Thomas are now prepared to do first-class dressmaking. Cutting and fitting a specialty.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Wanted. Six two-year-old Bulls. Patterson & Gaskill.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Home Grown Nursery Stock of all kinds for sale by S. E. MAXWELL.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

FOR RENT. The house in which I am living for rent from April 1st. Carpets, Curtains, and some furniture for sale. R. C. HAYWOOD.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Leave Orders for Fruit Trees with R. J. Maxwell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

FOR SALE. A Phaeton, Single Harness, and Lady's Saddle for sale. R. C. Haywood.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

As soon as the weather will permit, I will have for sale, in Arkansas City, a large lot of house plants. S. E. Maxwell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

WALNUT VALLEY NURSERY.

Evergreen, Roses, and Ornamental Trees and Shrubs of all kinds at S. E. Maxwell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 8, 1882.

Will trade several Residences and Lots in town for a small farm. Inquire of D. E. Sifford.

[KANSAS NEWS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, Wednesday, March 15, 1882. Front Page.

Winfield has the telephone.

[EDITORIAL COLUMN.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Charles Erving, a Washington lawyer, who was employed by the Osage Indians to obtain payment from the Government for alienated lands, now claims a fee of $71,000, the act having been passed by Congress granting such payment to the Indians.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs has agreed substantially upon Senator Coke's bill to provide for the allotment of lands in severalty to Indians on reservation and to extend the civil and criminal laws in the respective States or Territories to Indians to whom lands are so allotted within their boundaries.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Senator Plumb has introduced in the Senate a bill to require the Secretary of the Interior to state an account of the number of acres of land in the Indian Territory belonging to the Cherokee Nation, lying west of the Arkansas River, and to certify to the Secretary of the Treasury the amount of such valuation as remains due and unpaid on such lands. The bill then proposes the appropriation of a sum of money equal to the amount so verified to pay for the lands; $500,000 of which sum is to be invested as a permanent seminary fund of said Nation, under the provisions of the act of 1889, for the investment of Indian funds, and the remainder to be subject to the order and jurisdiction of the Cherokee National Council, as other moneys belonging to said Nation.

[SOME ITEMS FROM COURIER.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Henry B. Pruden has sold his farm of 160 acres in Creswell Township to James Fair for $4,000.

Joe Roberts got $2,700 for his farm in Walnut Township. David Tomkinson is the purchaser.

A deed was filed Monday from Peter Pearson to Geo. and Wm. Beach, conveying 160 acres in Beaver Township for $1,450.

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Pleasant View Jottings.

Bessie Johnson has been quite sick for several days from the effects of vaccination.

Mrs. Billy Hadaky has suffered a great deal this winter with rheumatism.

J. B. Curry's school will close, at this place, on Tuesday, Feb. 14th.

Mr. J. A. Scott met with quite a loss last Thursday night. He was raising a couple of very nice coltsyearlings pastand while standing in the stable one of them got its head fast in the partition, and the other biting it, caused it to break its neck. LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

A calico ball is talked of at Winfield.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Speed sold his livery barn, in Winfield, for $3,000.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

John B. Walker is now running the Circulating Library.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Five acres near the mounds east of Winfield sold for $600.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. James Hill is Administrator of W. E. Chenoweth's estate.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Another stone store building contracted for on West Summit Street.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Charley Schiffbauer will take a trip to the land of "Lo" in a few days.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

T. J. Rude will be a candidate for Supt. of Public Instruction next fall.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

C. M. McIntire contemplates erecting a residence in the north-west part of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Herman Godehard will soon run a bread wagon to supply his town trade in the staff of life.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. James Ridenour has just about completed a neat little residence in the north-east part of town.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Shedden has been adjudged insane, and will be kept at the county jail, under medical treatment, for the present.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. and Mrs. Ordway, who have been staying at Winfield, have returned to this place for a few days before starting to Iowa.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The many friends of Miss Alma Dixon will be pleased to hear she has resumed her position in the establishment of A. A. Newman & Co.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Peter Cooper celebrated his ninety-second birthday a short time since by a big dinner at which Peter himself was the jolliest man in the crowd.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Atkinson, the tailor, has arrived, and invites all to call and inspect his goods, at his shop, over Matlack's store.

AD:

ATKINSON,

THE

TAILOR,

HAS

ARRIVED.

GO AND SEE HIS

GOODS,

AT HIS ROOMS OVER

Matlack's Store.

Arkansas City, Kans.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. T. R. Houghton is putting in an addition to his harness shop, the present building not being large enough for the wants of his ever increasing business.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

That new sign of our gunsmiths, the Stedman Brothers, is simply immense, and calls the attention of passersby to their establishment in a manner that will be profitable to all.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Work upon Howard's addition to their store is being pushed rapidly toward completion, and a few more days will see it in presentable shape for the reception of their new goods.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

James Hardin, County Treasurer, will sell the east half of Sec. 16, Tp. 34, Range 3, on March 25th. The land is about four miles up the Arkansas River, and is appraised at $5 per acre.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The Real Estate firm of Smith & Teets have moved their office into the building occupied by James Benedict, on West Summit St., where they invite their patrons to call and see them.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Monday's train brought more strangers to Arkansas City than have ever arrived at any one time before, and which proves conclusively that our city is rapidly becoming the objective point for a large immigration.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. A. G. Newman came in on Monday's train. He was accompanied by Mr. Foster, of Minneapolis. Both gentlemen are friends of Mr. C. C. Pratt, now in this city, whom, they hearing of his sickness, came to visit.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

S. P. U. The Stock Protective Union will meet at the Bland Schoolhouse, West Bolton, on the last Saturday in March (25th) at 7 o'clock p.m. Election of officers and other business will come before the meeting. AL. MOWRY, Capt.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Dr. J. T. Shepard is putting in an addition to his residence for a kitchen, and with the recent improvements made in the way of grading around the house and planting of shrubbery, trees, etc., it will be one of the prettiest places in town.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mrs. Berger and Miss Thomas are prepared to do all kinds of dressmaking, cutting, and fitting in the latest styles and fashion. These ladies are well known in the community and we heartily recommend our people to call upon them when needing work of this kind.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Our former citizen, Chas. H. Payson, whom it was hoped experience would teach a lesson, was recently arrested and lodged in jail at Topeka. His parents sent him $250, with which he paid back the money he was charged with embezzling, and he is again on the wing. We are afraid Payson is a lost community. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

We call attention to the new "ad" of Messrs. Wolfe & Harnly, who have just opened out a large and well assorted stock of parlor, kitchen, and office furniture in the building just south of C. R. Sipe's tin shop. These gentlemen are practical mechanics and will we doubt not make a success of their undertaking.

AD:

WOLFE & HARNLY'S

NEW FURNITURE STORE,

ONE DOOR SOUTH OF C. R. SIPES.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

A Mr. Shedden, residing in this city, last Saturday commenced raising a disturbance, and was taken before Judge Bonsall, who, believing him to be insane, sent him to the Winfield jail for safe keeping. He has suffered in this way once before, but this present attack is attributed to undue religious excitement at the recent revivals.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The building boom is still on the increase. New homes going up on all parts of the townsite.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

We notice the nomination has been made of Walter A. Smith for U. S. Marshal of Colorado. Mr. Smith will be remembered by the old settlers as our first Register of Deeds. Walt, we shall be happy to congratulate you.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Colonel Manning is in El Chape, New Mexico, interested in mining. The TRAVELER used to be an opponent of the Col. in an early day, wholly on account of local strife, but yet "with all thy follies, Colonel, we love thee still."

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Last Thursday witnessed the departure of Messrs. Newman and Matlack for the East. Both gentlemen will purchase their spring stocks before returning, and the advent of their purchases will be anxiously looked for by their fair patrons.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Joe E. Conklin, Esq., of the "hub," was in town last Saturday upon business. He informed us he had made arrangements, and given the necessary instructions for the erection of a summer residence at Geuda Springs, the same to be commenced right away.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. Jud. Marshal, wife and child, with Miss Houston, sister of Milt's, came down from Leavenworth last week to pay a visit to Geuda Springs. Mr. Marshal was formerly a merchant of this place, doing business in the room now occupied by Wyckoff & Son.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

A granger over in Harper County bought a large tract of Government land on the Cherokee strip at $1.00 per acre, and borrowed money enough to fence it. The money loaners have the land now, with a few strands of wire around it, and the granger is $700 ahead [? Paper had adead?].

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. Wm. Atkinson and wife arrived in the city last Saturday, and are now residing in rooms over Matlack's store. Mr. Atkinson will follow the business of a tailor, and we hope our citizens will extend him their patronage. A good tailor establishment is what we have needed lo these many days.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Hon. J. M. Hawarth [? THOUGHT HIS NAME WAS HAYWORTH...COULD BE PAPER HAS BEEN MISSPELLING HIS NAME ALL ALONG ?], U. S. Indian Inspector, took his departure last week for his home, in Olathe, Kansas. Mr. Hawarth has long been in the Indian service, and is recognized by the people of Kansas as being at the head of the department he represents. One thing especially, we can say for him, that cannot be said for all, he is a genial gentleman wherever he goes.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The next annual meeting of the M. E. General Conference will be held at Winfield.

Rev. P. V. Jones is appointed to the Winfield church for the year.

Rev. J. A. Hyden goes to Burlington.

Rev. H. A. Tucker goes to Ottawa.

Arkansas City: I. N. Morehead.

Arkansas City circuit, supplied by Josephus Kitch.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Five wood choppers were arrested at Otoe Agency last week by the Indian police, and brought before the Agent for examination. They proved they were not on the Otoe reserve and were released. Agent Woodin declares he will confiscate the property of anyone found hauling wood from the Otoe reservation and send them to Fort Smith. He says the best of the timber has already been culled out, and game has been hunted until there is but little left. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

It is with pleasure we call attention to the "ad" of Mr. J. B. Walker in this issue of the TRAVELER, and at the same time bespeak for him a liberal patronage. Mr. Walker has been a resident of this place four years, and is too well and favorably known to need a word from us. However, this we will say, that he is a thoroughly energetic businessman, and as such will always keep in stock everything that can possibly be found in a first-class Book, News, and Stationery Store. Call and see him, in the Post Office building.

AD:

JOHN B. WALKER,

-DEALER IN-

BOOKS, STATIONERY, NEWS,

CONFECTIONERIES, DRUGGIST'S SUNDRIES,

CIRCULATING LIBRARY

P. O. BUILDING

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

As the accommodation train on the Santa Fe was passing Pleasant Valley between here and Arkansas City last Saturday evening about eight o'clock, a lot of roughs, who seemed to have no fear of GOD, man, the devil, or a railroad company in their hearts, made a cowardly attack upon the train, throwing stones through the windows of the coach, and firing pistols in a very reckless manner. No one was hurt so far as we have been able to learn, and so far there have been no arrests made, but it is thought that several of the roughs have already been identified and that the whole outfit will be taken in. We truly hope none engaged in the villainous work are residents of Cowley County, for if there is anything we pride ourselves on, it is the moral tone of our citizens and the absence of that class of men who would get so low in the scale of degradation as to engage in rowdyism of this kind. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

FOUND

Between Arkansas City and the Walnut Mills, On Monday, March 13th, 1882, one Pocket, and two Account Books.

Owner can have the same by proving property and paying for this advertisement.

George H. Shearer,

Two miles east of Ark. City.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Mr. Lafe McLaughlin has let the contract for the erection of a two story stone building 24 x 70 with basement, the same to be located on the lots between the Bakery and Kimel & Moore's grocery on West Summit St. Work upon the same commenced yesterday and it will be pushed to completion at the earliest date practicable. [Kimmel?]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

TOBACCO. Our remarks on the raising of tobacco in Cowley County a few weeks since, had the desired effect of causing several parties to procure the seed, and a number of acres will be planted. In a few weeks Wm. Buckman and J. L. Wright will have the plants ready for transplanting, and T. H. McLaughlin has the seed for sale. Sheep men assure us they will be glad to buy every pound that is raised and pay a good price for it, and those who plant it should begin to inquire about and engage the crop before it matures, if they are successful. There is too much money sent from Cowley County that might be expended at home. Now if the farmers will follow up the plan of supplying what has to be sent abroad for they must profit by it. Cure your own pork, and have hams and sidemeat to sell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The Indian Territory.

Hic-a-ub-by, the Governor of the Chicasaw Nation, died recently. He was a full blood, and was elected to succeed Gov. R. F. Overton, who resigned last summer. By his death the duties of Governor fall on Jonas Wolf, President of the Senate, until next summer, when the regular election takes place.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Major Drumm is proposing to enclose an immense pasture for a cattle range, in the Indian Territory, provided he can get a permit from the Cherokee authorities. The fence will be built out of cedar posts and barbed wire; will be between fifty and sixty miles in length; will require seventy tons of wire, and will enclose about 24,000 acres.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

The walnut log sale came off in Cooweescoowee, as advertised. Quite a lot of bidders were on handmen from Chicago, and elsewhere. J. H. Bartles and Wash Morgan, citizens, bought mostly all the logs that were sold. The logs sold for from $5.75 to $17.30 per 1,000 feet. The whole of the sale amounted to about $4,000, which goes to the Nation.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Wm. Fields, of the U. S. Indian Police, killed Jim Simpson, and captured Daniel Lucky, the murderers of young Cobb, some time ago near Gibson Station. Fields had to kill Simpson in self defense, as Simpson shot at him. He arrested them in the Creek Nation at a mill. There was a reward of $200 apiece offered for these murderers, and Fields drew his money one day last week. There are one or two more of the murderers still at large.

SKIPPED THE BASIS OF ASSESSMENT FOR 1882...BELIEVE I ALREADY DID THIS FROM WINFIELD COURIER. INTERESTING TO NOTE THAT REAL ESTATE WENT FROM $1.25 TO $10.00 PER ACRE.

[SOME BUSINESS LOCALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Skipped three ads by P. H. Albright & Co., playing up a drop in rates on real estate loansone percent per annum lower than ever before!

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN

It having been rumored that the stores of Peter Pearson and Wolfe & Harnly are one business, and owned by Mr. Pearson, this is to certify that such is not the case, and that we, and we only, are the sole owners of the Furniture Store south of C. R. Sipe's.

W. P. Wolfe and A. H. Harnly

Arkansas City, March 14th, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Wanted a Horse, not over 7 years old, to drive single by C. R. Sipes.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

BONDS WANTED.

The undersigned desires to invest $1,200 in School Bonds. Will pay the highest market price. Bonds and interest will be payable at Winfield, Kansas. Write, or inquire personally, of G. L. Rinker, Executor of estate of Judge Bailey, deceased, or Jennings & Troup, Attorneys, Winfield, Kansas.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

STRAYED

One sorrel horse, seven years old, about 15 hands high, very thin in flesh and hind legs stocked. A reward will be given for the return of the same. Archie Dunn.

Ark. City, Mar. 9th, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 15, 1882.

Tobacco Sheep Dip at T. H. McLaughlin's.

[PERSONALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Caldwell gets ice from Nebraska.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Rev. McClung is still at Caldwell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The Y. M. C. A. have an organ in their Rooms.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The Walnut River is fordable again at Harmon's ford.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

J. H. Sherburne, Ponca Indian trader, made a visit to Emporia last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Corn brought in by the farmers finds ready sale, to sheep and cattle men, at 67 cents.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mr. Lane, of Cambridge, Ohio, is another one of the Buckeyes numbered among us.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Capt. John G. Schimpshire, Tax Collector of the Cherokee Nation, is at Caldwell.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Samuel Burress, one of the live young cattle men of the Nation, paid this place a visit last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Rev. I. N. Morehead, of the M. E. Church, is located at Arkansas City during the ensuing year.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The Sunday Bible Reading at the Y. M. C. A. Rooms is an established institution, at five o'clock every Sunday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The second hand store had an auction last Saturday. One or two ponies were also sold at auction by the city auctioneer.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mr. Cole, a well known sheep man, is holding a large herd up on the east side of the Arkansas River, opposite Salt City.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The Y. M. C. A. will give an entertainment at one of the churches, three weeks from yesterday, for the benefit of their library.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

A good swimmer rescued a young lady, three men, and two boys from drowning in Slate Creek during a late rise of the creek.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

J. L. Abbott, a minister of the M. E. Church at Oxford, Kansas, has been in jail at Kansas City for some weeks on a charge of forgery.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Joe Garris, with some parties from Grouse Creek, went to the Nation this week to test the speed of their greyhounds, running antelope.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Everybody notices our rapid growth, and commercial travelers are investing in town lots, saying its prospects are as good as any they know of.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Miss Linda Christian stole away from the laborious duties of teaching a country school, last Saturday, and rusticated in the city during Sabbath day.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The literary exercises at the Y. M. C. A. Rooms last evening were very interesting. A somewhat more extended programme next Tuesday evening.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

"Erin go Braugh!" There will be fun ahead when Judge Christian reaches Wichita, El Dorado, Emporia, and Topeka, with his lecture on the wild Irishman.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mr. Snyder took the place of the Daniels' Bros. this week in the grocery trade. Mr. Snyder knows what a farmer needs and proposes to sell to them at living rates.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mrs. Peed, with her daughter, Linnie, returned from the mountains of Colorado, last week, to again take up their abode among us. We don't know of anyone more welcome.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Indian ponies don't sell so readily since a number of them have been reclaimed by other Indians. Don't buy any branded stock of Indians that may be for sale on the streets.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Don't sign a recommendation of the "sickle grinder," or any other machine to unknown parties. Some Illinois farmers find to their sorrow that their recommend was a note of $200.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Cowley County men will always meet with favor. The many friends of Hon. C. R. Mitchell unite in congratulating him upon his recent appointment as a member of the State Board of Charities. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

"Big Man," of the Caddo Indian Tribe, and "Niasta," of the Wichitas, with Joseph Leonard, scout and interpreter, are in Washington. They want a defined reservation where they are on the Washita River.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The following pupils of the Intermediate Department of the Arkansas City schools were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Clara Ford, Annie Wagstaff, Hattie Franey, Minnie Wilson, and Ella Pettit.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Subscriptions of $1 per month are being asked to establish a billiard hall and chess room near the corner of Summit Street and Central Avenue. Mr. O. F. Godfrey will have charge of the apartments if the enterprise succeeds.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

W. M. Randall was summoned to the State of Arkansas, last week, by telegraph, to attend the funeral of his son, Boone. The young man had been sick for some time, but the news of his death came unexpectedly to the old gentleman.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The house just outside the city limits, on the north part of town, occupied by Mollie Burke and one or two prostitutes, took fire last Tuesday afternoon, and burned to the ground. Some furniture and carpet were consumed with the building.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The consolidation of the Pawnee and Otoe tribes will leave one Agent out. We don't know which of the two would care the least to go. Dr. Bowman and Major Woodin are both about as independent Indian Agents as you generally meet with.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The horse and buggy came back, alone in the dark, but the goose hunters did not get in for an hour or two afterwards. Whether the horse got loose or was turned loose, Mr. France has not yet been able to learn. The horse won't say anything about it.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

An effort is being made to organize a hook and ladder company, that would prove very efficient in case the flames should threaten the city. An appropriation will be asked of the city, and if sufficient encouragement is met with, the hooks and ladders will soon be on the ground.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

City election April 3rd, 1882.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

City Ordinance No. 100, in this issue.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Gen. Jordan, of Ponca, is in the city.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Auction sale at D. M. Purdy's farm March 31, 1892.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Agent Woodin, of Red Rock, was in the city last week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

O. J. Godfrey commenced work upon his new billiard hall yesterday.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

DIED. On Saturday last, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Lewis, of Silverdale.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

We received a pleasant call from Supt. D. D. Keeler, of Kaw Agency, this week.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Sherburne were in town Monday last en route for Osage Agency.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Read the new "ad" of Mrs. S. Rhodes, our new milliner.

Mrs. S. Rhodes, MILLINERY,

ONE DOOR NORTH OF SHEPARD & MAXWELL'S DRUG STORE.

Just received a full line of Millinery and Fancy Goods of the latest styles and best quality for the spring season of 1882, and extend a cordial invitation to the Ladies of Arkansas City, and to the general public, to call and examine her stock.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Hon. Geo. Ordway and wife left for Iowa last week to make arrangements for perma- nently locating here.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Union Sabbath School Organization at the Parker Schoolhouse next Sabbath at 12 m. Everybody invited. A. SPRAY.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell has sold his residence and will shortly remove to Geuda Springs, but will retain his office in this city.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

There will be a grand Festival in the New Baptist Church, in Winfield, Thursday evening, March 23rd, 1882, to which all our friends are most cordially invited. Friends don't fail to come.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Conductor Miller was compelled to remain at home last week, on account of a severe cold, that threatened pneumonia, but is now much better. Dr. Chapel attended him with his usual success.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mr. Chastain brought in a couple of fine antelope last week that he shot about fifteen miles below this place. They were about 600 yards distant, and he brought down the two out of one herd, with a Sharp's 50 caliber rifle.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Hon. C. R. Mitchell, of Cowley County, will succeed Gen. T. T. Taylor as a member of the State Board of Charities. We congratulate Robert. Courant.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The Indians report game abundant on the Pawnee reserve. Deer and other animals have been so constantly hunted, during the winter, that they were drawn from their ranges, and now find less disturbances about the Indian camps than in the woods along the Cimarron River.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

ICE. Messrs. Davenport and France, had two carloads of ice shipped from Kansas City, last week, at a cost of about $300, and now have it securely packed in the ice house on the Walnut River, opposite Searing's mill. Ice will sell for about 2-1/2 or 3 cents per pound next summer.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

HOME MISSION SOCIETY. The ladies composing the above Society met last Monday evening, at the residence of Mrs. R. A. Houghton, and elected the following officers for the ensuing three months.

Miss Susie Hunt: President.

Miss Annie Norton, Vice President.

Miss Mary Theaker: Secretary.

Miss Alma Esterday: Treasurer.

A meeting will be held at Mrs. J. T. Shepard's, Friday, March 31st, 1882, at which a full attendance is requested.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Arrangements have been made to have Judge Christian deliver his remarkable lecture on "Ireland and the Irish," at Wichita, Augusta, El Dorado, Emporia, Topeka, and Lawrence within the next thirty days. The old friends of Judge Christian have taken hold and promise him a good house wherever he goes. At Wichita, Murdock, of the Eagle, takes an active part, while Gov. Eskridge looks after Emporia, Father Baker at Topeka, and the town of Lawrence looks after itself. The Commonwealth gave the old Judge a very complimentary notice, and assures the people of a rare treat.

[ORDINANCE NO. 100: ELECTION FOR CITY OFFICERS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

[Published March 22nd, 1882.]

ORDINANCE NO. 100.

Entitled an ordinance calling an election for City Officers.

Be it ordained by the Mayor and City Councilmen of the city of Arkansas City:

SECTION 1st. That an election be held at the City Clerk's office, in the city of Arkansas City, on the first Monday, the 3rd day, of April, A. D. 1882, for the purpose of electing a Mayor, Five Councilmen, and a Police Judge for the ensuing year.

SECTION 2nd. That Ordinance No. 100 be and remain in force on and after its publication once in the Arkansas City TRAVELER. H. D. KELLOGG, Mayor.

Attest: I. H. BONSALL, City Clerk.

[FIRE EQUIPMENT: ORGANIZING A FIRE COMPANY.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

The necessity of a more efficient and better organized "fire extinguisher" has at last impressed itself upon some of our citizens. Recognizing the fact that a slight fire in the busi ness part of town would most surely sweep our business street without some organized means of preventing a spread, the young men had a meeting, in the Y. M. C. A. Room, last Thursday for the purpose of forming a Hook and Ladder, or Fire Company. C. L. Swarts was elected chairman. After stating the object of the meeting and discussing the subject, pro and con, it was decided to elect a permanent organization. W. V. McConn, F. J. Hess, and E. O. Stevenson were appointed Committee on Permanent Organization; J. Kroenert, W. D. Mowry, and F. J. Hess were appointed Committee on Apparatus. Another meeting will be held this (Wednesday) evening, at the City Council Rooms. Those interested are invited to attend.

[PLEASANT VIEW JOTTINGS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Mr. S. D. Collinson planted his early potatoes last Tuesday (14th).

Miss Bertha Kelsol has been visiting friends in this vicinity for a few days past.

The prospects for a good crop of peaches, this year, are very flattering in this part of the country.

One of Mr. Hammon's children has been seriously ill for some time, but it is now thought to be out of danger.

There was a spelling bee the last night of J. H. Curry's school, and all passed off as merry as a marriage bell.

Mr. Tom Scott has purchased the east quarter of land from Mr. W. McCoy and has moved his house thereon.

Mrs. Rev. Broadbent has been afflicted more or less for about sixteen weeks with the neuralgia, and is, at present, dangerously ill.

A hog buyer of Mr. Buffington, of Oxford, was in this neighborhood last Thursday, and bought 5 head of hogs from S. D. Collinson and 11 head of J. A. Scott, for which he paid $5.55 per hundred.

Blanchie, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Collinson, has been suffering greatly, for some days past, with a gathering in her head. It is now broken and she is doing as well as could be expected.

Young calves demand a good price now. J. A. Scott's cow has twin calves, about ten or twelve weeks old, that he has been offered $16 for. How is that for high?

The burning of the prairies these fine spring evenings are the best means of destroying the chinch bug, and other insects that damage our crops, as well as it is edifying to the beholder. LEAN CONTRIBUTOR.

[SOME BUSINESS LOCALS.]

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

Don't forget to look at the Daisey Suite at Peter Pearson's upper show rooms.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

AUCTION SALE.

I will sell, at Public Auction at my residence in Arkansas City on Thursday, March 23rd, 1882, at 2 o'clock, p.m., my Household Furniture, Stoves, Carpets, etc.

The above are subject to private sale until that time. A Phaeton and Single Harness also for sale. R. C. Haywood.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

FOR SALE: 76 Cows and 68 Yearlings. H. J. Chinn.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

WANTED. At Ponca Agency, a female cook. $3.50 per week.

Address Gen. J. Jordan, Agent.

Arkansas City Traveler, March 22, 1882.

FARM FOR SALE CHEAP!

The following described lands, on State line, in Bolton Township, can be purchased cheap within the next 30 or 60 days.

Lots 3 and 4, sec. 14, tp. 34, n., r. 4 e., 104-1/2 acres, Two never-failing Springs, House with three rooms, Stable, Apple and Peach Orchard; 45 acres in cultivation. For full particulars inquire of Mitchell & Swarts.